HEARTBEAT OF THE NATION

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ISSUE 716 | FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

ANALYSIS

This time, sorry will not be enough to heal the damage
THOMAS KEAN tdkean@gmail.com ONE can only imagine President U Thein Sein’s response when informed of his rural development minister’s recent outburst in rural Magwe Region. Was there anger? Incredulity? Exasperation? We can reasonably assume it was a combination of all three – and more. For a government that bills itself as “people-centred”, U Ohn Myint has created a major problem. His comments on January 28 about government critics being thrown in jail were bad enough. But it was his declaration that people in rural areas should simply accept what he deigns to give them – that they should put up and shut up – that is arguably most galling. It shows a complete and utter disregard for everything President U Thein Sein has set out to achieve in the second half of his five-year term: a government that is consultative, that is responsive, that shows respect for the people who put it in power. MORE ON NEWS 11

DEVELOPMENT BRINGS ECOLOGICAL WOES TO BEACH RESORT
NEWS 14

KOREAN CONSORTIUM FALLS OUT OF FAVOUR ON HANTHAWADDY AIRPORT
BUSINESS 28

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3

In Maungdaw, a fire still rages amid the ashes
A devastating blaze and alleged clashes between security forces and Muslims which rights groups say left dozens killed and a policeman missing have once again pitted Maungdaw township’s Rakhine and Rohingya communities against each other.

PHOTO: SI THU LWIN

China trade sinks rice target
Illegal trading means Myanmar is likely to meet barely half of its 3-million-tonne annual export target.
BUSINESS 28

2 THE MYANMAR TIMES February 10 - 16, 2014

Page 2

online editor Kayleigh Long | kayleighelong@gmail.com

THE INSIDER: The local lowdown & best of the web
Page 2 felicitates Hugo Swire
Minister of State for the UK Foreign Office Hugo Swire followed his recent visit to Myanmar by holding a brief Q&A session over Twitter last week, inviting people to pose questions using the hashtag #askFCO. Predictably, Swire was slammed by people seeking answers to questions on myriad topics including ceasefire talks, IDP camp conditions, political prisoners, press freedom, returning refugees, human trafficking, rape as a weapon of war, ongoing reports of the Tatmadaw pushing an offensive line in Kachin, the upcoming census, the internal investigation into the alleged massacre in Maungdaw, the current parliamentary composition, Aung San Suu Kyi, constitutional amendment, the Rohingya, emissions transparency, military engagement, et al.  Mr Swire, whose Twitter bio asserts his interest in “#digitaldiplomacy”, breezed his way through the session, offering responses that essentially amounted to a very British “I did raise that with them and we’re keeping an eye on it.” Still, it is impossible to give comprehensive answers in 140 characters. Perhaps some engagement is better than no engagement.

From the mailbag… The Myanmar Times Facebook inbox is a mixed bag. Sometimes we receive genuinely useful correspondence and feedback. A lot of the time it’s just spam. And sometimes, there are submissions that baffle me – and make my day. Last week, one particular highlight was a long-ranging poem about world peace, infused with a strong Rastafarian sentiment. Written all in caps, punctuated by exclamations of JAH! and referencing basically every city in the world, it begins, “TRUE DEMOCRACY NOT HIPOCRACY JAH BLESS.” To the man who wrote this: Erryting is irie. Don’t let babylon get you down. Also in the mailbag this week was a message from a concerned citizen asking if The Myanmar Times could testify to the veracity of a report doing the rounds on social media in Bangladesh that Aung San Suu Kyi had converted to Islam. The offending article contained an ancient picture of Suu Kyi and had been poorly photoshopped to show her sporting a keffiyeh, with the BBC logo pasted underneath. To clarify: This report is false. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any further questions.

When Myanmar was Burma...
Archival material provided by Pansodan Gallery

Staff at the Ueno Zoo in Tokyo take part in the annual drill where animal escapes are simulated by zookeepers. (AFP)

Dabaung issue of Oh We, March 1972

Analysts say the Valentine’s Day speed-dating event to be held at Yangon stalwart 50th Street bar is projected to further complicate matters in the already-incestuous expat community.  The event, promoted on the ever-smarmy Yangon Expat Community forum, offers punters the opportunity to speed-date their way through a room full of people they’ve probably already met, but with the fun twist of intense sexual pressure in a sealed pheromone-ridden sin pit. All this for a mere $20! As the ad on YEC asks darkly, “3 MINUTES TO IMPRESS...CAN YOU HANDLE THE PACE?” Starts at 7:30pm. Review to follow.

50th Street Lonely Hearts Club

Marina for NOW! magazine. Photo: Pyay Han (ColorMax)

Style

Statement

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FEATURE

NEWS EDITOR: Thomas Kean | tdkean@gmail.com

News 3

In Maungdaw, a fire still rages
SI THU LWIN sithulwin.mmtimes@gmail.com THE first sight as you approach Maungdaw along a bumpy dirt road, after taking the daily ferry from Sittwe to Buthidaung, is a “Welcome to Maungdaw” gateway erected in 2000. There are hints of trouble – the glass in its clock tower was cracked during violence in June 2012 and remains unrepaired; signboards in town carry messages such as “People can be safe if there is rule of law” and “Our town will be developed if there is peace and stability” – but for the most part Maungdaw appears peaceful. In reality, it has for many years been torn between two very different – some would say irreconcilable – societies. In the nearby village of Du Chee Yar Tan West, the ashes where homes once stood are testament to the extent of the conflict. More than a dozen homes were torched on January 28, 15 days after a policeman went missing in the area. The flames have been extinguished, but a fire of hatred and anxiety still burns. The Buddhist and Muslim communities now blame each other for the fire. Some have accused the police force of involvement; not only does the government deny this, but it has accused the Muslims of burning their own homes. “Police, ward administrators and ethnic Rakhines set fire our houses,” said Muslim Lailar Bacon, as he sifted through the remains of rice that was burned in the fire. “All our staple foods – rice, oil and so on – were lost in the fire. Why would we burn our own homes?” Rakhine living near Du Chee Yar
A Muslim man holds burned rice in Du Chee Yar Tan West village. Photo: Si Thu Lwin

Rohingya hluttaw rep questioned by police
KAYLEIGH LONG kayleighelong@gmail.com UNION Solidarity and Development Party MP U Shwe Maung has been questioned by police in Nay Pyi Taw over comments he made to Democratic Voice of Burma about possible police involvement in a fire that broke out in a Muslim village in Rakhine State late last month. More than a dozen homes were destroyed in the blaze at Du Chee Yar Tan West village near Maungdaw in northern Rakhine State on January 28. U Shwe Maung said the February 4 interrogation came at the behest of President U Thein Sein, who sent a letter to Pyidaungsu Hluttaw Speaker Thura U Shwe Mann requesting permission for police to question the MP. The interview lasted about 90 minutes and was conducted at his USDP living quarters in Nay Pyi Taw. It focused on allegations that U Shwe Maung, a Rohingya, had defamed the state and police by saying that residents believed security forces were involved in starting the fire. U Shwe Maung said he was asked to reveal the names and phone numbers of those he received the information from. He agreed to give the information but only with the approval of Thura U Shwe Mann. The full video of his interview with DVB may also be produced as evidence in order to establish the broader context for his comments. U Shwe Maung told The Myanmar Times on February 2 that he is normally cautious with his choice of words. “I always censor myself so that I don’t violate any law and avoid words which may confuse or mislead people. I always maintain and balance my words to avoid any religious and ethnic misunderstanding.” A January 29 statement issued by the Ministry of Information confirmed the police and fire officials had responded to a fire in Du Chee Yar Tan village at about 8:45pm the previous evening. Five “Bengalis” were seen running away from the fire, the statement said. “There is no Rakhine village near that village, and the neighbouring villages are just Bengali villages. They ran away after setting fire to their houses,” it said.

A Muslim boy stands beside burned homes in Maungdaw’s Du Chee Yar Tan West village on February 1. Photo: Si Thu Lwin

Tan expressed concern about the safety of their families and businesses, as well as access to education for their children – following last month’s violence, teachers posted to schools in Rakhine villages ran away and schools remain closed. “We dare not go outside our village to catch frogs and crabs because the Bengalis are provoking us,” said U Tun Hla Aung from the Rakhine village of Khayay Myine. “At night they also destroyed the crops we had grown with loans from the bank because they know that if we

can’t pay back the interest we will be arrested.” Locals – Rakhine locals, at least – are in no doubt as to the cause of the conflict. There are 381 villages in Maungdaw. Of those, 86 are Rakhine, Kathe and Hindu, while 288 are Muslim – Bengali or Rohingya, depending on your sympathies. Just seven are a mix of Rakhine and Muslim. State records put the Rakhine population at 21,355 and the Muslim population at 444,725. Muslim households, at 51,241, outnumber Rakhine 10 to one. “Ninety-eight percent of population growth is among the Bengali population. Rakhine account for 1pc and civil servants another 1pc. The population gap is now very big,” said Maungdaw resident Ko Kyaw Kyaw Tun. “We are suffering the consequences of poor border control,” he said. Rakhine residents frequently decry what they describe as a growing lawlessness in the township, typified by the attack on a police patrol in Du Chee Yar Tan Middle village by a Muslim mob on January 13. The head of the patrol, Police Sergeant Aung Kyaw Thein – along with his M20 gun – remains missing. “There is no rule of law in Maungdaw,” said Rakhine political

activist and Maungdaw resident Ko Win Thein. “Because there is no law and order, a policeman was killed and his weapon taken. The authorities couldn’t even resolve the case yet. We feel like we are living in a rebel area.” Authorities say they are doing their best to implement the law in difficult circumstances. “There may have been some problems with border control management but we are now carefully checking all border crossings,” said a senior officer from the state’s police force. In the case of the attack on Police Sergeant Aung Kyaw Thein, the authorities have issued arrest warrants for 27 people, said Police Colonel Nay Myo, the head of the Rakhine State Police Force. “Eleven of those are going to the other country to receive an award and the rest are hiding in the Bengali villages,” he said. “We’ve got a list of their names and taking steps so that they can be arrested as soon as possible.” But Rakhine residents say the authorities are fighting a losing battle. “If we stay in our village, we feel like we are just waiting for death,” said U Tun Hla Aung from Khayay Myine. “One day our village will disappear.” – Translation by Thiri Min Htun and Zar Zar Soe

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Karen National Union chair General Mutu Say Poe speaks at a conference in Kayin State in late January. Photo: Wa Lone

Nationwide ceasefire could still be months off
Ethnic leaders say that the next round of formal talks, scheduled for the Kayin State capital Hpa-an in March, could lead to a ceasefire “before the rainy season”

WA LONE
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Dated: 10th February, 2014

THE long-delayed nationwide ceasefire may not be signed for several months, ethnic leaders told The Myanmar Times last week, as they prepared to visit Yangon in late February for informal talks with chief government peace negotiator U Aung Min. Salai Lian Hmung from the Nationwide Ceasefire Coordination Team – the main negotiating body for armed ethnic groups – said the next round of formal talks, to be held in the Kayin State capital Hpa-an, will likely take place in March. There is no guarantee the nationwide ceasefire will be signed immediately, though. “We hope to sign the nationwide ceasefire before the rainy season if we can get an agreement at the Hpa-an peace talks in March,” he said. At a January 30 meeting with the government peace team in Chiang Mai, a new disagreement over the draft emerged when ethnic groups demanded they be able to retain full authority over their territory until political dialogue is complete. They also said the government should recognise them as legal organisations.

“It is especially important that the government recognise … our territory during this period,” said KNU general secretary Phado Saw Kwal Htoo Win, who is also a spokesperson for the NCCT. One source close to the government indicated they might be willing to give some ground on the territory issue. “Formally recognising the territory [of the armed ethnic groups] is difficult for the government to accept because it contravenes the 2008 constitution. We have to negotiate an outcome that is acceptable to both sides,” he said. Despite the new hurdle, U Aung Naing Oo from the Myanmar Peace Center said most of the points of difference have been ironed out through recent informal meetings.

‘The government, parliament and military have different opinions so I can’t say for sure when we will sign.’
U Naing Han Thar New Mon State Party chairman

“There are not so many difficult points left for the government and ethnic groups to discuss. It’s more an issue of sequencing [steps in the peace process] and trust-building,” he said. The most recent talks took place on January 30 in Chiang Mai, when armed ethnic groups shared the draft ceasefire they agreed on during talks at the Karen National Union headquarters in Hlaingbwe township. Leaders of 17 armed groups attended the meeting, which was expected to run for three days but ended on January 25 after six days of discussions. Speaking to reporters afterward, New Mon State Party chair U Naing Han Thar said there were still “many difficulties” to be overcome before signing the nationwide ceasefire. “The government, parliament and military have different opinions so I can’t say for sure when we will sign,” he said on January 25. Political analyst U Sithu Aung Myint said the meeting had laid clear some of the divisions that exist within the ethnic groups. “For example, the KNU leader and Kachin Independence Organisation leader have different views,” he said. While KNU leader General Mutu Say Poe urged the groups to move forward with the signing of the ceasefire, KIO vice chair General N’ Ban La accused the government of being “so tricky”, and said they need to remain vigilant.

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News 5

‘Terrorists’ to blame for hit attempt, say Rakhine pair
WA LONE walone14@gmail.com EI EI TOE LWIN eieitoelwin@gmail.com RAKHINE political leaders who were shot at in Malaysia last week say the attack was the work of “Islamic terrorists”. The incident has prompted calls for the government to take stronger steps to resolve religious tension between Muslims and Buddhists, particularly in embattled Rakhine State. Arakan League for Democracy (ALD) leader U Aye Thar Aung, Rakhine Nationalities Democratic Party (RNDP) leader U Aye Maung and their entourage were shot at by two gunmen on a motorcycle in Kuala Lumpur at 11pm on February 5. They returned to Yangon on February 7. place, said the men spoke Myanmar with an accent. “I heard them say, ‘Shoot again.’ Although they were wearing a helmet I could see clearly they had beards.” The Rakhine leaders were invited to Malaysia to attend an annual event organised by the MalaysiaArakan Organisation on February 4. Before departing on January 30 they had both received threatening emails warning them not to travel to Malaysia. President’s Office director U Zaw Htay told The Myanmar Times the government had been unaware the delegation was in Malaysia. “They went there for personal reasons and did not inform the embassy. After the incident the embassy staff organised special security for them and helped them to get to the airport safely,” he said. “The Ministry of Home Affairs is working with the embassy in Malaysia to find out the truth … The government has also discussed this with the Malaysian government.” MPs condemned the violence and said it highlighted the need for a “solution” to the Rakhine State issue, although there was no consensus on what that solution should entail. “This is a warning that there will be more attacks on Myanmar citizens,” said RNDP representative U Tun Aung Kyaw, a member of parliament’s international relations committee. “Concerning Rakhine State, extremists have attacked citizens both inside and outside the country. Now they even attacked MPs,” he said. “Unless the government solves the problem this will happen again and again.” National League for Democracy MP Daw Sandar Min said the incident was clearly related to Myanmar’s “internal issues”. She stressed the need to consider the international dimensions of the Rakhine State conflict. “The important point is how the government solves these problems. When we are considering this we shouldn’t forget that we can’t isolate ourselves. We should think about how we can live together in our country in peace and harmony.”

Mother appeals to high court over ruling on daughter’s death
SHWE YEE SAW MYINT
poepwintphyu2011@gmail.com

A GRIEVING mother has vowed to unearth the truth about the death of her teenage daughter. She says the initial finding – upheld by two courts – of accidental death by drowning is not satisfactory. Daw Naw May Sae says she has seen a police photograph of her daughter’s body that shows injuries to her mouth, neck, back and arm. While township and district courts have rejected her application for a review, the case will now be reviewed by the Yangon Region High Court. Second-year student Naw May Thu Thu Zaw, 19, went missing after being picked up by her boyfriend in Mayangone about 11am on April 19. Her body was found the next day at 6am by the Hlaing River in Insein township, not far from her boyfriend’s house.

Naw May Thu Thu Zaw. Photo: Supplied/Facebook

“The pathologist said my daughter had no external wounds, and there was water in her lungs. So the court decided it was death by drowning,” said Daw Naw May Sae. “Her boyfriend called her home at Hmawbi about 7:30pm on April 19 and told her cousin to meet my daughter at Hmawbi bus station. But she never arrived,” said Daw Naw May Sae, who then reported her daughter to the police as a missing person.

“That evening, the police told me they had found my daughter’s things at the Aung Zeya Bridge, and that a body had been found in Insein,” she said. By the time she saw the body at Insein hospital, it was in a state of decomposition. A township court investigation concluded in September that the cause of death was drowning, a finding confirmed by a district court in January. “But when we met the township officer who carried my daughter’s body from the river, he said he had taken a picture of her body, which I had never seen,” said Daw Naw May Sae. The picture showed the injuries to the body, which included a broken arm. But her request to the court for further investigation was turned down, she said. “I want to find out the truth, and to find out who is responsible for my daughter’s death,” said Daw Naw May Sae. 88 New Generation legal adviser Ko Lin Lin said his organisation would help the victim’s mother. “We are collecting facts about the deposition in the lower court,” he said.

‘All Rakhine people in Malaysia and Myanmar understand that these gunmen are Islamic terrorists.’
U Aye Thar Aung Arakan League for Democracy

U Aye Thar Aung was emphatic when asked who was responsible. “All Rakhine people in Malaysia and Myanmar understand that these gunmen are Islamic terrorists,” he said. U Aye Maung said the men shot at their car three times from behind, hitting the rear of the car and shattering its window. Nobody was injured in the incident and Malaysian police retrieved 9mm bullets from the body of the car, he said. Malaysia police and intelligence authorities have promised to take action over the attack. ALD member U Hla Myint, who was present when the attack took

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NLD leader backs new constitution review body
EI EI TOE LWIN
DAW Aung San Suu Kyi has backed the formation of a new committee to draft a bill on constitutional change, despite complaints from smaller parties that missed out on representation. MPs agreed to form the 31-member committee on February 3. Pyidaungsu Hluttaw Speaker Thura U Shwe Mann had proposed the new body be established to implement the findings of the 109-member constitutional review committee, which submitted its findings to parliament on January 31. The Union Solidarity and Development Party holds 11 seats on the committee, while the military has seven and the National League for Democracy has two. The National Unity Party, National Democratic Forces, Rakhine Nationalities Development Party, Chin Progessive Party, PhalonSawaw Democratic Party and Shan Nationalities Democratic Party have one seat each. “It is better to form a small committee. I thought it would be better if it even smaller [than 31 members]. The most important thing is that the committee is workable, not how many members it has,” Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said. “In the end, all MPs will decide [whether to approve the amendments]. When that happens everyone should be able to discuss their views openly in parliament.” However, U Paw Hlyan Lwin of the Chin Progressive Party objected to the proposed committee, arguing it disadvantages smaller parties. “There are 21 parties in the parliament so we think each party should have one representative,” he said. The speaker responded by saying that the nine parties without representation would be allowed to attend meetings and provide input on constitutional reform. He said the number of positions on the committee allocated to each party depended on how many MPs they had in parliament. If the body was larger it would slow down the amendment process, he said. “I guarantee nobody will miss the chance to discuss [constitutional change] when ... the committee presents its findings to parliament,” he said. “The final decision will be made by all MPs, not only those on the committee.”

Five deta
Investigation continues after fo
POLICE last week seized the computer of imprisoned Unity journal reporter Ko Lu Maw as part of an investigation into his reporting of an alleged chemical weapons factory in Magwe Region, his wife has told The Myanmar Times. Five staff from the weekly journal Unity were detained and charged under the state secrets act last week over their reporting of an alleged militaryrun chemical weapons factory in Magwe’s Pauk township. Ko Lu Maw’s wife, Ma Lwin Lwin Myint, said on February 7 that the authorities had come to her house to interrogate her and seize her incarcerated husband’s belongings earlier that morning. “I will sue them for trespass,” she said. While she was not informed of any new charges against her husband, information found on his computer could lead to additional charges under the catch-all 2004 Electronic Transactions Act. The act schedules between seven and 15 years’ jail time for using electronic technology – including phone and computers – for “receiving or sending and distributing any information relating to secrets of the security of the State or prevalence of law and order or community peace and tranquillity or national solidarity or national economy or national culture”. The four journalists, including Ko Lu Maw, and the company’s chief executive officer were arrested on January 31 and February 1 and charged with offences under the 1923 Burma State Secrets Act pertaining to trespassing on a “prohibited area” with a

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News 7

tained over ‘Unity’ article
ur reporters and Unity journal’s CEO were arrested and charged under state secrets act
accordance with Myanmar’s Code of Criminal Procedure. CEO U Tin San and three more journalists were arrested on February 1 for allegedly breaching the 1923 Burma State Secrets Act. In its January 23 and January 30 issues the journal had published a series of investigative reports alleging the military had seized more than 3000 acres of farmland in Pauk township, Magwe Region, and constructed a weapons factory on the site. Unity reported that the factory was producing chemical weapons, although an official from the factory was quoted as denying this in the January 30 issue. On February 4 the case was sent to the interim Myanmar Press Council, which issued a strongly worded statement urging organisations engaged in a dispute with journalists to negotiate before taking legal action. The council said that because proposed press laws have not yet been enacted any complaint involving journalists should be dealt with fairly and in line with democratic principles. Several Myanmar-based journalist advocacy groups released a joint statement criticising the government’s decision to hold the journalists for more than 24 hours without due cause. Speaking to The Myanmar Times presidential spokesperson U Ye Htut dismissed the allegations of wrongful procedure, and said the Ministry of Defence had received the correct paperwork from the court to make the arrests and to continue detention.

Pyidaungsu Hluttaw to have final say on ministry’s press bill
HSU HLAING HTUN hsuhlainghtun.mcm@gmail.com UPPER house MPs have decided to send the draft Printers and Publishers Enterprise Law to the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw after disagreeing with an amendment made by their counterparts in the lower house. Amyotha Hluttaw MPs agreed to nearly all of the changes made by the Pyithu Hluttaw during a discussion and vote on February 4. They differed, however, on the lower house’s proposal to remove section 32, which states that police must seize evidence from publishing houses in accord with the Code of Criminal Procedure. The section is contained in chapter 9, which details offences and punishments for violations of the law. MPs argued the clause on the Code of Criminal Procedure should not be removed because the offences listed are considered non-cognisable, meaning police require court approval to proceed with an arrest. “The section will be decided with a vote in the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw,” representative U Phone Myint Aung said, referring to the combined upper and lower houses. “Then it will be on the president’s desk and we’ll be able to see the extent to which it enables freedom of expression and ensures the rights of the journalists.” The bill was drafted by the Ministry of Information and has proven controversial because interim press council members argue it does not enshrine freedom of expression, places too much power in the hands of the ministry and leaves journalists vulnerable to legal action. They also allege the ministry misled them and ignored their recommendations on amendments to the bill. The press council has now drafted its own bill, the draft Media Law, which is also being considered by parliament. While the Amyotha Hluttaw objected to removing section 32, they approved several other lower house amendments, including a provision that will ban government funding for the press council because it is a non-government body. – Translation by Thiri Min Htun

A copy of Unity for sale at a streetside shop last week. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

“prejudicial purpose”. Ko Lu Maw was arrested on January 31 and is being held at a prison in Pakokku. Ma Lwin Lwin Myint was also detained while visiting her husband. She was held overnight and interrogated but released on February 6. “Police did not say why they arrested me,” Ma Lwin Lwin Myint told

The Myanmar Times last week. “They interrogated me and asked me when I married Ko Lu Maw, where I am living and when [he] went to the weapon factory.” The state-run New Light of Myanmar reported on February 6 that she had been released on bail by Pakokku township judge Daw Swe Swe Win in

‘We’ll be able to see the extent to which it enables freedom of expression and ensures the rights of the journalists.’
U Phone Myint Aung Amyotha Hluttaw representative

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THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 17, 2014

Monks protest in Yangon during the visit of an Organisation for Islamic Cooperation delegation on November 15, 2013. Photo: Boothee

Hearing new voices in the debate on citizenship
A survey of more than 2000 people from 11 states and regions on the concept of citizenship finds some consistent beliefs across ethnic lines, including a strong focus on fairness and high interest in politics
MARIE LALL mariecarine.lall@gmail.com CITIZENSHIP as a concept that encompasses rights, responsibilities and political participation is not well understood in Myanmar, if a recent study is any indication. This is also reflected in the paucity of public debate: Citizenship is rarely mentioned in the press, while it has only very occasionally appeared in President U Thein Sein’s speeches. Many still think of it in terms of national identification cards. More recently the media has discussed citizenship in the context of the 1982 citizenship law and the Rohingya issue. However, broader issues pertaining to the rights and responsibilities that come with citizenship will almost certainly increase in importance as the 2015 general election approaches. In order to further this debate, a team of Myanmar Egress researchers collected data around the country for 18 months, speaking to more than 2000 ordinary citizens in seven states and four regions. The purpose was to focus on the concept of citizenship in light of Myanmar’s reform process, looking in particular at how individuals view the state and how political participation is perceived. The research mainly surveyed young people – 62 percent were between 18 and 36 years of age – from the educated middle and lower-middle classes: one-third had matriculated and another third held an undergraduate degree. Of the respondents, 24pc self-identified as Bamar, or Burmese. The subsequent report, Citizenship in Myanmar – contemporary debates and challenges in light of the reform process, has uncovered some startling results. Most significantly, the questions posed prompted broadly similar answers – whether positive or negative – from respondents, regardless of their ethnicity. There were three striking examples. When asked how alienated or abandoned they felt by the state, individuals from Kachin, Kayin, Kayah, Shan, Bamar, Rakhine and mixed-race backgrounds all responded similarly. While levels of alienation were much lower than expected, more than 65pc in each category felt somewhat ignored by the state. Secondly, in responding to a question on their level of interest in politics, the same set of rights. There were, however, regional differences on whether the fairness was based on access to resources – favoured by Bamar and mixed-race – or a federated concept of ethnic rights and national rights, the preference of other ethnic groups. A lot of these rights focused on freedom of culture, religion and speech, as well as access to land and – most importantly – access to opportunities. A growing sense of differing views on what rights are and what citizens can expect could certainly present challenges for the government. One of the most prominent crosscutting themes was that of patriotism and nationalism, often linked to culture and religion, and sometimes to language. Braveness, strength, and protecting culture and traditions came up regularly in the qualitative answers. This was more than simply love for one’s country and seems to reflect an almost martial tradition. It was not surprising to find the names of ancient kings mentioned almost as role models. Difficult to separate from the patriotic quotes, the role of Buddhism was another prominent theme. A very large number of respondents within the Buddhist ethnic groups – not only Bamar respondents – equated citizenship with religion or seemed to think that in order to be Myanmar one also has to be Buddhist. This religious nationalism, if not dealt with carefully, could serve to alienate those with a different religious identity. Another prominent theme was the “right to live in the country”. Given the decades where Myanmar citizens had no rights in the Western sense of the word, it is notable that the right to reside in the country seems to be a reoccurring theme across the citizenship debate. While this issue may be more prominent now due to the demands for Rohingya to be given – or denied – this right, it clearly predates the recent conflict in Rakhine State and has been reflected not only in the citizenship legislation but also the anti-Indian and anti-Chinese movements in the past. Again, this emerges as a challenge to the government in light of the 2015 elections, where religious and ethnic nationalism could lead to discrimination and division rather than unity. There are also findings that bode well for the country’s future. A government trying to transform a nation is faced with two steep challenges. The first is to make the people believe in a future that is positive and possible, and the second is to follow that up with coherent action to fulfil that possibility. Countries that have had years of stagnation develop a “learned helplessness” and it is encouraging to find that the Myanmar people surveyed here believe in the transformation of their country. Although the questions in the nationwide survey were intended to capture the situation today, the majority of the answers focused on “what should be”, which indicates there is a common belief that the future is mostly positive. Rather than being stuck in the helplessness of the past, citizens – while acknowledging the lack of rights – also recognised the momentum and direction of change. They projected their views of the future by speaking about the concept of fairness, sharing consistent beliefs and believing in a common national future.
Marie Lall is a reader in education and South Asian studies at the Institute of Education, University of London, and an education adviser to Myanmar Egress. The report mentioned in this article will soon be issued by Myanmar Egress and a copy can be requested by emailing the author.

A very large number of Buddhist respondents seemed to think that in order to be Myanmar one also has to be Buddhist.
ethnicities had largely similar responses, with 55pc to 65pc endorsing political participation. The third example was whether ethnicities were given sufficient rights – and the responses from most were again within a narrow range, with around two-thirds stating that they were not. The two anomalies were that respondents from Mon State had noticeably less interest in politics, while respondents from the majority group felt as connected or alienated as other ethnicities, despite the perception that that state favours the Bamar. Fairness was a theme that transcended all responses: All who took the survey said they should be given equal

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Why the government is right to deny Rohingya citizenship
U NYI NYI newsroom@mmtimes.com IT is legally indisputable that the Rohingya are not and have never been a Myanmar ethnic group. For many years, however, Muslims have invaded illegally into northern Rakhine State, particularly Maungdaw and Buthidaung townships. When the government ordered an operation to prevent their illegal entry into the state, many Muslims fled to Bangladesh. There have been countless rounds of negotiations between Myanmar and Bangladesh. Some of those who fled from the government forces into Bangladesh were repatriated into Myanmar under a United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) program. Myanmar prior to 1823 are automatically eligible for Myanmar citizenship. Section 5 mentions that any person born of parents who are both citizens are also citizens by birth. A citizen on the date the law came into force is also a citizen. The schedule of section 7 of the law clearly mentions how one can become a citizen, associate citizen and naturalised citizen. Because of the complexity of the schedules they have not been examined in this article. Under the law, a central body is empowered to make decisions in regards to a person’s citizenship, associate citizenship or naturalised citizenship. Those who have entered Myanmar prior to January 4, 1948 - along with their children, if born within the state - can apply for naturalised citizenship by submitting strong and conclusive evidence of their status. If they cannot, they are not eligible for citizenship. In the case of the Rohingya, it is very clear that they are not in conformity with either the 1948 or 1982 laws. That is the main reason that they are not entitled to become Myanmar citizens. In 2001, after my retirement from the Attorney General’s Office, I was appointed program manager of the UNHCR Immigration and National Registration Project, which managed and supervised the northern Rakhine State repatriation project. In this role I came to know much about the Muslims in question. Many years ago they entered into northern Rakhine State without a single legal document. The government, therefore, is 100-percent legally correct in not considering them for citizenship.
U Nyi Nyi is an international legal consultant and former director of the Attorney General’s Office.

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THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

Malaysia and the erosion of religious freedom
ROGER MITTON
The head of the UMNO automatically becomes prime minister and that post is now held by Najib Razak, who, ironically, is a rather secular Muslim and as a youth his lifestyle was most assuredly not Islamic. Indeed, as a member of the landed gentry, he indulged in all the pleasures of the flesh that privileged young men are prone to do. Not only is he one of the Four Noblemen of his home state of Pahang, but he is the son of former Prime Minister Razak Hussein and the nephew of Razak’s successor, Hussein Onn. Perhaps because of this lordly heritage, Najib has trouble relating to common folks, especially those in the UMNO’s rural Malay heartland states, where its rival, the Islamic Party of Malaysia (PAS), grows ever stronger. It does not help that Najib is Western-educated and looks physically more Caucasian than Malay, or that after a messy divorce he remarried a woman whose forceful demeanour is viewed as un-Malay. All these and other factors have upset conservative Muslim voters, who regard Najib as a bit of a toff and not Islamic enough. Since he has also failed to win over the Chinese and Indian communities, it was hardly unexpected that in last May’s vote the front suffered its worst electoral result since 1969. At this rate, it will lose power next time. What to do? Well, it has been made clear to Najib that if he wants to keep his job he must reinforce the UMNO’s appeal to its Malay heartland voters who make up over 60 percent of the population. Among the best ways to do that is to stress that the UMNO supports and wants to bolster Islamic values. To this end, the party is backing a ban on Malay-speaking Christians using the term “Allah” to refer to God. It has also condoned the caning of a woman for drinking beer and is adopting ever-tougher anti-gay policies. Even more significantly, it has reached out to the PAS to try to persuade the Islamists to leave the opposition alliance and join the government. Already, the two parties are converging on a way to introduce shariah, or Islamic criminal, law in Malaysia. If that succeeds, then Malaysian Muslims convicted of theft, adultery or drinking beer will face punishments like whipping, stoning and amputation of limbs. Naturally, the prospect of the introduction of shariah law has caused racial and religious tension to soar and the rhetoric used by both sides has become highly charged. Last month, Najib pleaded for his people to put “to rest the politics of hate”, but since religious folks just love to nurture hatred, his words went unheeded. Sadly, it now appears that Malaysia’s growing embrace of a more fundamentalist form of Islam leaves it in danger of turning into the Saudi Arabia of the region.

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No one holding a stay permit can become a citizen under the 1982 law.
They were returned to the places to which they invaded illegally many years ago. The Department of Immigration and National Registration issued temporary stay permits for the welfare of the Muslims. Temporary settlements were provided by UNHCR and other NGOs, and those Muslims still have stay permits. No one holding a stay permit can become a Myanmar citizen under the 1982 Citizenship Law, which replaced the 1948 Union Citizenship Act. Under section 3, only members of ethnic groups that settled within

WHILE religious people, whether they are Buddhist, Christian, Hindu or Muslim, preach tolerance and peace, they invariably practise intolerance and hatred. It is a paradox most evident in Myanmar, where sectarian violence threatens to torpedo the country’s progress to democracy. But it has also reared its head in Malaysia, where Muslims and Christians have recently clashed over the kind of stupidly childish matters that only concern religious dogmatists. The situation has become so bad that many are deeply fearful about the way the ostensibly secular National Front government, which has ruled Malaysia since independence, is turning aggressively Islamist. These fears have grown stronger since the front fared badly in last year’s general election and subsequently began to search for ways to reverse its steady loss of support. The front is helmed by the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO), whose members are all ethnic Malays and are therefore Muslims, as defined under the nation’s constitution.

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CONTINUED FROM NEWS 1 If the president succeeds in creating a government that genuinely responds to the needs of its citizens, it would represent a true break from the military rule of the past. Unfortunately, U Ohn Myint’s references to ruling with the gun indicate he is still stuck in that earlier era. The defence that he was “emotional” just doesn’t cut it. Similarly, he can’t expect much sympathy based on his record, which is pretty thin given rural development was added to his portfolio less than six months ago. The truth is that in today’s Myanmar, no one – whether a senior military officer, government official, MP or otherwise – can be allowed to behave like a tyrant. U Ohn Myint has shown complete disrespect for the political system that enabled him to enjoy the privileges of a minister in an increasingly credible government. The question now is: How will the government respond? Will it stand by its man? Or will it stand up for the people? There is a precedent here. In 2012, Minister for Agriculture and Irrigation U Myint Hlaing was quoted as calling MPs uneducated and ill-informed after they cut his ministry’s budget. After a motion was tabled in parliament, he was forced to offer a grovelling apology. U Ohn Myint will be incredibly lucky if he gets off so lightly because the context is quite different. In making his apology, U Myint Hlaing insisted he had been misquoted. The rural development minister’s tirade was caught on video and is available for all to see, so he cannot offer a similar defence. While U Myint Hlaing was taking a cheap shot at parliamentarians – who, as politicians, should by no means be above criticism – U Ohn Myint has managed to insult pretty much everyone. “I’m brave enough to slap anyone in the face,” he crudely declared amid the expletives. The president needs to consider his response carefully. Nobody wins from a knee-jerk reaction. But at the same time, the only way the government’s credibility can be salvaged is to send a definitive message: Behaviour of the kind exhibited by U Ohn Myint is no longer tolerated in Myanmar.

News 11 IN BRIEF
German president to open chambers of commerce
German President Joachim Gauck is scheduled to lead a high-level delegation of parliamentarians and German business leaders to Myanmar this week as part of a regional tour. Mr Gauck will spend February 4-9 in India, meeting civil society groups and business organisations and holding political talks in Bangalore and New Delhi, before travelling to Myanmar February 9-12. The German embassy in Yangon has not yet confirmed Mr Gauck’s travel plans, including who he will meet during the visit, but he is expected to attend the opening of the German Chambers of Industry and Commerce (DIHK). This year marks the 60th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Myanmar and Germany. Mr Gauck will become the first German president to visit Myanmar since von Weizsäcker in 1986. Guido Westerwelle became the first German foreign minister to visit Myanmar in late April 2012. During the trip he met President U Thein Sein and National League for Democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. Wolfgang Thierse, the then-vice president of the German parliament, followed last year. – Tim McLaughlin

Stills from a video showing U Ohn Myint speaking to villagers in rural Magwe Region. Photos: Supplied

U Ohn Myint under investigation, says govt
Rural affairs minister was “emotional” when he said he would throw critics in jail
EI EI TOE LWIN eieitoelwin@gmail.com A SENIOR government minister is under investigation for telling villagers in Magwe Region that he would throw all of the government’s detractors in jail. Minister for Information U Aung Kyi told the Pyithu Hluttaw on February 4 that the government is considering action against Minister for Livestock, Fisheries and Rural Development U Ohn Myint over his comments, which sparked a public protest in Yangon. “We need to investigate whether he said these words with good faith or bad faith,” U Aung Kyi said. Speaker Thura U Shwe Mann said parliament would watch closely to see whether the government follows through with its promise for an investigation. During a visit to Thityarkaut village on January 28, U Ohn Myint – a former commander of Northern Region Command in Myitkyina – told residents that he “doesn’t care about any MP … I’m brave enough to slap anyone in the face.” He told them he would “take action” against those who speak out against the government and if they don’t heed his warnings he will ensure they are jailed. “I ruled people by holding guns. I don’t take notice of anyone. Today some foolish people are saying there is no development in our country. Don’t believe what they are saying,” he said. He then threatened the villagers, warning them not to “question my benevolence … or I will do nothing for you”. He added that international support for rural development would come with strings attached and was not motivated by goodwill. He made the comments in response to a question from a resident as to how the ministry planned to provide drinking water to the village. A video of the encounter leaked online and the incident was reported in local media. On February 4, MP U Aung Soe from Tanintharyi Region submitted a motion calling on the government to punish U Ohn Myint. He said the minister had made similarly obscene comments and threats to residents of Pulone Ton Tone village in Kawthoung township, Tanintharyi Region, in October 2013 and MPs could not overlook his behaviour any longer. “U Ohn Myint’s comments look like we are in a dictatorship. They are an insult to the parliament,” said U Aung Soe, a representative of the National League for Democracy. He added that U Ohn Myint’s speeches contradict the government’s public statements and could generate instability. “We tolerated his first action in Tanintharyi but we can’t stand it again … People are getting angry now and they don’t want to have this rude minister any more.” U Aung Kyi did his best to defend U Ohn Myint, saying he was “emotional” when he made the comments and they did not reflect his actions. U Ohn Myint, who only recently took on the rural development portfolio, had done his best to fulfil the basic needs of the villagers, U Aung Kyi insisted. “It seems like he spoke with them like this because he felt like they were his relatives,” he said.

Five football fans hospitalised after brawl at women’s match
The coach of a women’s football team has been accused of beating five fans with a rod following a Yangon Region Chief Minister’s Cup football match. The trouble started during the February 1 match, in Yangon Region’s Seikkyi Khanaungto township, when a fan of the Kyae Tar Yar Pan team, Ma Thida, 38, got into an argument with female fans of the opposing Zalat Pan team. After the game, the Zalat Pan coach allegedly beat Ma Thida and four other Kyae Tar Yar Pan fans, who were subsequently hospitalised for treatment. Players from the Zalat Pan team have been accused of throwing bricks at the fans. Police have charged the Zalat Pan coach and players with five offences, including causing grievous hurt. – Toe Wai Aung, translation by Thiri Min Htun

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THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

EU calls for end to Muslim travel ban
Ambassador pledges to continue generous aid program but calls on government to ensure safety of NGOs working in Rakhine State

SI THU LWIN
sithulwin.mmtimes@gmail.com

The EU delegation meets with residents in Sittwe’s Aung Mingalar ward on January 31. Photo: Si Thu Lwin

THE European Union ambassador to Myanmar has called for an end to mobility restrictions for Muslim residents and improved security for NGOs following a visit to Rakhine State last week. Ambassador Roland Kobia visited Aung Mingalar ward in Sittwe – home to a large Muslim IDP camp – and Du Chee Yar Tan village in Maungdaw township, where violence flared last month. He also travelled to Mrauk Oo and Myebon townships. On January 30 the EU delegation met residents in Du Chee Yar Tan and discussed its findings with state authorities on February 1. It also met members of the Rakhine community in several parts of the state. In a statement issued on February 3, the EU said the visit had enabled it to “get a balanced picture of the situation on the ground”. “It emerged clearly from the discussions that both Buddhist and Muslim communities have suffered tremendous trauma in recent months. Both communities live in poverty and fear. Despite some radical voices, the mission understands that what both sides have in common is the aspiration of achieving security, peace and prosperity in Rakhine State,” the statement said. Speaking to reporters during the visit, Mr Kobia said that EU would act as a mediator in resolving conflicts between different groups in Rakhine State without bias. He also suggested local officials need to choose their words carefully to avoid further stoking the fires of conflict. “Our first priority is to assist [everyone in need] and protect their fundamental rights. I would like to suggest lifting restrictions on travel that have been imposed in [Muslim] wards.” The EU is providing 70 million euros (about US$95 million) and “much more is to come”, it said in the

statement. Most of this is distributed through international and local NGOs. Mr Kobia said the government needed to ensure the security of aid groups and their staff. Some ethnic Rakhine – including government officials – have accused aid organisations of favouring Muslims over Buddhists when distributing assistance. “Nearly 3000 residents including

MILLION EUROS

The European Union’s aid commitments to Rakhine State to date

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monks showed their dislike to these organisations by holding protests,” state government spokesperson U Win Myaing told The Myanmar Times, referring to protests on January 3. “Bengalis want international organisations to come to the state so that they can tell them what they want. That’s why they are inciting violence.” The fire in Du Chee Yar Tan village, U Win Myaing said, was “an arson made by [Bengalis]. They hope to erect refugee camps that draw attention from international organisations, but we don’t house them in camps because we know their intention.” At a meeting with Mr Kobia held in a mosque in Sittwe’s Aung Mingalar ward, area residents – some displaced from other areas of Rakhine State – expressed their frustrations at the lack of mobility imposed by security restrictions. “The conflicts cause trouble for everyone,” Muslim resident U Thar Aye told The Myanmar Times. “We no longer want to live this way of life, where we must travel by showing certificates even though we are citizens.” Security forces have been posted around mosques in Sittwe since June

2012, with additional security posted around the IDP camp in Aung Mingalar ward. No one is allowed to go out except in emergencies, according to a police officer handling security. Security has also been posted in Du Chee Yar Tan and other Maungdaw villages, said a police officer from the state police force. But Muslim residents say they don’t want the show of force. “We want the withdrawal of these police forces,” said Amil Hu Saut from Du Chee Yar Tan. “It’s inconvenient for us and we don’t dare to live here because we are afraid of being caught.” Ethnic Rakhine, on the other hand, said they want more security. “We can’t sleep well at night any more. We don’t dare to go to cut wood in the forest and we also worry about our families,” said U Tin Kyaw, a former soldier from the Rakhine village of Ka Yay Myaing. A government official who accompanied the delegation on the tour said the security was to “keep things peaceful for both sides” and “will be pulled back when the condition becomes quiet”. In Aung Mingalar ward in Sittwe, however, residents say conditions under the security forces are stifling.

The state government has arranged for mobile market vehicles to visit the ward every Wednesday and Sunday. However, residents said that other basic needs are not being met. “We need a doctor to provide health care for our residents because it is not easy to go out. The food supply [three condensed milk tins of rice per person each day] isn’t sufficient for the needs of families,” one ward resident told the EU delegation. While displaced Rohingya – or Bengali, as they are officially referred to – residents are not granted citizenship and hence not issued government identification, Muslims in Sittwe who qualify for citizenship say they are still not being granted the National Registration Cards that guarantee them full rights. One Muslim resident of Aung Mingalar ward told the EU delegation that while six of his seven siblings had been issued NRC cards, he himself had not, despite having applied for one more than three years ago. “I have three children. I can’t go out wherever I want and nor can I find jobs for my children,” U Aung Win, 60, said. – Translation by Zar Zar Soe

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News 13 IN BRIEF
Villagers flee fighting in Mong Mit
Residents from two villages in Shan State’s Mong Mit township have been forced to flee their homes after ethnic rebels attacked a military outpost, residents and the Mandalay Region Police Force Office said. About 80 allied troops from Kachin, Palaung and Shan armies attacked a Tatmadaw military base run by the Mong Mit Tactical Operation Command at about 6pm on February 3, said U Myat Kyaw, one of the displaced residents from Shwe Thar Yar. About 30 people then surrounded Shwe Thar Yar and started firing into it with two heavy weapons and small arms, he said. They then retreated to the northeast. Villagers from nearby Pan Hti Lar also fled their homes, police said, although the total number of displaced is not known.

Army to return 150,000 acres to original owners
EI EI TOE LWIN eieitoelwin@gmail.com TATMADAW Commander-in-Chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing has given the green light for the military to return more than 150,000 acres of seized farmland to the original owners, a deputy minister for defence has told parliament. Major General Kyaw Nyunt told Pyidaungsu Hluttaw representatives on February 5 that the complete list of 154,116.48 acres to be returned will be published soon in state-run newspapers. “The military plans to relinquish confiscated land and does not plan to seize any more land,” Maj Gen Kyaw Nyunt said. The admission came after MPs criticised the Ministry of Defence’s draft budget for 2014-15, which included funding for agricultural activities. A number of MPs said the Tatmadaw should cease non-military activities and focus more attention on training. U Banyar Aung Moe, the Amyotha Hluttaw representative for Mon State’s constituency 7, said the military’s agriculture holdings created “tension” with the public. He also said there have been cases of forced labour on military-run farms. If the military fails to return the confiscated land the “dignity of the

Air Bagan plane forced to return to Nyaung Oo airport

An Air Bagan plane bound for Yangon was forced to return to Bagan’s Nyaung Oo Airport shortly after takeoff after smoke began emerging from the toilet. The plane departed the airport at about 1:15pm on February 3 but had to return after ascending to about 300 metres (1000 feet) after the smoke warning light activated. After landing the passengers were temporarily transferred to Bagan’s Shwe Nan Daw Hotel. Two engineers were sent to repair the plane, which landed safely at Yangon International Airport around 5pm. – Than Naing Soe, translation by Thiri Min Htun

Mandalay to get new, upgraded football stadiums

Four Myingyan residents charged over protest
A soldier stands guard at a military compound in Shwe Pyi Thar following a land dispute in 2012. Photo: Boothee

Tatmadaw will decline”, U Banyar Aung Moe warned. The Tatmadaw drew criticism in July when it said it would return only 18,000 acres of confiscated land to farmers. While the true number of military land grabs is not known, 565 cases have been forwarded to a land management committee led by Vice President U Nyan Tun.

Deputy Minister Maj Gen Kyaw Nyunt insisted that resolving land disputes is a priority for the military. He said he believed the issue could be resolved in a way that can rebuild the military’s good relationship with the people. “The Tatmadaw does not use forced labour on its land and there is no law that permits us to do so,” he said.

Four alleged organisers of a protest over a land dispute in Mandalay Region’s Myingyan township have been charged under section 18 of the peaceful protest law. They were charged on February 3, a day after the demonstration took place. A group of about 100 people marched through Myingyan to the township administration office holding placards with the words “Give back the land for primary school 16’s post-primary students”.

Mandalay Mayor U Aung Maung has announced plans for new or upgraded sporting fields in all seven Mandalay townships. “Construction of football fields is now started in Pyigyitagun and Chan Mya Tharsi townships, while upgrading and laying of new grass is taking place at existing fields in other townships,” U Aung Maung said during a meeting with social organisations at Mandalay Education College late last month. “We are also making arrangements to create more public parks and other sporting facilities.” – Si Thu Lwin, translation by Zar Zar Soe

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Beachgoers play in the waves at Chaungtha beach. Photo: Staff

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

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Chaungtha beach
Development brings tourist dollars for a lucky few – and ecological problems
FIONA MACGREGOR newsroom@mmtimes.com THE white sands and alluring waters of Myanmar’s delta coast lie just a few hours’ drive from Yangon, and at first glance the landscape forms a rural idyll, a world away from the trafficjammed urban centre and its dusty, noisy development sites. But as city escapees spend their weekends revelling in the natural delights of Chaungtha beach, local residents are battling the impact of habitat destruction, which threatens not just their livelihoods but also the future of the entire region. Elephants may be a national emblem in Myanmar, but when their nightly raids on rice crops leave families starving and people fearing for their lives, they instead become a symbol of terror and devastation. With natural forests increasingly depleted, farmers near Chaungtha say it is little wonder that the hungry giants have become bolder and more aggressive in foraging cultivated crops. Resolving the human-elephant conflict is proving a major challenge. In a paddy field in Saetae Kwin village close to Chaungtha beach, farmer U Hla Myo Naing, a father of five, shows where elephants destroyed his rice crop. Giant footprints indicate just how close the marauding creatures came to his family home. “They’re getting more aggressive; worse and worse every year. At harvest time and at least once or twice a month we cannot sleep at night because we have to chase the elephants,” says the farmer, who explains he and his family use firecrackers and other noisy objects to chase away the raiding animals. U Hla Myo Naing reckons he lost about 15 percent of his harvest in 2013 to elephants, while his neighbour lost about 30pc. They’re now relying on donations from other neighbours to help make up the production shortfall but with so many farms in the area falling victim to the hungry elephants it is hard to see how there will be enough to go around. What’s not hard to see is why the animals are encroaching so much on their human neighbours. Any visitor taking the road from Pathein to Chaungtha will spot the palm plantations expanding in ever-increasing swathes across a landscape that until recently was the site of indigenous

(Reg. No: IV/14919/2013 in classes 14, 16, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 and 42)

Class 14: Jewelry, clocks and watches. Class 16: Printed matters. Class 25: Clothing, headware and footware. Class 28: Toys, games and playthings. Class 29: Foods prepared from meat, pork, fish and poultry products, meat sandwiches, fish sandwiches, pork sandwiches, chicken sandwiches, preserved and cooked fruits and vegetables, eggs, cheese, milk, milk preparations, pickles, desserts. Class 30: Edible sandwiches, meat sandwiches, pork sandwiches, fish sandwiches, chicken sandwiches, biscuits, bread, cakes, cookies, chocolate, coffee, coffee substitutes, tea, mustard, oatmeal, pastries, sauces, seasonings, sugar. Class 31: Fresh fruits and vegetables Class 32: Non-alcoholic beverages, syrups and other preparations for making beverages. Class 42: Services rendered or associated with 1) operating and franchising restaurants and other establishments or facilities engaged in providing food and drink prepared for consumption; 2) preparation and sale of carry-out foods; 3) the designing of such restaurants, establishments and facilities; and 4) training of persons in the management and operation of such restaurants, establishments and facilities. Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademarks or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for McDonald’s Corporation P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416

Left: Farmer U Hla Myo Naing shows where elephants have destroyed his rice crop. Right: Trees damaged by elephants. Photos: Fiona Macgregor

forests – the elephants’ natural home and foraging place. “The elephants don’t have any grazing left, because their habitat has gone. That’s why they approach the people, and it’s the people who’ve gone into the elephant’s territory [to cut down trees],” says U Hla Myo Naing. Asked for possible solutions, he simply responds that he does not know how the problem can be resolved. Elephant raids following deforestation are not the only threat encroaching on Chaungtha’s beautiful shores. Hotel developments in the area may offer new job opportunities, but just a short walk from the manicured lawns and seafront resort bungalows huge piles of ugly and unsanitary rubbish spill over and around paths and farm borders – not-so-well-hidden evidence that most visitors leave a great deal

Dated: 10th February, 2014

‘At harvest time and at least once or twice a month we cannot sleep at night because we have to chase the elephants.’
U Hla Myo Naing Farmer near Chaungtha beach

more than footprints. Louise Gray, a UK-based environment correspondent on holiday in Myanmar, expresses dismay at what she witnessed at Chaungtha. “It was shocking and worrying to see the amount of rubbish from hotels so close to where farmers and their families are living. It is very concerning that the authorities are allowing a natural beauty area to be degraded in this way and local people’s health potentially put at risk. “I am also concerned that as the country develops its tourism [industry] – which ... will help provide jobs – the rubbish problem will get worse, and in the long term people will stop coming because of the smell, dirty water and possible social problems dumping rubbish causes. And it’s not just rubbish that’s spoiling the waters around Chaungtha. In December local media quoted hotel representatives as saying that the beach’s water is being polluted by dust from charcoal production and its soil eroded by the destruction of nearby mangrove forests. The sturdy mangrove trees in the delta’s waters have been a long-time source of material for charcoal production but a lack of management and foresight has not only led to dirty water but also robbed the region of a valuable habitat, putting it at risk of massive coastal erosion and disaster. Environmental studies concluded the colossal destruction wrought by Cyclone Nargis in 2008 could have

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News 15

NLD office redevelopment hits ownership snag
WA LONE walone14@gmail.com THE National League for Democracy’s plan to redevelop its humble Yangon headquarters into an eightstorey office tower has hit a snag. U Kyaw Win Tun, the son of a former owner of the compound, at No 97(b), West Shwegonedaing Street, Bahan township, has publicly objected to the redevelopment, arguing that he is the legitimate owner. On February 1, he placed a notice in the New Light of Myanmar stating that his lawyer, U Sein Myint, had sent a notice to the municipal authorities and relevant government ministries objecting to the new building. The notice said the NLD does not have permission from the owner to build on the site or to give ownership to anyone else. “We will take legal action for this because we have all the ownership documents, including grant papers,” U Kyaw Win Tun said on February 5. “This land is my inheritance and I want it back.” But the case is complicated by the fact that the former owner, U Tun Kyaing, left behind two wives when he died in 1979. Unable to resolve a dispute over his estate, the two families went to court and the case was resolved in 2003. U Kyaw Win Tun is the son of U Tun Kyaing’s first wife, while the NLD bought the land from his second

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi stands outside the National League for Democracy’s Yangon headquarters. Photo: Thet Htoo

blues
for everyone else
been mitigated, at least to some extent, had more mangroves remained intact to protect the territory. While it is evident that many of the environmental problems affecting one of Myanmar’s most popular beaches will take serious and concerted efforts to be addressed, a series of pilot projects now being launched in the region could offer some hope for its forests, residents and animals. In January the Ministry of Hotels and Tourism announced that Chaungtha beach is among a number of places that will be surveyed as prospective sustainable tourism sites by the Institute for International Development (IID) and the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD). The ministry also said it has been working with the Ayeyarwady Region government on a plan to provide Chaungtha beach with electricity 24 hours a day. Meanwhile, those concerned for the environment around Chaungtha are already leading a number of smaller initiatives. On a small island in a mangrove river close to the beach, Teddy Din, a program director at sustainable business initiative EcoDev and a Cyclone Nargis survivor, shows off an example of a small shrimp farm which he hopes will prove a model for the kind of development that could help both the human population and the vital mangroves in the region. Not only has the farm been created to produce shrimps in an environmentally friendly manner, but it is also the site of an experiment to grow young mangroves to replace some of those destroyed for charcoal production. “We hope eventually to incorporate eco-tourism as part of this project too,” Mr Din adds. Meanwhile, EcoDev is working on an initiative to promote the use of ecostoves as an alternative to mangrovethreatening charcoal fires. It has also received funding for a community forest project aimed at teaching local communities how to manage the forests without destroying them in the hope that it will lead to the protection of not just trees but also the animals that live among them. “We can’t stop people chopping down trees entirely,” Mr Din says. “But we can teach them how to do so in a sustainable way.”

wife, Daw Khin Nu, who still lives next door, at No 97(a). NLD spokesperson U Nyan Win insisted last week that the claims were groundless and the project would continue. “If there’s a dispute they should speak to the person we bought it from. It doesn’t concern us, because we bought it legally,” he said.

On December 30 the party formed a committee to oversee the project and it launched a fundraising drive on February 4. NLD member U Saw Hlaing, who is in charge of the finances for the redevelopment, said the party is “still waiting” for government permission to begin work. The party does not yet know how much the

project will cost because the design has not been finalised. “When we get permission from the government we will start work as soon as we can,” he said. “We are now accepting funds from Myanmar citizens. We will not accept anything from those who are not Myanmar and we won’t take anonymous donations.”

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News 19 CRIME IN BRIEF
Wife chops husband for forgetting the rice
A 42-year-old man from Taikkyi is recovering in hospital after his wife slashed him on the back of his head for failing to cook rice for her. The attack occurred about 10am on February 2 when Ko Kyaw Lwin Oo was splitting bamboo into strips. His wife asked if he had finished cooking rice. After he answered no, she attacked Ko Kyaw Lwin Oo from behind with a knife. He was transferred to Taikkyi hospital and the woman has been charged with voluntarily causing grievous hurt.

NLD and 88 Generation reach political deal
More details on nature of future cooperation likely to be revealed this week
EI EI TOE LWIN eieitoelwin@gmail.com NATIONAL League for Democracy chair Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and leaders of the 88 Generation student group have reached an agreement to cooperate for democracy and national reconciliation. Five members of the 88 Generation – Min Ko Naing, Ko Ko Gyi, Ko Mya Aye, Ko Pyone Cho and Ko Jimmy – met Daw Aung San Suu Kyi in Nay Pyi Taw on February 4. The agreement comes as clear differences have emerged in the respective political strategies of the 88 Generation and the NLD since political reforms began in early 2011. Under Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s leadership, the NLD has contested elections and won seats in parliament over the past two years while the 88 Generation has remained on the sidelines as an activist network. But Ko Jimmy told The Myanmar Times both sides had agreed to work together more closely in future. “Both of us have been fighting for democracy and national reconciliation for more than 20 years. We all

American computer trainer found dead in apartment

Police say an American computer trainer found dead in his apartment in Yangon’s Kamaryut township late last month died of natural causes. The 46-year-old man, who worked at Pride International School Myanmar, was discovered at about 8:30am on January 28 by the school’s manager. There was no evidence of wounds to his body and he had been suffering from heart disease and diabetes, police said.

Man charged with kidnapping seven ‘Bengalis’

Bus ploughs into toll gate, wounding three passengers

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi in the Pyithu Hluttaw in 2012. Photo: Kaung Htet

understand this is a very important time and we feel that we need to cooperate with each other to reach our goals,” he said. The talks focused on specific areas of cooperation but Ko Jimmy

declined to comment further. “I can’t speak about the meeting in detail now. We will publish a statement in the coming week before Union Day [on February 12] that will include more details.”

A man from Magwe Region has been charged with slavery and kidnapping after he was intercepted in Yangon Region last year driving a car carrying seven Muslims from Rakhine State. The Mitsubishi Pajero bore a fake Ministry of Construction insignia, police allege, and the 35-year-old driver could also face a charge of forgery. The car was stopped in Hmawbi on November 26. Police Captain Maung Aung from Nay Pyi Taw’s AntiHuman Trafficking Department filed charges against the man on January 27 following an investigation. The seven passengers, two of whom were women, were described as “Bengalis” and were aged between 20 and 30, police said.

A bus driver is set to face two charges after losing control of his vehicle and slamming into first a motorbike and then a wooden toll gate building in Hlaing Tharyar township. The driver said the bus’s brakes failed as he approached the toll gate at 6am on February 1. He tried to pull off to the side of the road and use his gears to slow the vehicle down but it was too late to avoid hitting the building, which contained CCTV equipment. Three passengers on the bus, which had come from Mandalay Region’s Wundwin township, were injured and transferred to Insein Hospital. Damage was estimated at K700,000. – Toe Wai Aung, translation by Thae Thae Htwe, Win Thaw Tar and Thiri Min Htun

Thailand border camp babies in legal limbo
BRIDGET DI CERTO bridget.dicerto@gmail.com THOUSANDS of children born in refugee camps on the Thai-Myanmar border last year remain in limbo, registered neither as refugees nor Myanmar nationals, a nongovernment group operating in the camps says. The Border Consortium, which delivers aid to the hundreds of thousands of Myanmar nationals who live in the border camps, said on February 3 that 3137 babies were born in the camps in 2013. “Children born in the camps are not automatically registered. If they have a parent who is a registered refugee, they can get registered, but this takes some time administratively,” Mike Bruce from the consortium told The Myanmar Times. “If the parent is in the resettlement process, then this may be expedited. However, the registration process is not automatic for any newborns,” Mr Bruce said. The Border Consortium said in a statement on February 3 that the population in the camps had decreased by 7.1 percent in 2013, when 9066 people left the camps. The majority were resettled in a third country under a United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) resettlement program. “It is important to note that while there was a net population decrease, new refugees are continuing to arrive in the camps; there were 3300 new asylum seekers arriving in 2013,” executive director Sally Thompson said. The release also said that 3.4pc of camp residents had returned to Myanmar in 2013. Those arriving in the camps since 2006 have been unable to register as refugees under the UNHCR program.

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News 21

Rakhine march on security issues
Thousands demonstrate in Sittwe calling for police to be given stronger weapons and powers to combat unrest

SI THU LWIN
sithulwin.mmtimes@gmail.com

ABOUT 3000 ethnic Rakhine marched through the streets of Sittwe on February 2 calling for increased weaponry and powers for local police, and an end to perceived international bias in favour of the state’s Muslims. Organisers of the procession had estimated 500 people would take part but the number quickly swelled as they marched from U Oattama Park to Wingabar field demanding an increased police presence and stricter implementation of the 1982 Myanmar Citizenship Law. The law guarantees citizenship for Myanmar’s recognised ethnic groups, which does not include Rohingya Muslims who dominate northern Rakhine State. Protesters also called for the police to have the power to fire on civilians if necessary to uphold security in the conflict-hit state. Members of the march carried placards with messages urging the

A woman holds a poster during a protest through the streets of the Rakhine State capital Sittwe on February 3. Photo: Si Thu Lwin

government to nullify so-called white cards and other temporary ID documents ahead of the March 29 census to ensure that those who hold them do not get voting rights.

As The Myanmar Times has previously reported, the census count will not impact voter eligibility and every person in Myanmar, regardless of their citizenship status,

will be counted. The demonstrators also carried placards demanding international NGOs leave the state within a week, alongside other signs reading “Do not accept the countries who bias toward Bengali” and “Don’t want UN organisations that bias toward Bengali”. Tensions in the state swelled in January after an alleged clash between Muslims, Rakhines and security forces in Du Chee Yar Tan village, Maungdaw township, left one police officer missing. International rights groups say 40 Rohingya were also killed, although the government denies that there were any serious civilian casualties. Protesters were quick to link the violence with a lack of strong police firepower. “In the Maungdaw case, though police have weapons one police officer with a weapon was abducted,” Rakhine Women Network Group chair Daw Nyo Aye told The Myanmar Times. “We haven’t found him so far. Now we have examples [of why police need weapons]. “If the police are helpless to protect themselves, how can they protect people? Who do we depend on for our security?” – Translation by Thiri Min Htun

Rakhine police seize 90,000 ATS in January
SI THU LWIN sithulwin.mmtimes@gmail.com RAKHINE State police have seized drugs worth more than K200 million since the start of the year, they announced last week. The biggest haul involved a 28-year-old Rakhine man, U Than Hlaing, a resident of Danyawady, who was arrested at Sittwe Port on a ship bound for Buthidaung. Police say they found 70,000 amphetamine-type stimulants, known as ATS, in U Than Hlaing’s possession in a 7 kilogram package, and confiscated a GSM handset and K50,000. A police spokesperson said that a search of the suspect’s house, in Kyaung Gyi ward, Sittwe, led to the seizure of 490 more ATS pills worth K140,000, plus a further K80,000. In separate raids, the police seized 19,000 ATS in Maungdaw, and 494 bottles of morphine in Sittwe, he added. The suspects have been charged with a number of offences under the Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Law, including drug possession and trafficking. The investigation continues. – Translation by Thiri Min Htun

IN BRIEF
Two cruise liners to dock in Yangon
Two international cruise liners will make stops at Yangon’s Thilawa port this month as part of their itineraries, the Ministry of Hotels and Tourism says. Great Britain’s MV Balmoral will arrive in Yangon from Colombo in Sri Lanka on February 11, carrying 1088 passengers and 519 crew members. It will leave two days later for Singapore. US cruise ship MV Silver Shadow will arrive in Yangon from Phuket, Thailand, on February 19 and depart two days later for Malaysia’s Lankawi. – Rosie

Japan to help revise Myanmar school curriculum

The Japan International Cooperation Agency and the Ministry of Education are cooperating to reform the primary school curriculum, the agency said in a statement on February 5. The Project for Curriculum Reform at Primary Level of Basic Education in Myanmar is a part of the National Comprehensive Development Plan. Assessment committees empowered under the nationwide plan have recommended reform of the curriculum. During the five-year project JICA will provide technical assistance to the ministry to introduce a new curriculum to government primary schools and teacher education colleges. – Staff

More airlines to fly between Myanmar, Japan

Myanmar and Japan have signed an aviation agreement that will allow more airlines to offer flights between the two countries. Under a previous arrangement signed in 1972, only one airline from each country could fly between Myanmar and Japan. However, under a new deal signed on January 30 by Department of Civil Aviation director general U Tin Naing Tun and Japanese ambassador to Myanmar Mikio Numata, one more airline from each country will be allowed to offer flights. “One of the main points of the new contract is that we can now land at Narita airport. Before only Japanese planes could land there,” U Tin Naing Tun said. – Rosie

22 News

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

UNICEF report reveals lack of data on children
BRIDGET DI CERTO
bridget.dicerto@gmail.com

A DEARTH of data on the status of children in Myanmar was readily apparent in the 2014 United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) The State of the World’s Children report, published late last month. Many key indicators for the state of children, such as access to learning materials at home, understanding of HIV among 15-to-24-year-olds, child labour and domestic violence were absent from the lengthy report, which highlighted the performance

of 194 countries on a range of indices affecting children. Figures for the percentage of the population living below the international poverty line of US$1.25 a day and the amount of public spending on military versus health or education could also not be calculated. The report’s lack of data on Myanmar children said as much about the state of affairs for younger generations as the collected figures. The Myanmar Times has previously reported that the upcoming 2014 census will seek to count the population of Myanmar for the first time in 30 years, delving into details about education levels, as well as mortality and fertility rates, that have not been collated for a generation. The data showed Myanmar’s

under-five mortality rate has improve since 1990, but the country remains in the lowest quartile of the 194 countries surveyed. Life expectancy was estimated at 63 years, and the number of under-five deaths annually was put at 48,000. In nutrition results, the incidence of low birth weight in Myanmar was calculated at 9 percent, but according to the results, health deteriorated as the child aged. Moderate-to-severe stunting in children was 35pc and wasting 8pc. Immunisation coverage for most cited diseases hovered in the mid80pc range. However, data on exact numbers of immunisation in the country remain elusive, with little to no information available from autonomous areas, according to UNICEF.

Minister for Environmental Conservation and Forestry U Win Tun (centre) arrives at Moeyingyi Wildlife Sanctuary on February 2. Photo: Zarni Phyo

More Ramsar sites likely, says minister
AYE SAPAY PHYU ayephyu2006@gmail.com MYANMAR is conducting surveys of its wetland sites to gauge potential for listing them as areas of international importance under the Ramsar Convention, the environmental minister said yesterday. Only the Moeyingyi Wetland Wildlife Sanctuary in Bago Region has so far been listed as a Ramsar site but a number of others are likely to be put forward for inclusion once the surveys are completed, Minister for Environmental Conservation and Forestry U Win Tun said during a ceremony at Moeyingyi to mark World Wetlands Day. “The ministry in cooperation with local and international non-government organisations has been conducting site-specific surveys on potential Ramsar sites, including Indawgyi Wildlife Sanctuary, Meinmahla Kyun Wildlife Sanctuary and the Gulf of Mottama, which is an important habitat for the endangered spoon-billed sandpiper,” he said on February 2. The minister also launched an information centre at Moeyingyi that was established with the support of the Norwegian government. Moeyingyi covers almost 104 square kilometres (40 square miles) and was designated as a Ramsar site in 2004. Adopted in 1971, the Ramsar Convention commits member countries to maintaining important wetland areas. Wetland areas in Myanmar are mainly associated with the Ayeyarwady, Chindwin and Sittoung river basins, as well as coastal regions. A survey conducted in 2004 by the Forestry Department with assistance from Japan identified 99 sites. U Win Tun said Myanmar’s wetland areas are important for a number of reasons, including climate change mitigation and adaptation, agriculture and tourism. “Wetlands provide reliable water [supplies] and fertile soil for improved agriculture production. They play a vital role in achieving sustainable development in developing countries like Myanmar,” he said. World Wetlands Day is a worldwide annual campaign to conserve the wetlands areas. This year’s theme was “wetlands and agriculture”, which aimed to highlight the need for cooperation in the management of wetland and agricultural areas.

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News 23 IN BRIEF
Norway to offer more AIT scholarships
Norway plans to continue a scholarship program that has already helped 90 students undertake tertiary studies in Thailand, its ambassador said last week. Ambassador Anne Ollestad said at a ceremony on January 30 that her country believes the scholarships to the Asian Institute of Technology are important for improving access to education for Myanmar’s younger generations. “We are confident that courtesy of such programs, the emerging middle class in Myanmar will help create a dynamic and a vibrant nation,” the ambassador said in a statement. Ninety students received scholarships under the program in 2012 and 2013. Applications for postgraduate scholarships for 2014 close on February 21. – Staff A former Mon capital, the town receives mostly Thai tourists, who visit its pagodas and buy traditional handicrafts. A spokesperson for the Bago Region Ministry of Hotels and Tourism said strong growth in visitors is expected. “By 2015 we expect many more visitors,” he said, “and we will need more hotels to accommodate them.” – Rosie

Rights group ends visit with praise, criticism
BILL O’TOOLE
botoole12@gmail.com

INTERNATIONAL advocacy group Human Rights Watch has given the government a mixed report card following a weeklong visit that included meetings with President U Thein Sein and a range of civil society groups. Speaking to journalists on February 6, senior officials from the rights group offered measured praise for reforms undertaken by the government. “One good illustration of the progress that has been made is the fact that Human Rights Watch is here in such a significant forum. Our staff is not only here … but [were] received at the highest levels of government,” said Mr Kenneth Roth, the group’s executive director. However, Mr Roth and his colleagues used most of their presentation to highlight both ongoing human rights abuse and elements of the current government that continue to block reform. They touched on a range of issues, including the plight of civilians displaced by armed

Ten-year jail terms for human trafficking pair

Renovated high-end hotel reopens in Bago

Representatives from Human Rights Watch speak at a press briefing in Yangon on February 6. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

‘Whether the people of Myanmar like it or not, the success of the reform efforts is being judged to a great extent by the treatment of its most persecuted minority, the Rohingya.’
Kenneth Roth Human Rights Watch

conflict in border areas, restrictions on media and the many political prisoners who remain incarcerated. In particular, Mr Roth emphasised the plight of Rohingya Muslims in Rakhine State and said HRW had raised the issue repeatedly with officials in Nay Pyi Taw. “Whether the people of Myanmar like it or not, the success of the reform efforts is being judged to a great extent by the treatment of its most persecuted minority, the Rohingya.” When pressed on the issue by reporters, Mr Roth also expressed disappointment that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and other political leaders have not spoken out more forcefully on the Rohingya issue. “There is nothing that would be more effective in ending the violence than firm leadership.” Human Rights Watch’s meetings with government officials in Nay Pyi Taw highlighted the breadth of views and attitudes on the reform process, Mr Roth said. While President U Thein Sein was

described as “responding with real dialogue”, Mr Roth said the meeting with the Ministry of Defense was “disappointing”. “[What] the deputy minister said was that all cases of abuse [by soldiers] are being addressed by the justice system of this country … He said there is accountability in the courts. That’s not our understanding of reality.” While mostly optimistic in tone, the group’s presentation emphasised that much work still needs to be done to improve human rights. “The central question facing the country today is whether Myanmar will move toward a genuine democracy … or is it going to settle for a democratic façade of continuing military rule with the stunted future that that involves. We don’t know the answer to that question.”

Visitors to Bago now have more accommodation options, after a newly renovated hotel was officially opened last week. Government officials say four more hotels are expected to open soon in the Bago Region capital, which is 80 kilometres (50 miles) northeast of Yangon. Shwe War Tun Hotel, on the main Yangon-Mandalay Road, was opened by Bago Region Chief Minister U Nyan Win on January 28. Youth Force Hotel Company, which also redeveloped the former Ministry of Foreign Affairs building in Yangon’s Dagon township, began upgrading Shwe War Tun Hotel three months ago after it was put up for tender. Formerly run by the Ministry of Hotels and Tourism, Shwe War Tun is situated on 4.87 acres, and has 132 rooms and a 50,000-square-foot wedding hall. Government officials said at the ceremony the number of hotels in Bago is set to rise by one-third, with four under construction.

Two women have been sentenced by Shwe Pyi Thar township court to 10 years’ imprisonment for human trafficking offences. Ma Mar Oo, 37, and Ah Nge Lay, 44, promised two women from Shwe Pyi Thar a K500,000-amonth salary and K15,000 bonus if they worked in Lashio township as housemaids. The two victims, aged 34 and 24, were then sent to a woman named Ma Soe, who took them to China and sold them to a Chinese woman. They were found by Chinese police after fighting with the Chinese woman and repatriated back to Myanmar. Ma Mar Oo and Ah Nge Lay were arrested on June 28 and sentenced on January 16. Ma Soe remains on the run, police say. – Toe Wai Aung, translation by Thiri Min Htun

Bus driver flees after man dies in crash

Police are hunting for the driver of a Dyna bus who lost control of the vehicle and skidded off the road, killing one person and injuring eight. The accident occurred in North Dagon township beside Dagon University on January 2. The driver immediately fled the scene. The deceased man was a resident of Dagon Seikkan township, police said. The eight injured passengers were treated at a hospital in Thingangyun township. – Toe Wai Aung, translation by Thae Thae Htwe

24 News BRIEFS
New airline gets DCA okay
Local carrier Mann Yadanarpon airline has received authorisation from the Department of Civil Aviation to operate flights between Mandalay, Yangon, Nyaung Oo, Heho, Kengtung, Tachileik and Myitkyina, starting February 27. Mann Yadanarpon will use a French-built 70-seater aircraft. In May, it will start cross-border trips to export Mandalay products to Chiang Mai, Thailand, the company’s chief executive officer announced. After the arrival of a second aircraft in March, the airline will extend its service incountry, he said. – Shwegu Thitsar, translation by Thiri Min Htun

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

MPs amend constituency funding program to meet govt regulations
EI EI TOE LWIN eieitoelwin@gmail.com PYIDAUNGSU Hluttaw Speaker Thura U Shwe Mann has reassured the government that it can examine a K33 billion constituency funding program for spending irregularities at any time, after MPs agreed to make changes to program to ensure it meets the government’s financial procedures. During a debate in the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw on February 6, he said that despite teething problems the program had proven popular with the public, and that MPs plan to formalise it by passing a Development Funds Law. “The Pyidaungsu Hluttaw’s actions are done according to the law but [the program] doesn’t follow the procedures released by the Union Government. However, we have made plans to ensure funds are not misspent,” Thura U Shwe Mann said. “People are so happy with the development funds ... because they never received that amount of money in the past. The funding is so big that it can reach every region in Myanmar. We are happy to fulfil the real needs of
Pyidaungsu Hluttaw Speaker Thura U Shwe Mann. Photo: AFP

Palaung demonstrate over drug scourge

Ethnic Palaung have taken to the streets to call for the eradication of poppy cultivation and drug abuse. More than 12,000 people led by local Buddhist monks took part in a February 3 demonstration in Namhkam in northern Shan State. Addressing the protestors, drug eradication activist Mai Aik Naing from Mann Aung village said the Palaung people “have fallen prey to the impact of drugs derived from poppy cultivation”. – Aung Kyaw Min

TRADEMARK CAUTION NOTICE
ASICS CORPORATION, a company organized under the laws of JAPAN carrying on business as manufacturer and merchant and having its principal office at 1-1 Minatojima-Nakamachi 7-chome, Chuo-ku, Kobe City, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan is the owner and sole proprietor of the following Trademarks:-

Myanmar Registration Numbers. 466/1983 & 4/7844/2007 for Int’l Class 25

the people using this money.” Introduced in November, the program allocates K100 million to each of Myanmar’s 330 townships for 201314. MPs are responsible for choosing development projects to spend money on, with roads and electricity and water supply the main priorities. However, President U Thein Sein has argued that the program is unconstitutional because MPs are undertaking the tasks of the government. On January 27 he announced he would seek the Constitutional Tribunal’s ruling on whether the program conformed to the constitution. On February 6, both Minister for Finance U Win Shein and Union Auditor General U Thein Htaik fronted the hluttaw to explain the government’s concerns over the program. They said the main issue is requirements in government financial rules that would require civil servants, rather than MPs, to take the development funds from the bank and disburse them. The program also needs to

follow the Ministry of National Planning and Economic Development’s rules for capital expenditure and then be audited by the Auditor General’s Office. Currently, MPs are withdrawing the funding to disburse for projects. During negotiations with the government on February 5, the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw agreed to reorganise township development committees so that they contain civil servants from the township municipal body, Department of Rural Development and General Administration Department. A civil servant on the committee will be assigned to withdraw the money for disbursal. While the director general of the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw was originally responsible for keeping spending records, under the new rules this will be undertaken by the township’s General Administration Department. A government working committee for township development will audit the program. “[These changes] aim to ensure

development funds are spent according to the constitution, in a way that directly benefits the public and can be audited,” U Win Shein said. Thura U Shwe Mann acknowledged the initial rules for the program did not follow the government’s regulations but he said this was largely because he did not have the authority to order civil servants to take part. “The Pyidaungsu Hluttaw can amend the original announcement if the Union Government gives its own announcement or instruction in which civil servants are told to participate,” he said. He also defended the financial record-keeping rules in the original announcement and insisted the Auditor General’s Office could inspect spending records in the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw Office at any time. “Not only the Union Auditor General’s Office but also any auditors in the region or state governments can examine the MPs. They don’t need to be lenient toward any MP misusing public funds. If the auditors find an MP misused public funds, they can take action against him or her,” he said. He said the constituency funding was an important initiative for national development and the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw plans to enact a Development Funds Law to ensure its continuation. The program was established under an amendment to the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw Law in late 2013. He said this new law will be constitutional and will ensure the program follows the government’s financial rules. “You can wait and see – if it is not in accord with the existing laws then we can amend it,” he said. “The laws we enacted today are not for the hluttaw and not for the government – they are for the state and its citizens.” – Translation by Thiri Min Htun

Myanmar Registration Numbers. 467/1983 & 4/7842/2007 for Int’l Class 18 and 467/1983 & 4/7843/2007 for Int’l Class 25

Myanmar Registration Numbers. 468/1983 & 4/7840/2007 for Int’l Class 18 and 468/1983 & 4/7841/2007 for Int’l Class 25 Used in respect of :Leather and imitations leather and articles made from these materials; skins; hides; trunks, bags, sacks and cases; umbrellas; parasols and walking sticks; whips, harness and saddlery, and parts and accessories of the foregoing goods. (International Class 18) Clothing, including protective clothing, boots, shoes and slippers; and parts and accessories of the foregoing goods. (International Class 25) Any unauthorised use, imitation, infringements or fraudulent intentions of the above marks will be dealt with according to law. Tin Ohnmar Tun & The Law Chambers Ph: 0973150632 Email:law_chambers@seasiren.com.mm (For. Ella Cheong LLC, Singapore) Dated: 10th February, 2014

26 News
Country Representative, Myanmar Based in Yangon, Myanmar (CFM/YGN/14001)
ChildFund Australia is an international development agency that works in partnership with children, their communities, and other stakeholders to create lasting and meaningful change by supporting long-term community development and promoting children’s rights. ChildFund Australia’s goals are to achieve and demonstrate effectiveness and accountability in its fundraising and program activities and add value to the efforts of its partners through quality development programs that are respectful, responsive and effective in helping children in poverty, their families and communities. For over a year, Childfund has been working with local partners in Myanmar in a respectful, responsive, and effective manner to, together, deliver quality development programs to eliminate or reduce poverty for children, their families and communities. Reporting to the Sydney-based International Program Director, the Country Representative is responsible for leading and managing ChildFund’s activities and their development in Myanmar, with the overall objective of improving the well-being of children. This is a unique opportunity for a highly motivated person with substantial experience in the development sector and proven leadership ability to increase the momentum on the ground and lead it to the next level of impact and scale. Candidates with ability to develop and maintain good relationships with local NGO and CBO partners, government officials, local authorities and other agencies especially on issues and activities related to the program are particularly encouraged to express interest For further information, please visit the ChildFund Australia website via the following link to download the Position Description and the Application form https://www.childfund.org.au/work-with-us Applicants MUST follow the application process outlined in the website. All inquiries and all applications must be submitted electronically to People & Organisational Development Department: hr@childfund.org.au Closing Date: Thursday 20 February 2014 (COB)

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

Pilgrims walk on the stairway leading to Shwesettaw Pagoda during the 2011 pagoda festival. Photo: Staff

TRADEMARK CAUTION NOTICE
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Accommodation costs soar at Magwe festival
AUNG SHIN
koshumgtha@gmail.com

Myanmar Registration Number. 4/5042/2013 Used in respect of: Dietetic substances adapted for medical use, products for sanitary purposes, food supplements for medical use, food for babies; pharmaceutical and veterinary preparations, especially medicines available without prescription, pharmaceutical drugs, medicinal infusions and tea blends; fresh plant juices made with medicinal herbs, also recommended for children, the sick and diabetics as well as persons sensitive to sodium salt as well as for food for babies; dietetic substitutes for cooking salt and sugar for medical purposes. (International Class 05) Milk; milk powder for dietary purposes; whey; health food, also in the form of semi-finished heath food or food supplements for non-medical use made with proteins, lipids, fatty acids, also with added vitamins, minerals and trace elements, either separately or in combination ( included in this class ) (International Class 29) Health food or food supplements for non-medical use made with carbohydrates and dietary fiber, also with added vitamins, minerals and trace elements, either separately or in combination (included in this class); milk gruel for food; diet products finished and semifinished (included in this class) ( International Class 30) Any unauthorised use, imitation, infringements or fraudulent intentions of the above mark will be Dealt with according to law. Tin Ohnmar Tun & The Law Chambers Ph: 0973150632 Email:law_chambers@seasiren.com.mm (For. Ella Cheong LLC, Singapore) Dated: 10th February, 2014

LACTANA

PRICE-GOUGING at Myanmar’s longest Buddhist festival is “out of control”, the chair of the local pagoda trustee committee has complained. Shwesettaw Pagoda Festival in Magwe Region’s Minbu township opened last week and will run for 73 days, ending on April 17 – Myanmar New Year’s Day. It attracts tens of thousands of pilgrims from across the country and this year’s influx of tourists has caused accommodation and other prices to soar, despite efforts to fix what trustees say are fair rates. “We set exact prices for accommodation. But guesthouse owners are charging as much as they like during the festival. It’s out of our control,” said U Khin Maung Myint, who heads the Shwesettaw Pagoda board of trustees. About 5000 to 10,000 pilgrims visit every day during the festival, helping to drive accommodation prices up to 10 times the set maximum of K10,000. “We allowed guesthouse owners

to charge K40,000 to K50,000 on peak days. But they take in more than K100,000 a day,” said U Khin Maung Myint, who is also administration officer for Minbu District. One pilgrim from Yangon complained that the price-gouging made Shwesettaw one of the most expensive festivals to visit. “We have to pay above normal rates for everything – transportation and tolls, accommodation, food. There’s a saying: ‘If you’re going to Shwesettaw, take extra money.’” But the owners of these businesses are also a valuable source of income for the board of trustees, which awards contracts to companies and individuals to run accommodation and during the festival. Resident Ko Katone said the trustee’s are not transparent about how

100,000
The rental fee for a bamboo hut at the Shwesettaw Pagoda festival department of the President’s Office and owned several apartments in an affordable housing project. He said he had bought the apartments in instalments and wanted to resell them, police allege. The woman paid K5 million for two apartments and was given fake ownership documents, police say. The man was arrested by police in front of the Yankin Children’s Hospital on January 28. After interrogation, they discovered

KYAT

much is made from these contracts. “They announce the proceeds collected every day from donation boxes. But no one knows how much they get from other sources, like stalls, guesthouses, parking, and road and bridge tolls,” he said. “During the festival, even a small betel stall has to pay at least K30,000 for a permit.” U Khin Maung Myint rejected this criticism, however, saying the permits are issued to business partners on the basis of “mutual agreement” rather than a competitive system. “If we selected partners by bidding or voting, it would increase competition and the situation would be harder to control. This is a very profitable business, so we just let our partners run it,” he said. Last year, trustees received more than K9 billion (US$9.2 million) from donation boxes, nearly K1 billion from stalls and guesthouses, and K2 billion from other sources in last year’s festival, said U Khin Maung Myint. “The Shwesettaw Pagoda Festival receives K10 billion or more a year. We have to fund the festival and the maintenance of the pagoda and pay nothing to the government. The system may have some defects but we are not breaking the law,” he said, adding that the committee also has K20 billion saved in a bank account.

Arrest made over apartment sale scam
TOE WAI AUNG linnhtet.lt@gmail.com A MAN who allegedly absconded after swindling millions of kyat from seven women by selling fake house ownership documents has been arrested in Yangon Region, police said last week. Police allege the Tarmwe township resident embarked on the scam in March 2013, when he convinced a woman from Kyeemyindaing township he worked in the information the alleged scam was far broader than originally believed. Police say the man confessed to taking almost K19 million in total from seven people. The alleged victims – all women – were residents of Insein, Hlaing, Ahlone, Bahan, Pabedan and Kyeemyindaing townships. Police say that more cases could still come to light. The man has been charged with cheating and forgery and faces up to 10 years in prison. – Translation by Thiri Min Htun

28 THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

Business
New airport project now up for grabs
ZAW WIN THAN zawwinthan@gmail.com A SINGAPORE-LED consortium has been brought back into contention for a US$1.1 billion contract to build a new airport near Yangon after the original tender winner, from South Korea, failed to meet the government’s specifications for the project, a senior Department of Civil Aviation has told The Myanmar Times. In August 2013, the South Korean Incheon Airport consortium won the tender for the contract to build Hanthawaddy International Airport in Bago Region, with another consortium comprising of Singapore’s Changi Airport Group, Yongnam Holdings Ltd and Japan’s JGC Corporation selected as the backup. However, the DCA recently invited the Singaporean group to “re-enter negotiations” for the project because of problems with Incheon’s proposal, the official said on February 5. The conflict comes as the Incheon Airport consortium has been pushing to change certain aspects of the project, including the operating capacity of the airport, a planning official tied to the project has said. “We haven’t yet decided which consortium will do the project,” the official said. “First we announced that South Korea’s Incheon Airport consortium was selected to build and operate the airport but … their proposal didn’t actually meet our requirements.” “We recently invited Yongnam to reenter negotiations but it doesn’t mean we cancelled the proposal submitted by Incheon Airport consortium … We want to also see the proposal from the Singaporean consortium. “This is why we also announced backup companies from the start. I would like to say this is an ongoing process and we don’t know who will take the bid for the project at the moment. MORE ON BUSINESS 32
zawhtikemjn1981@gmail.com

Rice exports falter on illicit
ZAW HTIKE
RICE exports this year are set to fall to less than half of the government target of 3 million-tonnes as traders are withholding stock from its trading partners in an attempt to secure more favourable prices being offered by illicit Chinese importers, officials said. U Lu Maw Myint Maung, joint secretary general of the Myanmar Rice Federation, told The Myanmar Times, that Myanmar exported nearly 1 million tonnes of rice through the first nine months of the fiscal year at the end of January, falling short of the 1.01 million tonnes of rice exported during the same period last year. “Because of an unstable local rice price, we have not been able to speed up exports during the rainy season, he said. “If we had, Myanmar would probably have been able to export about 2 million tonnes this year, because there is enough reserve.” He said that traders are increasingly looking to sell rice through Shan State’s Muse border, alongside China’s Yunnan Province, where they can earn as much as 28 percent more profit by dealing with tax-dodging Chinese importers. Though there is nothing illicit about local rice sellers trading over the borders, many Chinese trad-

Officials believe that illegal trading from across the border will result in exports falling to less than half of the go

Men load bags of rice onto a truck to be exported out of the country. Photo: Kaung Htet

Price per ton of 5 percent broken rice sold through the Muse border

$446

ers are subject to a 17pc import tax on all rice bought from Myanmar, a tax many choose not to pay, he said. While they are then able to offer a better premium on imports, they also tend to not honour contacts and pay significantly less than promised. “Local traders would not easily be able to reclaim their rice back because of the high transportation charges and would have to sell at the lower

price,” U Lu Maw Myint Maung said. “This led to fluctuations in the local price, so that big exporters could not draw up contracts for as much as we wanted.” He said that the price of 25pc broken rice on the international market goes for US$315-$320 per tonne. That is compared to the 2480 yuan ($404) the same rice is sometimes sold for through the Muse border. Five percent

broken rice, meanwhile, is sold for $405-$415 per tonne in the international markets, well short of the 2740 Yuan (about $446) per tonne it fetches along the Yunnan border. In an effort to deal with the problem, the government has been in talks with Chinese authorities to try and formalise the rice trade, U Maung Aung, an adviser to the Ministry of Commerce he told The Myanmar Times.

BUSINESS EDiTOR: Philip Heijmans | pheijmans13@gmail.com

29

Stolen car parts reach into the thousands
BUSINESS 30

YCDC nix highrises at the ports
PROPERTY 34

Exchange Rates (February 7 close)
Currency
Euro Malaysia Ringitt Singapore Dollar Thai Baht US Dollar

Buying
K1325 K290 K770 K29 K980

Selling
K1335 K297 K778 K30 K984

China trade
the price being offered by illicit traders in China would likely not begin to decrease until the end of the high trading season. “The price [of rice exported to China] is not likely to go down until March as we are now exporting 3000 to 3500 tonnes of rice through Muse a day,” said U Thauk Kyar, an executive member of the Muse rice traders’ association. The fiscal 2012-2013 total of 1.6 million tonnes was the highest in 46 years, thanks to the demand from China for exports via the newly booming Muse border post, which accounted for 60pc of the total 1.6 million tonnes exported last year, said U Lu Maw Myint Maung, adding that China has faced in increased demand for quality rice over the past year. However, with Myanmar’s entry into the EU generalised system of preferences last year, Myanmar traders have started to export to Europe, said U Lu Maw Myint Maung. “EU traders can import rice from Myanmar without paying import taxes if they can prove the country of origin,” he said. Former joint secretary of the Myanmar Rice Federation and rice exporter U Myo Thura Aye said that 10 EU countries, including Spain, Portugal, Belgium and the Netherlands, are now buying rice from Myanmar. “We’re exporting 5000 tonnes a month to Europe and 20,000 tonnes to Africa,” he said, adding that a smaller amount is going to the Philippines and Malaysia. In addition, Myanmar Agribusiness Public Corporation (MACPO) announced last week that come May they will export up to 8000 tonnes of rice to Japan this year, said U Soe Tun, the company’s director. “MAPCO is going to export … rice to Japan jointly with Japanese firm Mitsui & Co after it won a tender of Japanese government to import rice,” he said, adding that they would start importing 5pc broken rice at $470 per tonne.

overnment’s target of 3 million tonnes for the fiscal year

Progress on new oil refinery in Magwe Region slows to a crawl
Govt says it is still considering tender applicants several months after deadline

AUNG SHIN
koshumgtha@gmail.com

THE government still has yet to choose a consultancy firm to carry out impact assessments of a proposed oil refinery in Magwe Region seven months after a deadline for a tender asking them to apply, an official said. U Aye Cho, director of the Ministry of Energy’s Myanma Petrochemical Enterprise (MPE), said that the project was still in the preliminary phase as they continue to consider which

firm will carry out the required environmental and social impact studies. “We have seen at least three foreign consultancy firms, but we are still choosing among them,” he said. The ministry announced tenders for assessments in July, with a deadline to pick one by August 16, but the ministry has not released details of any progress in those assessments. The new refinery, capable of producing up to 50,000 barrels per day, will be built in Minhla township and will process crude oil coming from the Myanmar-China Oil Pipeline, the ministry has said. The Union Parliament approved K40 million for the assessment of a

new oil refinery last year. “It is an ongoing project and we haven’t decided yet on how it will be funded. The capacity would be from 40,000 barrels per day to 56,000bpd, but we haven’t decided on that yet either,” said U Aye Cho, adding that three locations in Minhla township had been proposed to accommodate the refinery. Currently MPE runs three refineries: Chauk, with capacity of 6000bpd, Thanbayagan, with a capacity of 25,000 bpd and Thanlyin, which is able to produce 20,000 bpd. The utilisation rates of those ageing refineries are low, according to the Ministry of Energy.

Gold firm renounces use of the ‘tical’
Local company stands alone in effort to bring Myanmar’s gold trade to int’l standard
KYAY MOHN WIN kyaymonewin@gmail.com IN an effort to modernise the gold trade, local-based firm Myanmar Gold Development (MGD) will begin selling gold in the international unit of measure, grams, becoming the first major firm in Myanmar to renounce the long-used traditional measurement known as the tical, an MGD official said. Dating back hundreds of years, the tical – equal to 0.576 ounces – has long served as the widely accepted unit of measure for gold though it has drawn criticism from both local and international gold sellers for making cross-border gold trade difficult. ‘’We are using grams instead of using traditional units of tical because we want to branch out a separate way from others. We also want Myanmar people to get into the habit of using grams. It’s a kind of preparation for [the Asean Economic Community set for] 2015,” said MGD director U Kyi Sein, adding that his firm has plans to sell gold to foreign markets. Some gold traders said selling gold in grams might be a hard sell as it requires adjusting prices with the international markets. “Gold prices are changing second by second, so if they want to succeed, they should avoid fixing the price and adjusting according to the world price otherwise it won’t work in here,” said U Tun Tun, president of the Mandalay Gold Association. U Myo Aung, a gold trader in Mandalay, echoed the sentiment, saying, “It will be difficult if the gold bars are measured with grams because people are old-fashioned and they are used to traditional measurements.” “I think selling gold in small sizes with the [international] price is a good idea, but it would be better if they began selling a wide variety of gold bars using traditional measurements like ta mat thar [one-fourth of a tical] and ngar muu thar [half a tical].”

“We have been trying to sign an MOU [memorandum of understanding] with regional governments in China to permit importing rice from Myanmar legally,” he said. “Although they have not permitted rice imports, market demand is very big, so they seize illicit rice imports from Myanmar only sometimes,” he said. As a result, experts believe that

‘We also want the Myanmar people to get into the habit of using grams. It’s a kind of preparation for 2015’
U Kyi Sein Director at MGD

Myanmar to get credit insurance this year
At least two other new policies are in the pipeline as business sector requires more diverse insurance plans
SHWEGU THITSAR khaingsabainyein@gmail.com MYANMA Insurance will begin offering credit insurance, deputy finance minister Dr Maung Maung Thein announced last week. Speaking during a training session for the new product, he said that credit guarantees will protect sellers from non-paying buyers in the country’s increasingly risky marketplace. “In the past, we have been told that it is an unneeded form of insurance, but now we see that it is essential,” he said, adding that the new type of insurance will become available in the coming months. In addition, the state-run giant plans to roll out at least two other types of insurance, farmers and health insurance, once potential customers become more familiar with the concept, he said. People now know that insurance is essential,” he said. “Private insurance companies should not be afraid of providing services here. They won’t lose out, because people want insurance, and international experts are ready to help as much as they can.” He said private insurance companies would be able to offer credit guarantee insurance after the first year of operation. Despite the opportunity for Myanma Insurance to expand, recently opened private insurance firms are only allowed to sell premiums for just six policies, though officials said that will change this year. – Translation By Thiri Min Htun

30 Business The Fine Print

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

With SEZ law, investors will have to wait to benefit
SEBASTIAN PAWLITA sebastian@pwplegal.com kYAW ZAY YA kyaw@pwplegal.com A NEW Special Economic Zones Law was enacted on January 23, granting substantially more tax benefits to export-oriented businesses than the Foreign Investment Law. However, the first special economic zone (SEZ) in the country expected to be operational, Thilawa, will open doors in 2015 at the earliest, meaning that investors looking to do business now have to invest under the Foreign Investment Law. The new law requires the government to set up a “central body” which, in its turn, is to set up one “central working body” and management committees for each SEZ. Investment permits for setting up a business in an SEZ are to be issued by the management committees, rather ambitiously within 30 days after submission of the complete application dossier. It is not entirely clear from the wording of the law if the management committees will need approval from the central working body. The example of neighbouring countries shows that the less central interference there is, the better it is usually for the investor, at least if there are enough industrial zones to choose from. In Vietnam, most industrial zone authorities are in fierce competition against each other and are quite helpful when it comes to assisting investors against bureaucracy. The management committees are supposed to be one-stop service centres issuing investment permits, registering companies, issuing entry visas, work permits, construction permits and certificates of origin and collecting taxes. SEZs are set up by private developers. The developer is selected by the central body in an open tender “according to international standards”. Foreigners can bid, either alone or in a joint venture with a local partner. Priority is to be given to a developer who is “well experienced in the management of SEZs” and gives rise to the expectation for “prompt implementation of the project”. The law stipulates several criteria that a location must fulfil in order to be considered as a candidate for the setting up of an industrial zone (being on the government’s list for regional development, easy import and export routes, sufficient prospects for the development of infrastructure and availability of workers). Other areas may be considered as well, provided that the project is feasible and beneficial to the state and the people. In order to establish a special economic zone, the central body requires approval from the government and the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw. The private developer has to lease the land for the SEZ from the management committee (i.e. from the state). The maximum lease term is 50 years; one renewal for up to 25 years is possible. The developer then subleases plots of land to the investors. The maximum sublease term is also 50 years with the possibility to renew once for 25 years. However, if the investor has a permit to operate a factory for 30 years, the sublease term would also be only 30 years. Like the Foreign Investment Law, the new SEZ Law contains a guarantee against nationalisation. The developer and investors “have the right to exchange and transfer their own foreign currency within the SEZ and overseas”. Joint-venture partners may agree on foreign dispute resolution. On an interesting note, the law says that “foreign insurance companies and insurance companies formed as a joint venture between a local and a foreigner” may “operate their agency offices and insurance businesses within the SEZ”. Presently, foreign insurance companies can only have a rep office in Myanmar.
Sebastian and Kyaw Zay Ya are consultants with Polastri Wint & Partners Legal & Tax Advisors.

Legal & tax insight

A mechanic inspects an imported vehicle last week at a dealership in Yangon. Photo: Boothee

Parts stolen from 15% of all imported vehicles
AYE NYEIN WIN
ayenyeinwin.mcm@gmail.com

LOCAL car dealerships are earning a poor reputation among buyers as up to 15 percent of vehicles that arrive in Myanmar through Yangon’s ports are missing parts, port officials have admitted. Speaking at a press conference last week, Myanma Port Authority (MPA) joint managing director U Kyaw Myint said that since the imported car market opened in 2011, about 34,700 vehicles have fallen victim to robbery or accidents before they even make it to the dealership. As a result, buyers are forced to settle for taking in vehicles with missing or damaged parts. “Importers should beware when they order cars online. Sometimes the drivers steal or destroy parts while

driving the cars from ship to yard, and they tell importers the parts were lost in the port. Importers should check the vehicle carefully,” he said. He said that of those vehicles reported with missing parts, 50pc lose parts before they even reach Myanmar’s ports, while another 35pc lose parts while being driven to the dealership from the shipping yard. Missing items can include CD players, in-car televisions, rear-view mirrors and other accessories, he said. Importers claim there is no checklist system in the exporting countries to ensure that cars are complete when being prepared for shipping to Myanmar, while the MPA said they cannot be held responsible for losses sustained before the cars arrive. In an effort to limit theft at the ports, the MPA said it will install CCTV cameras and additional security checkpoints at the pontoon bridges where the cars are parked, as well as provide an inspection checklist for importers, who can report any discrepancy.

In the meantime, car dealers told The Myanmar Times that they continue to be on the losing end of rampant theft and are often forced to compensate their clients. “I faced the problem that car keys or spare parts are lost. We explain the theft to the customers and sometimes they don’t accept it, so we give compensation,” said U Soe Htun, a representative from Farmer Auto. Others, meanwhile, found ways to work around the issue. “We never really face that problem because we always use DHL to carry the spare parts although sometimes the companies from importing countries do not want to pay to put spare parts in the mail,” said Ko Win Ko, managing director of Win Ko Auto. “In that case, importers can complain to the ports with the complete documentation, but they will wait for more than two weeks,” he said. Between 2011 and the end of 2013, more than 231,608 cars entered Myanmar ports, according to MPA data.

www.mmtimes.com
WASHINGTON

Business 31

US Export-Import Bank opens doors in Myanmar
In a statement move, the US declares that it has not yet given up on competing in Myanmar
THE US Export-Import Bank last week began to offer credit for trade with Myanmar, hoping to support businesses against competitors in a market that has boomed since democratic reforms. The decision sends “a strong signal that we are committed to strengthening economic ties with Burma as the nation continues its transition”, Export-Import Bank president and board chair Fred Hochberg said in a statement, using Myanmar’s former name. Officials said they hoped to boost US exports and jobs by providing similar terms as credit agencies from European and Asian nations, whose governments have gone even further in ending barriers to trade with the once pariah state. “Hopefully with this announcement we can level the playing field and we can compete on the basis of price and quality, not terms,” said an official from the ExportImport Bank, who requested anonymity in line with agency policy. Effective immediately, US exporters can turn to the ExportImport Bank to seek credit insurance on their products, direct loans or loan guarantees. Myanmar has earned the trust of some foreign investors thanks to sweeping reforms since the quasi-civilian government took power in 2011. US President Barack Obama’s administration has heralded Myanmar’s changes as a success for diplomatic outreach, but critics say America has overlooked human rights violations. The Export-Import Bank’s decision “is very much a reflection of Burma’s creditworthiness and it’s not connected to any particular event,” said another official. The Export-Import Bank is no stranger to the country. One of its first projects after its creation in 1934 was to provide $22 million to build the Burma Road to supply China during its war with Japan. – AFP

JICA onboard to help modernise bank trading systems in Myanmar
AYE THIDA KYAW
ayethidarkyaw@gmail.com

A NEW payment system to facilitate international business transactions could be in use in 2017, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) announced last week. Central Bank deputy governor U Set Aung and JICA Myanmar’s chief representative Tanaka Masahiko signed the agreement to modernise

the funds payment and securities settlement systems on February 4. “We have to complete the system in 2016 and start in 2017,” said a central bank official who asked not to be named as he is not authorised to speak to the media. As the government tries to establish a modern banking system and a securities market to increase foreign investment and trade, the new system for interbank trading will play a central role, industry experts have said. The payment and settlement system in domestic banks is now done manually, which takes up staff time and causes delay, banking sources

‘We will be able to check the payments online and inform customers very quickly about their status.’
U Zaw Lin Htut Deputy managing director of Kanbawza Bank

said, adding that much of the work is done by hand and by using dated paper storage techniques. Banks also tend to use locally made software that is unable to process a number of requests and does not work for settlements, he said. Experts worry systems that are currently incompatible with international systems will make it difficult for the sector to integrate with the outside world. The new financial information and communication technologies (ICT) work in real time to ensure timely transactions by using digital scanning for cheque clearance, said the central bank official. Japanese and other delegations that visited Yangon in late 2013 criticised weaknesses in the banking infrastructure as a barrier to doing business. U Zaw Lin Htut, deputy managing director of Kanbawza Bank, said the new system would ease cash flows. “We will be able to check the payments online and inform customers very quickly about their status,” he said.

World Bank gives $31.5m for telecoms
AUNG SHIN koshumgtha@gmail.com THE World Bank will provide a US$31.5 million credit toward reforming Myanmar’s telecommunications sector by expanding access and making usage more affordable, it announced on February 6. According to a press release, the project will enable a competitive telecoms sector through regulatory reforms to be made in the development of the information, communication and technology (ICT) sector. “Myanmar has one of the lowest rates of telecommunications and internet access in the world. The vast majority of people face high costs, poor service or a complete lack of access,” World Bank country director Ulrich Zachau said in a release. The project will also facilitate “egovernment”, a project creating a single online window for government information and services. “The reform of Myanmar’s telecommunications sector is an integral part of lifting millions of people out of poverty,” Mr Zachau said.

IN BRIEF
GOOGLE bought a 5.94 percent stake in Lenovo for US$750 million on the same day it agreed to sell handset maker Motorola to the Chinese technology giant, a report said last week. The US Internet firm acquired 618.3 million shares in the PC maker at US$1.213 each when Lenovo bought Motorola for $2.91 billion on January 6, according to Dow Jones Newswires. The deal provides Lenovo with footholds in smartphone and tablet markets where it is eager to gain traction. – AFP

Hong Kong Google announces that it bought 5.94pc stake in PC giant Lenovo

32 Business
COMMENT

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

The ongoing tribulations of banking
ANDREW WOOD quiriesmyanmar@fsplatinum.com BANKING for foreigners in Myanmar isn’t easy. Despite apparent progress in the opening up of the economy, things have not improved much in the past year in this respect. ATM machines are now available, but can be unreliable and costly to use, while some users have reported fraud. Part of the reason is the long removal of the Myanmar kyat from international markets. A sudden transition to the free movement of currency is highly likely to lead to the sharp depreciation of the kyat and consequent damage to the economy. This could include the flight of capital out of the country, setting back the foreign direct investment (FDI) program. Though the number of foreign organisations and individuals in Myanmar wanting access to overseas banks is growing, the demand is not high enough to bring about improvements. Most expatriates manage their money in two ways: for some, their employer pays part of their salary to an offshore account and the remainder in local currency. Others are paid locally in cash and leave the country to make deposits in an overseas account. It is possible to make some international transactions here. Western Union has links with seven local banks that allow inbound transfers. But nobody knows when export transfers will be possible, even as demand continues to grow. The attitude of some foreign banks doesn’t make things any easier. Some refuse to open an account for anyone living in Myanmar, and at least one British-run bank will close the account of anyone who informs them that they live here. New regulations designed to prevent tax evasion (FATCA) cause many international banks to refuse to deal with United States citizens at all. Overseas, only one Thai bank accepts non-resident expatriates. Additionally one offshore bank in the Isle of Man offers expatriates, including Americans, access to accounts, though applicant screening is rather stringent. In Myanmar, expatriates can open foreigncurrency accounts in three state-owned banks and 14 private banks. But the banking situation here is difficult and may get even more so before it eases and opens up.
Andrew Wood is executive director of Bangkokbased firm Platinum Financial Services Limited.

cONTINUED fROm BUSINESS 28 We will make an official announcement when the results come out,” he said. On February 4, Yongnam said in a statement that its consortium had been asked by the DCA to enter negotiations on the design, construction, operation and maintenance of Hanthawaddy International Airport and its facilities. The airport will be built under a publicprivate partnership with a 30-year concession period. The Hanthawaddy contract was the largest of three awarded on August 10 to private companies by the Ministry of Transport’s Tender Selection Committee. Located on a 9000-acre (3642-hectare) site about 77 kilometres (48 miles) northeast of Yangon near Bago, Hanthwaddy was first slated for development in the early 1990s. Work began in March 1994 but ceased in October 2003. Despite its distance from the city, the site was considered the most suitable among a shortlist of nine. The DCA had planned for construction to begin in June 2013 for a December 2016 completion date, but it was postponed as negotiations with the winning consortium had not concluded. The airport will be capable of handling up to 10 million passengers a year, well above Yangon International Airport’s current capacity of 2.7 million. However, by 2015 Yangon International Airport will have been upgraded to accept 6 million passengers. Pioneer Aerodrome Services, a Myanmar company linked to conglomerate Asia World, won the tender to renovate the airport. The Yongnam-CAPE-JGC consortium was also selected as the backup.

An artist’s impression of the proposed Hanthawaddy International Airport, to be built near Bago. Photo: Supplied

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Japan-based Mitsubishi Corporation was selected to renovate Mandalay International Airport, with France-based VINCI Airports selected as the backup company. “They are working on drafting the contract agreements,” the official said. “After they have submitted them, we will review whether or not their contract agreements meet the requirements and then proceed as necessary.” The project, having been on the table now for several years, has drawn mixed reviews from industry experts, who heralded efforts to build a modern airport in Myanmar, while also criticizing Hanthawaddy for its inconvenient location. “We definitely need another internationalstandard airport since visitor numbers in Yan-

gon are increasing rapidly,” said Daw Phyu Phyu Mar, managing director of Seven Star Tours in Yangon, adding that the highway linking Yangon to the airport would have to be upgraded. Daw Aye Mra Tha, public relations manager at Myanmar Airways International (MAI), echoed those thoughts, but said a new airport in Hanthawaddy would also cost passengers a lot of time. “Normally passengers need to check in 2 hours before the departure time and from Yangon to Bago would take at least 1.5 hours to drive,” she said. “I know this is the best site among others but I think it is a pretty long drive from Yangon.”

Business Development manager Marketing manager Sales and distribution manager Brand manager Logistic officer Medical doctor Project manager Sales engineer Site engineer Chief Accountant Accountant HR Manager HR Executive Legal executive Secretary Passenger service agent ( airline) Receptionist Customer service

The United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) in Myanmar is inviting qualified candidates to apply for the following positions: Sr. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Title and level Communication Officer (NOC) Project Management Advisor(PMA) (IICA2) Field Finance Assistant (LICA-3) Equity and Social Inclusion Analyst (LICA-5) Partnership Analyst (Intern) Programme Development (Intern) Duty Station Yangon Nay Pyi Taw Multiple Duty Stations Yangon Yangon Yangon Position National International National National International International Deadline 13 Feb 14 13 Feb 14 14 Feb 14 14 Feb 14 20 Feb 14 21 Feb 14

The benefit package for the above positions includes an attractive remuneration, 30 days annual leave and 10 holidays per year, medical insurance (for national positions), learning and development opportunities and a challenging work environment with 250 national and international colleagues. All applications must be made through the UNOPS E-recruitment System. Please go to https://gprs.unops.org and click on the post that you are interested in applying for. If you do not have access to the internet, please contact UNOPS directly on the numbers below. For any quires please do not hesitate to contact UNOPS at 95 1 657 281-7 Ext: 147

No. 851/853 (A/B), 3rd Floor, Room (7/8), Bogyoke Aung San Road, Lanmadaw Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: (951) 229 437, 09 49 227 773, 09 730 94007 Email: esearch@yangon.net.mm, esearch.myanmar@gmail.com www.esearchmyanmar.com www.facebook.com/esearchmyanmar

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WASHINGTON
India’s Ambassador to the US Subrahmanyam Jaishankar speaks during an interview with AFP at the Indian Embassy in Washington on January 31. Photo: AFP

Business 33

TRADE MARK CAUTION
SUNTORY HOLDINGS LIMITED, a Company incorporated in Japan, of 1-40, Dojimahama 2-chome, Kita-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka, Japan, is the Owner of the following Trade Mark:-

Reg. No. 5312/2008 Reg. No. 8855/2013 in respect of “Class 33: Liqueurs”.

MIDOR I

Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Mark will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A., H.G.P., D.B.L for SUNTORY HOLDINGS LIMITED E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm P. O. Box 60, Yangon. Dated: 10 February 2014

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that TOTAL SA a company organized under the laws of France and having its principal office at 2 place Jean Millier, La Défense 6, 92400 Courbevoie, France is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademarks:-

India warns United States of consequences on visa reform
INDIA has warned the United States of consequences for its companies if lawmakers tighten visa rules on hightech firms as part of an immigration overhaul. Ambassador Subrahmanyam Jaishankar said that India would see a decision to restrict certain temporary visas for skilled workers as a sign that the US economy is becoming less open for business. “We think this is actually going to be harmful to us. It would be harmful to the American economy and, frankly, it would be harmful to the relationship” between the two countries, Mr Jaishankar told AFP in an interview. “Once I feel I’m not getting a fair deal, I am less responsive to the concerns of the other party. Then tomorrow if an American company comes and says, ‘You know, we’ve got this set of problems,’ the temptation for me is to say, ‘I’m out for lunch,’” he said. The Republican leadership of the House of Representatives recently laid out general principles for an overhaul of immigration – whose main goal would be to give legal status to the estimated 11 million undocumented foreigners in the United States. A version passed last year by the Senate, which is led by President Barack Obama’s Democratic Party, offers automatic immigrant visas for foreigners who earn advanced science degrees at US universities. But it changes rules on so-called H-1B visas, which are issued to skilled workers who come temporarily to the United States. The Senate bill, while increasing the overall number of H-1B visas available, would hike fees and restrict additional H-1B visas for companies considered dependent on such foreign workers. The move came after complaints by US companies and labour groups that Indian tech firms bring in their own, lower-paid employees rather than hiring Americans. Mr Jaishankar charged that the changes attacked the business model of India’s showcase IT industry, which he said was making the US economy more competitive by helping companies operate round-the-clock. The ambassador said he has raised his concerns in meetings with more than 25 members of Congress, including House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, since he arrived in Washington in December. – AFP

(Reg: Nos. IV/9332/2005 & IV/14284/2013) in respect of :- “Industrial oils and greases; lubricants; fuels (including motor spirit).” Class: 4

OPERCOM
(Reg: Nos. IV/7066/2003 & IV/14285/2013) In respect of :- “Instructional and teaching material” Class: 16 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademarks or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates For TOTAL SA P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416

Dated: 10th February, 2014

Sony cuts 5000 jobs, exits PC business on $1b loss
SONY last week warned it would book a US$1.08 billion annual loss and cut 5000 jobs while exiting the stagnant PC market this year as the once-mighty electronics giant struggles to reinvent itself in the digital age. The shock news comes a week after Moody’s downgraded the firm’s credit rating to junk, saying the maker of Bravia televisions and the PlayStation games console had more work to do in repairing its battered balance sheet. It also comes as Japan’s embattled electronics sector faces serious challenges from foreign rivals such as US giant Apple and South Korea’s Samsung. Sony said the job cuts would save about $1 billion a year starting from early 2015 as it announced the sale of its Vaio-brand PC division to a Japanese investment fund. It did not disclose financial details of the deal with Japan Industrial Partners (JIP), but local media this week reported that the sale was worth between 40 billion yen ($400 million) and 50 billion yen. Citing “drastic changes” in the global personal computer market, Sony said it had decided to concentrate “its mobile product lineup on smartphones and tablets and to transfer its PC business to a new company established by JIP that will enable [its] continuation”. It would “cease planning, design and development of PC products”, Sony added. The job losses – about 1500 in Japan and 3500 overseas – were tied to its ailing television and PC businesses, it said. Several hundred Vaio employees are expected to be rehired by its new owner and Sony said it will “explore opportunities for other employees to be transferred to other businesses within the Sony Group”. For others, Sony said it planned to offer an “early retirement support program”. The Japanese firm, a small player in the global PC market, has pinpointed digital imaging, videogames and mobile as the core units that it hopes will lead a turnaround in its electronics business. Sony chief Kazuo Hirai, who was due to hold a press briefing last week, has shrugged off pleas to abandon the television unit. The firm last year turned down a call from US hedge fund boss Daniel Loeb to spin off 20 percent of its entertainment arm, which includes a Hollywood film studio, to boost profits. Mr Hirai’s efforts to turn the firm around got a boost in the year to March 2013 after it posted a small net profit after four years in the red. However, that was largely due to a weak yen and the selling off of assets, including its Manhattan office building for more than $1 billion, as part of the wider restructuring. Sony said it had made “significant progress” in shaking up its electronics business, but warned it would not achieve its goal of making the lowmargin TV business profitable for the current fiscal year to March. – AFP

TOkYO

Number of jobs Sony will cut from its Japan base

1500

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34 THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

Property
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MPA scraps waterfront high-rises on new ban
A three-storey limitation on new buildings meant to preserve a view of Shwedagon pagoda will block several high-rise projects along the river
is a place elsewhere for high-rise buildings,” he said. But the ban will hamper the development of the port area, said MPA engineer U Mya Than. “We want to develop the port area to international standards to maximise revenues. If we can’t carry out the development plan, it could cost us profit,” he said, adding that the port authority had to explain the reasons for the ban to companies who had received tenders. MPA has not yet started any construction in this area for high -rise buildings as the tender and selection process for development companies is still under way. MPA sources said that while plans for high rise construction had already been drawn up, planning would be paused while the new building heights passed through parliament. MPA sources said the drastically reduced building height would cause the authority to go back to the drawing board with its budget for the ambitious waterfront development.  Planned construction in the area included an extended river bank in Botahtaung area to create about 100 feet (30 metres) of additional land into the Yangon River to build a resort and public park. The Sule Port was scheduled for an internationalstandard upgrade to allow bigger container ships to dock and nearby the Nan Thi Dar jetty was in line for a high-class makeover to house modern residential and commercial spaces.

A BAN on high-rise buildings that block the view of Yangon’s iconic Shwedagon pagoda has forced Myanmar Port Authority (MPA) to abandon parts of its waterfront development plan, government officials said. The plan, drawn up in 2012, envisaged upgrading port facilities as well as the construction of a shopping mall, including a number of 10- and 12-storey buildings, for which some tenders have already been invited. However in the last week of January YCDC submitted the draft Yangon Land Use and Buildings Height Zoning Plans to parliament for approval. The plan would limit building heights along the waterfront to three storeys. “According to YCDC, no buildings higher than three storeys can be built on the waterfront, especially in Botahtaung, Pansodan port and the Nan Thi Dar jetty area because tall buildings block the views of the city’s sights. So we have to stop some projects,” U Htein Lin, a spokesperson for Myanmar Port Authority, told The Myanmar Times. Ministry of Construction planner Daw Hlaing Maw Oo said that YCDC imposed the three-storey

The MPA’s proposed development plan for Inland Port Terminal in Yangon shows several modern buildings including several high-rises. Photo: Supplied

limit in some waterfront areas to ensure that visitors entering the city along the Yangon River could see Shwedagon pagoda. “Shwedagon is the main image of Yangon. It should be visible from Botahtaung and Pansodan Port, and high-rise buildings would block the view,” she said. The YCDC already has in place construction height limits in various parts of the city to protect views of the iconic pagoda. New buildings in Dagon township in particular are

generally capped at six storeys to protect the prime views. Currently, building heights from Sule Pagoda to the Botahtaung waterfront area are capped at three stories. The city stretch includes the Water Front Special Development Zone, Urban Heritage Conservation Are and the so-called “green” and “blue” zones in Botahtung and Kyauktada townships. “We will not allow high buildings of government projects or other private construction if they

are contained in these three zones,” U Nay Win, deputy director of the building department of YCDC, said. “If [construction is] not in these three zones or even the two townships, they can build high-rises.” The original port authority plan covered parts of the downtown Botahtaung, Pansodan, Latha, Lanmadaw and Ahlone townships, said U Nay Win. “We limited building height in order to preserve urban resources and to retain the city’s image. There

IN BRIEF
Japan will scrap plans to generate electricity at its multi-billion dollar experimental Monju fast breeder reactor, a media report said last week, in a move that could affect the nation’s nuclear fuel cycle program. Monju was designed to generate more fuel than it consumes via nuclear chain reaction, and was intended to be at the core of a program that would reuse spent fissile materials in a country that has few natural resources of its own. But its complex technology has been plagued with problems and setbacks that have left it idling for more than a decade, with little return on the initial 1 trillion yen (US$9.8 billion) construction outlay and the 50 million yen it uses every day in running costs, even while shut down. The government will review its overall nuclear energy plan, with the aim of repurposing Monju into a research centre for reducing spent fissile fuels, the business daily Nikkei reported. – AFP

Tokyo Japan to abandon troubled fast breeder reactor: report

Quote of the week

35

“Shwedagon is the main image of Yangon. It should be visible from Botahtaung and Pansodan Port”
— Daw Hlaing Maw Oo, City Planner at the Ministry of Construction

India eases tourist visa process
WORLD 40

New Mingalar Mon Market set to open at end of May
TIN YADANAR HTUN yandanar.mcm@gmail.com A new six-storey marketplace worth K7 billion now under construction will be open for business in the already overcrowded retail hub Mingalar Taung Nyunt come June, its market’s developer said last week. Complete with three floors able to house 540 shops as well as three storeys of parking space, the new New Mingalar Mon Market will open on May 31, said U Kyaw Swar Aye Thaung, project director of Aung Myin Thu Group Construction Co. The 0.8-hectare (2-acre) market is located next to three other markets: Mingalar Market, New Mingalar Market and Mingalar Mon Market in Mingalar Taung Nyunt township. “Congestion is very bad in Mingalar Taung Nyunt township and around these three markets,” said U Kyaw Swar Aye Thaung. “There are a lot of trucks and taxis near the markets and accidents frequently occur because of the restricted parking space. The new market will help alleviate this problem.”

A customer looks at stone-encrusted jewellery at Bogyoke Market last week. Photo: Aung Htay Hlaing

HOUSE OF THE WEEK

Bogyoke shopkeepers still awaiting lawsuit
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SHOPKEEPERS at Yangon’s Bogyoke Market who were threatened with legal action the market’s manager over an ownership dispute say they have received no notice that they are to be sued for up to K600 million. The jewellery and precious stone sellers are resisting a demand from the Private Super World Cooperative company to temporarily vacate

the premises for renovations, claiming that the firm is not the owner and has no authority to issue such an order. Super World plastered eviction notices all along the hall where the stalls are located demanding that the jewel vendors leave the area by January 31, while simultaneously claiming they have begun legal proceedings against the disobedient shops. Nevertheless, many shopkeepers remained as the lines of communication have gone quiet. “We have received no notification from the court. If they have sued us, we all are ready to take action,” said one shopkeeper, who asked not to be named

for fear of possible consequences. “All 35 of us are happy to go to court, and the other shopkeepers will appear as witnesses,” she said, adding that the question of the ownership of the site still had to be established. The row escalated when the remaining shopkeepers took to the media last month, publishing a sharp notice in the Mirror. The lawyer for the owners, U Chit Ko Ko, then published a demand for an apology, which never came. Acting for company owners Daw Shu Kyi and U Mg Mg Lwin, U Chit Ko Ko maintained that he has launched legal action against the shopkeepers.

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THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

Panama Canal cost deadlock ‘bad news’ for world economy
NEGOTIATIONS over who should pay for extra costs for upgrading the Panama Canal have collapsed, putting the project and up to 10,000 jobs at risk, the Spanish company leading the works said last week. In a quick response, the EU’s executive deplored the breakdown in talks as bad news for jobs and the global economy and urged the parties involved to reconsider “in the coming days”. Completion could be delayed by three to five years if no agreement is reached, the consortium conducting the work led by Sacyr has warned, citing an estimate by insurance group Zurich. The threat to the widening of the vital maritime link comes on the 100th anniversary of the opening of the canal, considered an extraordinary achievement of engineering. The project to widen the canal, one of the biggest civil engineering operations in the world, is due to be completed next year but is bedevilled by a dispute over huge cost overruns. The EU’s Industry Commissioner Antonio Tajani, who has been mediating in the dispute, said “the interruption of the works would be bad news for employment, for the worldwide economy, for the expansion works of the canal.” Spain’s Public Works Minister Ana Pastor called for an agreement be found quickly “because what is at stake is infrastructure that has an impact not only on the economy [of Panama] but also the world economy.” The canal is a vital link in maritime trade routes which is used by 5 percent of world shipping. The canal facilities are being widened to permit the passage of ships carrying up to 12,000 containers, twice the current limit. But the disputed contract to build locks, due initially to be completed this year, was already running nine months late and since the beginning of this year work has slowed down further. The consortium of companies undertaking the work, called GUPC, says that unforeseen costs total US$1.6 billion (1.2 billion euros) beyond the initial $3.2 billion value of the contract. The announcement from Sacyr hit shares in the company, pushing them down 6.4pc to 3.63 euros in midday trading on the Madrid stock market which was showing an overall gain of 0.01pc. – AFP

Israel approves 550 new settler homes in Jerusalem
ISRAEL expedited plans for more than 550 new settler homes in east Jerusalem last week, in a move exacerbating tensions between Israel and the Palestinians as they hold US-backed peace talks. The city council said it had granted private contractors permits to build in three settlement neighbourhoods of annexed east Jerusalem – 386 units in Har Homa, 136 in Neve Yaakov and 36 in Pisgat Zeev. “We are talking about building permits, which is really the final stage,” Peace Now spokesperson Lior Amihai told AFP. “It’s a shameful decision at a shameful time. A government that wants a two-state solution would not issue that amount of permits for east Jerusalem neighbourhoods.” But the municipality said the plans “were approved years ago” and noted that, at the same meeting, the local council had also backed plans for construction in Arab neighbourhoods of east Jerusalem. “There has been no change in the policy of the city council over the past forty years and we are continuing to build in all neighbourhoods of the city according to a plan for Jews and Arabs alike,” the statement said. Israel captured east Jerusalem

Israeli municipality workers use a mechanical digger to demolish a house belonging to a Palestinian family that the authorities say was built without municipal permission in the Arab east Jerusalem neighborhood of Jabel Mukaber, on February 5. Photo: AFP

during the 1967 Six Day War and later annexed it in a move never recognised by the international community. It considers all of Jerusalem its “eternal, undivided” capital and does not see construction in the eastern sector as settlement building.

The future status of annexed Arab east Jerusalem, which Israel views as part of its eternal, undivided capital and the Palestinians have demanded as the capital of their future state, is one of the thorniest issues in the decades-old conflict. – AFP

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Science & Technology 37

Physicists unearth art forgery in Italy museum
BarCamp 2014 looks into to the future
YE MON yemon@myanmartimes.com.mm TECH experts and enthusiasts alike gathered in Yangon this weekend for the city’s annual BarCamp conference.  Held at MICT Park from 1-2 February, the community based tech gathering attracted over five thousand people, according to organizers. As in years past, the forum had a strong focus on using technology to foster civic engagement and awareness. “[This is a] Low-risk settings for innovation and supporting a competitive civic tech marketplace, said U Thaung Su Nyein, Secretary of Myanmar Computer Professionals Associations. Among the many presentations, The Myanmar Computer Professionals Association unveiled their vision for a website that will help Yangonites report problems with the city’s notoriously dilapidated roads. Based on the UK app “Fixmystreet,” the app would provide a streamlined system for citizens to report problems such as broken streetlights and collapsed paths to the authoritiets.  “We will need lots of updated road map data, and we must know about the relevant government organizations” said U Thaung Su Nyein, a member of the association. In the realm of politics, members of the 88 generation arrived pitch a website that would provide voting records and even ratings to members of parliament. “It [could be] a very high powered weapon for transitioning to democracy…people should know about their MP’s performance” said, U Ko Ko Gyi of the 88 generation. ITALIAN nuclear physicists turned art detectives said last month that they have discovered that a painting in the prestigious Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice is a fake. The art world’s top experts and researchers have been trying to establish since the 1970s whether a painting believed to be part of the “Contraste de Formes” series produced by French artist Fernand Leger between 1913 and 1914 was genuine. The Guggenheim Collection kept the painting in storage while Leger expert Douglas Cooper – who suspected it may be a fake – tried along with others to certify its origin, without success. Scientists at the Florence-based Institute for Nuclear Physicists triumphed with a brand new carbon 14 dating method, the so-called “bomb peak” curve, never before used in the art world. “It is now a certainty that the painting is a fake. The enigma has now been solved,” the institute said in a statement. “The researchers measured the radiocarbon content in a minute fragment of unpainted canvas of the work, believed to be part of the Contraste de Formes series... then plotted their results against the socalled ‘bomb peak’ curve,” it said. “This comparison, used for the first time to ascertain the authenticity of a painting, demonstrated with absolute certainty that the canvas support was produced after 1959, at least four years later than Leger’s death in 1955,” it added. The “bomb peak” is based on radiocarbon levels released during a series of nuclear tests conducted during the Cold War, after 1955. One of the secondary effects of these was an enormous increase in the level of radiocarbon (C-14) in the earth’s atmosphere, the institute said. These levels peaked towards the mid-sixties and then fell again with the signing of various international treaties banning nuclear weapons tests. “Scientists call this phenomenon the ‘bomb peak’. As the level of radiocarbon in the atmosphere increased, it also increased at a corresponding rate in all living organisms, including the cotton and linen plants used to make canvases for artwork,” it said. The Guggenheim Collection sent a small sample from a folded, unpainted edge of the canvas of the painting and sent it to Florence where it was analysed using accelerator mass spectrometry. Physicists measured the level of radiocarbon to establish the date of the canvas – based on when the crops used to make the canvas were harvested – by comparing the level of radiocarbon in the fabric with those over the bomb peak period. The results of the analysis – which revealed a much higher radiocarbon content than there would have been had the work been an original – were published in The European Physical Journal Plus on January 21. Pier Andrea Mando, head of the institute’s Florence division, said it was “the first time radiocarbon dating has been used to reveal a forgery in contemporary art, by comparing levels of that isotope in the atmosphere during the bomb peak period.” – AFP

IN PICTURES
a 1.5-metre new species of giant jellyfish washed up on a beach near Hobart , Tasmania last week. Lisa Gershwin, a scientist with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, said the type of jellyfish had been seen in the past, but never one so big. Photo: AFP

Patrons and presenters explore the forum’s offerings. Photo: Boothee

38 THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

World
PAKiStAn

WORLD EDITOR: Fiona MacGregor newsroom@mmtimes.com

Taliban peace talks begin
THE Pakistani government has entered into formal talks with Taliban insurgents, exchanging possible ground rules for how best to try to reach a negotiated peace agreement. A four-member delegation appointed by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif met for several hours on February 6 with three representatives of the Pakistani Taliban in an attempt to avoid a major domestic conflict. The Pakistani Taliban, formed when various militant groups coalesced in late 2007 and early 2008, has been waging a bloody insurgency aimed at imposing a harsh interpretation of Islamic law in overwhelmingly Muslim Pakistan. Under pressure domestically and abroad to curb the violence, Mr Sharif has been pushing for months to get the Taliban to the bargaining table. If an agreement is not reached soon, the normally cautious prime minister may be forced to order military action, perhaps as early as this spring or summer. After the meeting, which was held at a government guest house in Islamabad, the two sides emerged and read a joint statement describing the gathering as “cordial”. The government delegation, led by Pakistani journalist Irfan Siddiqui, told the Taliban delegation that it wants an immediate ceasefire and for the talks to remain within the framework of Pakistan’s constitution. The government also requested that the talks be limited to concerns only in those areas where the insurgency is strongest, most notably the resistive tribal areas near the country’s border with Afghanistan. That request could be a precursor to future government concessions allowing greater autonomy for the Taliban in areas such as North and South Waziristan, while trying to avoid elevating the group’s influence in more populated areas. For its part, the initial demands of the Taliban delegation, led by a prominent religious scholar, were largely procedural. It wanted clarification on whether the government’s negotiating team was empowered to make decisions. For the talks to succeed, the Taliban negotiators said, they also need access to Mr Sharif, Pakistan’s army chief and the head of the country’s Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI). Though additional talks were expected to continue for several, analysts remained deeply pessimistic that Mr Sharif can reach a meaningful peace treaty with the Taliban. The Taliban, which includes numerous factions and commanders, is increasingly splintered. Some Pakistani analysts and attorneys have questioned how any serious talks could proceed considering the Pakistan government’s outlawing of the Taliban in August 2008. Before reaching a peace deal, the government would have to legally recognise the Taliban for the agreement to pass constitutional muster, they say. Farhatullah Babar, a Pakistan senator, said he’s also skeptical that the government could negotiate a pact in which it cedes authority to the Taliban in tribal areas in exchange for the group ending attacks in urban centres such as Lahore and Karachi. “The problem is not only these troubled areas, but it is militancy which is going on in the whole country,” Mr Babar said. “The militants could say Karachi is also the restive region or for that matter Peshawar, and then what would the government do?” – Washington Post

IN PICTURES
HONG KONG
PHOTO: AFP

An Honour Guardsman stands in front of flags during a welcome cere Sochi Winter Olympic Games on February 7.

Hong Kong’s ‘Biggest ever’ WWII bomb discovered
POLICE have successfully dismantled the largest World War II bomb yet found in Hong Kong after its discovery on a construction site prompted the evacuation of 2260 people. The nearly 1-tonne US Navy ANM66 bomb was discovered by building workers on February 6 in the Happy Valley district, near the city’s famous downtown racing track. “It was the biggest bomb ever found in Hong Kong,” police stated. Bomb disposal experts took 15 hours to remove the live explosives from the bomb, which was unearthed close to a Sikh temple, hotels and residential housing. The bomb weighed 2000 pounds – more than 900 kilograms – and was more than 5 feet (1.7 metres) long, with a diameter of 2 feet (600 centimetres), police said. News footage showed two large holes drilled into the side of the bomb casing. – AFP

BEIJING

China’s Xi touts Russia ties as Western leaders shun Olympics
PRESIDENT Xi Jinping has underscored Beijing’s close ties with Moscow and cooperation on Syria as Russia hosts the Sochi Olympics. As China’s first leader to attend a major overseas sports event, Mr Xi chose the country as his first foreign destination after taking office in March 2013. State-run media have highlighted Mr Xi’s trip as a sign of strong ties between the two countries, contrasting it with Western heads of state who opted to skip the Winter Games. “China and Russia are good neighbours, good partners and good friends,” Mr Xi was paraphrased as saying while meeting his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin at the Black Sea resort on February 6, according to the Chinese foreign ministry’s website. “China and Russia will continue to cooperate closely on major international and regional issues,” in particular a naval escort of Syria’s chemical weapons, Mr Xi was further cited as saying. He also stressed boosting the two countries’ energy ties, while Mr Putin noted that past militarism of China’s longtime rival Japan could not be forgotten, echoing recent criticisms by Beijing, the foreign ministry said. Beijing is locked in an escalating territorial dispute with Tokyo and has increasingly attacked its 20-century imperial aggression. China and Russia have supported an international deal for Syria to eliminate its chemical weapons cache, and as veto-wielding members of the United Nations Security Council, they have sided with one another against Western powers in the Middle Eastern country’s protracted conflict. “While most world leaders, notably those from the US, the UK, France and Germany, will not go to Sochi amid a spectre of censure, Mr Xi’s presence makes close Sino-Russian ties even more prominent,” the Global Times said in an editorial on February 7. US President Barack Obama and a host of key EU leaders will be absent from the opening ceremony, in what is seen by some as a snub to Russia after it passed a widely-condemned law banning the spread of gay propaganda to minors. Mr Xi’s attendance “constitutes an unconventional protocol in China’s diplomatic endeavours,” the editorial said, adding that “the bilateral ties are enjoying the best time ever in history”. “China and Russia will maintain close contact and coordination on major international and regional issues, such as the Syria crisis,” the Xinhua state news agency said earlier this week. Mr Xi’s visit “is another case in point that the two sides have each other’s support over issues of major concern”, it said. – Washington Post

‘The bilateral ties are enjouing the best time ever in history’
The Global Times Editorial

39

Atrocities in Central African Republic continue
worLD 43

Xbox inspiration for Korean border guards
worLD 44

Marvel’s superheroines take over US comic scene
WorLD 47

Syria warned to speed up weapon removal
SYRIA must move faster to remove its deadly chemical weapons stockpile and meet the June 30 deadline set for destroying its arsenal, the UN Security Council has demanded. The 15 member nations “call upon the Syrian Arab Republic to expedite actions to meet its obligations”, the council’s president for the month, Lithuania’s UN ambassador Raimonda Murmokaite, told reporters on February 6. The chemical weapons must be transported to the Syrian port of Latakia “in a systematic and sufficiently accelerated manner”, Ms Murmokaite insisted, after summarising the closeddoor discussions with Sigrid Kaag, who is tasked with coordinating the country’s disarmament. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has pledged to eliminate Syria’s entire chemical weapons arsenal by the end of June or face sanctions, including the possible use of force. Less than 5 percent of the deadly stockpile has been removed from Syria, according to Washington, and Damascus has just missed another key deadline. Rejecting in part Damascas’ explanations for the delay, the Security Council noted that, according to UN assessments, “Syria has sufficient material and equipment” as well as “substantial international support” to transport their chemical weapons stockpile in line with deadlines. The Lithuanian ambassador “welcomed the cooperation” between the government and the joint mission by the United Nations and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons led by Ms Kaag. The council’s members “remain committed to seeing the 30 June deadline met,” Ms Murmokaite concluded. Earlier on February 6, diplomats concern at the slow pace of the handover, fearing that Mr Assad is playing for time, but Russia, Syria’s key ally on the UN Security Council, called for calm. “Things are moving along,” the Russian ambassador Vitaly Churkin said on February 5. “We are confident this project is going to be accomplished in a timely manner and these chemicals are going to be destroyed.” But, even before Ms Kaag’s briefing, envoys remained sceptical. “We feel the time for excuses has run out,” British ambassador Mark Lyall Grant said as he arrived. “There needs be proper arrangements for accelerating the process of getting the chemicals out of Syria.” The United States says only about 4 percent of Syria’s declared arsenal has left the port of Latakia so far – far less than the 700 tonnes the country was supposed to dispose of by the end of 2013. In addition to the 700 tonnes of the most deadly agents that should have been dealt with last year, another 500 tonnes of less deadly “category two” chemicals should have left by February 5. In fact, only two small shipments have left Latakia, on January 7 and 27. Another 120 tonnes of isopropanol is due to be shipped before March 1. – AFP

UNITED NATIONS

‘We feel the time for excuses has run out’
Mark Lyall Grant British Ambassador

said Ms Kaag had told the council that Syria’s delay in destroying its chemical arsenal was “not insurmountable” but Damascus must sharply step up the pace to meet its deadlines. “As the Council is aware, the intermediate timeline objectives have notbeen met. Syria is at critical juncture,” diplomats quoted Ms Kaag as warning the council. Western powers have expressed

emony in Sochi the day before the official opening of the 2014

KUALA LUMPUR

Malaysia halts execution, rights group reports
AMNESTY International has reported that Malaysia has postponed plans to hang a man for murder in a case that sparked an outcry from rights groups. Chandran Paskaran, a Malaysian, was sentenced to hang in 2008 for killing another man in a fight five years earlier in the southern state of Johor. Amnesty had earlier revealed that it learned the execution of Mr Chandran, 35, was set for February 7. The government of the Muslim-majority country is tight-lipped about its application of capital punishment and AFP was not able to confirm the global rights group’s claims. Shamini Darshni, executive director of Amnesty International’s Malaysia chapter, told AFP the execution was halted on the order of Johor’s state sultan. “The risk to his life, however, is not over, and his death sentence must be commuted immediately,” Ms Shamini said in a later statement. Amnesty and other rights groups have urged Malaysia to abolish the death penalty. “What happens to cases of imminent executions which do not get the same attention from civil society and the media?” Ms Shamini said. “There are many others in Chandran’s position - the hundreds of prisoners on death row in Malaysia should have their sentences commuted immediately,” she said. Amnesty had said hanging Chandran would be an “enormous step backwards on human rights” and chided Malaysia for staging “secretive” executions to evade criticism. New York-based Human Rights Watch and the Malaysian Bar Council were among groups echoing Amnesty’s calls to spare Chandran. Various Malaysian government authorities declined comment or did not immediately respond to AFP queries. About 900 people were on death row in Malaysia as of 2012, mostly for drug offences, according to the government. In 2012 a government minister said the country may reconsider a mandatory death sentence for drug trafficking, raising rights groups’ hopes, but nothing further has been announced. Between 1960 and 2011, nearly 450 people were executed, according to data released in 2011. – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
THE BLACK & DECKER CORPORATION, a corporation organized and existing under the laws of the State of Maryland, of 701 East Joppa Road, Towson, State of Maryland 21204, U.S.A., is the Owner of the following Trade Mark:-

40 World International
GENEVA

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

UN condemns rights restrictions in Vietnam
VIETNAM has come under fire over the harassment and jailing of regime critics and its expanded use of the death penalty, during a UN review of its rights record. Diplomats gathered at the UN Human Rights Council widely condemned continued restrictions on freedom of expression, including preventing activists from attending the hearing in Geneva. “Vietnam still harasses and detains those who exercise universal rights and freedoms, such as freedom of expression and association,” US representative Peter Mulrean told the assembly, calling on the country to “release all political prisoners”. He was one of 106 diplomats who spoke at Vietnam’s so-called Universal Periodic Review, which all 193 UN countries must undergo every four years. Many hailed the communist country’s progress in areas such as poverty reduction and boosting school enrolment, as well as its signature of the Convention against Torture, since its last review in 2009. Vietnamese Vice Foreign Minister Ha Kim Ngoc insisted the oneparty state, which recently became Britain, urged the country to rein in its use of the death penalty. Murder, rape, serious financial crimes, and drug and arms trafficking are among the crimes carrying the death penalty in Vietnam. Vietnam last month sentenced 30 drug smugglers to death, and is currently believed to have more than 700 prisoners on death row. Although Vietnam does not release statistics, Amnesty International recorded 86 new death sentences in 2012 and said that five executions were carried out the previous year. The Vietnamese vice foreign minister said at the end of the session it was a “pity that some comments were based on a lack of objective information”. Wednesday’s session came just days after Dang Xuong Hung – Vietnam’s consul in Geneva from 2008 to 2012 – said he had sought political asylum in Switzerland. In an open letter, he called on the Vietnamese delegation at the rights council to admit to the country’s violations. “Once we dare speak the truth, we won’t have to waste time dishonestly concealing the facts,” he wrote.

Reg. No. 1195/1985 in respect of “Household Products; Electric blenders, Fruit processors, Ironing machines, Electric kitchen machines, Electric knives, Mixing-machines, Electric kettles, Vacuum cleaners, Coffee percolators, Cookers, Power Tools/Mechanics; Portable blowing machine, Chucks and keys, Grinders, Cutting machines, Drilling bits, Electric drills, Pneumatic hammers, Machine tool lathes, Lawn mowers, Machine tools, Metalworking machines, Power hammers, Riveting machines, Saws, Brushes, Saw blades, Electric shears, Battery chargers, Polishers, Work Bench”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Mark will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A., H.G.P., D.B.L for THE BLACK & DECKER CORPORATION P. O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 10 February 2014

Vietnamese flag. Photo: AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
YANMAR CO., LTD., a Company incorporated in Japan, of 1-9, Tsurunocho, Kita-ku, Osaka, Japan, is the Owner of the following Trade Mark:-

a member of the council itself, was going out of its way to encourage a “diverse emergence of the press and mass media, including the internet”. But Sweden’s Anna Jakenberg Brinck criticised “an increase in regulations to control the internet and in harassments and arrests of netizens”. She said at least 58 people had been arrested or sentenced to prison under “vague provisions of ‘national security offences’ for exercising their right to freedom of expression on the internet” since 2009. Japan’s representative recommended Vietnam do more to guarantee freedom of expression and the independence of the press, including online. Others, including Switzerland and

NEW DELHI

India eases tourist visa process
Reg. No. 4421/2013 in respect of “Class 7: Generators of electricity with waste heat utilization systems; agricultural implements other than hand-operated, agricultural machines; combine harvester, rice transplanter, binder, mobile thresher, rice huller, power tiller, bush cutter, vegetable transplanter, lawnmowers, motors and engines other than for land vehicles; parts and accessories for motors and engines of all kinds (other than for land vehicles); diesel engines, gasoline engines, engines for marine vehicles; marine compressors, piston pin bushing, piston, piston pin, piston ring, fuel filter, pump, pump machines, gas heat pump, generators of electricity, diesel generators, gasoline generators, gas engine generators, construction machines and apparatus; loading-unloading machines and apparatus; parts and fittings thereof. Construction machines; excavator, wheel loader, POWER SHOVEL, BULLDOZER, motorized all-terrain carriers, carrier, snow ploughs, submergible cleaner for fish farming nets. Class 9: Life jacket, helmet, kneepad, elbow pad, elbow protection against accidents, safety boots against accidents, sunglasses, goggle, goggle for protection against dust. Class 12: Motors and engines for land vehicles; vessels and their parts and fittings; pleasure boat, fishing boat, tractor, tractor for agriculture. Class 18: Bag, waist porch, backpack, bags for fishing. Class 21: Glove, cotton work gloves, rubber glove, gauntlet. Class 25: Jacket, jacket for waterproofing, jacket for fishermen, jacket for fishing, parka, anorak, coat, down coat, vest, vest for fishing, sweater, shirt, dress shirt, water imp, yacht parka for waterproofing, pants, fatigue pants, jump suit, salopette, working clothes for fishermen, legging, wader, shirt, earmuff, apron, nect warmer, arm warmer, hat keeping off the sun light, cap, knit hat, hat, hat for work, boots, rain shoes, sneaker, boat shoe, work boot, rubber boots, boots for fishing (for waterproofing)”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Mark will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A.,H.G.P.,D.B.L. for YANMAR CO., LTD. P.O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 10 February 2014
TOURISTS travelling to India from 180 countries will no longer have to queue at their local consulates to obtain visas after New Delhi announced an “historic” overhaul of its strict visa regime. Most foreigners currently have to wait several weeks before learning whether they will be allowed to enter India after submitting their applications at visa processing centres, a major deterrent for potential visitors. Under the new scheme, many tourists will be allowed to apply online and then receive the green light within five days, before picking up their visa at the airport on arrival into India. “We have decided to extend the visa-on-arrival facility to tourists from 180 nations,” Planning Minister Rajiv Shukla told reporters in the capital February 5. “The facility will provide a major boost to the country’s tourism sector. This is historic,” Mr Shukla said. Visitors from countries which account for the bulk of India’s tourists – such as the United States, Britain and France – will be among those to benefit from the changes to regulations, and will no longer have to go through the time-consuming process of applying in person. Citizens from eight countries including Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka and Iraq have not been included in the changes for security reasons. A meeting of top foreign ministry, tourism and other government officials February 5 cleared the way for the changes, which were also recently approved by the India’s intelligence agencies. The changes were first mooted last October, although for 40 countries only. The government hopes to have the necessary infrastructure in place, including at the country’s airports, by October in time for the start of the peak tourist season, local media reported on 6 Feb . India currently issues visas on arrival to visitors from 11 foreign nations, including Japan, Finland and Indonesia. Despite its cultural attractions, beaches and mountains, India attracts relatively few foreign holidaymakers – 6.58 million in 2012, which was about a quarter of Thailand or Malaysia. India tightened entry restrictions in 2009 in the wake of revelations that David Headley, a foreign militant who helped plot the 2008 attacks in Mumbai, regularly stayed in India on longterm tourist visas. – AFP

Russell E. Train Education for Nature Program (EFN)
WWF is offering the best and brightest future conservation leaders from Myanmar the opportunity to pursue graduatelevel study (Master’s and PhD’s) and short-term training in conservation anywhere in the world. Fellowships: Priority will be given to candidates working on integrated spatial planning and management; species such as Asian elephants and Irrawaddy dolphins; reducing wildlife crime; sustainable forestry; integrated river basin management; protected area management, and green economy principles. EFN supports up to two years of studies for a maximum of $30,000 per year. Eligibility Criteria • You must be a citizen and legal permanent resident of Myanmar. • You must have at least two years of work experience in conservation (paid or unpaid) and a demonstrated commitment to working in Myanmar. • Your research should be focused on one of the topics listed above. • You must be enrolled in, admitted to, or have applied to a master’s or PhD program. • You must plan to begin your studies no later than January 2015. • You must commit to working for at least two years in your home country after the completion of your degree. Applicants can access the online application at: www.worldwildlife.org/efn. And may email questions to efn@wwfus.org. Application deadline for fellowships: February 28, 2014. Applications submitted after this date will not be considered. Professional development grants are open all year around.

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NonthAburi

International World 41

IN PICTURES
PHOTO: AFP

A Thai farmer waves a national flag next to a tractor during protests at the Commerce Ministry in Nonthaburi province on February 6 over delayed payments for rice pledged under a controversial government scheme. The populist initiative, which paid farmers above market rates for rice, has prompted anger among anti-government protesters who say it has engendered widespread graft, damaged Thai public finances and dislodged the kingdom from its position as the world’s top rice exporter. Disrupted elections on February 1 failed to ease the pressure on Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, with experts saying a series of legal moves – including one over the rice policy – threaten to erode her authority and potentially bring down her government.

LONDON

China drives Asian defence spending, but is ‘decades’ behind US
CHINA’S growing military might is forcing its neighbours to ramp up their defence spending but it will be decades before it rivals the United States as a military superpower, a UK think tank has reported. Chinese military spending might match that of the US by the 2030s, the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) said February 5 as it launched its annual study of global military capabilities and defence economics. However, China’s capabilities, expertise and ability to project power to the same level will take several more years to catch up, the institute’s experts said at their London headquarters. the rapid pace of capability development and the potential for accidental conflict and escalation will continue to be of concern.” The experts said that even when Beijing’s military spending catches up with Washington’s, it will take decades after that for its capabilities to match the United States. Furthermore, Western powers may be able to retain their skills and abilities with smaller forces, which would push any crossover date further into the future. Giri Rajendran, research associate for defence and economics, said that assuming China can maintain its current economic growth rates, it may be able to match US spending in the “mid to late 2030s”. “Even if they start ramping up to a rough parity in the late 2030s, it will still be 20 to 30 years before you start approaching military parity,” he said. The United States remained by far the world’s biggest defence spenders in 2013, with a budget of US$600.4 billion, the report said, followed by China ($112.2 billion) and Russia ($68.2 billion). Japan was seventh ($51 billion), India ninth ($36.3 billion) and South Korea 11th ($31.8 billion). Christian Le Miere, the IISS naval forces and maritime security expert, said, “Territorial disputes, specifically maritime disputes, are certainly a driver of increasingly competitive military procurement in Asia. “While they are the focus of many security concerns in Asia, they could more theoretically be seen as an outlet for the tensions being created by the rise of China.” The IISS said tensions between China and Japan had risen substantially and they needed military-to-military consultations to reduce the risk of tactical encounters or a strategic crisis. Land warfare expert Ben Barry said the rise of Chinese military power “should not be seen as wholly negative”, given they were playing a growing role in UN peacekeeping operations and took part in the international anti-piracy mission in the Indian Ocean. – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
Marriott Worldwide Corporation, a company incorporated in Maryland (USA), of 10400 Fernwood Road, Bethesda, Maryland (USA), is the Owner of the following Trade Mark:-

‘Territorial disputes are certainly a driver of increasingly competitive military procurement in Asia.’
Christian Le Miere International Institute for Strategic Studies

Asian defence spending in 2013 was 11.6 percent higher than in 2010, in real terms, the IISS said. The largest absolute spending increases in the past year were in East Asia, with China, Japan and South Korea accounting for more than half. China now spends around three times as much as India on defence, and more than neighbours Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam combined. “These outlays are fuelling heightened military procurement in a region replete with conflicting territorial claims as well as long-standing potential flashpoints,” IISS director-general John Chipman said. “Not least because of the Asia-Pacific’s central place in the global economy,

Reg. No. 10757/2013 in respect of “Class 35: Business management services relating to hotels, restaurants, night clubs, bars, spas, recreational and fitness facilities, retail stores, condominiums, apartment buildings, and meeting facilities for others; business center services; business administration services; business meeting planning services; retailing services relating to the sale of articles and equipment for household purposes namely clothing, footwear, headgear, linens, bedding products, interior furnishings, bathroom furnishings, toiletries, cosmetics, fitness and exercise equipment, toys, plush toys, musical recordings, cd’s, videos, stationery, printed matter, umbrellas, leather goods; advertising services; sales promotion for others; office machines and equipment rental; commercial and industrial management assistance; organisation of trade fairs for commercial or advertising purposes; business management consultation; business management in relation to franchise services; business management assistance; business management of hotels and advisory services for business management. Class 41: Providing entertainment, sporting and cultural activities; arranging conferences and organizing exhibitions for cultural and educational purposes; casino services; gaming services;

cabaret services; nightclub services; arranging for tickets and reservations for shows and other entertainment events; health and fitness club services, namely, providing services, facilities, instruction and equipment in the fields of fitness and physical exercise; providing services, facilities, instruction and equipment in the fields of tennis, recreational activities, bicycling, horseback riding, skiing, beach access and social functions; golf club, golf course and golf instruction services; wedding planning services; event planning and management services; education; providing of training; entertainment; amusement parks; sport camp services; rental of sports equipment (except vehicles); providing sports facilities; health club services (golf); arranging and organisation of conferences; organisation of exhibitions for cultural or educational purposes; providing facilities for recreation activities; providing swimming pools; providing facilities for water sports; providing tennis facilities; night club. Class 43: Temporary accommodation; services for providing food and drink; hotel services; restaurant, catering, bar and lounge services; resort lodging services; provision of general-purpose facilities for meetings, conferences and exhibitions; provision of banquet and social function facilities for special occasions; and reservations services for hotel accommodations for others”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Mark will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A.,H.G.P.,D.B.L. for Marriott Worldwide Corporation P.O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 10 February 2014

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BANGUI

International World 43

Lynching in Central African Republic highlights ‘horror still unfolding’
THE military ceremony was meant to be a fresh beginning, an army being reconstituted after months of bloodshed, in front of a new interim president who declared how proud she was of the nation’s soldiers. But moments after the ceremony on February 5 ended, the past returned with vengeance. A group of uniformed soldiers, witnesses said, spotted a man in the crowd who they suspected was a former rebel. They grabbed him and stripped off his clothes. Within seconds, he was stabbed to death with knives and machetes. One soldier stomped on his face; another dropped a huge slab of rock on his head. They chopped off one of his legs, the other foot and a hand. The soldiers dragged the corpse onto a busy avenue, as African peacekeepers watched. Then, the soldiers grabbed tires from a nearby repair shop, threw them on the corpse and set it on fire. Then they posed for pictures, smiling with the burned corpse. Many bystanders approved of the man’s brutal end. Revenge had become part of their society’s fabric. “We think it was okay that the soldiers killed him,” said Junior Mazongo, 27, an employee at the tire repair shop. “In Africa, you take my eye, and I will take yours. You take my arm, and I will take yours.” The lynching was the latest disturbing sign of how far the Central African Republic, one of the world’s poorest countries, has disintegrated into a spiral of atrocities. The Seleka rebels seized power in a military coup in March, and since then, thousands Peter Bouckaert, emergencies director for Human Rights Watch, arrived shortly after the man was killed. He said the African soldiers were there but did nothing. A short while later, French soldiers arrived. “The body was completely on fire,” Mr Bouckaert said. “People were taking photos, kids were standing around watching. The French troops walked up to the body and told people to back away.” “Then, a woman came up to me and said, ‘We’ll eat him after he is cooked,’” Mr Bouckaert said. “And then this guy walks up with the man’s leg. The soldiers just gasped. They are like, ‘Put it down,’ so he throws it into the fire, and he leaves. They just let him leave.” Afterward, local Red Cross workers came and carried away the remains. Within moments, traffic returned to the avenue, as the sidewalk craftsmen and employees of the tire repair shop went back to work. The only evidence of the lynching was the charred black patch on the road. Many of the soldiers involved in the killing could be identified in photos. Mr Bouckaert said it was essential for Samba-Panza to condemn this “act of barbarity” and hold the perpetrators accountable. “This was a beautiful moment this morning,” Mr Bouckaert said. “It was a moment of hope that suddenly turned into a moment of absolute horror once again. I have been here this time for two weeks, and I have seen five lynchings, or attempted lynchings. It’s not calming down. The horror is still unfolding.” – Washington Post

A soldier puts his knife away after taking part in the lynching of a man suspected of being a former Seleka rebel. Photo: AFP

of civilians have been killed and displaced as clashes between the mostly Muslim rebels and Christian militias have engulfed this Christian-majority nation. Last month, rebel leader Michel Djotodia resigned after pressure from regional countries in a bid to bring peace, and an interim president, Catherine Samba-Panza, filled his position. But those efforts have failed to stop the violence. Today, some 6500 French and African peacekeepers are struggling to stem the brutalities.

The violence also unveiled the tense environment in the capital. Even as the peacekeepers patrol the streets of Bangui and traffic has returned to normal in many areas, pockets of insecurity prevail. Sporadic gunfire explodes during the day. Muslim areas are still being looted; the streets are empty by sundown. Nevertheless, the military ceremony was imbued with a sense of optimism. Ms Samba-Panza pledged to secure most of the country “within a month” and vowed to go after anyone

who fomented instability. “At a certain point, everyone will be held responsible for their acts,” she said in her address to the roughly 4000 officers and soldiers. “I am warning troublemakers who continue to sow disorder in the country.” Shortly after Ms Samba-Panza left, the soldiers targeted the alleged former rebel. It was unclear whether he was a Muslim or Christian, but many witnesses suspected he was a Muslim because of his alleged ties to the rebels.

SYDNEY

Australia ‘gifts’ Malaysia custom boats
THE Australian government is to give Malaysia two customs boats as a gift, part of a strategy to tackle peoplesmuggling in the region. Most asylum-seeker boats bound for Australia make the precarious journey from Indonesia, but Malaysia is sometimes used as a transit country to transport people through the ThaiMalay border to Sumatra across the Malacca Strait. The Bay Class vessels, which Australia is phasing out, will be handed over in mid-2015 with Immigration Minister Scott Morrison calling it a “practical operational strategy to stem this criminal trade”. Mr Morrison last year said a critical plank of the government’s policy was to disrupt asylum-seekers crossing the Thai-Malay border and prevent their passage to Indonesia. “Malaysia is a key partner in regional and bilateral efforts against people-smuggling,” he said February 6. “These vessels will offer enhanced search and rescue and interception capacity to the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency’s border protection operations.” – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Kracie Home Products, Ltd. a jointstock company duly organized under the laws of Japan, Manufacturers and Merchants of 20-20, Kaigan 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trademarks:-

(Reg: Nos. IV/7696/2006 & IV/4756/2010)

(Reg: No. IV/3556/2010)

(Reg: No. IV/3557/2010)

(Reg: No. IV/3558/2010) the above four trademarks are in respect of : “Soaps; perfumery; essential oils, cosmetics, hair lotions, dentifrices” – Class: 3 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademarks or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Kracie Home Products, Ltd. P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416

Dated: 10th February, 2014

44 World International
SEOUL

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

X Box technology used to guard sensitive Korean border zone
SOFTWARE designed for Microsoft’s popular X Box games console has morphed from virtual shooter gaming to the real-life challenge of guarding the world’s last Cold War border. The movement-recognition Kinect software behind a sensor that allows hands-free play on the Xbox, is the basis for a security device now deployed along the demilitarised zone (DMZ) that separates North and South Korea, after being adapted by a South Korean programmer. Four kilometres (2.5 miles) wide and 248km (155 miles) long, the DMZ is a depopulated no-man’s-land of heavily fortified fences that bristles with the landmines and listening posts of two nations that technically remain at war. As a military buffer zone, it remains an area of profound Cold War hostility, but its man-made isolation has also created an accidental wildlife park recognised as one of the best-preserved habitats on Earth. The Kinect-based software developed by Ko Jae-Kwan, founder-president of Saewan Co., has been taken up by the military because of its ability to differentiate between human and animal movement. Mr Ko, 39, said his device could DMZ since August last year, he added. “Such devices are established as part of our project to strengthen surveillance with scientific equipment, but we cannot provide details for security reasons,” a defence ministry official said on condition of anonymity. Despite all the security measures in place along the DMZ, there have been highly publicised incidents of undetected crossings. Five South Korean generals and nine mid-level officers were removed from their posts or disciplined in 2012 after a defecting North Korean soldier simply walked undetected across the border and knocked on the door of a guard post. The security lapse was all the more embarrassing as it came at a time of surging military tensions when the South Korean army was supposedly on high alert. Mr Ko said he planned to update the existing Kinect-based sensors to a version capable of detecting heart rates and reading body temperature, features that Microsoft added to the Xbox One version of the console released last year. “For its price,” he said “the device is very accurate and effective in covering vulnerable areas.” – AFP

A South Korean soldier keeps vigil at an observation point on the southern side of the demilitarized zone (DMZ) that separates South and North Korea. Photo: AFP

detect the sound, movement and direction of anybody attempting to cross the DMZ and immediately alert South Korean border guards.

“Existing sensors, which had been in place along the border, were highly efficient but could not tell the difference between humans and

animals, sending wrong signals frequently,” Mr Ko said. The new sensors have been in place along certain sections of the

TRADE MARK CAUTION
Wizard Co., Inc., a Company incorporated in the State of Delaware in United States of America, of 6 Sylvan Way, Parsippany, New Jersey 07054, U.S.A., is the Owner of the following Trade Marks:-

Reg. No. 9739/2013

AVIS

Reg. No. 9740/2013

Reg. No. 9741/2013 in respect of “Int’l Class 9 : Electrical and scientific apparatus; computer software for use in vehicle rental offices used to track reservations and vehicles, and maintaining data concerning vehicles, customers, and rentals; computer software related to vehicle rentals, recorded; downloadable software in the nature of a mobile application for vehicle rental or leasing services; global positioning system (GPS); interactive computer kiosks comprising computers, computer hardware, computer peripherals, and computer operating software, for use in vehicle rentals or leasing services; navigation apparatus for vehicles; satellite radios; telecommunications and data networking hardware, namely, devices for transporting and aggregating voice, data, and video communications across multiple network infrastructures and communications protocols. Int’l Class 12 : Vehicles; automobiles; motor buses; buses and structural parts therefor; license plate frames; motor vehicles, namely, automobiles, trucks, vans, sport utility vehicles and structural parts therefor; trailers. Int’l Class 16 : Paper goods and printed matter; booklets in the field of travel, vehicle rental, transportation; calendars; magazines featuring featuring travel; pens; tourist brochure; travel books; maps; printed forms; printed matter, namely, paper signs, books, manuals, curriculum, newsletters, informational cards and brochures in the field of travel, vehicle rental, and transportation. Int’l Class 35 : Advertising and business services; business administration in the field of transport and delivery; customer loyalty services and customer club services, for commercial, promotional and/or advertising purposes; offering business management assistance in

the establishment and/or operation of vehicle rental and leasing facilities; on-line retail store services featuring motor vehicles; providing incentive award programs for customers through issuance and processing of loyalty points for on-line purchase of company’s goods and services; providing incentive award programs for customers through the issuance and processing of loyalty coupons for frequent use of participating businesses; providing public sector contract vehicle management; providing transportation documentation for others; transportation management services, namely, planning and coordinating transportation of people for others. Int’l Class 36 : Financial services; providing vouchers for payment of transportation expenses. Int’l Class 37: Repair services; emergency roadside assistance services, namely, responding to calls for roadside assistance, flat tire changing, emergency fuel supplying, and battery jump starting. Int’l Class 39: Transportation and storage services; arranging travel tours; bus transport; car rental; car transport; chauffeur services; coordinating travel arrangements for individuals and for groups; emergency roadside assistance services, namely, towing, winch-out and key delivery services; leasing of automobiles; leasing of cars; leasing of trucks; leasing of vehicles; making reservations and bookings for transportation; online transportation reservation services; passenger transport; providing an on-line searchable computer database featuring information on travel; Provision of travel information; rental car reservation; rental of moving vans; rental of GPS equipment for navigational purposes; rental of trucks; rental of vehicles; transport of travellers; transportation consulting; transportation information; travel agency services, namely, making reservations and bookings for transportation; transportation reservation services; travel clubs; travel route planning; vehicle driving services. Int’l Class 41: Education and entertainment; membership club services. Int’l Class 42 : Computer and scientific; providing a web site featuring technology that enables users to book travel”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Marks will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A.,H.G.P.,D.B.L. for Wizard Co., Inc. P.O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 10 February 2014

MORELIA

Grim warning found with severed heads
A CHILLING note was found alongside the severed heads and dismembered bodies of four people in the Mexican state of Michoacan where vigilantes are battling a drug cartel, authorities have said. The heads were placed on top of plastic bags on a street in the town of Zacapu, an official in the Michoacan state prosecutor’s office said on February 6. The arms and legs were found near a church. A note was left near the body parts, reading, “This is what will happen to those who support the Knights Templar” cartel. The victims have been identified and authorities are trying to determine whether they are linked to organised crime, the official said. Alfredo Castillo, a central government official assigned to address the violence in Michoacan, said an alleged local leader of the Knights Templar was arrested early on February 6. He was identified as Candido Perez Garcia and allegedly collected extortion payments. He was found with an AK-47 assault rifle, a pistol and a cache of synthetic drugs. The previous weekend, two decapitated heads were left in the town of Antunez. The Knights Templar have been locked in a turf war with the Jalisco New Generation drug cartel. Last year, civilians fed up with the police’s failure to deal with the Knights Templar gang began to form vigilante militias to oust the criminals from the region. The government of President Enrique Pena Nieto has deployed thousands of federal police and troops to Michoacan, seeking to restore security, but violence has continued. – AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
IP Holdings Limited, a Company incorporated in The Cayman Islands, of C/O Maples Corporate Services Limited of P.O. Box 309, Ugland Houses, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman Islands, is the Owner of the following Trade Marks:-

thegoldenlane
Reg. No. 11621/2013

thegoldenpath
Reg. No. 11622/2013

sanda
Reg. No. 11623/2013 in respect of “Class 9: Scientific, nautical, surveying, photographic, cinematographic, optical, weighing, measuring, signaling, checking(supervision), lifesaving and teaching apparatus and instruments; apparatus and instruments for conducting, switching, transforming, accumulating, regulating or controlling electricity; apparatus for recording, transmission or reproduction of sound or images; magnetic data carriers, recording discs; automatic vending machines and mechanisms for coin-operated apparatus; cash registers, calculating machines, data processing equipment and computers; fire-extinguishing apparatus; Electrical and electronic telecommunications, telephonic and communications apparatus and instruments; data communication apparatus and instruments; apparatus and instruments for the processing, transmission, storage, logging, reception and retrieval of data being in the form of encoded data, text, audio, graphic images or video or a combination of these formats; image processing apparatus, instruments and equipment; photographic apparatus; modems; encoded cards; smart cards; holograms; media for storing information, data, images and sound; blank and pre-recorded magnetic cards; smart cards; cards containing microprocessors; integrated circuit cards; electronic identification cards; telephone cards; telephone credit cards; credit cards; debit cards; cards for electronic games designed for use with telephones; magnetic, digital and optical data carriers; magnetic, digital and optical data recording and storage media (blank and pre-recorded); electronic publications(downloadable) provided on-line from computer databases, the Internet or other electronic network; satellite receiving and transmission apparatus and instruments; apparatus for downloading audio, video and data from the Internet; adapters for use with telecommunications and communications apparatus and instruments; radio telephones, mobile and fixed telephones; apparatus for access to broadcast or transmitted programmes. Class 16: Paper, cardboard and goods made from these materials, not included in other classes; printed matter; bookbinding material; photographs; stationery; adhesives for stationery; or household purposes; artists’ materials; paint brushes; typewriters and office requisites (except furniture); instructional and teaching material (except apparatus); plastic materials for packaging (not

included in other classes); printers’ type; printing blocks; magazines (periodicals), commercial directories in a form of paper; Booklets; books; Credit card imprinters, non-electric; Drawing boards; Envelopes [stationery]; Forms, printed; Manuals [handbooks]; Maps (Geographical --- ); Postcards; Printed matter; Newsletters; Newspapers; Publications (Printed --- ); Signboards of paper or cardboard; Periodicals. Class 35: Advertising; business management; business administration; office functions; compilation of directories for publication on computer databases, the Internet or other electronic network; provision of information and advice on the supplying and promoting of the selection and display of goods; provision of promotional information on the supply of goods in the fields of telecommunications; retail services in the field of telecommunications and multimedia goods; the bringing together, for the benefit of others, of a variety of goods in the field of telecommunications and multimedia, enabling customers to conveniently view and purchase those goods, including such services provided on-line from a computer database, the Internet or other electronic networks; arranging and conducting of exhibitions for business purposes; business promotion, research, management, administration, assistance and information services; business strategy and planning services; provision of trade information; provision of directory services; telephone answering for others; providing commercial directory information; Business management consultancy; Commercial administration of the licensing of the goods and services of others; Commercial information agencies; On-line advertising on a computer network; Organization of exhibitions for commercial or advertising purposes; Organization of trade fairs for commercial or advertising purposes; Outdoor advertising; Telephone answering for unavailable subscribers; Telecommunication services (Arranging subscriptions to --- ) for others; Rental of advertising time on communication media; Commercial information and advice for consumers [consumer advice shop]; Computer databases (Compilation of information into --- ); Computer databases (Systemization of information into --- ); information and advisory services relating to the aforesaid services. Class 36: Insurance; financial affairs; monetary affairs; real estate affairs. Insurance; financial affairs; monetary affairs; real estate affairs. Banking services including home, Internet and remote banking; insurance and finance services including such services provided over the Internet or any other electronic network, discount services including discount card services; issue and redemption of tokens, vouchers and points; credit card services; charge card services; provision of electronic payment services including electronic fund transfer services and on-line transaction facilities; administration of funds and investments; provision of information and advisory services relating to monetary affairs and the aforementioned services including the provision of information from a computer database, the Internet or other electronic network; financing and guarantee services relating to telecommunications and communications apparatus and instruments; guarantee services relating to telecommunications and communications apparatus and instruments; provision of electronic payment services including electronic fund transfer services and online transaction facilities. Class

37: repair and maintenance of telecommunications and communications apparatus and instruments; provision of information, advisory services, consultation services, and assistance relating to the aforementioned services including the provision of such services on-line from a computer database, the Internet or other electronic network. Class 38: Telecommunication, mobile and fixed telecommunication, and satellite, cellular, and radio communication services; hire, leasing and rental of telecommunications, telephonic and communications apparatus and instruments; communication of information (including web pages), data by radio, telecommunications and by satellite; telephone, mobile telephone, message collection and transmission, radio-paging, call diversion, directory enquiries and electronic mail services; transmission, delivery and reception of sound, data, images, music and information broadcast or transmission of radio or television programmes; messaging services, namely, sending, receiving and forwarding messages in the form of text, audio, graphic images or video or a combination of these formats; unified messaging services; voicemail services; video conferencing services; video telephone services; providing telecommunications connections to computer databases, the Internet or other electronic networks; providing access to digital audio, video and data websites from a database, the Internet, or other electronic network; delivery of audio, video and data by telecommunications; telecommunication and communication database services, namely enabling the consumer to download digital content from a network and server to an individual database. Class 41: Education; providing of training; entertainment; sporting and cultural activities; education and training including such services provided on-line from a computer, the Internet or other electronic network; providing games; providing on-line electronic publications; publication of electronic books and journals on-line; radio and television entertainment services including those provided on-line from a computer, the Internet or other electronic network; sporting and cultural activities; exhibition services in relation to education, entertainment and training purposes; arranging and conducting of conferences, seminars, symposia, tutorials and workshops; interactive and distance learning courses and sessions provided on-line via a telecommunications link or computer network or provided by other means; electronic library services for the supply of electronic information (including archive information) in the form of text, audio and/or video information; providing digital music (not downloadable) from a computer database, the Internet or other electronic network; provision of information and advice relating to all the aforementioned services”. Fraudulent imitation or unauthorised use of the said Trade Marks will be dealt with according to law. Win Mu Tin, M.A., H.G.P., D.B.L. for IP Holdings Limited P. O. Box 60, Yangon E-mail: makhinkyi.law@mptmail.net.mm Dated: 10 February 2014

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Kracie Home Products, Ltd. a company organized under the laws of Japan and having its principal office at 20-20, Kaigan 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo, JAPAN is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademarks:-

46 World International
WASHINGTON

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2014

(Reg: No. IV/8889/2013) In respect of: - “Soaps; perfumery, essential oils, cosmetics, hair lotions; dentifrices.” Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademarks or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Kracie Home Products, Ltd. P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416 Dated: 10th February, 2014

Foreign investors eye Iran despite US warnings
INTERNATIONAL firms are jockeying to be “first in line” to do business with Iran once sanctions are loosened, despite US warnings that even preliminary trade deals risk weakening the West’s economic leverage over Tehran’s nuclear program. A French delegation of more than 100 potential investors began a threeday visit to Iran on February 3, the largest European business delegation to visit Iran in more than 30 years. The trip is the latest in a parade of trade delegations visiting Iran long before a hoped-for deal to permanently curb Iran’s disputed nuclear program is complete. The United States has lobbied other nations not to undermine talks that begin in earnest this month, or prejudge the outcome, by welcoming one of the world’s foremost oil producers back to the international marketplace after several years as a near-pariah. However US State Department and Treasury officials conceded on February 4 that other countries are not accepting the message. “As far as we have seen today, there are not deals getting done, but rather people getting first in line in the hope that someday there will be a deal,” Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The French delegation included executives from some of France’s biggest companies, including Total, Lafarge and Peugeot. Delegations from the Netherlands, Germany, Italy, South Korea and other countries have made similar trips since Iran and six world powers talks turn into something more, if these talks turn into deals that violate the elaborate sanctions that remain in place, that we will take action,” Mr Cohen said. A final deal with Iran would allow for removal of banking and oil sanctions applied over a decade of a diplomatic standoff. Firms from other foreign countries stand to benefit far more than any in the United States, since there are long-standing separate prohibitions on most US financial activity with Iran. “We have told them all that they are putting their reputations, themselves, and their business, [their] business enterprises, at risk if they jump the gun,” Ms Sherman said. However France’s finance minister brushed off US criticism of the trip. “It’s not about doing ‘business as usual’,” Pierre Moscovici told journalists at an entrepreneurs’ gathering in Paris, referring to an expression used by US Secretary of State John Kerry when he phoned his French counterpart Laurent Fabius to complain about the visit. “It seems to me that the signal given by this visit is exactly the opposite, which is to say, ‘Fulfil your obligations and, if one day that happens, things will go well.’” Mr Moscovici said. “One must definitely not take this as a sign of laxness or consent but as a bet on a future that rests on firmness and negotiation. “If one day Iran changed its attitude then there would be, we know, significant commercial and economic opportunities for all countries,” he added. – Washingon Post/AFP

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Aspen Global Incorporated a company organized under the laws of Mauritius and having its principal office at c/o Appleby Management (Mauritius) Limited, La Chaussee Street, Port Louis, Mauritius is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trademark:-

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani during an interview broadcast live on state television in Tehran on February 5. Photo: AFP

(Reg: No. IV/14932/2013) in respect of: - “Medicines and pharmaceutical preparations” – Class: 5 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Aspen Global Incorporated P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416

HEDEX

Dated: 10th February, 2014

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that Kracie Holdings Ltd. a company organized under the laws of Japan and having its principal office at 20-20, Kaigan 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan is the owner and sole proprietor of the following trademark:-

reached the landmark interim deal at the end of November. That agreement saw Iran suspend its most controversial uranium enrichment activity but continue lower-level enrichment. The United States and European Union lifted some sanctions on petrochemical products, insurance and precious metals, as well as the auto industry and parts and services for passenger planes. For now, Iran has obtained very limited easing of sanctions under a six-month placeholder deal. Companies or governments still risk heavy penalties under United Nations, US or European sanctions, Ms Sherman and Treasury Undersecretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence David Cohen said. “We are as crystal clear as possible in all of our engagements that if these

JUBA

Food crisis grows in South Sudan
THE UN’s food agency has launched an urgent appeal to raise US$77 million for South Sudan, threatened by a major food crisis as basic commodities run out. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said 3.7 million people “are now facing acute or emergency levels of food insecurity” and 7 million people “are at risk of some level of food insecurity in the world’s newest nation.” Thousands are believed to have been killed in South Sudan during fighting between forces loyal to President Salva Kiir and a loose coalition of army defectors and ethnic militia, and over 870,000 people have fled their homes in the last six weeks. “South Sudan was already the scene of one of the world’s largest humanitarian operations before the fighting began, and the situation is now deteriorating rapidly,” said Sue Lautze, FAO’s head of office in South Sudan. The agency said it was calling for US$77 million “for critical food security ... as prices of staple crops soar and basic commodities run out.” – AFP

(Reg: No. IV/4757/2010) in respect of : - “Bleaching preparations and other substances for laundry use; cleaning, polishing, scouring and abrasive preparations; soaps; perfumery, essential oils, cosmetics, hair lotions; dentifrices” - Int’l Class : 3 “Pharmaceutical and veterinary preparations; sanitary preparations for medical purposes; dietetic substances adapted for medical use, food for babies; plasters, materials for dressings; material for stopping teeth, dental wax; disinfectants; preparations for destroying vermin; fungicides, herbicides” – Int’l Class : 5 “Household or kitchen utensils and containers (not of precious metal or coated therewith); combs and sponges; brushes (except paint brushes); brush-making materials; articles for cleaning purposes; steelwool; unworked or semi-worked glass (except glass used in building); glassware, porcelain and earthenware not included in other classes” - Int’l Class: 21 “Meat, fish, poultry and game; meat extracts; preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables; jellies, jams, compotes; eggs, milk and milk products; edible oils and fats, food supplements not for medical use, as far as included in this class” - Int’l Class: 29 “Coffee, tea, cocoa, sugar, rice, tapioca, sago, artificial coffee; flour and preparations made from cereals, bread, pastry and confectionery ices; honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder; salt, mustard; vinegar, sauces (condiments); spices; ice, food supplements not for medical use, as far as included in this class” – Int’l Class : 30 “Beers; mineral and aerated waters and other non-alcoholic drinks; fruit drinks and fruit juices; syrups and other preparations for making beverages” – Int’l Class: 32 Any fraudulent imitation or unauthorized use of the said trademark or other infringements whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. U Kyi Win Associates for Kracie Holdings Ltd. P.O. Box No. 26, Yangon. Phone: 372416

Dated: 10th February, 2014

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New YorK

International World 47

TRADE MARK CAUTION
NOTICE is hereby given that ESPRIT INTERNATIONAL, a company organized and existing under the laws of the State of California, United States of America, with offices at 1370 Broadway, 16th Floor, New York, new York 10018, United States of America, is the Owner and Sole Proprietor of the following trade mark(s):

New leading role for Marvel’s super heroines
US comic creator Marvel has launched a series of female character revamps aimed at increasing its fanbase among women and girls. The publisher debuted its reboot of Ms. Marvel — in which she’s introduced as a Muslim-American teenager from Jersey City, NJ — on February 5. The move came as part of a broader women’s initiative that the publisher is calling “Characters and Creators”. Black Widow, Elektra and She-Hulk will also be spotlighted in their own books, and X-Men and Captain Marvel will see a new emphasis on women. The “Characters and Creators” initiative aims to speak directly to an audience that long was not the target for superhero comic books in America: women and girls. Axel Alonso, Marvel’s editor-inchief, says that the stars of these new books “are not the big-breasted, scantily clad women that perhaps have become the comic-book cliché. They are women with rich interior lives, interesting careers and complicated families who are defined by many things least of all their looks.” But is Mr Alonso worried about scaring off the traditional male readership associated with comic books? “What people want are heroes,” insists Mr Alonso from Marvel’s New York offices. “They want fascinating stories with compelling characters, regardless of gender.” Jeanine Schaefer, who edits the new, all-female X-Men, agrees. “There’s this fear that the men who have traditionally been our fan base

(1)

EDC

The said Trade Mark consists of the English word “EDC” in ordinary block letters. The above Trade Mark is used in respect of the following description of goods, that is to say: Class 18: Leather and imitations of leather, and goods made of these materials and not included in other classes; animal skins, hides; handbags, trunks and travelling bags; carrying cases; garment bags; shoe bags; backpacks; sports bags; gym bags; knapsacks; rucksacks; shoulder bags; duffel bags; tote bags; shopping bags; bags for campers and climbers; school bags; belt bags; beach bags; luggage; luggage tags; valises; attaché cases; billfolds; pouches, wallets, purses; briefcases; lunch bags; fanny packs; waist bags; cosmetic bags and cases; toiletry bags and cases; key cases; umbrellas, parasols and walking sticks; whips, harness and saddlery; all included in Class 18.

(2)

ESPRIT

Ms. Marvel is just one of Marvels many new female characters. Photo: Marvel

‘[These] are not the big-breasted, scantily clad women [of ] comic-book cliché. They are women with rich interior lives, interesting careers.’
Axel Alonso Marvel editor-in-chief

will stop reading if we bring in new voices,” Ms Schaefer said. “But we’re finding that that’s just not the case.” The proof is in the numbers, and in the case of the all-female X-Men series, the numbers are solid. The first book was released last May, and became Marvel’s top-selling comic that month. The comic book world, Mr Alonso asserts, is no longer a boys’ club. “While we don’t have any market research, the eyes don’t lie,” he tells us. “If you go to conventions and comic book stores, more and more female readers are emerging. They are starved for content and looking for content they can relate to.” So is this just about the bottom line?

Is there a group of dudes sitting around a table at Marvel, trying to come up with books they think female fans will want? “It’s easy for fans to think, ‘They’re just a bunch of guys doing what they think women want,’” Ms Schaefer said. But, she added, “It’s not about publicity or trying to jump on the bandwagon.” She says for many other women editors, writers and artists, these female-led books are “a labour of love.” “There are women here and there — always have been,” Ms Schaefer says of the comic-book world, both on the creative side and within the fan base. “And we’re trying to make our voices heard.” – AFP

The said Trade Mark consists of the English word “ESPRIT” in ordinary block letters. The above Trade Mark is used in respect of the following description of goods, that is to say: Class 18: Leather and imitations of leather, and goods made of these materials and not included in other classes; animal skins, hides; handbags, trunks and travelling bags; carrying cases; garment bags; shoe bags; backpacks; sports bags; gym bags; knapsacks; rucksacks; shoulder bags; duffel bags; tote bags; shopping bags; bags for campers and climbers; school bags; belt bags; beach bags; luggage; luggage tags; valises; attaché cases; billfolds; pouches, wallets, purses; briefcases; lunch bags; fanny packs; waist bags; cosmetic bags and cases; toiletry bags and cases; key cases; umbrellas, parasols and walking sticks; whips, harness and saddlery; all included in Class 18. Class 25: Clothing, footwear and headgear; clothing for men, women and children; outer clothing; formal wear; casual wear; leisure wear; sportswear; waterproof wear; rainwear; suits, waistcoats, coats, overcoats, parkas, jackets, vests, windbreakers, tops for wear, blouses, shirts, t-shirts, polo shirts, sweatshirts, sport shirts, golf shirts, rugby shirts, tunics, camisoles, jogging suits, snow suits, knitwear, jerseys (clothing), sweaters, pullovers, cardigans, trousers, jeans, pants, slacks, sweat pants, shorts, dresses, skirts, culottes, socks, leggings, stockings, tights; sleepwear, pyjamas, nightshirts, nightgowns, dressing gowns; bathrobes; swim wear, bathing suits, bathing trunks, bathing drawers, beach clothes; hosiery; women’s lingerie, brassieres, panties, slips; underwear; costume; uniforms; smocks; scarves, pelerines, shawls; hats, caps, toques, sunvisors; ear-muffs; neckties; gloves (clothing); belts (clothing); sweat bands, headbands (clothing), wristbands; trouser straps; footwear for ordinary use and for use in sport, boots, sneakers, loafers, shoes, leisure shoes, sandals, slippers; shoes and footwear for golf; all included in Class 25.

(3)
The said Trade Mark consists of the English word “ESPRIT” in stylized. The above Trade Mark is used in respect of the following description of goods, that is to say: Class 18: Leather and imitations of leather, and goods made of these materials and not included in other classes; animal skins, hides; handbags, trunks and travelling bags; carrying cases; garment bags; shoe bags; backpacks; sports bags; gym bags; knapsacks; rucksacks; shoulder bags; duffel bags; tote bags; shopping bags; bags for campers and climbers; school bags; belt bags; beach bags; luggage; luggage tags; valises; attaché cases; billfolds; pouches, wallets, purses; briefcases; lunch bags; fanny packs; waist bags; cosmetic bags and cases; toiletry bags and cases; key cases; umbrellas, parasols and walking sticks; whips, harness and saddlery; all included in Class 18. manufactured, imported, sold by or on behalf of ESPRIT INTERNATIONAL in the Union of Myanmar. That a Declaration of Ownership in respect of the said Trade Mark(s) have been registered in the Office of the Sub-Registrar, Yangon, on the 19th day of June, for 2013 under Registration Nos. IV/5828/2013, IV/5829/2013 and IV/5830/2013. WARNING is hereby given that any fraudulent imitation, unauthorised or improper use of the said Trade Mark(s) or other infringement of the rights of ESPRIT INTERNATIONAL in any manner whatsoever will be dealt with according to law. Dated this 10th day of February, 2014. U Kyi Win Associates for ESPRIT INTERNATIONAL 53-55 Maha Bandoola Garden Street, Yangon

the pulse editor: WHITNEY LIGHT

light.whitney@gmail.com

THE MYANMAR TIMES february 10 - 16, 2014

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GE T

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GERS O FIN N

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GRAVE SECRETS
OF YANGON’S IMPERIAL TOMB

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BY AMaUrY LOrin

YO

HILE visiting Yangon on January 25, 2012, Asif Ali Zardari, the president of Pakistan, insisted on visiting a very special monument, where he laid a floral wreath: the mausoleum of Bahadur Shah Zafar, commonly called Zafar (“Victory”), the last Mughal Emperor of India, who ruled from 1837-1857. The president also gave a US$50,000 cheque to the mausoleum’s caretaker. He wrote in the visitors’ book: “I pay my tribute to Bahadur Shah Zafar, the last Emperor of the great Mughals, who saw the sun set on a majestic era, but never lost patience, never abandoned grace and never ceased being a mystical poet.” Why was this visit two years ago so important to the president of Pakistan? Born in 1775 into the prestigious imperial Timurid dynasty (a Sunni Muslim Persianate dynasty of TurcoMongol lineage), a famous Urdu poet, a devout patron and a refined calligrapher, Zafar became the Mughal Emperor at the late age of 62

when his father died on September 28, 1837. But he ruled as a puppet king; he never took much interest in public affairs. Rarely in history have poets made great generals. Then, in 1857, came the first revolt of the Indians against the British occupation. Known as the Sepoy Mutiny, historians consider it the most important anti-colonial revolt of any launched against a European empire in the 19th century. Zafar found himself with part of his family exiled to Rangoon in Britishcontrolled Burma. Zafar publicly supported the rebellion almost in spite of himself. Against his will, Sepoys – ­­ native peasant-soldiers enrolled in the East India Company – made him their commander-in-chief, because they saw him as the only leader who could unite all Indians, Hindu and Muslim. Despite his protests, Zafar was implicated in the killings of 52 Europeans. The British tried him for “treason” and “aiding rebels”, but in the eyes of the Indian nation Zafar became a heroic national freedom fighter. He was found guilty on all charges. Under these chaotic circumstances, the British would not compromise

with the Mughal rulers. They sought to take over the country, and within a year had created the British Raj (1858-1947). Zafar was not sentenced but exiled. He went with his wife, Empress Zeenat Mahal, and some

The former ruler’s departure from Delhi marked the end of a long era: the Mughal rule of the Indian sub-continent for more than three centuries, between the mid 16th and early 18th centuries. At its peak, the Mughal Muslim Empire, which

The British tried him for “treason” and “aiding rebels”, but in the eyes of the Indian nation he was a heroic freedom fighter.
remaining members of the imperial family, though most of them were killed post-haste in Delhi by the British Major William Hodson, who presented Zafar the decapitated heads of his three sons. originated in Persia, ruled about a quarter of the world’s population. Under it, the Indian economy remained prosperous. It had created a uniform currency and road system, unified the country and given rise to

great cities. The Taj Mahal, the Red Fort, the Agra Fort and Shalimar Gardens in Lahore are among the finest examples of monuments built by the Mughals, most of which are now UNESCO World Heritage sites. It had been a period of great intellectual and artistic excitement, to which Zafar himself greatly contributed. Zafar’s captors told him he would be shot “on the spot like a dog” if he attempted to escape. After five years of a very sad exile in colonial captivity, a wretched and frail Zafar died in Rangoon on November 7, 1862, at the age of 87, profoundly humiliated. Just before death he wrote, “Not to be heard, not a spirited song; I am the voice of anguish, a cry of colossal grief. […] Life comes to an end, dusk approaches; in peace I will sleep, sheltered by the grave.” Soon after, in 1876, Britain’s Queen Victoria was proclaimed Empress of India. Hastily, the British buried Zafar according to Islamic rites. Later, his wife and granddaughter, Raunaq Zamani, were buried alongside him. The British wanted Zafar’s tomb to be lost and forgotten, and hoped to leave no trace that could allow the body to be identified. Thus the exact

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the pulse 49

The British colonialists hoped the Last Mughal of India would be forgotten, but his tomb has become a bustling pilgrimage site for Myanmar’s Muslims
Tomb of Mughal Emperor Humayun, in Delhi. Zafar and his sons took refuge here during the Indian Rebellion of 1857. Photo: Wikimedia Commons This stone marks the grave of Bahadur Shah Zafar, in Ziwaca Street, Dagon township, Yangon. Photo: Amaury Lorin

Last Mughal Emperor of India, Bahadur Shah Zafar, under custody after being tried by the British, died in 1862 in Rangoon (Yangon). Photo: Rex/Universal History Archive

place of Zafar’s grave was unknown for almost a century, though Yangon’s Muslims knew for a long time that the Emperor was buried somewhere within a definite compound to the south of Shwedagon Pagoda. Grass had covered the spot, which was surrounded by a simple bamboo fence. On February 16, 1991, however, workers digging a drain for a new building stumbled upon the brick-lined tomb. It contained an inscription, and the body’s identity was quickly confirmed. To the excavators’ surprise, the almost intact skeleton of the Emperor was found wrapped in a silk shroud covered by floral petals only about three-anda-half feet (one meter) under the ground. The anonymous tomb, much larger than most, laid in a northsouth position. A mausoleum, Bahadur Shah Zafar’s “Dargah” (Sufi shrine), was built a couple of years later at the precise place of the grave. The current hall, dedicated to the memory of Zafar, was inaugurated on December 15, 1994 by Myanmar’s minister for religious affairs, with the assistance of the Government of

India and the presence of the Indian Ambassador. It’s been oft-visited ever since. Finding Zafar’s Dargah at 6 Ziwaca Street near U Wisara Road in Dagon township – south from the Shwedagon Pagoda – isn’t difficult and definitely a worthwhile excursion, especially on the weekend. It is still a very busy place of pilgrimage today, notably for Myanmar’s Muslims, who honour Zafar as an “emperor-saint”, Indians, and any visitor interested in the history of the Mughals and the British Raj. Beautiful prayers are daily said and sung in wide separate prayer rooms for men and women, who offer loads of flowers and fruits to their beloved emperor-saint. The walls of the two-storey mausoleum are covered with engraved marble plaques. Nine steps lead to a crypt, where men sing the Koran at the top of their lungs and play drums, swinging their bodies from right to left. A canteen welcomes the visitors under a mango tree in the entrance courtyard. The whole place is full of life. Zafar’s eventful life, of course, is not the only case of an exiled

monarch in the complex history of Burmese-Indian relations. In a strange irony, Thibaw, the last King of Burma (1878-1885), was exiled twentyseven years later in the opposite direction – from Burma to Ratnagiri, India, having suffered defeat in the Third Anglo-Burmese War and forced to abdicate the throne. He died there in 1916. For more on the subject of Zafar’s tragic destiny, William Dalrymple, a Scottish writer, has beautifully captured the story in his bestseller The Last Mughal. Calls to bring the last Mughal Emperor’s body back to India and make a special burial for him in Mehrauli, a village near Delhi where his father and grandfather are buried, have grown since 2007, the 150th anniversary of the Indian Sepoy
Amaury Lorin is a French Yangonbased historian, journalist and consultant. He is the author of Nouvelle histoire des colonisations européennes, XIXe-XXe siècles (France University Press, 2013) and the founder of Myanmar Challenge.

Mutiny. An active campaign started last year to have the remains returned, and an empty grave in a marble enclosure is ready to welcome him – a popular cause that accords with Zafar’s own last wish. Also, in 2009, a trust was launched in India to trace Zafar’s descendants. This is not the end of a story rich with unexpected developments.

Bahadur Shah Zafar, by Veena Gupta.

50 the pulse
Show Review What’s On

THE MYANMAR TIMES February 10 - 16, 2014

Polite revelry
Laneway Festival Singapore delivers an earnest, friendly atmosphere and a first-rate line-up of indie pop

E

JOhn Lichtefeld

NTERING its fourth year, the Singapore stop on the indie rock festival circuit known as St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival has begun to mimic the creative culture of its adopted hometown: friendly but hesitant, showy but sincere, and balanced precariously on the thin line between properly enthusiastic and nervously overeager. Laneway Singapore is well suited to a city currently working out its own artistic identity. The 2014 iteration of the touring Australian fest was held for a second year in the open expanse of the carefully maintained meadows at the Gardens by the Bay. While lacking the historical significance or architectural grandeur of its original residency in Fort Canning Park, the gardens’ rolling hills created a sort of natural amphitheatre, with the stage nestled at the base and festival amenities on the elevated periphery. Once inside the park, festival-goers were met with an immediate choice: to the left, and onto the grassy hillside populated by families, picnickers and the occasional hung-over expat; or to the right, and into the jammed crowd in front of the main stage. To be fair, among those who had pressed toward the very front were a sizable contingent of families, picnickers and hung-over expats outstretched on blankets in a fashion that would all-but-guarantee a trampling death at any other music festival. This being Singapore rather than Altamont, however, even the relative rowdies at the front were generally polite. The food and drink selections were decent if not particularly unique, although replacing Heineken with Stella was a marked improvement from previous years, and while the drink lines never posed much of a challenge, around dinner time the food carts were overwhelmed by hour-long queues. The line-up for the day was spread

James Blake. Photo: John Lichtefeld

across three stages, two of which were halves of a massive main stage, with a third, smaller dance stage tucked several hundred metres away in a separate area of the park. While the majority of the big names were hosted on the main stage, several of the more anticipated acts, including Jamie XX and Mount Kimbie, were relegated to the dance-oriented “Cloud Stage”. Making the hike between the two areas took only a few minutes, though finding a suitable vantage point required a bit of planning and early movement. Vance Joy, the earnest young Australians chosen to open the festivities, eased the crowd into the day with some light alt-county before turning over the reins to the livelier and more challenging art-rockers Youth Lagoon. This kind of juxtaposition of lighter, pop-oriented musicians against heavier, experimental artists would repeat several times to mixed results. Of the earlier main stage acts, the psychedelic trio Unknown Mortal Orchestra proved to be a standout, ripping through an inspired set before turning it over to Philadelphia’s garage king Kurt Vile for one of the better artist-to-artist transitions of the day. Despite his relative popularity, Kurt Vile lost a portion of his crowd just several songs in to one of the day’s true revelations, XXYYXX. For a 19-year-old producer with what appeared to be only a few samplers

on stage, XXYYXX made the most of his time, bombarding the packed dance-stage crowd with pulsing bass, chopped vocals and chirpy melodies that have come to define the newest generation of post-dubstep producers. He showed up the more veteran duo of Mount Kimbie, who, despite their solid pedigree, stumbled through a pre-set soundcheck and seemed overwhelmed by the variety of equipment they had brought to replicate their stellar recordings. Later on the main stage, Haim proved to be another standout, though I confess I skipped out early to hear the always wonderful Jamie XX absolutely burn down the dance floor at the Cloud Stage. He was an as-advertised crowd-pleaser, leading a massive crowd through a bass-heavy, genre-defying set topped off with his own mix of his band’s famous cover “You Got the Love”. Wandering back toward the main stage in a bit of a daze, I arrived to the photo pit just as Chvrches was finishing up and James Blake was preparing to go on. Blake struck me as an odd choice for a headliner, not because of any lack of talent but simply because his music strikes me as more appropriate for private listens at home or through a solid pair of earphones. As if to make up for his minimalist sound palette, Blake had his amplifier turned to 11, and his opening bars of gentle piano gave way to jet-engine levels of bass. Much was apparently made of the line-up choices this year, especially the inclusion of some local acts in lieu of more popular foreign artists included in the Australian dates. I wasn’t aware of the controversy until I was actually at the show, but it didn’t seem to be a roaring debate once the music started. While there are several artists I would have liked to see included – John Talabot and King Krule jump to mind – overall the programming was worth the price of admission. From the perspective of an expat Yangonite, Laneway Singapore proved a lovely respite and a small reminder of some of the fun we’re missing out on at home.

An image from “Holi” by Xavier Zimbardo. Photo: Institut Français de Birmanie

Got an event? List it in What’s On! Email whatsonmt@gmail.com ART February 10-13 12-5pm “Six” new photography from Myanmar, Deitta Gallery, 3rd floor, 4A Parami Road February 10 7pm “Holi” opening, photos by Xavier Zimbardo, Pansodan Gallery, 286 Pansodan Street February 11 7pm “A Plea for Altruism” opening, photos by Matthieu Ricard, Mojo Bar, 135 Inya Road February 12-16 9am-5pm “Colourful February” group exhibition of paintings by 16 local artists, New Idea Art Gallery, 307 Bo Soon Pat Street, Pabedan February 12-18 10am-6pm “In Transit” by installation artist Aung Ko, presented by the Goethe Institute, 8 Ko Min Ko Chin Road, Bahan February 12-18 10am-6pm “The Myanmar Project: Work in Progress” landscape photography by HansChristian Schink February 14 6:30pm “Inner Light” photo and dance show, Institut Français, 340 Pyay Road February 15 2pm lecture by Jean Loh on Yung Changjiang’s “Requiem for the Three Gorges” February 15 6:30pm Yangon Photo Night of the Year, Institut Français, 340 Pyay Road FILM February 12 5pm “Ghost Street: The Fight and Plight of Indian Widows” screening and lecture by Xavier Zimbardo, Institut Français, 340 Pyay Road Februrary 12 6:30pm “Les nuit photographiques” screening by Nicolas Havette, Institut Français, 340 Pyay Road DANCE February 11 & 13 7pm “Travelogue 1: Twenty to Eight”, modern dance choreographed by Sasha Waltz, hosted by the Goethe Institute, free entry, National Theater Yangon, Myoma Kyaung Street MUSIC February 12 9pm Live Jazz and Pizza Night, 50th Street Bar & Restaurant, 9/13 50th Street February 12 7-11pm Empire Band’s Fund Fair Show, a benefit concert for orphans presented by Myanmar Business Development. Tickets K4500, available at City Mart. People’s Park, Pyay Road MISC February 12 9-11:30pm, Black Party, a mixed gay event for expats and locals, Flamingo Bar, Yangon International Hotel, 330 Ahlone Road February 13 5pm “The Bishnois: Ecologists Since the 15th Century” lecture by Franck Vogel, Institut Français, 340 Pyay Road February 13 6pm Panel lecture on war and conflict photography, Institut Français, 340 Pyay Road February 14 7pm Valentine’s Day Speed Dating, $20 per person, RSVP to yangonsrendezvous@gmail.com, 50th Street Bar & Restaurant, 9/13 50th Street February 15 3:30pm “How to Market Your Photographs” lecture by Hossein Farmani, Institut Français, 340 Pyay Road

February 10-16

52 the pulse
Late for Nowhere

THE MYANMAR TIMES February 10 - 16, 2014

Another voice of hope
A father and daughter’s history of democracy in Burma
Democratic Party, whose aim was to organise a revolt against U Ne Win and restore democracy in Burma. A widespread revolution failed to materialise, and Ed eventually moved to the United States to spend his remaining years with his family. His daughter Wendy had been born in 1947 and grew up spending evenings in the office of The Nation while her father worked at his desk. She was arrested in 1967 while trying to leave Burma illegally but was released after 10 days and allowed to move to Thailand, where she started working as a newspaper journalist. Toward the end of his life, Ed entrusted Wendy with the manuscript containing his own written account of his life. For more than 20 years after her father’s death, Wendy couldn’t bring herself to read her father’s papers. When she finally did, she wasn’t certain how to approach the writing of his memoirs. “In the beginning I was asked to write a book of my father’s memoirs, but I knew instinctively that this was something I couldn’t do and probably didn’t want to do,” she said in an interview in Yangon last week. “It was such a big story and his voice was very forceful, but it was a book that was written in kind of a white heat toward the end of his life. Most memoirs are self-serving. He had a different agenda. This last spurt of journalistic urge came out, like, ‘I’ve got to get down this story that I lived through.’” Wendy finally came up with the idea to write her own memoir based on her father’s written account, and thus the seeds of Golden Parasol were sown. “[My father’s manuscript] would be the foundation, but I would tell what I remembered. The editors also said the book needed to be my story but about my father, and that was a very big hurdle,” she said. “Even though I was resolved to do it that way, I hadn’t realised how daunting and intimidating my father’s voice was. My older brother read the first draft and said, ‘When it’s your voice it’s fine and interesting, but when you start to channel dad’s voice the effect is grotesque.’ It was a bit harsh but I realised it was true.” By the time Wendy started working on Golden Parasol, she had already published three novels – The Coffin Tree (1983), Irrawaddy Tango

dlong125@gmail.com

DOUGLAS LONG

T

HE years immediately following a dramatic change in government are dangerous and confusing times for any country. In Myanmar, the 2010 election was a hopeful step toward democracy and away from the decades-long nightmare of military rule. But there are also many new uncertainties, including questions about the extent to which the government should exercise control over the lives of its citizens; about the ability – or willingness – of authorities to quell sectarian violence; and about the sincerity and motives of some elected politicians, from exmilitary officers to figureheads of the pro-democracy movement. This is, of course, not the first time the country has faced a major democratic transition. In January 1948, Burma gained independence from autocratic British rule, kicking off an exciting but chaotic period of attempted nation-building and democratisation. As writer Wendy Law-Yone points out in her book Golden Parasol: A Daughter’s Memoir of Burma (2013), such times are also exhilarating for journalists. During the postindependence period, “news-gathering … was an exciting, free-wheeling no-hold-barred business” that also had its downside: “[J]ournalists were often perceived as troublemaking scum or bad-news messengers that deserved to be snuffed out.” Wendy’s father, Ed Law-Yone, knew about these hazards firsthand: In July 1948, he launched an Englishlanguage newspaper in Yangon called The Nation. He printed 2000 copies of the first issue but sold only 20. Despite these modest beginnings, the paper was destined to become the most influential English-language

Wendy Law-Yone. Photo: Douglas Long

daily in Burma at the time. Golden Parasol tells the story of Ed’s life, which was in turns fascinating and frustrating. He was acquainted with U Ne Win through the 1950s – he was sometimes invited over to the general’s house to play chess and Scrabble – but ended up in jail soon after U Ne Win took power in a military coup in 1962. Released five years later, Ed moved to Thailand to help form the People’s

Wendy Law Yone’s first book of non-fiction. Photo: Supplied

‘In the beginning, I was asked to write my father’s memoirs, but I knew instinctively I couldn’t do it and didn’t want to.’
Wendy Law-Yone Author

(1993) and The Road to Wanting (2010) – and she expected writing nonfiction to be easier. “My novels always covered difficult subjects to confront. I thought, ‘Nonfiction is factual. It’s all there. All I have to do is write it,’” she said, quickly adding that this turned out not to be the case. “I realised the subject matter didn’t matter. It all had to do with an intrinsic problem I had, which I related to the influence of my father: Somehow I got infected with the idea that I needed to be able to stand by every word and defend it, either grammatically or factually or politically,” she said. “I always thought that maybe this was because it was fiction, but when I started to write nonfiction I thought, ‘Now it’s about the country, politics and history, and how much more so.’ There was a fundamental fear of needing to get it right.” What helped Wendy get beyond this impasse was the understanding that she could not possibly write the definitive book about the politics of her father’s era. “I realised that it had to be just about things my father saw and

things related to him,” she said. Nevertheless, the resulting book has been criticised in some quarters for not containing enough material about Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and the current pro-democracy movement. “The book does deal with what’s happening now. I touch on the changes that I myself had been a part of, but many, many people have asked why I haven’t talked more about Aung San Suu Kyi,” she said. “But Aung San Suu Kyi simply wasn’t a part of the history. General Aung San was, and so I wrote about him. “I was trying to show that many people think Aung San Suu Kyi’s was the first project to restore democracy, but it’s not true. There was already one such project back in my father’s time, which is now forgotten.”
Wendy Law-Yone will appear at the Irrawaddy Literary Festival at Kuthodaw Pagoda in Mandalay from February 14 to 16.

Read more stories about Myanmar on Douglas Long’s blog, Late for Nowhere, http://latefornowhere.wordpress.com.

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Living well in Myanmar

the pulse 53

More than milk
Early start on table food may benefit breast-fed babies

CHRISTOPH GELSDORF, MD
livingwellmyanmar@gmail.com

N

EW parents are typically interested in understanding how and when to introduce new foods when babies start eating. Most people with access to good medical care receive guidance on the importance of breast-feeding at the beginning of life. But advice on the timing of table food seems to be variable. Historically doctors have tended to tell parents to introduce slowly foods that are known to cause allergies. Dairy products, eggs, nuts and fish were felt to be most safe when given to kids between one and three years old. The biological argument was that an infant’s immune system is fragile and therefore more likely to generate the type of antibodies (IgE) that can result in an allergy. However, the research that these recommendations were based on is not very strong and the purported biologic mechanism is only theoretical. Meanwhile we have seen more recently the rise of advocates for the “germ exposure” theory. The hypothesis is that exposure to potential allergens while the immune

system is developing will keep it from overreacting to those same allergens in later life. This school of thought advocates an approach to early childhood that minimises excessive hygiene and overprotection from the environment. In this context, new research from Finland might prove important in helping primary care doctors counsel their patients. Investigators followed 3781 children from birth to age five and used questionnaires to compare their diets with both the frequency of receiving asthma and allergies diagnoses, and the level of antibodies in their blood. They found that the earlier parents introduced grains (wheat, rye, oats, barley), fish and eggs, the less likely the children were to have asthma, nasal allergies and allergic reactions to the specific foods. They additionally found that mothers who continued to breast-feed while food was introduced had children with a lower chance of developing asthma. While this type of observational study can show only an association between early food and reduced allergy – ie, it cannot prove that fewer allergies is directly caused by early introduction of food – it nevertheless echoes other, newer research that shows similar results. The implication is that doctors may have done a disservice to our youngest patients over the years by recommending parents wait to give cereals, fish and eggs.

Research suggests children who start earlier on grains, fish and eggs are less likely to have asthma. Photo: Wiki Commons

Also, the study is interesting because it suggests breast-feeding is protective against allergies based on the total number of months that it occurs, rather than on the amount of time that breast milk is the infant’s only source of nutrition. Exclusive breast-feeding up to at least four months is well established as a way to reduce infections and disease. The American Academy of

Pediatrics continues to recommend exclusive breast-feeding up to six months, but it may well turn out that we can achieve the benefits of both illness and allergy protection by introducing food earlier while continuing to breast-feed. In my clinics in Yangon and California I’ve adjusted my conversation with parents to reflect this general trend in the medical

evidence. I suggest breast-feeding for a total of 12 months, while adding grains at four-to-five months, fish around nine months and eggs before one year. The most important tasks for the doctor remain supporting mom and dad during the often challenging process of establishing breast-feeding and continuing to emphasise the strong advantages of breast milk over formula.

54 the pulse tea break
Universal Crossword
Edited by Timothy E. Parker

THE MYANMAR TIMES February 10 - 16, 2014

SUDOKU PACIFIC

2 X 3 By Rob Lee
ACROSS 1 Canned meat brand 5 Guard on the deck 9 Milky way? 14 Beginning of a conclusion 15 Swirling current 16 Italian white 17 Not as much, to a professor? 20 Presley’s birthplace 21 Title for Laurence Olivier 22 Serve up mixed drinks 23 Poem full of praise 24 Locust or fly 26 Like a koala bear 28 Commits a boo-boo 30 What some keepers keep 34 Warmed the bench 37 Guitarist’s device 39 Skylit courtyards 40 Hoisted with one’s own petard 44 Verbally retract 45 Lose it during a debate 46 “Told ya!” 47 Ruler with absolute power 49 No mere spectator 51 Use shears 53 Omega predecessor 54 Miss identification? 57 Hop-drying kiln 60 Biting breeze 62 Lathered (up) 64 What not even the richest person on Earth has 67 1,000 kilograms, to a Brit 68 Popular lunch bag munchie 69 Eagle of the sea 70 Mary-Kate or Ashley 71 Ballet costume 72 Drink for Robin Hood DOWN 1 Brief fracas 2 Like a peacock? 3 Showing shock 4 Small burrowing rodent 5 Asset 6 Newspaper moneymakers 7 15th of March, say 8 Line of a song 9 Take off the shelf 10 Canine’s canines 11 Test one’s courage 12 Tied up 13 Sax player’s purchase 18 River through Hamburg 19 Part of DEA 25 Kind of boat or train 27 TV dinner platform 29 Daytona measurement 31 Interesting historical periods 32 Egypt’s main water supply 33 Out of harm’s way 34 Seven card poker game 35 Ground floor apartment 36 Turn’s partner 38 Ship deck 41 Crowning event 42 City northeast of St. Etienne 43 Response to a sneeze 48 Antler prong 50 Situation for tear gas 52 Turn on a point 54 Part of a steeple 55 Reddish-brown dye 56 Whipped by a whisker 57 Snorkel’s dog 58 Missing from the base 59 Some family tree members 61 Land in the Andes 63 “May I speak?” 65 Marshy area 66 Like a prof. emeritus

DILBERT

BY SCOTT ADAMS

PEANUTS

BY CHARLES SCHULZ

CALVIN AND HOBBES

BY BILL WATTERSON

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Laugh all the way to the bank when you rent this space.
The tea break page is being re-formatted in readiness for our move to a daily cycle. It may look something like this in the future. Our market research shows that a page like this attracts a large number of readers, who loyally read it every day. Ring Marketing Department to book this space permanently and laugh all the way to the bank with the extra business coming in your door.

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the pulse food and drink 55

An Ayerwady lunch
Spiced and fried with potato, a local catch makes perfect fishcakes

PHYO’S COOKING ADVENTURE

I

phyo.arbidans@gmail.com

USED to eat lots of freshwater fish in Myanmar before I left for Australia. I love deep-fried fish, especially catfish, nga phae and nga chin (in the carp family). My mother-in-law cooked fish often when my husband and I were living at her place. One of my favorite dishes is fishcakes. The recipe here is different from Asian-style fish cakes, as they use lots of herbs and potatoes. In part they’re inspired by Indian-style fried mashed potatos cakes stuffed with minced meat. My mother mashed the potatoes, fish, herbs and spices together. Then she pan-fried them. Now I miss them a lot. I also miss ocean trout fishcakes and herbs. I’ve finally got around to making a few experiments, which I share here with you. One day I will also share the recipe for a uniquely Myanmar fishcake too.

Pan-fried fishcakes with sweet chilli sauce. Photo: Phyo

NGa tan fishcaKes Serves 4
200g potatoes 250g nga tan (big white fish) or nga bart 1/3 cup vegetable oil 1 medium red onion or Asian shallots 3 cloves garlic

2 tsp grated ginger 1/8 tsp turmeric powder 1/2 cup pin sein (Asian basil) 2 pieces lemon grass (white part only) 2 green chillies Clean and fillet fish. Saute 2 cloves garlic, 1 teaspoon grated ginger and turmeric powder in 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. Add fish and cook through.

When fish is ready, remove from the stove and cool. Discard bones. Wash and boil potatoes until cooked through. Then cool and peel. Mash potatoes and fish individually, and set aside. Add all other ingredients to a handheld food processor and mix well. Salt to taste. Bring mashed potatoes and fish into the food processor and mix well. It might be sticky, but use a

spatula to stir occasionally. Take a couple tablespoons of the mixture in your hands and form into a ball. Repeat. Press down so that each cake is a flat circle 1cm thick and 5-6cm in diameter. Arrange on tray or flat plate and cover with cling wrap. Keep in fridge for at least 1 hour. When cakes are ready, add remaining oil into a non-stick frying pan and heat on medium. When oil is hot enough, fry the fish cakes. Tip: Touch the oil in the pan with a spatula or wooden spoon. If bubbles rise around it, the oil is ready for frying. While frying, check the colour at the bottom of fishcake by lifting carefully. When it turns golden, turn the fishcake over. When cooked through, transfer cakes to a plate covered with kitchen paper. It will absorb the excess oil. Serve with green salad or sweet chilli sauce. Makes six fishcakes. MOrninG GlOrY (Ka ZUn Ywet) salad Serves 4 1 bunch morning glory (ka zun ywet) 2 red onions or Asian shallots 1 ½ tbsp lime juice 1 ½ tbsp garlic sachet (fried garlic oil)

1 tsp fish sauce 1 ½ tbsp fried garlic 1 tbsp roasted rice powder 1 tbsp dried shrimp powder Wash morning glory and pick the fresh and crunchy parts of the leaves and stems. Dry. Slice onions thinly and soak in water for 5 minutes. Wash well and drain. Tip: Myanmar salads use lots of onions but they are very nice to eat, giving nice flavour and texture. The secret is that we slice them very thinly and then soak in water for at least 5 minutes to let the pungent juice out. After that, we wash and knead them in water, squeeze and let dry. Boil water in a big pot to blanch the morning glory. Then add 1 tablespoon salt. When it’s bubbling, blanch watercress for 3 minutes. Refresh in icy cold water. Drain and dry well. Chop and set aside. Add all ingredients into a big bowl and mix well. For hot and spicy salad, add green chillies. Shopping notes Fried garlic: I have bought it packaged. It is used locally in tea-leaf salad. Available in super markets. Roasted rice powder: Roast some rice and grind it, or find premade powder that you can roast available in the supermarket.

Newly opened Myanmar restaurant already a hit
NYein Ei Ei Htwe nyeineieihtwe23@gmail.com IN rural areas, Myanmar people are bound to inquire about the opening of a new shop or restaurant. In the cities, you don’t expect this. So my interest was piqued by a new restaurant in Mandalay, Dawn Lann Gyi, that seemed to be all the buzz with local people despite having opened just a month ago. A new place offering Myanmar curry and traditional snacks, Dawn Lann Gyi is decorated at the entrance with timbers. Inside are caned tables, chairs and a signboard hanging from a crossbeam. Ropes, bamboo and fans are arranged in complex fashion. It is a confusing mash-up of traditional and modern styles. Out front, many motorbikes were parked, indicating a full house. Inside, the kitchen sits at the centre of the restaurant compound and is surrounded by tables. But for those who don’t want to sit at tables, there is a special bamboo hut in yard. There are also private rooms available. In the main room, about seven tables sit very close each other. It’s a noisy environment, and you can’t really hear the traditional music that plays through the stereo system. We ordered the house special pwe taw sar (a king’s lunch), which is the main offering aside from many choices of vegetable salads and fruit juices. It appeared within a few minutes. Pwe taw sar is a tray that Myanmar people call daung lan. It comes with small wood cups filled with roasted dried muttons, baked and dried fish, small fried fish, fried prawns, vegetable soup, fried beans and pounded sour fruit paste. Another six cups offered different vegetable salads and a big bowl of rice. Prepared for six people, it all costs K15,000. Though all the dishes were tasty, overall the meal was not an adequate example of Myanmar cuisine. Where was the chicken or fish curry? Everything was a side dish, although certainly enough to feed six. After having lunch, we ordered some of the Myanmar traditional snacks: htan thee mont (K500) made with toddy and mont san (K500) made with pounded sticky rice and coconut. Though the mont san tasted great, we lost our appetite for the htan thee mont, which was old, tough and overly sweet with a coating of sugar juice. We ordered the pineapple juice (K800), which was delicious and refreshing, and accepted that our lunch was pretty good except for the snacks. Dawn Lann Gyi restaurant is also already famous for breakfast, which is served from 6-9am. Pa lar tar (Indian pancakes) with chicken curry is the specialty, and other offerings include noodles with curry and rice and beans. Having seen the crowd at lunchtime, you’d be wise to get there early.

MandalaY

Wine This Week
Cabernet Sauvignon 2010
True to its cabernet sauvignon roots, this wine immediately effuses a rich fruit smell. The bouquet has an earthy leather scent plus blackberry and plum notes, a slight sweetness with hints of mint. But compared with its olfactory offerings, this California wine’s taste is surprisingly mild, and not overly sweet. It strikes the front of your tongue with a tangy kick but quickly melts into a smooth, mild finish. More discerning drinkers might find this one too easy, though surely some will find themselves imbibing at rapid pace and enjoying the hit of tang followed by mellow fruit, though the considerable body of this wine barely disguises its alcohol content. This cab will easily match with a variety of foods, but probably something herband-nut rich would be best. Try a pine nut pesto with pasta. At K7800, this Hob Nob staple makes for a good vin de table that won’t hurt your pocket.

b HO b NO

Dawn Lann Gyi
5C 68th Street, between 33rd and 34th streets Chan Aye Thar San township, Mandalay Food 7 Beverage 7 Service 9 Value for money 10 X-Factor 6

Pwe taw sar (a king’s lunch). Photo: Nyein Ei Ei Htwe

Total Score:

7.8/

10

K

7800

56 the pulse socialite
Myanmar Micro Finance Bank opening

THE MYANMAR TIMES FEBRUARY 10-16, 2014

Huawei New Year New Dream dinner

Ko Zaw Win Naing and Ko Moe Myint Yang Aung

Ko Myat Thu, Ko Thung Hun, Ma May Thuri Myint Swe, Ma Khin Hla Hla, Ma Stella Kyaw Win and Khin Aye Nwe

Wang Bond and Zhana Lei

Lotteria opening

PTT dinner party

Eainder Kyaw Zin

Daw Win Min Khaung, U Kyaw Min Oo and guests

Thiri San

Ariyasak Thephchatri

Ko Aung Naing Tun

Irin Chitasaranachi

MJI Enterprise Co., Ltd opening

Ceremony to pay respect to karate sportsmen

Yuko Kato

Yamamoto

Major Thant Zin

Tkeshi Shiraishi

Kazutoyo Furuta

lucky draw organised by Kubota

Fundraising fair

Ikuma Kawasaki, Yoko Miyazaki and Ko Aung Kyaw Zaw

Ko Min Min

Ko Joe

Ma San San, Ma Moe Moe Win and Ma Khin La Pyae Win

Luminarc showroom opening

Ko Naing, Wang Li Jun and Ma Pan Ei Hnin Si

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SETRA Digital Scale lucky draw ceremony

the pulse socialite 57

MOH MOH THAW
mohthaw@gmail.com

Mingalabar! fans of Socialite. This week she had a lot of events. On Monday, she attended the opening ceremony of Pang Mu Gems and Jewellery in Kan Lane. She didn’t go anywhere on Tuesday. On Wednesday, she was out again to attend the lucky draw organised by Kubota at Traders Hotel, the Lotteria opening in Chinatown, a ceremony to pay respect to karate sportsmen and the Chinese New Year dinner at Chatrium Hotel. She took a rest on Thursday. Then she was at Sedona Hotel for the lucky draw held by Setra. On the following day, she attended Cotto’s Thank You Party and Coffee Show. She enjoyed a dinner party with PTT and Maung Myat Swan Htet’s birthday party at Sedona Hotel. On Sunday, she had three events: the MJI Enterprise opening ceremony, Huawei New Year New Dream dinner and the opening of Myanmar Micro Finance Bank.

U Zaw Min Thant

Suzuki gift presentation ceremony

Chinese New Year dinner at Park Royal Hotel

Myat Swan Htet’s birthday party

Yamada, Ko Myo Min Tun, Asano and Ma Aye Nwe Nwe Hman

Herman Feigl and staff

IKON Mart glass tasting

U Khin Maung Myat and Myat Swan Htet

Ma Swe Zar Lwin

Guests

U Sunny and Guests

Franz Dumey

Pang Mu Gems & Jewellery

Chinese New Year dinner at Chatrium Hotel

Ma Nang Aung

Rev Dr Yaw La

U La Mai Khon Zar

U Zaw Myo Thein

Sirichad, Ko Kaung Min Khant, Ma Ei Shwe Sin and Anusat

Casio showroom opening

Tetsushi and Akio

Ko Kyaw Kyaw Moe

58 the pulse travel

THE MYANMAR TIMES February 10 - 16, 2014

DOMESTIC FLIGHT SCHEDULES
YANGON TO NAy PyI TAW Flight Days Dep FMI A1 1,2,3,4,5 7:30 YH 833 2 7:00 Y5 777 1,2,3,4,6 7:45 FMI A1 6 8:00 FMI B1 1,2,3,4,5 11:30 FMI A1 7 15:30 FMI C1 1,2,3,4,5 16:30 NAy PyI TAW TO YANGON Flight Days Dep FMI A2 1,2,3,4,5 8:50 FMI A2 6 10:00 YH 731 2 13:00 FMI B2 1,2,3,4,5 13:00 FMI A2 7 17:00 Y5 778 1,2,3,4,6 17:30 FMI C2 1,2,3,4,5 18:00 YANGON TO MANDALAy Flight Days Dep YH 917 1,5 6:00 YH 909 2,4,6,7 6:00 YJ 891 Daily 6:00 YJ 901 2,3,4,5,6,7 6:10 YH 917 2,3,4,6,7 6:10 YH 909 5 6:10 YH 909 3 6:10 Y5 234 Daily 6:15 6T 401 Daily 6:20 K7 222 Daily 6:30 K7 626 1,5 6:45 K7 226 2,4 6:45 YH 831 6 7:00 YH 833 2 7:00 W9 201 Daily 7:30 8M 6603 2,4,7 9:00 K7 624 Daily 10:30 YJ 751/W9 7751 5,7 10:30 YJ 761 2,4,6 10:30 YJ 211 5,7 11:00 YJ 201 2,3,4 11:00 YJ 601/W9 7601 6 11:00 YH 737 3,7 11:15 YH 729 2,4,6 11:15 YH 737 5 11:30 YH 727 1 11:30 W9 251 2,5 11:15 6T 807 7 11:30 Arr 8:30 8:10 8:25 9:00 12:30 16:30 17:30 6T 807 K7 224 W9 129 YH 731 6T 501 W9 211 1 Daily Daily Daily Daily Daily 12:00 14:30 15:00 15:00 15:30 15:30 13:25 16:35 16:55 17:10 17:30 16:55 YANGON TO NyAUNG U Flight Days Dep YH 917 1,5 6:00 YJ 891 Daily 6:00 YH 909 2 6:00 YH 909 1,5 6:10 YH 909 4,6 6:10 YH 909 3 6:10 YH 917 2,3,4,6,7 6:10 YJ 901 2,3,4,5,6,7 6:10 YH 909 2,7 6:00 W9 141 Daily 6:15 6T 401 Daily 6:20 6T 351 1,2,3,4,6,7 6:30 K7 222 Daily 6:30 YH 921 4 7:00 W9 143 Daily 7:15 YJ 601/W9 7601 6 11:00 K7 224 Daily 14:30 YH 921 2 15:00 W9 211 Daily 15:30 YH 731 Daily 15:00 6T 501 Daily 15:30 NyAUNG U TO YANGON Flight Days Dep YH 917 2,3,4,6,7 7:45 YH 918 1,5 8:25 YJ 891 Daily 7:35 W9 141 Daily 7:50 K7 222 Daily 8:05 YH 910 4,6 8:25 YJ 901 2,3,4,5,6,7 8:35 YH 922 2 8:35 YH 910 3 8:35 YH 909 2 9:20 W9 144 Daily 8:50 YJ 902 1 9:15 YH 910 2,7 9:20 YH 910 1,5 9:35 6T 351 5 10:50 YJ 762 6 16:50 K7 225 Daily 17:45 W9 211 Daily 17:55 YH 732 Daily 17:55 6T 502 Daily 18:35 Arr 8:25 7:20 9:20 7:45 8:25 8:35 7:45 8:20 9:20 7:35 7:40 7:50 7:50 8:35 8:35 12:20 17:25 17:20 17:40 17:55 18:20 YANGON TO MyITKyINA Flight Days Dep YH 833 2 7:00 YH 831 6 7:00 K7 844 2,4,7 7:30 K7 624 Daily 10:30 YJ 201 2,4 11:00 W9 251 2,5 11:15 YJ 201 3 11:00 MyITKyINA TO YANGON Flight Days Dep YH 834 2 10:35 YH 832 4,6 10:35 YJ 202 2,4 14:05 K7 625 Daily 15:40 W9 252 2,5 16:05 YJ 202 3 14:35 YANGON TO HEhO Flight Days Dep YH 909 2,7 6:00 YJ 891 Daily 6:00 YH 917 1,5 6:00 YH 909 1,5 6:10 YH 909 3 6:10 YH 917 2,3,4,6,7 6:10 W9 141 Daily 6:15 6T 401 Daily 6:20 K7 222 Daily 6:30 6T 351 1,2,3,4,6,7 6:30 YH 921 4 7:00 W9 201 Daily 7:30 K7 828 1,3,5 7:30 YJ 751/W9 7751 5,7 10:30 YJ 761 2,4,6 10:30 YH 505 4,6,7 10:30 YH 737 3,7 11:15 YH 505 2,3 11:00 YJ 201 3 11:00 W9 203 Daily 11:00 YH 737 5 11:30 W9 119 1,3,6 11:15 YH 727 1 11:30 6T 807 7 11:30 K7 826 2,6 11:45 6T 807 1 12:00 K7 224 Daily 14:30 W9 129 Daily 15:00 YH 731 Daily 15:00 6T 501 Daily 15:30 HEhO TO YANGON Days Dep 2,7 8:25 Daily 8:35 5 8:40 Daily 9:00 Daily 9:05 3,4 9:30 4 9:30 2,3,4,6,7 9:35 Daily 9:35 Daily 9:45 1,5 9:55 Daily 9:55 4,6,7 11:55 Daily 12:25 2,3 12:25 1,3,5 13:50 7 14:05 1 14:35 1,3,6 15:45 2,4 15:20 6 15:20 1 15:35 7 15:45 1 16:15 Daily 16:00 3,7 16:40 Daily 16:25 Daily 16:25 Daily 16:55 2,6 17:25 5 17:50 Arr 10:35 10:35 11:05 13:25 13:50 14:10 14:20 YANGON TO SIT T WE Flight Days Dep 6T 605 Daily 11:15 YH 511 1,5 11:30 W9 309 1,3,5,6,7 11:30 K7 426 Daily 12:30 6T 611 4,6 14:30 SIT T WE TO yANGON Flight Days Dep YH 511 5 13:05 6T 606 Daily 13:35 K7 427 Daily 14:05 6T 612 4,6 16:15 YANGON TO MyEIK Days Dep Daily 7:00 1,3,5,7 7:00 MyEIK TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 11:30 1,3,5,7 11:25 Arr 13:15 13:05 12:55 13:50 15:55

Arr 9:50 11:00 13:55 14:00 18:00 18:10 19:00

Arr 7:40 7:40 8:05 7:35 7:45 7:45 7:50 7:30 8:25 8:40 8:10 8:10 8:40 9:10 8:55 10:10 11:55 12:25 12:25 12:25 12:25 13:05 13:25 14:15 13:40 13:40 12:40 12:55

MANDALAy TO YANGON Flight Days Dep YJ 901 2,3,4,6,7 7:50 YH 910 4,6 7:40 YH 910 2,7 7:40 YH 910 3 7:50 Y5 233 Daily 8:10 YJ 891 Daily 8:20 6T 402 Daily 8:45 K7 223 Daily 8:55 YH 918 1,5 9:10 W9 201 Daily 9:10 W9 144 Daily 9:20 Y5 132 3,5,6,7 9:30 K7 227 2,4 10:35 K7 627 1,5 10:55 YH 834 2 12:00 YH 832 6 12:30 K7 845 2,4,7 12:50 6T 808 7 13:15 YJ 212 5 15:00 6T 808 1 13:45 YJ 212 7 15:00 YJ 202 2,4 15:30 YJ 202 3 16:00 YJ 762 2,4 16:05 YJ 762 6 16:05 YJ 602/W9 7602 6 16:20 W9 120 1,3,6 16:30 K7 225 Daily 16:50 YH 728 1 17:00 YH 738 5 17:05 YH 730 6 17:00 W9 129 Daily 17:10 YH 732 Daily 17:10 W9 211 Daily 17:10 K7 625 Daily 17:10 8M 6604 2,4,7 17:20 YJ 752/W9 7752 5,7 17:20 YH 738 3,7 17:25 6T 502 Daily 17:50 YJ 004 3 18:00

Arr 9:55 9:45 10:40 10:40 9:25 10:15 10:45 11:00 11:05 11:05 10:45 10:30 12:00 12:20 13:55 13:55 16:00 15:15 16:25 15:45 16:55 16:55 17:25 17:30 18:10 17:45 17:55 19:00 18:25 19:00 19:25 18:35 19:15 19:15 18:35 18:30 18:45 18:50 19:55 19:25

Arr 13:55 13:55 16:55 18:35 19:00 17:25

Arr 14:55 15:00 15:25 17:40

Flight K7 319 YH 633

Arr 9:05 9:15

Arr 10:45 11:05 10:15 10:40 11:00 9:45 9:55 10:40 10:40 10:40 10:10 10:35 10:40 10:55 13:55 18:10 19:00 19:15 19:15 19:55

Arr 8:25 8:50 9:55 8:40 9:30 9:35 8:20 9:20 9:30 8:45 9:30 9:40 8:45 11:40 11:40 11:55 12:40 12:25 12:10 12:10 12:55 12:25 12:55 13:50 13:00 14:20 15:45 16:10 16:25 16:40

Flight K7 320 YH 634

Arr 13:35 13:25

YANGON TO ThANDWE Flight Days Dep W9 141 Daily 6:15 6T 351 1,2,3,4,6,7 6:30 YH 505 4,6,7 10:30 YH 505 2,3 11:00 6T 605 Daily 11:15 W9307 2,4 11:30 W9 309 1,3,5,6,7 11:30 YH 511 1,5 11:30 ThANDWE TO YANGON Flight Days Dep W9 141 Daily 9:50 6T 632 1,2,3,4,6,7 10:15 6T 605 Dailys 12:25 6T 632 5 13:00 YH 506 4,6,7 13:10 YH 506 2,3 13:40 W9 307 2,4 14:05 W9 309 1,3,5,6,7 14:05 YH 512 1,5 14:05

Arr 9:35 10:00 13:10 13:40 12:10 13:50 13:50 14:05

Arr 10:40 11:10 15:00 13:55 14:00 14:30 14:55 14:55 14:55

Domestic Airlines
Air Bagan Ltd. (W9) Air KBZ (K7)
Tel : 513322, 513422, 504888, Fax : 515102 Tel: 372977~80, 533030~39 (Airport), Fax: 372983

Air Mandalay (6T)

Flight YH 910 W9 141 YH 910 6T 352 YJ 891 YH 910 YH 922 YH 918 6T 402 K7 223 YH 918 W9 201 YH 505 W9 204 YH 505 K7 829 6T 808 6T 808 W9 120 YJ 762 YJ 762 YJ 762 YJ 212 YH 727 K7 224 YH 738 W9 129 YH 731 6T 501 K7 827 YH 738

Arr 10:40 10:40 10:55 11:10 10:15 10:40 10:40 10:45 10:45 11:00 11:05 11:05 14:00 13:35 14:30 15:05 15:15 15:45 17:55 17:30 18:10 17:45 16:55 18:25 19:00 18:50 18:35 19:15 19:55 18:40 19:00

Tel : (Head Office) 501520, 525488, Fax: 525937. Airport: 533222~3, 09-73152853. Fax: 533223.

Asian Wings (YJ)

Tel: 951 516654, 532253, 09-731-35991~3. Fax: 951 532333

Golden Myanmar Airlines (Y5)
Tel: 95 9 400446999, 95 9 400447999, Fax: 01 860 4051

Yangon Airways(YH)

Tel: (+95-1) 383 100, 383 107, 700 264, Fax: 652 533.

FMI Air Charter - Sales & Reservations

Tel: (95-1) 240363, 240373 / (+95-9) 421146545

Domestic
6T = Air Mandalay W9 = Air Bagan YJ = Asian Wings K7 = AIR KBZ YH = Yangon Airways FMI = FMI AIR Charter Y5 = Golden Myanmar Airlines

Subject to change without notice
Day 1 = Monday 2 = Tuesday 3 = Wednesday 4 = Thursday 5 = Friday 6 = Saturday 7 = Sunday

www.mmtimes.com

the pulse travel 59

INteRNatioNal FLIGHT SCHEDULES
Flights PG 706 8M 335 TG 304 PG 702 TG 302 PG 708 8M 331 PG 704 Y5 237 TG 306

YANGON TO BANGKOK Days Dep Daily 7:15 Daily 8:40 Daily 9:50 Daily 10:30 Daily 14:55 Daily 15:20 Daily 16:30 Daily 18:20 Daily 18:05 Daily 19:45 YANGON TO DON MUENG Days Dep 1,3,5,7 8:00 Daily 8:30 Daily 12:50 Daily 17:35 1,2,3,4 20:55

Arr 9:30 10:25 11:45 12:25 16:50 17:15 18:15 20:15 19:50 21:40

MANDALAY TO DON MUENG Flights Days Dep FD 2761 Daily 12:50 MANDALAY TO KUNMING Days Dep Daily 14:40 NAYPYIDAW TO BANGKOK Days Dep 1,2,3,4,5 19:45

Arr 15:15

Flights TG 2981 TG 2983 PG 709

BANGKOK TO MANDALAY Days Dep 1,2,4,6 7:45 3,5 17:30 Daily 12:05

Arr 9:00 18:45 13:25 Arr 12:20 Arr 13:50 Arr 19:15

French appeal
For all its bustle, Phnom Penh keeps its colonial character

PhnOM Penh

Flights MU 2030

Arr 17:20

DON MUEANG TO MANDALAY Flights Days Dep FD 2760 Daily 10:55
Flights MU 2029 Flights PG 721

Flights PG 722

Arr 22:45

Flights DD 4231 FD 2752 FD 2756 FD 2754 FD 2758

Arr 9:45 10:20 14:40 19:25 22:50

YANGON TO SINGAPORE Flights Days Dep MI 509/SQ 5019 1,2,6,7 0:25 8M 231 Daily 8:00 8M 233 5,6,7 14:00 Y5 233 Daily 10:10 SQ 997/MI 5871 Daily 10:25 3K 586 Daily 11:40 MI 517/SQ 5017 Daily 16:40 TR 2827 1,6,7 15:10 TR 2827 2,3,4,5 17:10 3K 588 2,3,5 19:30 YANGON TO KUALA LUMPUR Flights Days Dep 8M 501 1,3,5,6 8:55 AK 1427 Daily 8:30 MH 741 Daily 12:15 MH 743 Daily 16:00 AK 1421 Daily 19:05 YANGON TO BEIJING Days Dep 2,3,4,6,7 14:15

Arr 5:00 12:25 18:25 14:40 14:45 16:20 21:15 19:35 21:35 00:10+1

BANGKOK TO YANGON Flights Days Dep 8M 336 Daily 11:55 TG 303 Daily 8:00 PG 701 Daily 8:50 TG 301 Daily 13:00 PG 707 Daily 13:40 PG 703 Daily 16:45 TG 305 Daily 17:50 8M 332 Daily 19:20 PG 705 Daily 20:00 Y5 238 Daily 21:10 DON MUENG TO YANGON Flights Days Dep DD 4230 1,3,5,7 6:30 FD 2751 Daily 7:15 FD 2755 Daily 11:35 FD 2753 Daily 16:20 FD 2757 1,2,3,4 19:35 SINGAPORE TO YANGON Flights Days Dep SQ 998/MI 5872 Daily 7:55 3K 585 Daily 9:10 8M 232 Daily 13:25 TR 2826 1,6,7 13:10 MI 518/MI 5018 Daily 14:20 TR 2826 2,3,4,5 15:00 Y5 234 Daily 15:35 3K 587 2,3,5 17:20 8M 234 5,6,7 19:25 MI 520/SQ 5020 1,5,6,7 22:10 BEIJING TO YANGON Days Dep 2,3,4,6,7 8:05

KUNMING TO MANDALAY Days Dep Daily 13:55 BANGKOK TO NAYPYIDAW Days Dep 1,2,3,4,5 17:15

Arr 12:40 8:45 9:40 13:45 14:30 17:35 18:45 20:05 21:15 21:55

International Airlines
Air Asia (FD)
Tel: 251 885, 251 886.

Air Bagan Ltd.(W9) Air China (CA) Air India

Arr 7:15 8:00 12:20 17:05 20:25

Tel : 513322, 513422, 504888, Fax : 515102

Tel : 666112, 655882.

Tel : 253597~98, 254758. Fax: 248175

A dilapitated colonial police station in Phnom Penh. Photo: Washington Post

Arr 12:55 12:50 16:30 20:15 23:20

Flights CA 906

Arr 21:55

Arr 9:20 10:40 14:50 14:30 15:45 16:30 17:05 18:50 20:50 23:35

Bangkok Airways (PG) Condor (DE)

Tel: 255122, 255 265, Fax: 255119

Tel: + 95 1 -370836 up to 39 (ext : 810)

Dragonair (KA)

Tel: 95-1-255320, 255321, Fax : 255329

Golden Myanmar Airlines (Y5)
Tel: 95 9 400446999, 95 9 400447999, Fax: 01 860 4051

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YANGON TO GAUNGZHOU Flights Days Dep 8M 711 2,4,7 8:40 CZ 3056 3,6 11:35 CZ 3056 1,5 17:40 YANGON TO TAIPEI Days Dep 1,2,3,5,6 10:50

Arr 13:15 15:50 22:05

Flights CA 905

Arr 13:15

Malaysia Airlines (MH)

Tel : 387648, 241007 ext : 120, 121, 122 Fax : 241124

Flights CI 7916

Arr 16:15

KAULA LUMPUR TO YANGON Flights Days Dep AK 1426 Daily 6:55 MH 740 Daily 10:05 MH742 Daily 13:50 8M 502 1,3,5,6 14:00 AK 1420 Daily 17:20 GUANGZHOU TO YANGON Flights Days Dep CZ 3055 3,6 8:35 CZ 3055 1,5 14:40 8M 712 2,4,7 14:15 TAIPEI TO YANGON Days Dep 1,2,3,5,6 7:00 KUNMING TO YANGON Days Dep 1,3 8:25 2,3,4,6,7 13:00 Daily 13:30

Arr 8:00 11:15 15:00 15:00 18:25

Myanmar Airways International(8M)
Tel : 255260, Fax: 255305

Silk Air(MI)

Tel: 255 287~9, Fax: 255 290

YANGON TO KUNMING Flights Days Dep MU 2012 1,3 12:20 MU 2032 Daily 14:40 CA 906 2,3,4,6,7 14:15 YANGON TO CHIANG MAI Flights Days Dep W9 9607 4,7 14:30 YANGON TO HANOI Days Dep 1,3,5,6,7 19:10

Thai Airways (TG)

Arr 18:20 18:00 17:35

Tel : 255491~6, Fax : 255223
Arr 10:35 16:40 15:50

Vietnam Airlines (VN)

Fax : 255086. Tel 255066/ 255088/ 255068.

Qatar Airways (Temporary Office)
Tel: 379845, 379843, 379831, Fax: 379730 Tel: 371867~68, Fax: 371869.

Arr 16:20

Flights CI 7915

Arr 9:55

Biman Bangladesh Airlines (BG)

Flights VN 956

Arr 21:30

YANGON TO HO CHI MINH CITY Flights Days Dep VN 942 2,4,7 14:25 YANGON TO DOHA Days Dep Daily 7:30

Arr 17:10

Flights MU 2011 CA 905 MU 2031

Arr 11:40 13:15 14:00

International
FD & AK = Air Asia TG = Thai Airways 8M = Myanmar Airways International Y5 = Golden Myanmar Airlines PG = Bangkok Airways MI = Silk Air VN = Vietnam Airline MH = Malaysia Airlines CZ = China Southern CI = China Airlines CA = Air China KA = Dragonair Y5 = Golden Myanmar Airlines IC = Indian Airlines Limited W9 = Air Bagan 3K = Jet Star AI = Air India QR = Qatar Airways KE = Korea Airlines NH = All Nippon Airways SQ = Singapore Airways DE = Condor Airlines MU=China Eastern Airlines BR = Eva Airlines DE = Condor AI = Air India BG = Biman Bangladesh Airlines

Flights QR 919

Arr 11:15

CHIANG MAI TO YANGON Flights Days Dep W9 9608 4,7 17:20 HANOI TO YANGON Days Dep 1,3,5,6,7 16:35

Arr 18:10

YANGON TO PHNOM PENH Flights Days Dep 8M 403 1,3,6 8:35 YANGON TO SEOUL Days Dep 4,7 0:50 Daily 23:35

Arr 12:30

Flights VN 957

Arr 18:10

Flights 0Z 770 KE 472

Arr 8:50 07:45+1

HO CHI MINH CITY TO YANGON Flights Days Dep VN 943 2,4,7 11:40 DOHA TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 21:15 GAYA TO YANGON Days Dep 1,3,5,6 11:20 PHNOM PENH TO YANGON Days Dep 1,3,6 13:30 SEOUL TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 18:30 3,6 19:30 TOKYO TO YANGON Days Dep Daily 11:45

Arr 13:25

YANGON TO HONG KONG Flights Days Dep KA 251 1,2,4,6 01:10 YANGON TO TOKYO Days Dep Daily 22:10 YANGON TO SIEM REAP Days Dep 1,3,6 8:35 YANGON TO GAYA Days Dep 1,3,5,6 9:00 YANGON TO DHAKA Days Dep 1,4 19:30

Flights QR 918

Arr 06:29+1

Arr 05:35

Flights 8M 602

Arr 14:30

Flights NH 914

Arr 06:45+1

Flights 8M 404

Arr 14:55

Flights 8M 401

Arr 10:45

Flights 8M 601

Arr 10:20

Flights KE 471 0Z 769

Arr 22:30 23:40

Flights BG 061

Arr 20:45

Flights NH 913

Arr 17:15

MANDALAY TO BANGKOK Flights Days Dep TG 2982 1,2,4,6 9:50 TG 2984 3,5 19:35 PG 710 Daily 14:15

Arr 12:00 21:45 16:40

HONG KONG TO YANGON Flights Days Dep KA 250 1,3,5,7 21:50 DHAKA TO YANGON Days Dep 1,4 16:15

Subject to change without notice
Day 1 = Monday 2 = Tuesday 3 = Wednesday 4 = Thursday 5 = Friday 6 = Saturday 7 = Sunday

Arr 23:45

Flights BG 060

Arr 18:30

N November, as Cambodia’s rainy season was coming to a close, my girlfriend and I looked at a new apartment in Phnom Penh’s old French district. Located in the central part of the city near the US Embassy, the building was advertised as the modern incarnation of the colonialera Hôtel Manolis. Now chopped up into apartments, the hotel provides a footnote to French literary and colonial history. In 1923, the writer and future French minister of cultural affairs André Malraux occupied a room there. Malraux was a young man, travelling with his wife, Clara, and a friend, when he was caught trying to spirit Cambodian antiquities out of the country. Criminality, scandal, intrigue, the ghost of Malraux: What more could you want in a potential living space? The French real estate agent, however, offered a better-known selling point when we met him for a walkthrough. The area, he told us, had been featured in the 2002 Matt Dillon movie City of Ghosts. I’ve lived in Phnom Penh for nearly two years and thought that I knew the city well. But when we ascended the staircase and opened the door to the flat, a much older model appeared. The apartment had slatted royal-blue shutters and tiled, dusty floors. There were no air conditioners: Ceiling fans pushed the hot air around. From the living room windows, whose many locks took about three minutes to open, small steps led down to a low-slung balcony. Five minutes earlier, we’d been immersed in a bustling Phnom Penh. Here inside, past and present merged. We were being shown an apartment with French colonial roots by a transplanted Frenchman 60 years after King Norodom Sihanouk led the crusade for independence from France in 1953. Perhaps the strangest thing was that there was nothing strange about it. Despite the sprouting of skyscrapers, the arrival of mega-malls, the rise of English as a dominant second language and the hurried urban development, Phnom Penh still retains a strong French feel. The French Chamber of Commerce has seen an uptick in small to medium enterprises. According to the French Embassy, the number of French citizens living in Cambodia has doubled over the past 10 years and grown at an average annual rate of 10 percent over the past three. France has one of the largest Cambodian diaspora communities outside the United States, largely because of the refugees who fled there to escape the terror of the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. In recent years, many have been coming home. In Phnom Penh, I’ve met a lot of French people without going out of

my way to meet French people. Our landlord at the time we looked at the apartment was French. A skinny French guy had shown us another apartment weeks before. I ate at French restaurants, bars and cafes every week. Some of them, like the apartment, were in refurbished versions of buildings constructed during the French Protectorate, which started in 1863 and ended under Sihanouk 90 years later. Although the protectorate was dismantled six decades ago, the FrenchCambodian relationship seems to have continued in a less exploitative form, like the aftermath of a breakup where two people illogically remain friends. I remember what an advocate for the French business community said to me while leaving Van’s Restaurant, which serves pricey but tasty French fare out of the former Indochina Bank building in Phnom Penh. Lamenting the modern development threatening to overtake the city’s architectural past, he gestured to the leafy, elegant courtyard: “To me, this is Cambodia.” A tale of two tours The French government and Sihanouk’s distant forerunner, King Norodom, agreed to swap protection in exchange for trading rights in 1863. A few years later, the French persuaded the king to move the capital to where it is now. In one of my favorite guidebooks ever written, Strolling Around Phnom Penh, the French scholar Jean-Michel Filippi makes a valuable observation. French rule endured for more than half the number of years that Phnom Penh has been Cambodia’s modern capital. As such, French architectural and planning legacies abound. Filippi’s book, which is full of several self-guided walks in different quarters of the city, offers one way of exploring. Acerbic and funny, he begins the first stroll of the French area by condemning a building as an “architectural absurdity” that’s between a “hideous bunker and an architectural piece of nonsense which fulfills the function of a hotel”. He’s good company. But a friend had recommended seeing the colonial era through a preservationist group called Khmer Architecture Tours. Half of the threehour excursion takes place on foot. In between stops, we each hopped briefly into a cyclo, or cyclopousse, the bicycle rickshaw that was invented, appropriately enough, by a Frenchman, Maurice Coupeaud, in 1937. In Phnom Penh: A Cultural and Literary History, historian Milton Osborne writes that Coupeaud pulled off a colonial publicity stunt by riding a cyclo himself from Phnom Penh to what is now Ho Chi Minh City, about 125 miles (200km) away. The journey took 17 hours. MOre On pUlse 60

60 the pulse
cOntinUed frOM pUlse 59

THE MYANMAR TIMES February 10 - 16, 2014

february 10 – 16, 2014
AQUariUs | Jan 20 – Feb 18

WEEKLY predictiOns
LeO | July 23 – Aug 22 An investment in your growth is an investment in your ability, your adaptability and your promotion. No matter how much it costs you at present to keep growing and learning, the cost of doing nothing is greater. Make the world better by improving yourself, especially in time-management skills. Be not afraid of growing too slow but only of standing still. VirGO | Aug 23 – Sep 22 Looking back and lamenting will not help you move forward. One of the best things you can do for yourself is talk with other professionals who are at an equal or higher level than you. Never allow yourself to miss learning opportunities. Enjoy talking about leadership with good leaders all the time. Beware of mirages. Pay attention to what is central to both love and wisdom. Libra | Sep 23 – Oct 22 The things that drive you crazy are actually possible opportunities. Know that people or circumstances that take you out of your power have extraordinary value. Look deeply into yourself to discover the reasons for your negative reactions. Use the challenges to grow self-awareness. Believe that when the doors of perception are cleansed everything in the world may be seen through the eyes of love. ScOrpiO | Oct 23 – Nov 21 Your positive language will provoke a set of positive sensations within you that support you to automatically play the victor. Shadows exposed to the light begin to disappear. Your changed idea of truth can evolve into greatness and success. One idea discovered in one book can change the way you see the world. Keep simple tactics for superb relationships. SaGittariUs | Nov 22 – Dec 21 Obsessive Attention to Detail (OAD) is a way to know the nature, quality and value of others. No one wants to take responsibility for things without good prospects. Taking personal responsibility is honourable and you should maintain your self-esteem and personal value this way. Your organisation will become effective in all directions. Your heart needs to be known by others. CapricOrn | Dec 22 – Jan 19 The more experiences, the better the life, and the person who experiences most wins. By getting clear on what you want out of life, heighten your awareness around what’s most important. Clarity breeds success. Just collapse the timeline by doing more important stuff faster and sooner, and stay focused and committed. Reasonability is the path to making your heart suited for love.

Today is the day to enjoy the fruits of your efforts. Push yourself more to do your best and to experience life spontaneously. Never forget to focus your priorities and maintain balance. You do not have to feel negatively toward social interference and unexpected changes. Sex could be a problem if there is not enough of it. Passion and desire are stronger than your reasoning ability. Pisces | Feb 19 – March 20 A fresh sense of future possibilities and confidence will be forthcoming. Communication will be more energetic than usual and unexpected events will be effective by their nature. You should bend the social rules a little in order to exercise a free-spirited approach to life. Whenever your creative ability is used in a practical way, the climb will not be very steep or long. Generosity can create love. Aries | Mar 21 – Apr 19 You should strive to feel and act with necessary pause. Don’t be impulsive and rushing. Your talents are best suited for a profession where success depends on quick decisions. A great philosopher once said that life must be lived forward but it can be understood only backward. The same is true in love. During a time of calm, you can record today’s insight on how to deal with tomorrow’s crisis. TaUrUs | Apr 20 – May 20 There is nothing permanent except change. Bring your ability to think intuitively. It has nothing to do with intelligence or logic, but it is linked to quite a different area of your mind. Learn how to trust in others and better use aspects of your unconscious, including the unconscious area of your being, and you will be able to open the doors of your perception. Have a warm, caring and emotional disposition. GeMini | May 21 – June 20 Nothing in the world is more dangerous than a sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. The major problem of your life is the decay of your belief in personal immortality and keeping temerity. Know that moderation in temper is always a virtue but moderation in principle is always a vice. Don’t let love go into frustration and disappointment because of ego. Cancer | June 21 – July22 Give yourself quiet time to be alone and deepen your spiritual connection. Taking an active and intelligent interest in the voices of others in social communication is very important to realising the true value of information. Competition brings out the best in products but social relationships need no competition. Social affairs are the roots that will lead to beauty and love.

Phnom Penh, where past and present merge. Photo: Washington Post

WHERE TO STAY The Plantation No. 28, St. 184 011-855-232-151-51 www.theplantation.asia Boutique resort in the middle of the city, expanded from a Frenchera building. Rooms from $85. Villa Langka No. 14, St. 282 011-855-23-726-771 www.villalangka.com Leafy, laid-back boutique hotel with pool near the city’s Independence Monument. Rooms from $50. Our tour guide was a Cambodian architecture student from the Royal University of Fine Arts in Phnom Penh. First, he took us into the surviving Post Office, which is still in use and right across the street from Malraux’s onetime hotel room. He led us over to a wall where we gazed up at photos of old counters lost in the changing restorations of the place. The high ceilings, he pointed out, created a cooling effect necessary in the tropical heat. “Sometimes, I really admire these colonial architects,” he said. Dining out The more visible and thriving aspects of the French scene in Phnom Penh are, not surprisingly, food and drink. There are so many good French restaurants and bars here that singling out a handful is difficult, but a few stand out for their distinctively French ambiance. In the gloomily lit Dodo Rhum House, a few blocks west of the river, the slim and occasionally surly Frenchman who runs the place can be found behind the bar, cigarette hanging from his lips, languidly pouring drinks. Not far away, L’Absinthe Bar sells cheap beer and varieties of the strong potion for about US$5 a glass, depending on the quality. It’s on Street 51 in Phnom Penh, a strip of rowdy backpacker bars and clubs. The mood is more laid-back at L’Absinthe, where I always seem to see a little dog running around. I’ve eaten at most of the restaurants: Comme à La Maison, the fittingly named Open Wine and Armand’s, where the FrancoCambodian owner, Armand Gerbié, pours cognac into a pan and theatrically flambés your $20 steak tableside. In 2012, Gerbié told AsiaLIFE that his performance was “an old-fashioned French thing”. It certainly delivers. While I like Armand’s, I prefer Chez Gaston, a small and less expensive restaurant on an unassuming block near the river. A collection of small tables looks out

WHERE TO EAT Chez Gaston No. 76, St. 15 011-855-779-109-45 French bistro on a small street near the river. Entrees start at around $8. Armand’s No. 3, St. 108 011-855-155-489-66 Pricier than Chez Gaston, but the owner puts on more of a show. Main entrees start at around $20. onto the street. The menu is written on a chalkboard. The owner, who isn’t named Gaston, buys little birthday presents for diners. On Valentine’s Day, he presented couples with roses. After the protectorate fizzled out in 1953, the French didn’t exactly leave. If anything, the community grew. Sihanouk, who called for independence and got it, was a Francophile among Francophiles. His preferences kept the relationship in good standing. “In Phnom Penh the French seemed to be everywhere,” Osborne writes in his book about the city, adding that even Sihanouk’s doctor was a French army colonel. But by the late 1960s, the French influence was on the decline. As commerce was nationalised, economic opportunities dwindled. In 1970, Sihanouk was deposed while abroad, and Cambodia was increasingly drawn into the Vietnam War. The new government, egged on by one of the high-ranking officials behind the coup, Lon Nol, launched xenophobic campaigns against large ethnic groups in the country, including the Chinese and, most viciously, the Vietnamese. Buildings lost their royal names in an antiroyalist backlash. In April 1975, the Khmer Rouge took over. Nearly 2 million Cambodians perished from disease, overwork, starvation and execution. Why a movement that targeted the educated classes, turned the country into a prison and eliminated markets and private property held off on demolishing the French buildings is still something of a mystery. During the architecture tour, I asked my guide for his theory. He dryly responded, “Maybe they didn’t have time.” By early 1979, the Vietnamese military had ousted the Khmer Rouge. The occupation lasted for 10 years. The French resurgence didn’t really start until the early to mid-1990s. The 1991 Paris Peace Agreements and the ensuing United Nations Transitional Authority

WHAT TO DO Khmer Architecture Tours www.ka-tours.org Preservationist group of architects and students offers a variety of scheduled tours of Cambodian and French architecture. Customised jaunts may also be arranged. Prices vary, but the popular cyclo and walking tour of colonial-era structures is $15 per person. Book by e-mailing contact@ka-tours.org. INFORMATION www.tourismcambodia.com in Cambodia ushered in a wave of development money, French nongovernmental organisations and French professionals. Frédéric Amat, author of Expatriates’ Strange Lives in Cambodia, came as a journalist almost 20 years ago. He remembers the time well. Sihanouk, the Frenchspeaking royal, came back from exile and reclaimed the throne. Cambodians living in France began to trickle back as well. “When you arrived at the airport, the paper to fill was written in French and Khmer,” he told me. “When you go to the hospitals, the forms were in French.” The community now stands at around 4700, according to the embassy, a number that includes many Cambodians with dual citizenship. Historically correct In December, we signed a year’s lease and moved into the apartment we’d looked at. A Cambodian family lives on the first floor; when I waved hello to the middle-age couple, the man responded, “Bonjour.” An air conditioner was installed as part of the negotiations. Outside, contemporary Phnom Penh beckons. While I’m glad that I’ve found a bit of history, to me the flat isn’t Cambodia. I like the sounds of streetside restaurants coming to life in the morning, and I like giving directions to my colonial apartment by saying, “Go up the river and make a left at the street right before KFC.” The first night here, I rewatched City of Ghosts. The film is about an American (Dillon) who pursues a former business associate in Phnom Penh, only to find himself entangled in a web of corruption. It’s rife with clichés, but I’d forgotten about the role played by the famous French actor Gerard Depardieu. He runs the hotel and cafe where Dillon’s character sets up shop during his misadventure. A Frenchman running a business in Phnom Penh well after the demise of colonial Cambodia. Now that’s about right. – The Washington Post

AUNG MYIN KYAW 4th Floor, 113, Thamain Bayan Road, Tarmwe township, Yangon. Tel: 09-731-35632, Email: williameaste@gmail.com

The Essentials
EMBASSIES Australia 88, Strand Road, Yangon. Tel : 251810, 251797, 251798. Bangladesh 11-B, Than Lwin Road, Yangon. Tel: 515275, 526144, email: bdootygn@ mptmail.net.mm Brazil 56, Pyay Road, 6th mile, Hlaing Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 507225, 507251. email: Administ. yangon@itamaraty.gov.br. Brunei 17, Kanbawza Avenue, Golden Velly (1), Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 566985, 503978. email: bruneiemb@ bruneiemb.com.mm Cambodia 25 (3B/4B), New University Avenue Road, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 549609, 540964. email: RECYANGON @ mptmail.net.mm China 1, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Road, Yangon. Tel: 221280, 221281. Danmark, No.7, Pyi Thu St, Pyay Rd, 7 Miles, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 01 – 9669520 - 17. Egypt 81, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Road, Yangon. Tel: 222886, 222887, Egyptembassy86@ gmail.com France 102, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Road, Yangon. Tel: 212178, 212520, email: ambaf rance. rangoun@ diplomatie.fr Germany 9, Bogyoke Aung San Museum Road, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 548951, 548952, email: info@rangun. diplo.de India 545-547, Merchant St, Yangon. Tel: 391219, 388412, email: indiaembassy @ mptmail.net.mm Indonesia 100, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Rd, Yangon. Tel: 254465, 254469, email: kukygn @ indonesia.com.mm Israel 15, Khabaung Street, Hlaing Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 515115, fax: 515116, email: info@ yangon.mfa.gov.il Italy 3, Inya Myaing Road, Golden Valley, Yangon. Tel: 527100, 527101, fax: 514565, email: ambyang. mail@ esteri.it Japan 100, Natmauk Rd, Yangon. Tel: 549644-8, 540399, 540400, 540411, 545988, fax: 549643 State of Kuwait Chatrium Hotel, Rm: 416, 418, 420, 422, 40 Natmauk Rd, Tarmwe Tsp, Tel: 544500. Lao A-1, Diplomatic Quarters, Tawwin Road, Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 222482, fax: 227446, email: Laoembcab@ mptmail. net.mm Malaysia 82, Pyidaungsu Yeiktha Road, Yangon. Tel: 220248, 220249, email: mwkyangon@ mptmail.net.mm Nepal 16, Natmauk Yeiktha, Yangon. Tel: 545880, 557168, fax: 549803, email: nepemb @mptmail.net.mm Norway, No.7, Pyi Thu St, Pyay Rd, 7 Miles, Mayangone Tsp,Yangon. Tel: 01 – 9669520 - 17 Fax – 01- 9669516 New Zealand No. 43/C, Inya Myaing Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-2305805 Netherlands Diplomatic Mission No. 43/C, Inya Myaing Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-2305805 North Korea 77C, Shin Saw Pu Rd, Sanchaung Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 512642, 510205 Pakistan A-4, diplomatic Quarters, Pyay Rd, Yangon. Tel: 222881 (Chancery Exchange) Philippines 50, Sayasan Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 558149-151,Email: p.e. yangon@gmail.com Russian 38, Sagawa Rd, Yangon. Tel: 241955, 254161, Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia No.287/289, U Wisara Rd, Sanchaung. Tel : 01-536153, 516952. Serbia No. 114-A, Inya Rd, P.O.Box No. 943, Yangon. Tel: 515282, 515283, email: serbemb @ yangon.net.mm Singapore 238, Dhamazedi Road, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 559001, email: singemb_ ygn@_ sgmfa. gov.sg South Korea 97 University Avenue, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 5271424, 515190, fax: 513286, email: myanmar@mofat. go.kr Sri Lanka 34 Taw Win Road, Yangon. Tel: 222812, Switzerland No 11, Kabaung Lane, 5 ½ mile, Pyay Rd, Hlaing Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 534754, 507089. Thailand 94 Pyay Rd, Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 226721, 226728, 226824 Turkish Embassy 19AB, Kan Yeik Thar St, Mayangone Tsp,Yangon. Tel : 662992, Fax : 661365 United Kingdom 80 Strand Rd, Yangon. Tel: 370867, 380322, 371852, 371853, 256438, United States of America 110, University Avenue, Kamayut Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 536509, 535756, Fax: 650306 Vietnam Bldg-72, Thanlwin Rd, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 511305 UNITED NATIONS ILO Liaison 1-A, Kanbae (Thitsar Rd), Yankin Tsp, Tel : 01-566538, 566539 IOM 318 (A) Ahlone Rd, Dagon Tsp, Yangon.Tel – 01-210588, 09 73236679, 0973236680, Email- iomyangon@iom.int UNAIDS 137/1, Thaw Wun Rd, Kamayut Tsp. Tel : 534498, 504832 UNDCP 11-A, Malikha St, Mayangone tsp. Tel: 666903, 664539. UNDP 6, Natmauk Rd, Bahan tel: 542910-19. fax: 292739. UNFPA 6, Natmauk Rd, Bahan tsp. tel: 546029. UNHCR 287, Pyay Rd, Sanchaung tsp. Tel: 524022, 524024. UNIAP Rm: 1202, 12 Fl, Traders Hotel. Tel: 254852, 254853. UNIC 6, Natmauk St., Bahan, tel: 52910~19 UNICEF 14~15 Flr, Traders Hotel. P.O. Box 1435, Kyauktada. Tel: 375527~32, unicef.yangon@unicef. org, UNODC 11-A, Malikha Rd., Ward 7, Mayangone. tel: 01-9666903, 9660556, 9660538, 9660398. email: fo.myanmar@unodc.org UNOPS Inya Lake Hotel, 3rd floor, 37, Kaba Aye Pagoda Rd, Mayangone Tsp. Tel: 951657281~7. Fax: 657279. UNRC 6, Natmauk Rd, P.O. Box 650, TMWE Tel: 542911~19, 292637 (Resident Coordinator), WFP 5 Kan Baw Za St, Shwe Taung Kyar, (Golden Valley), Bahan Tsp. Tel : 2305971~6 WHO No. 2, Pyay Rd, 7 Mile, Mayangone Tsp, Tel : 6504056, 650416, 654386-90. ASEAN Coordinating Of. for the ASEAN Humanitarian Task Force, 79, Taw Win st, Dagon Tsp. Tel: 225258. FAO Myanma Agriculture Service Insein Rd, Insein. tel: 641672, 641673.

General Listing
ACCOMMODATIONHOTELS
Green Paradise Hotel 7, Yeik Tha (1) St, Waizayandar Housing, Tamwe Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-566727, 1222635 09-4200-33335, 09-4200-33337. Email : greenparadisehotel myn@gmail.com www.greenparadisemyn. com Hotel Yangon 91/93, 8th Mile Junction, Tel : 01-667708, 667688. Inya Lake Resort Hotel 37 Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd. tel: 662866. fax: 665537. MGM Hotel No (160), Warden Street, Lanmadaw Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. +95-1-212454~9. www. hotel-mgm.com

ACCOMMODATION Long Term
Golden Hill Towers 24-26, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Bahan Tsp. tel: 558556. ghtower@ mptmail.net.mm.

YANGON No. 277, Bogyoke Aung San Road, Corner of 38th Street, Kyauktada Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : (951) 391070, 391071. Reservation@391070 (Ext) 1910, 106. Fax : (951) 391375. Email : hotelasiaplaza@gmail.com

Asia Plaza Hotel

Happy Homes
REAL ESTATE & PrOpErTY MANAGEmENT

Avenue 64 Hotel No. 64 (G), Kyitewine Pagoda Rd, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 09-8631392, 01 656913-9 Chatrium Hotel 40 Natmauk Rd, Tarmwe. tel: 544500. fax: 544400.

Tel: 09-7349-4483, 09-4200-56994. E-mail: aahappyhomes@ gmail.com, http://www. happyhomesyangon.com Marina Residence 8, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Mayangone Tsp. tel: 6506 51~4. fax: 650630.

No.7A, Wingabar Road, Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : (951) 546313, 430245. 09-731-77781~4. Fax : (01) 546313. www.cloverhotel.asia. info@cloverhotel.asia Clover Hotel City Center No. 217, 32nd Street (Upper Block), Pabedan Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 377720, Fax : 377722 www.clovercitycenter.asia Clover Hotel City Center Plus No. 229, 32nd Street (Upper Block), Pabedan Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 377975, Fax : 377974
www.clovercitycenterplus.asia

No. 205, Corner of Wadan Street & Min Ye Kyaw Swa Road, Lanmadaw Tsp, Yangon. Myanmar. Tel: (95-1) 212850 ~ 3, 229358 ~ 61, Fax: (95-1) 212854. info@myanmarpandahotel .com http://www. myanmarpandahotel.com ParkroYal Yangon, Myanmar 33, Alan Pya Pagoda Rd, Dagon tsp. tel: 250388. fax: 252478. email: enquiry.prygn@ parkroyalhotels.com parkroyalhotels. com.

17, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Yankin Tsp. Tel: 650933. Fax: 650960. Email : micprm@ myanmar.com.mmwww. myanmar micasahotel.com

ACCOMMODATIONHOTELS (Nay Pyi Taw)
(Nay Pyi Taw)

Reservation Office (Yangon) 123, Alanpya Pagoda Rd, Dagon Township Tel : 951- 255 819~838 Royal Kumudra Hotel, (Nay Pyi Taw) Tel : 067- 414 177, 067- 4141 88 E-Mail: reservation@ maxhotelsgroup.com

Confort Inn 4, Shweli Rd, Bet: Inya Rd & U Wisara Rd, Kamaryut, tel: 525781, 526872

Royal White Elephant Hotel No-11, Kan Street, Hlaing Tsp. Yangon, Myanmar. (+95-1) 500822, 503986. www.rwehotel.com Savoy Hotel 129, Damazedi Rd, Kamayut tsp. tel: 526289, 526298, Sedona Hotel Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Yankin. tel: 666900. Strand Hotel 92 Strand Rd. tel: 243377. fax: 289880. Summit Parkview Hotel 350, Ahlone Rd, Dagon Tsp. tel: 211888, 211966. Traders Hotel 223 Sule Pagoda Rd. tel: 242828. fax: 242838. Winner Inn 42, Than Lwin Rd, Bahan Tsp. Tel: 503734, 524387. email: reservation@winner innmyanmar.com Windsor Hotel No.31, Shin Saw Pu Street, Sanchaung. Yangon, Myanmar. Ph: 95-1-511216~8, www. hotelwindsoryangon.com Yuzana Hotel 130, Shwegondaing Rd, Bahan Tsp, tel : 01-549600 Yuzana Garden Hotel 44, Alanpya Pagoda Rd, Mingalar Taung Nyunt Tsp, tel : 01-248944

resorts

For more information about these listings, Please Contact - classified@myanmartimes.com.mm

Emergency Numbers
Ambulance tel: 295133. Fire tel: 191, 252011, 252022. Police emergency tel: 199. Police headquarters tel: 282541, 284764. Red Cross tel:682600, 682368 Traffic Control Branch tel:298651 Department of Post & Telecommunication tel: 591384, 591387. Immigration tel: 286434. Ministry of Education tel:545500m 562390 Ministry of Sports tel: 370604, 370605 Ministry of Communications tel: 067-407037. Myanma Post & Telecommunication (MPT) tel: 067407007. Myanma Post & Tele-communication (Accountant Dept) tel: 254563, 370768. Ministry of Foreign Affairs tel: 067-412009, 067-412344. Ministry of Health tel: 067-411358-9. Yangon City Development Committee tel: 248112. HOSPITALS Central Women’s Hospital tel: 221013, 222811. Children Hospital tel: 221421, 222807 Ear, Nose & Throat Hospital tel: 543888. Naypyitaw Hospital (emergency) tel: 420096. Worker’s Hospital tel: 554444, 554455, 554811. Yangon Children Hospital tel: 222807, 222808, 222809. Yangon General Hospital (East) tel: 292835, 292836, 292837. Yangon General Hospital (New) tel: 384493, 384494, 384495, 379109. Yangon General Hospital (West) tel: 222860, 222861, 220416. Yangon General Hospital (YGH) tel: 256112, 256123, 281443, 256131. ELECTRICITY Power Station tel:414235 POST OFFICE General Post Office 39, Bo Aung Kyaw St. (near British Council Library). tel: 285499. INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Yangon International Airport tel: 662811. YANGON PORT Shipping (Coastal vessels) tel: 382722 RAILWAYS Railways information tel: 274027, 202175-8.

No. (356/366), Kyaikkasan Rd, Tamwe Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Ph: 542826, Fax: 545650 Email: reservation@ edenpalacehotel.com

Reservation Office (Yangon) 123, Alanpya Pagoda Rd, Dagon Township. Tel : 951-255 819-838 Hotel Max (Chaung Tha Beach) Tel : 042-423 46-9, 042-421 33. Email : maxhotelsreservation@ gmail.com

M-22, Shwe Htee Housing, Thamine Station St., Near the Bayint Naung Point, Mayangone Tsp., Yangon Tel : 522763, 522744, 667557. Fax : (95-1) 652174 E-mail : grandpalace@ myanmar.com.mm

AdVertising
WE STARTED THE ADVERTISING INDUSTRY IN MYANMAR SINCE 1991

M A R K E T I N G & C O mm U N I C A T I O N S

A D V E R T I S I N G

No. 12, Pho Sein Road, Tamwe Township, Yangon Tel : (95-1) 209299, 209300, 209343, 209345, 209346 Fax : (95-1) 209344 E-mail : greenhill@ myanmar.com.mm

SAIL Marketing & Communications Suite 403, Danathiha Center 790, Corner of Bogyoke Rd & Wadan Rd, Lanmadaw Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: (951) 211870, 224820, 2301195. Email: admin@ advertising-myanmar.com www.advertising-myanmar. com

THE MYANMAR TIMES february 10 - 16, 2014 AIR CONDITION car rental
MYANMAR EXECUTIVE LIMOUSINE SERVICE

co working space

FITNESS CENTRE

Gems & Jewelleries

HEALTH SERVICES

The First Air conditioning systems designed to keep you fresh all day Zeya & Associates Co., Ltd. No.437 (A), Pyay Road, Kamayut. P., O 11041 Yangon, Tel: +(95-1) 502016-18, Mandalay- Tel: 02-60933. Nay Pyi Taw- Tel: 067-420778, E-mail : sales.ac@freshaircon. com. URL: http://www. freshaircon.com

Yangon La Source Beauty Spa 80-A, Inya Rd, Kamayut Tsp. Tel: 512380, 511252 Beauty Bar by La Source Room (1004), Sedona Hotel, Tel : 666 900 Ext : (7167) LS Salon Junction Square, 3rd Floor. Tel : 95-1-527242, Ext : 4001 Mandalay La Source Beauty Spa No. 13/13, Mya Sandar St, Chanaye Tharzan Tsp. Tel : 09-4440-24496. www.lasourcebeautyspa.com

• • • •

HOT LINE: 09 - 402 510 003 01-646 330 First Class VIP Limousine Car Rental. Professional English Speaking Drivers. Full Insurance for your Safety and comfortable journey Call us Now for your best choice www.mmels.com

No. (6), Lane 2 Botahtaung Pagoda St, Yangon. 01-9010003, 291897. info@venturaoffice.com, www.venturaoffice.com

Duty free

Balance Fitnesss No 64 (G), Kyitewine Pagoda Road, Mayangone Township. Yangon 01-656916, 09 8631392 Email - info@ balancefitnessyangon.com

Get the Best Pure Natural Gemstones and Jewellery No. 44, Inya Road, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-2305811, 2305812. email : info@bestjewels myanmar.com, Bestjewelsmyanmar.com

98(A), Kaba Aye Pagoda Road, Bahan Township, Yangon. Tel: 553783, 549152, 09-732-16940, 09-730-56079. Fax: 542979 Email: asiapacific. myanmar@gmail.com. Dent Myanmar Condo C, Rm 001, Tatkatho Yeikmon Housing, New University Avenue Rd, Bahan. Ph: 09-8615162.

Air Con Sales & Service No. 2/1, Than Thu Mar Rd, Thuwunna Junction. Tel : 09-4224-64130

BARS
50th Street 9/13, 50th street-lower, Botataung Tsp. Tel-397160.

Lemon Day Spa No. 96 F, Inya Road, Kamaryut Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 514848, 09-732-08476. E.mail: lemondayspa.2011 @gmail.com

Car Rental Service No. 56, Bo Ywe St, Latha Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-246551, 375283, 09-2132778, 09-31119195. Gmail:nyanmyintthu1983@ gmail.com,

Duty Free Shops Yangon International Airport, Arrival/Departure Tel: 533030 (Ext: 206/155) Office: 17, 2nd street, Hlaing Yadanarmon Housing, Hlaing Township, Yangon. Tel: 500143, 500144, 500145.

Life Fitness Bldg A1, Rm No. 001, Shwekabar Housing, Mindhamma Rd, Mayangone Tsp. Yangon. Ph: 01-656511, Fax: 01-656522, Hot line: 0973194684, natraysports@gmail.com

coffee machine

Engineering

Lobby Bar Parkroyal Yangon, Myanmar. 33, Alan Pya Phaya Road, Dagon Tsp. tel: 250388.

No. 52, Royal Yaw Min Gyi Condo, Room F, Yaw Min Gyi Rd, Dagon Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: 09-425-307-717

illy, Francis Francis, VBM, Brasilia, Rossi, De Longhi Nwe Ta Pin Trading Co., Ltd. Shop C, Building 459 B New University Avenue 01- 555-879, 09-4210-81705 nwetapintrading@gmail.com

CONSTRUCTION

Strand Bar 92, Strand Rd, Yangon, Myanmar. tel: 243377.fax: 243393, sales@thestrand.com.mm www.ghmhotels.com

BOOK STORES
Zamil Steel No-5, Pyay Road, 7½ miles, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. Tel: (95-1) 652502~04. Fax: (95-1) 650306. Email: zamilsteel@ zamilsteel.com.mm

One-stop Solution for Sub-station, M&E Work Design, Supply and Install (Hotel, High Rise Building Factory) 193/197, Shu Khin Thar Street, North Okkalapa Industrial Zone, Yangon. Tel: 951-691843~5, 9519690297, Fax: 951-691700 Email: supermega97@ gmail.com. www.supermega-engg.com

No. 20, Ground Floor, Pearl Street, Golden Valley Ward, Bahan Township, Yangon. Tel : 09-509 7057, 01220881, 549478 (Ext : 103) Email : realfitnessmyanmar @gmail.com
www.realfitnessmyanmar.com

FLORAL SERVICES

Diamond Palace Jewelry Shop (1) - No. 663/665, Mahar Bandoola Rd, Yangon. Tel : 01-371 944, 371 454, 371 425 Shop (2) - No.1103/1104/ 1105, Ground Fl, Taw Win Center, Yangon. Tel : 01-8600111 ext :1103, 09 49307265 Shop (3) - No.B 020, Ground Fl, Junction Square Shopping Center, Yangon. Tel : 01-527 242 ext : 1081, 09 73203464 Shop (4) – Ground Fl, Gamonepwint Shopping Mall, Kabaraye Pagoda Rd, Yangon. Tel : 01-653 653 ext : 8205 09 421763490 info@seinnandaw.com www.seinnandaw.com www.facebook.com/ seinnandaw

24 Hours Laboratory & X-ray, CT, MRI, Mamogram, Bone DXA No. 68, Tawwin Rd, 9 Mile, Mayangon Township, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : (951) 9 666141 Fax : (951) 9 666135

ENTERTAINMENT

BEAUTY & MASSAGE
• 150 Dhamazedi Rd., Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 536306, 537805. Email : yangon@ monument-books.com • 15(B), Departure Lounge, Yangon Int’l Airport. • #87/2, Crn of 26th & 27th St, 77th St,Chan Aye Thar Zan Tsp, Mandalay. Tel : (02) 24880. MYANMAR BOOK CENTRE Nandawun Compound, No. 55, Baho Road, Corner of Baho Road and Ahlone Road, (near Eugenia Restaurant), Ahlone Township. tel: 212 409, 221 271. 214708 fax: 524580. email: info@ myanmarbook.com

California Skin Spa NO 32.B, Inya Myaing Road, Yangon. (Off University Road) Tel : 01-535097, 01-501295. Open Daily : (10 AM - 8 PM) california-skinspa.com californiaskinspaygn2013 @gmail.com

CONSULTING

Myanmar Research | Consulting | Technology

Shwe Hinthar B 307, 6 1/2 Miles, Pyay Rd., Yangon. Tel: +95 (0)1 654 730 info@thuraswiss.com www.thuraswiss.com

Dance Club & Bar No.94, Ground Floor, Bogalay Zay Street, Botataung Tsp, Yangon.Tel: 392625, 09-500-3591 Email : danceclub. hola@gmail.com
(Except Sunday)

Floral Service & Gift Shop No. 449, New University Avenue, Bahan Tsp. YGN. Tel: 541217, 559011, 09-860-2292. Market Place By City Mart Tel: 523840~43, 523845~46, Ext: 205. Junction Nay Pyi Taw Tel: 067-421617~18 422012~15, Ext: 235. Res: 067-414813, 09-49209039. Email : eternal@ mptmail.net.mm

24 Hours International Clinic & Medical Assistance Services No. 68, Tawwin Rd, 9 Mile, Mayangon Township, Yangon, Myanmar Tel: + 951 651 238, + 959 495 85 955 Fax: + 959 651 398 24/7 on duty doctor: + 959 492 18 410 Website: www.leomedicare. com. “ One Stop Solution for Quality Health Care “ Myittar Oo Eye Hospital 499, Pyay Rd, Kamayut Tsp. Ph: 09-527381.

sales@manawmaya.com.mm www.manawmayagems.com

Ruby & Rare Gems of Myanamar No. 527, New University Ave., Bahan Tsp. Yangon.

Tel: 549612, Fax : 545770. Your Most Reliable Jeweller

FASHION & TAILOR

courier SerVice
DTDC Courier and Cargo Service (Since 1991) Yangon. Tel : 01-374457 Mandalay. Tel : 09-43134095. www.DTDC.COM, dtdcyangon@gmail.com Door to Door Delivery!!! Sein Shwe Tailor, 797 (003-A), Bogyoke Aung San Rd, MAC Tower 2, Lanmadaw Tsp, Yangon, Ph: 01-225310, 212943~4 Ext: 146, 147, E-mail: uthetlwin@gmail.com Floral Service & Gift Centre 102(A), Dhamazaydi Rd, Yangon.tel: 500142 Summit Parkview Hotel, tel: 211888, 211966 ext. 173 fax: 535376.email: sandy@ sandymyanmar.com.mm.

Marina Residence, Yangon Ph: 650651~4, Ext: 109 Beauty Plan, Corner of 77th St & 31st St, Mandalay Ph: 02 72506

Foam spray Insulation

The Natural Gems of Myanmar & Fine Jewellery. No. 30(A), Pyay Road, (7 mile), Mayangone Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-660397, 354398-9 E-mail : spgmes.myanmar @gmail.com The Lady Gems & Jewellery No. 7, Inya Rd, Kamayut Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel : 01-2305800, 09-8315555

No.(68), Tawwin Street, 9 Mile, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. Hunt line: +95 1 9666 141, Booking Ext : 7080, 7084. Fax: +95 1 9666 135 Email: info@witoriya hospital.com www.victoriahospital myanmar.com, Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ WitoriyaGeneralHospital Vibhavadi Hospital Bangkok, Thailand (Myanmar Branch Office) : 214(A-2) Waizayantar Rd, Thingangyun Tsp. Ph: 09-8625086.

Foam Spray Insulation No-410, Ground Fl,Lower Pazuntaung Rd, Pazun taung Tsp, Yangon.Telefax : 01-203743, 09-5007681. Hot Line-09-730-30825.

GENERATORS

Home Furnishing

GAS COOKER & Cooker Hoods

World’s leader in Kitchen Hoods & Hobs Same as Ariston Water Heater. Tel: 251033, 379671, 256622, 647813

No. 589-592, Bo Aung Kyaw St, Yangon-Pathein highway Road. Hlaing Tharyar tsp. Tel: 951645178-182, 685199, Fax: 951-645211, 545278. e-mail: mkt-mti@ winstrategic.com.mm

22, Pyay Rd, 9 mile, Mayangone Tsp. tel: 660769, 664363.

GIFT PRODUCT

Bldg-D, Rm (G-12), Pearl Condo, Ground Flr, Kabaraye Pagoda Rd, Bahan Tsp. Tel: 557448. Ext 814, 09-730-98872.

Yangon : A-3, Aung San Stadium (North East Wing), Mingalartaungnyunt Tsp. Tel : 245543, 09-73903736, 09-73037772. Mandalay : No.(4) 73rd St, Btw 30th & 31st St, Chan Aye Thar Zan Tsp. Tel : 096803505, 09-449004631.

Tel: 01-374851, 394360 Stores:Coreana @ Junction Square / Mawtin, UNIQHAN @U Wisara Rd; MBICenter. No.16, 87th st.

Sole Distributor of Red Ginseng from S.B. FURNITURE Korea Ginseng Corporation

S.B. FURNITURE

No-001-002, Dagon Tower, Ground Flr, Cor of Kabaraye Pagoda Rd & Shwe Gon Dine Rd, Bahan Tsp. Tel: 544480, 09-730-98872.

THE MYANMAR TIMES february 10 - 16, 2014 SANITERY WARE
a drink from paradise... available on Earth @Yangon International Hotel, No.330, Ahlone Rd, Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 09-421040512 Monsoon Restaurant & Bar 85/87, Thein Byu Road, Botahtaung Tsp. Tel: 295224, 09-501 5653. City Mart (47th St Branch) tel: 200026, 298746. City Mart (Junction 8) tel: 650778. City Mart (FMI City Branch) tel: 682323. City Mart (Yankin Center Branch) tel: 400284. City Mart (Myaynigone) tel: 510697. City Mart (Zawana Branch) tel:564532.

European Quality & Designs Indoor/ Outdoor Furniture, Hotel Furniture & All kinds of woodworks No. 422, FJVC Centre, Ground Floor, Room No. 4, Strand Road, Botahtaung Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. Tel: 01-202063-4, 09 509-1673 E-mail: contact@ smartdesignstrading.com www.royalbotania.com, www.alexander-rose.co.uk

Bldg-A2, G-Flr, Shwe Gabar Housing, Mindama Rd, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. email: eko-nr@ myanmar.com.mm Ph: 652391, 09-73108896

For House-Seekers

with Expert Services In all kinds of Estate Fields yomaestatemm@gmail.com

Tel : 09-332 87270 09-2541 26615 (Fees Free)

REMOVALISTS
No.430(A), Corner of Dhamazedi Rd & Golden Valley Rd, Building(2) Market Place (City Mart), Bahan Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-523840(Ext-309), 09-73208079. Ocean Center (North Point), Ground Floor, Tel : 09-731-83900 01-8600056

Bath Room Accessories 79-B3/B3, East Shwe Gone Dine, Near SSC Women’s Center, Bahan. Tel : 01-401083, 0973011100, 09-73056736

serVice office

Water Heaters

Marine Communication & NaVigation

Bld-A2, Gr-Fl, Shwe Gabar Housing, Mindama Rd, Mayangone Tsp, Yangon. email: eko-nr@ myanmar.com.mm Ph: 652391, 09-73108896

Relocation Specialist Rm 504, M.M.G Tower, #44/56, Kannar Rd, Botahtaung Tsp. Tel: 250290, 252313. Mail : info@asiantigersmyanmar.com

Executive Serviced Offices
www.hinthabusinesscentres.com

Tel : 01-4413410 Delicious Hong Kong Style Food Restaurant G-09, City Mart (Myay Ni Gone Center). Tel: 01-508467-70 Ext: 114 UnionBarAndGrill 42 Strand Road, Botahtaung, Yangon. Tel: 95 9420 180 214, 95 9420 101 854 www.unionyangon.com, info@unionyangon.com

The Global leader in Water Heaters A/1, Aung San Stadium East Wing, Upper Pansodan Road. Tel: 01-256705, 399464, 394409, 647812.

Paint
Top Marine Show Room No-385, Ground Floor, Lower Pazundaung Road, Pazundaung Tsp, Yangon. Ph: 01-202782, 09-851-5597 World’s No.1 Paints & Coatings Company Crown Worldwide Movers Ltd 790, Rm 702, 7th Flr Danathiha Centre, Bogyoke Aung San Rd, Lanmadaw. Tel: 223288, 210 670, 227650. ext: 702. Fax: 229212. email: crown worldwide@mptmail.net.mm Quality Chinese Dishes with Resonable Price @Marketplace by City Mart. Tel: 01-523840 Ext.109

Easy access to CBD Fully furnished facility Company setup for $1,000 Office available from $360 only

Made in Japan Same as Rinnai Gas Cooker and Cooker Hood Showroom Address

Water Heater

MEDIA & ADVERTISING

Water solution
Tel: + 95 1 374851 Email : info@jkmyanmar.com www.jkmyanmar.com (ENG) www.3ec.jp/mbic/ (JPN)

Media & Advertising All the way from Australia. Design for advertisement is not easy, reaching to target audience is even harder? We are equipped with great ideas and partners in Myanmar to create corporate logo, business photography, stationery design, mobile advertisement on public transport and billboard/ magazine ads. Talk to us: (01) 430-897, (0) 942-0004554. www.medialane. com.au

Sole Distributor For the Union of Myanmar Since 1995 Myanmar Golden Rock International Co.,Ltd. #06-01, Bldg (8), Myanmar ICT Park, University Hlaing Campus, Hlaing Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 654810~17.

Heaven Pizza 38/40, Bo Yar Nyunt St. Yaw Min Gyi Quarter, Dagon Township. Tel: 09-855-1383

Company Limited

Aekar

TOP MARINE PAINT No-410, Ground Floor, Lower Pazundaung Road, Pazundaung Tsp, Yangon. Ph: 09-851-5202

PLEASURE CRUISES

Legendary Myanmar Int’l Shipping & Logistics Co., Ltd. No-9, Rm (A-4), 3rd Flr, Kyaung St, Myaynigone, Sanchaung Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 516827, 523653, 516795. Mobile. 09-512-3049. Email: legandarymyr@ mptmail.net .mm www.LMSL-shipping.com

World famous Kobe Beef Near Thuka Kabar Hospital on Pyay Rd, Marlar st, Hlaing Tsp. Tel: +95-1-535072

1. WASABI : No.20-B, Kaba Aye Pagoda Rd, Yankin Tsp,(Near MiCasa), Tel; 09-4250-20667, 09-503-9139 Myaynigone (City Mart) Yankin Center (City Mart)

Swiss Business Office Center

Water Treatement Solution Block (A), Room (G-12), Pearl Condo, Kabar Aye Pagoda Rd, Bahan Tsp. Hot Line : 09-4500-59000

SCHOOLS

No. 36-38 (A), Ground Flr, Grand Myay Nu Condo, Myay Nu St, Sanchaung Tsp, Yangon. Tel: +95 (01) 230 60 67~71, Tel: +95 (0) 9 250 294 669 Email: sales@sbocyangon.com www.sboc-yangon.com

Water Treatment

Enchanting and Romantic, a Bliss on the Lake 62 D, U Tun Nyein Road, Mayangon Tsp, Yangon Tel. 01 665 516, 660976 Mob. 09-730-30755 operayangon@gmail.com www.operayangon.com

Office Furniture
Moby Dick Tours Co., Ltd. Islands Safari in the Mergui Archipelago 5 Days, 7 Days, 9 Days Trips Tel: 95 1 202063, 202064 E-mail: info@islandsafari mergui.com. Website: www. islandsafarimergui.com

Open Daily (9am to 6pm) No. 797, MAC Tower II, Rm -4, Ground Flr, Bogyoke Aung San Rd, Lamadaw Tsp, Yangon. Tel: (951) 212944 Ext: 303 sales.centuremyanmar@ gmail.com www.centure.in.th

Schenker (Thai) Ltd. Yangon 59 A, U Lun Maung Street. 7 Mile Pyay Road, MYGN. tel: 667686, 666646.fax: 651250. email: sche nker@mptmail.net.mm.

Horizon Int’l School 25, Po Sein Road, Bahan Tsp, tel : 541085, 551795, 551796, 450396~7. fax : 543926, email : contact@horizonmyanmar. com, www.horizon.com

No. (6), Lane 2 Botahtaung Pagoda St, Yangon. 01-9010003, 291897. info@venturaoffice.com, www.venturaoffice.com

Commercial scale water treatment (Since 1997) Tel: 01-218437~38. H/P: 09-5161431, 09-43126571. 39-B, Thazin Lane, Ahlone.

WEB SERVICE

STEEL STRUCTURE
Pre School and Primary years (Ages 2 to 10) No. 695, Mahabandola Road, (Between 19th & Sint Oh Dan Street), Latha Township, Yangon. Tel :01-382213, 395816 www.imecedu.com

22, Kaba Aye Pagoda Rd, Bahan Tsp. tel 541997. email: leplanteur@ mptmail.net.mm. http://leplanteur.net

home outdoor office Decorum Showroom, 99 Condo, Ground FLoor, Rm (A), Damazedi Rd, Kamayut Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 09-2504-28700 inof@decorum-mm.com

Road to Mandalay Myanmar Hotels & Cruises Ltd. Governor’s Residence 39C, Taw Win Rd, Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel: (951) 229860 fax: (951) 217361. email: RTMYGN@mptmail.net.mm www.orient-express.com

Bo Sun Pat Tower, Bldg 608, Rm 6(B), Cor of Merchant Rd & Bo Sun Pat St, PBDN Tsp. Tel: 377263, 250582, 250032, 09-511-7876, 09-862-4563.

Design, Fabrication, Supply & Erection of Steel Structures Tel : (+95-1) 122 1673 Email : Sales@WECMyanmar.com www.WEC-Myanmar.com

G-01, City Mart (Myay Ni Gone Center). Tel: 01-508467-70 Ext: 106

TRAVEL AGENTS
Temasek International College 56A Pho Sein Road, Tamwe Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-548121, 540510. carine@temasekcollege.com

Web Services All the way from Australia. World-class websites, come with usability and responsiveness. Our works include website, web apps, e-commerce, forum, email campaign and online advertisement. Plus, we’re the authorised reseller for local and international domain names. So, put your worries aside and let us create the awesomeness you deserved online. (01) 430-897, (0) 942-0004554. www.medialane. com.au

RESTAURANTS
G-05, Marketplace by City Mart. Tel: 01-523840 Ext: 105 Good taste & resonable price @Thamada Hotel Tel: 01-243047, 243639-41 Ext: 32 Acacia Tea Salon 52, Saya San Rd, Bahan Tsp. Tel : 01-554739

REAL ESTATE

Asian Trails Tour Ltd 73 Pyay Rd, Dagon tsp. tel: 211212, 223262. fax: 211670. email: res@ asiantrails.com.mm Shan Yoma Tours Co.,Ltd www.exploremyanmar.com

VISA & IMMIGRATION

Furniture Showroom Blk-90, BB2/A, No.2 High Way Road, Mya Ya Mon Housing, 26 Quarter, South Dagon Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 09-2500-68186 09-4500-41804 Email : sale.desmark@ gmail.com.

Real Estate Agent Agent fees is unnecessary Tel : 09 2050107, 09 448026156 robinsawnaing@gmail.com

Singapore Cuisine Super One Super Market, Kyaikkasan Branch, No. 65, Lay Daung Kan Rd, Man Aung Qtr, Tamwe Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-542371, 09-501-9128

Yangon Int’l School Fully Accredited K-12 International Curriculum with ESL support No.117,Thumingalar Housing, Thingangyun, Tel: 578171, 573149, 687701, 687702.

SUPERMARKETS
Capital Hyper Mart 14(E), Min Nandar Road, Dawbon Tsp. Ph: 553136. City Mart (Aung San) tel: 253022, 294765.

Get your Visa online for Business and Tourist No need to come to Embassy. #165. 35th Street, Kyauktada Tsp, Yangon. Tel: +951 381200, 204020 travel.evisa@gmail.com

HOW TO GET A FREE AD

FREE
General
Business
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Property
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Rent/Sale
MAYANGONE, Kabaaye Gamone Pwint Condo, Rm 4GH, 4th Flr, 3650 sqft, 3 MBR, 2 BR, 1 line Phone, Full furniture, Hot & Cold water, Teak Parquet Floor. Ph: 401285, 553-823, 092561-17979, 09-5312027.

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USD. (6).Inya Rd, 3 RC, 8000 Sqft, 4 MR,good for residence & office,12000 USD. Ph: 09-4921-4276. MYANGONE,MiniCondo, 2nd flr, 3 bed room, 1 big living room, 1 Dinning room and Kitchen, 3 verandas Full furnished, 2 bath rooms, 3 aircons. Internet, 50'x40', Quiet, 8½ mile, Pyay Rd, A-One Compound. Contact Ko Thant Zin: 09-73069754, 653005. Mayangone, 8 th Mile, Primrose Condo 3Flr,1MBR, 2SBR, Living Room, 1 Maid Room, Fully Furnish, Own Car Parking, Two Elevator, Security Card System, Contact: 09-511-1485. MAYANGONE, 4th Flr, Thiri Avenue, Taw Win St, 1500 Sqft, Fully furnish, Yearly Contract. Please contact to owner direct Ph: 200581, 09500-0621

Housing for Rent
(condo For Rent in University Avenue St), 1MBR, 2SBR, 4AC, Full Fun:, 1350 sqft, 16 Lakhs, Call-01-569448, 09-432-00669. 9 mile condo Mayangone, 1350 sqft, M2, S1, A/C4, Ph 1, fully furniture - 16 Lakhs, Contact: 09-432-00669. war Dan St, Lanmadaw, (25x50), RC 3½, S3, Ph, AC 3, 65 Ls, Ph: 569448. Lanmadaw 40/46, Lanmadaw 1 St, Ground Floor, Hong Kong Type, 15' x 50'. with yearly contract. Ph : 09-73181708. CLASSIC STRAND condo. Brand new 3 bed 2 bath. $3250/month. Marble/hardwood fitting, modern layout. Near strand hotel/union bar. jasonwongjp@gmail. com, 09-4211-02223. 6 Bed, 4 bath duplex. 3900 sqft, can be used as residence, office or both. bar. jasonwongjp@ gmail.com, 09-421102223. BAHAN , (1)Golden Velly 2RC, 5700sqft, 2MBR, 2SR .US 4500 (2) Golden velly, near Pearl condo, 2RC , 70 x 90, 2MBR, 2SR. US6500 (3) Yankin, Parami St, 2RC, 80 x 60, 4MBR, Fully furnish. US 5500 (4) Parami St, 2RC, 40 x 60, 4MBR,1SR, Fully furnish, US 7000, (5) Moekung Rd, 25 x 80, Hall, US6000. Ph: 0949214276. BAHAN , (1)New University Avenue Rd, New Condo, 1500 sqft, f.f US$ 3500 (2)Shwe Taung Gyar Rd, 60' x 60, 2 RC storey, f.f US$ 3500 (3)New University Ave Rd, 2 Flr, 44' x 55' , 3 MBR, Ph, f.f 25 Lakhs Maureen : 09-518-8320. B/OKKalar, (1)Thit Sar Rd, RC 3 storey house, US$ 3000 (2)Kamayut, Sanyeiknyein Rd, RC 2 storey house, 35 Lakhs Maureen : 09-518-8320. BAHAN, (1). Golden valley, 2 RC,6000 Sqft, 1 MR, 2 SR, 3000 USD. (2).Golden valley, 3 RC, 3375 Sqft, good for office, 9 Bed room, 6500 USD. (3).Golden valley, 2 RC, 4500 Sqft, 2 MR, 2 SR, 4000 USD. (4).Golden valley, 2 RC, 5300 Sqft, 4 MR, 2 SR,10,000 USD. (5). University Avenue Rd, 1500 Sqft, 1 MBR, 2 SR, fully furnish 2500

Expert Services
prime Engineer Co., Ltd. Building (A), Room (501), Yuzana Housing Compound. New Yaetarshae Rd, Bahan, Yangon, Myanmar, Office (+95) 9 31337444, Email: primeengineering @outlook.com Service OFFice you can trust. Business Service for foreign investors. 905, 9F, Panchan Tower, Corner of Dhamazedi Rd & Bagayar Rd, Sanchaung Tsp, Yangon. Tel: 01503895, Email :yangon_ info@v2m.jp, http:// www.v2m.jp

Computer
Computer Services : Software services, Web site services. Ph: 094201-09050.

Education
give your child the best possible start to life at International Montessori Myanmar (English Education Center). Accredited by IMC Bangkok (Since 1991), Our Montessori curriculum includes: Practical Life Exercises. Sensorial Training. Language Development. Mathematics. Cultural Studies. Botany & Zoology. History. Creative Art. Music and Movement. Cooking. Physical Development. Social & Emotional Development. Learning through play. 55(B), Po Sein Rd, Bahan, Yangon, Tel: 546097, 546761. Email: imm. myn@gmail.com English for Young learners : Build confiden ce in commu nicating in English. Build strong foundation in English for further education. Introducing reading with variety of books. Using Int'l syllabuses such as Oxford, Collins & Cambridge ,etc. Lesson will be conducted in English. Taught by qualified & internationally experience teacher.

Housing for Sale
Dagon TSP, Ground Floor, 24' x 50'. No. 66/B, Room - (7/B), Yawmingyi Street, Dagon. Ph : 249196, 249427, 09540-8575. OFFice space, 8000 sqft for sale in MICT park. Large international conglomerates are tenants. 18% yield. Please contact for details. jasonwongjp@ gmail.com Classic strand Condominium, 2200 sqft commercial/ residence for sale. 3rd floor, wide open space. 14 ft ceilings. Gym, cafe, facilities. Prime downtown location, close to strand hotel/union bar. jasonwongjp@gmail. com 6 Bed, 4 bath duplex. 3900 sqft, can be used as residence, office or both. $550k USD, negotiable. On Thein Phyu St, very near Monsoon restaurant and around corner of union bar. jasonwongjp@gmail. com OFFice space, 8000 sqft for sale in MICT park. Easy to rent out to large international conglomerates,18% yield. Pls contact us for details. jasonwongjp@ gmail.com Classic strand Condominium, 2200 sqft commercial/residence for sale. 3rd floor, wide open space. 14 ft ceilings. Gym, cafe, facilities. Prime downtown location, close to strand hotel/ union bar. jasonwongjp@ gmail.com Land & Building for Sales by owner:- 40' x 60' area land & Wood Building Water, Electricity OK & ready for staying No.294, South Dagon18(B) Aung Min Ga La St (Concrete Rd) Ph:01 573881, 09-514-8138

For Rent
Toyota Belta : 2011 year, 15,000km. almost new condition. $500 / month without driver. Car only. No-broker fee (real owner) Aceyangon79@ gmail.com. Ph : 09-43132872

For Sale

Language
language Proficiency: Effective & Scientific way. Tutor/ Translator/ Interpreter. (Such language: Hindi/ Sanskrit/ Bengali/ Nepali/ English & Myanmar), R.S. Verma. B.Sc., (Bot), Yangon. (UFL-English), Yangon. E-mail: rs verma. myanmar@gmail.com Phone: 09-730-42604, 09-2501-41473. LANGUAGE Proficiency: Effective & Scientific way. Tutor, Translator, Interpreter. (Such languages : Hindi, Sanskrit, Bengali, Nepali, English & Myanmar) R.S. Verma. B.Sc., (Bot) Yangon. Email:rs verma. myanmar@gmail.com. ph: 09-730-42604. Teaching Myanmar language for foreigners Near Myay Ni Gone City Mart, Shin Saw Pu Pagoda St. Tel: 09 4200 30 782 Teaching English for adults Near Myay Ni Gone City Mart, Shin Saw Pu Pagoda Street. 09 4200 30 782 FOR FOREIGNERS

Training
Decent Myanmar Training School Personal Management & Business Management Trainings Basic English Grammar IELTS preparation English for Specific Purpose-ESP. (1) Spoken English (2) Business Writing (3) Business English (4) English for Marketing (5) English for HRM (6) English for Media (7) English for IT (8) English for Law (9) English for Marine Engineering (10) English for Medicine 29/ B, Rm 7, Myay Nu St,

(1)MISUBISHI Canda 10' (hydrolic door) 2007 Engine Power 4900CC Pw, Ac, Ps front butterfly, Lay type 3 Tan, 1 G (190 Lakhs, (2)MISUBISHI Canntar box 10' (2006) Engine power 3000 CC, Pw, Ac, Ps front butterfly, Lay type 2 Tan, 1 G, Price :195 Lakhs, Pls contact : Ma Thanzin : 09-73101896 1250 KVA (1000KW) 500 KVA Cummins Genset Volvo Genset Stamford Alternator Sound Proof Type Sound Proof Type. Ph : 01 525218, 09-540-

RENT / SALE
KABAAYE GAMONE PWINT CONDO, Rm - 4GH, 4th Floor, 3650 sqft, 3 MBR, 2 BR, 1 line Phone, 5 Aircon, Full Furniture, Hot & Cold water , Teak Parquet Floor, Ready to Stay. Contact Phone 401285, 553823, 09-2561-17979, 09-531-2027.

Want to Rent
Apartment/House - Wanted Couple from Singapore seeks a clean and comfortable house or apartment in quiet neighbourhood not more than 9 miles from city - for long term stay (minimum 1 year) commencing January/ February 2014. Rental USD 2,500 per month. Email to yadana@ victorymyanmar.com or call 094-5005-3669

THE MYANMAR TIMES february 10 - 16, 2014

FREE
Employment
Office) Yazatingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri,NayPyiTaw. Ormrcshrrecruitment@ gmail. com For more information & application, pls visit to www. anmarredcrosssociety. org Pls mention “Position Title” in subject if you apply. myanmar Red Cross Society is seeking Water and Sanitation Officer 1 post in MRCS-Nay Pyi Taw and frequently travel to program areas: Myanmar National. University Degree in Water & Sanitation, Civil Engineering or related field. 3 years of experience in related community based water & sanitation project. Effective computer knowledge (MS Office, Internet). Red Cross Volunteers are preferable. Pls send application letter, CV & related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society Head Office, Yazathingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri,NayPyiTaw. Or mrcshrrecruitment@ gmail.com. medecins du Monde (MDM) is seeking(1) Methadone Advisor 1 post in Moegaung, Kachin State: MBBS (with valid medical registration: SAMA). 1 year experience as a Methadone medical doctor in the field of Harm Reduction. Fluency in English. Computer skills. (2)Account 1 post in Yangon: Bachelor of Economic (or) Diploma of Accounting. 2 years experience. Fluency in Myanmar & English. Computer skill. Pls submit CV & a cover letter to MDM Country Coordination Office in Yangon. 11(B), Mahar Myaing St, Sanchaung, Yangon. Ph: 01-230 4015, 09-731-71002 Or Email: office.mdm myanmar@ gmail.com & can speak & write well in English (Korean Language skill is also welcomed) and can go business travel to Nay Pyi Taw and any other places if necessary, Government retired is more preferable. (2) Sales & Marketing Manager - M/F 1 Post : Age between 25 ~ 40, Graduated, fluent in English, 3 or 4 year experience in the related field & experience in automotive and lubricant field, must have a record of performance with a very persuasive, empathetic selling style and must also have legal experience for documentation and evaluated assets and building sales network and have driving license. Can be able to travel any located in Myanmar and well know new market research, (3)B to B (OR) Dealer Section Manager - M/F 1 Post : Age between 25 to 40, Graduated, fluent in English, 3 or 4 year experience, must have a record of performance with a very persuasive, empathetic selling style. Self-motivated & competitive with a strong drive to get things done. Must also have legal experience for documentation and evaluated assets and building sales network & have driving license. Can be able to travel any located in Myanmar. Closing Date : 28.2.2014. Address : 37(A), 3 Quarter, Thamine Junction, Mayangone, Yangon. 01-654881~84, E-mail: fk.intermotor@ gmail.com. We are looking for English Native Speaking Teachers with a University Degree and Teaching Certificate from Canada, USA, UK, Australia, NZ, Singapore to teach one or more of: English, Maths, Chemistry, Physics, Computer Science, Biology, History, Geography... at a Senior High School (G- 12) Level in Yangon. Anyone interested please contact 09-5062891, 09-4200-79631. machinery & Solutions Co., Ltd. is seeking (1) Travel Coordinator 1 F, (2) Site Coordinator 1 F/M, (3) Electrical Engineer 2 F/M, (4) Substation Specialist 1 F/M, (5) Distribution Specialist 1 F/M, (6) Social Specialist 1 F/M, (7) Transmission Engineer 1 F/M, (8) Financial Management Analyst 1 F/M, (9) Welder/ Fitter 5 M, Position 1 - must have 1-3 years experience in Hotel/ Tourism/ Travelling/ Business Admin. Position 2 - any bachelor/ Degree prefer electrical engineering with 10-year experience in relevant fields and Good communication, negotiation, excellent interpersonal skill, presentation skill, analytical, planning and reporting skills. Welcome to any retired person who from MEPE. Position 9 must have mini: 5 years experience in relevant fields and holding certified 6G experience as an advantage. All positions will be enable communicate in English (4-skills)/ Internet & Email/ Microsoft Office. Those who are interested in challenging job can send Resume to hr.mands.sg@gmail. com with cover letter stated expected salary not later than 15.2.2014. GOLDEN ROCK Travel & Tours is seeking Tour Operator. The candidate for the Tour Operator position should ideally meet the following requirements: Good command of English and Computing Skills, A good personality, Age between 20 & 30, A team player and a person of integrity. Interested candidates possessing the above qualifications can call 01 527 379 or send in their CV’s via e-mail to sashan@ visitmyanmar.com Savoy Hotel , Yangon is urgently looking for (1) Human Resources Assistant 1 ~ 2 years experience, good English & good personality (2) Guest Relation Manager - 3 ~ 4 years experience, very good English, good personality (3) Bar Supervisor - 2 ~ 3 years experience, good English and good personality (4) Driver 3 years experience (5) Security - M 2 post, 2 years experience (Casual) (6) Door Girl - F 2 post, good personality (Casual) Application letter by email to generalmanager@ savoyhotel-yangon.com or 129, Dhammazedi Rd, Yangon. Tel: 526298, 526289. Pls mention the desire position on the application letter. We are seeking 3 vacancies of the florist for my floral service & gift shop. Female florists urgently required. Please contact : 09-518-5155. Export & Import : (1) Customer Service Manger - F 1 post (2) Export & Import Staff - M/F 3 posts (3) Sales & Marketing M/F 2 posts (4)Custom Clearance M/F- 3 posts (5)Operation (packer)-M 5 posts (6) Senior Accountant -F 1 post (7)Cashier - F 1 post. Travel & Tour : (1).Tour Operation Manager - M/F 1 post (2) Operation Staff - M/F 3 post (3) HR Manager - F 1 post Requirement for Qualification, skill & experiences are as per our conversation. Legendary Myanmar: No,9 A-4 3 Flr Kyaung Lane Myaeni Gone, Ph:01-823653,516-795, 503467 hr. legendary myanmar@gmail.com KELVIN CHIA Yangon Ltd is a foreign legal consultancy firm. We invite motivated and committed individuals to join us as (1) Lawyers who will work on a variety of corporate & commercial matters & transactions in Myanmar. If you are a Myanmarqualified lawyer with strong English language skills, you are invited to apply to join our Myanmar practice group. Myanmar nationals admitted to int’l bars are also welcome to apply. Training will be provided. Applicants may email to klm@kcyangon.com. (2) Corporate Affairs Executive/Assistant As a corporate affairs executive/assistant, you will be involved with business development, networking, market research & liaison work. Applicants should be proficient in English, energetic & self-motivated. All nationalities are welcome (Myanmar, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Taiwanese, etc). Pls email to kk@ kcyangon.com Elite Int'l School is seeking (1). English Teachers (Foreigner) (2). English Teachers (Local ) (3). Subject Teachers (Secondary & Primary Levels) (4). Music Teachers (5). Drawing Teachers Should you be interested send your detailed CV to 27, Bayintnaung Main Rd, Hlaing, Yangon. Ph: 01-531117 Email:elitein ternationalschool09 @ gmail.com Typist : High school graduate, Good key board skills & a decent command of the English (spelling, grammar & punctuation) to produce high quality documents, Efficient & pay attention to detail, Can use computer software packages, including Word, Excel & Power Point, Are a good communicator, Produce neat and well-presented work, Are discreet – much of the information you will be dealing with will be confidential. Ph: 134 A, Than Lwin Rd, Golden Valley Ward 1, Bahan, (BOX 729 GPO) Yangon. Ph: 526 180. Nestle is seeking (1) Sales Trade Develop ment Manager (Base in Mandalay). Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration or rele vant education degree.5 years' experience, in FMCG is preferable. (2) Nutrition AdvisorYa n g o n / M a n d a l a y / Mawlamyaing. Bachelor's Degree in Medical, Food Science, Food Technology, Nurs ing, Pharmaceutical or any Science related field. 1 year experience in Nutrition. (3) Marketing ExecutiveNestle Professional. Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration or related education degree. 3 years experien ce in Marketing. (4) Agronomist. Bachelor's Degree in Agriculture. 1 or 2 years experience. For all posts : Good command of English & Computer literacy. Pls submit complete detailed resume to Nestle Myanmar Ltd, Flr 11th Centerpoint Towers, No.65, Corner of Sule Pagoda Rd and Merchant St, Kyauktada, Yangon, Or email to: zinhnaung a @ n e s t l e m y a n m a r. com.mm (OR) tztzha@ gmail.com Searching for serious, confident, experienced taylor (man/woman) for small bag production. Good working conditions, Golden Valley, Yangon. Contact phone for details: 09-504-1359 Myanmar's largest advertising agency seeks a Client Service Representative to serve customers by providing agency service information; managing client communications; and coordinating with management and SAIL employees to deploy advertising services. Requirement : High English ability. Professio nal dress. Highly confident engaging with foreign clients, Market knowledge, Interpersonal skills, Documentation skills. Pls apply to: SAIL Marketing & Communications www. advertising-myanmar. com, 790, Bogyoke Rd and Wadan Rd Junction Suite 603, Danathiha Center, Lanmadaw. Ph: 211870, 224820 A ccountants , General Clerks, Marketing & Sales Persons - M/F : Age above 30 - Urgent Need US$ 1,000 /Month, Free accomodation, Food, Transport Yearly Bonus, Local Allowances, Festival Allowances To work in Nigeria, Lagos. 25 Myanmar are working there. No agent fees, Air Ticket Free, During Vacation with pay CPA or ACCA or M.Ba or B.Com or D.Ma or LCCI or any Accounting Academic Good for English speaking, Computer skill & MYOB & other accounting package. Ph:01-573881, 09-5148138. ParKway Cancer Centre is seeking Medical Doctor - F 1 post : M.B,B.S Graduate with SA MA registration, 2 years experience in medical field, Good com munication in English, Must be able to use computer, internet and Microsoft application with excellent skills. We welcome the candidates who are trust worthy, selfmotivated with positive working attitude. Pls submit: CV with relevant certificates, documents, recommendation letter attach and documents, & expected salary. Rm G-07, G Flr, Diamond Center, Pyay Rd, Kama yut. Tel : 532 438, 532 447, Email : yangon@ canhope.org MarKeting StaFF 2 posts medical products sales experience. Glorious Light Trading Co., Ltd Ph--09-2012304 , 01-391683 A Leading Shipping Company, based in Singapore with business activities in freight forwarding services is seeking (1). Management Trainee (2).Sales Executive: a degree holder from a recognized university, Age above 25; Possess superior oral & written communication skills as well as strong interpersonal skills and exhibit good judgment, & function with minimal guidance in a highly demanding environment; Able to speak and write English with proficiency; Able to use computer effectively and efficiently; Applications will be accepted until positions are filled. Pls apply via email with a recent photograph to star2013. collette@gmail.com our website at www. meridianshippinggroup. com . The Asahi Shimbun: Japanese newspaper is seeking; Admin and Reporter (Female) - 1 post : Essential English skill in writing & speaking, Age not more than 35, Please send resume to asahiyangon@gmail. com KELVIN CHIA Yangon Ltd is a foreign legal consultancy firm. We invite motivated & committed indivi duals to join us as: Administrative Execu tive : Good written & spoken communication skills in English. Mature and capable of supervising & directing subordinates. Must be well-organized, meti culous, have initiative & execute instructions promptly. Some account ing back ground & experien ce preferred. Pls send full resume stating their current and expected salaries, together with a recent photograph to chw@ kcyangon.com

UN Positions
the Int'l Organization for Migration (IOM) office in Yangon is seeking Security Guard 1 post in Thaton Tsp, Mon State. Interested Organization for Migration (Thaton Sub Office), 9/A, Min Rd (Min Lan), Lake Inn Ward, Thaton Township

Ingo Positions
the International Rescue Committee (IRC) is seeking Project Officer Agriculture 2 post in Myebon, Rakhine State. Bachelor's degree in related field. 2 yeras experience. Ability to work and travel in remote areas. Experience of work with NGO is an asset. Skilled in community mobilization, facilitation and health promotion. Skilled in Excel, Word software. Language: Very good command of English and Myanmar - written and verbal. Intersted and qualified candidates are to submit a Cover Letter and Curreculum Vitae to the HR Department not later than 21st February 2014. Please send e-mail at: MaiMyaMyintZu. Tin@rescue.org or IRC office. (1) International Rescue Committee (IRC), No.33/A, Natmauk Lane Thwe (1), Bocho (2) Quarter, Bahan Tsp, Yangon, Myanmar. myanmar Red Cross Society is seeking Admin & Finance Assistant (Township Branch Project) 1 post in Falam Township with frequent travel to project sites: Myanmar National. Relevant educational background (accounting, finance, administration or equivalent). 2 years experience in a similar position, preferably with a local or international organization. Effective English language skills. Effective computer knowledge (Microsoft Office & Internet). Red Cross Volunteers are preferable. Pls send application letter, CV & related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society Head Office, Yazathingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri,NayPyiTaw. Or mrcshrrecruitment@ gmail.com Closing date: 21-2-2014. internationalRescue Committee - Myanmar is seeking Finance Assistant 3 posts in Paletwa Tsp, Chin State/ Myebon Tsp, Rakhine State/ Loikaw Tsp, Kayah State: University degree in Accounting, Business Administration, Commer ce of Finance with a recognized professional certificate in accounting (CPA or equivalent certificate would be preferred). 2 years of accounting professional experience. Experience with various PC & financial related software (spreadsheets, accounting packages); Pls submit a Cover letter & CV to the HR Department Applications will be accepted by email at: MaiMyaMyintZuTin@ rescue.org or by delivery to Int'l Rescue Committee (IRC) : 33/A, Natmauk Lan Thwe (1), Bocho (2) Quarter, Bahan, Yangon. Closing date : 14 February 2014.

actinaid Myanmar is looking for suitable candidate to fill the following position: DIPECHO Consortium M&E Coordinator, (Myanmar Consortium for Community Resi lience). Education & Certifications: Degree inrelevant field from a reputable university or equivalent management working experience in the development or humanitarian sector. 5 years experience working in an M&E role in the development or humanitarian sector. Experience of DG-ECHO or EC funded projects; knowledge of DG-ECHO or EC funded donor requirements. Excellent communication & writ ing skills(Myanmar&English). Technical experience of DRR, CCA or resilience program ming. Pls send an application letter along with a current C.V to: No (1), Win Ga Bar Avenue, Shwe Gone Daing, Bahan, Yangon or email Aamyanmar.Job@ actionaid.org or a copy to job.actionaid509@gmail. com, No requirement of photo or copy of certificates. Closing date: 12, February 2014. th February 18 & 19th: Face-to-Face Interview & Written Interview internationalRescue Committee - Myanmar is seeking Finance Assistant 3 posts in Paletwa Tsp, Chin State/ Myebon Tsp, Rakhine State/ Loikaw Tsp, Kayah State: University degree in Accounting, Business Administration, Commer ce or Finance with a rexognized professional certificate in accounting (CPA or equivalent certificate would be preferred). 2 years of accounting professional experience. Experience with various PC and financial related software (spreadsheets, accounting packages). Pls submit a cover letter & CV to the HR Department. Applications will be accepted by email at: MaiMyaMyintZuTin@ rescue.org or by delivery to the IRC office : Int'l Rescue Committee (IRC), No.33/A, Natmauk Lane Thwe (1), Bocho (2) Quarter, Bahan, Yangon, Closing date : 14 February 2014. MYANMAR Red Cross Society is seeking (1) Field Coordinator -1 Post (2) Accountability, Equity, Inclusion Officer - 1 Post (3) Branch Project Finance & Admin Officer - 1 Post (4) Field Supervisor - 2 Posts (5) Field Assistant - 1 Post. Application process: Pls send your application letter, CV & related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society (Head Office) Yazatingaha Rd, Dekkhinathiri,NayPyiTaw. Ormrcshrrecruitment@ gmail.com For more information & application, pls visit to www. myanmarredcross society.org Pls mention “Position Title” in subject if you apply. (1) Admin & Finance Assistant - 1 post Application process: Pls send your application letter, CV and related documents to Myanmar Red Cross Society (Head

Local Positions
Fresh male/female graduates of any discipline with a good command of written and spoken English are invited to apply as Commercial Trainees for a Singapore based Trading company having requirement for its office in Yangon. Working knowledge of computers and a pleasant outgoing personality shall be an advantage. Please apply to vatsal@evertopcom. com Commercial Trainees Post : M/F, Any Graduate, Age 25 to 45, 3 years experienced, Good command of 4 skill English, Must be able to travel. Hyundai Car Showroom is seeking (1)Government Relation Officer - M/ F 2 Posts : Graduated with Business, Commerce & Int'l Relation, Age between 26 ~ 50, directly report to GM, Well knowledge of Government Business, Government Relation, Government Rules & Regulations, Govern ment Procedures & Private Business Development Plan & Strategy, 3 ~ 4 years experienced in Business Development Sector, Government Sector (MOC, MIC, Custom) and especially in Automobile Business, Able to use Computer

Vacancy Announcement Temasek International College
(1) Higher Education Marketing Manager / Director • Minimum of 3 years marketing experience in Yangon higher education • Strong connections to the local media and events partners • Your application will be treated with the upmost confidentiality directly with the Centre Director (2) Senior Lecturer / Head of Academics (Higher Education) • Master degree in Business or Hospitality • Prior experience with HND BTEC programs as head of academics • This position is opened equally to Myanmar and Foreign Nationals (3) Lecturers (Part time or Full time) • Specialized in Business or Hospitality with related Bachelor/Master degree and Experience To apply forward your resume to Ms.Carine Le Port, Centre Director : carine@temasekcollege.com You can also visit us at 56A Pho Sein Road, Tamwe Tsp, Yangon. Tel : 01-548121, 01-540510.

Vacancy Announcement
We are seeking

Account and Admin Assistant (1) post
Requirements : Effective English language skill, Computer knowledge (Microsoft Office and Internet) and relevant educational background (accounting, administration or equivalent). Please send your application letter, CV and related documents to antarakoh.myanmar @yahoo.com, akaceh@yahoo.com Email : wahwahmyat.2012@gmail.com

66 Sport

THE MYANMAR TIMES February 10 - 16, 2014

Super Bowl XLVIII sets record for TV viewers
SEATTLE’S 43-8 blowout of Denver in Super Bowl 48 offered little in the way of suspense, but 111.5 million viewers made it the most-watched television event in US history. Ratings released by the Fox network on February 3 showed the February 2 game also set a record for the most-streamed online sports event, while a whopping 25.3 million related tweets composed by 5.6 million authors were logged before, during and after the contest. The viewership for the Seahawks’ lopsided victory eclipsed the previous record 111.3 million viewers who watched the 2012 Super Bowl between the New York Giants and New England Patriots, according to the Nielsen tracking service. The NFL’s championship spectacular is always a big TV draw and, until ratings for last year’s game showed a slight decline, the Super Bowl had set viewership records for three straight years. The half-time show headlined by hit singer Bruno Mars, with guests the Red Hot Chili Peppers, was also a record breaker with an estimated TV audience of 115.3 million. That eclipsed the 110.8 million who watched Beyonce last year, as well as the previous record of 114.0 million set by Madonna two years ago. In its statement regarding the ratings, Fox concluded that interest in the game was piqued by the fact that it was the first Super Bowl to be played in an outdoor stadium in a cold-weather location – and that it was played in the New York metropolitan area, a massive media market. Even though the Broncos didn’t manage to score until the end of the third quarter, viewership climbed through the first half. “Viewership remained impressively high through the fourth quarter despite the fact that Seattle had the game well in hand,” a Fox statement said. Fox said the most active moments on social media during the game were when Seattle’s Percy Harvin returned the second half kickoff 87 yards for a touchdown (429,000 tweets), the conclusion of the half-time show (424,000 tweets) and Most Valuable Player Malcolm Smith’s second-quarter interception return for a touchdown (300,000 tweets). – AFP

LOS ANGELES

Ian Thorpe in rehab for depression

SYDNEY

A

Pete Carroll of the Seattle Seahawks holds the Vince Lombardi Trophy winning Super Bowl XLVIII on February 2 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Photo: AFP

USTRALIAN swimming great Ian Thorpe was in rehab for depression on February 4 after a mixture of painkillers and anti-depressants left him disoriented on a Sydney street, highlighting the pressures facing elite athletes after retirement. But his manager James Erskine insisted no alcohol was involved, as the swimmer’s father suggested he faced months of treatment but would “come out the other side”. A “dazed” Thorpe, 31, was discovered by police attempting to get into a car near to his parents’ house in the early hours of February 3 and taken to hospital for assessment. It was his second recent visit to hospital, after falling and needing shoulder surgery last week. At the time, his management denied reports that he was also being treated for depression and alcohol abuse. Erskine told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation that the five-time Olympic gold medalist was now receiving treatment for depression, a condition he has struggled with for years. “He’d been taking prescribed drugs, painkillers for his shoulder and he’s also on prescription drugs for anti-depression ... but it’s obviously a mixture of it and that mixture made him disorientated because he was wandering around at 3 o’clock in the morning,” he said. Residents rang police after Thorpe tried to get into a car that he thought belonged to a friend. “He became disorientated and he tried to get into what he thought was a friend’s car, but it wasn’t his friend’s car at all,” Erskine said. As well as being open about his depression, Thorpe detailed a battle with alcohol in his 2012 autobiography, but Erskine said it was not a factor in the recent incident.

Swimmer Ian Thorpe speaks with reporters during a press conference near the Olympic Stadium in London on July 26, 2012. Photo: AFP

“There was no alcohol involved, He hadn’t been drinking or anything like that,” he said. “The hospital then suggested – or more than suggested, I think – that he should go into rehab for depression and that’s what’s happened.” Thorpe’s father Ken told the Sydney Daily Telegraph he was optimistic his son would pull through. “He is battling with his health issues at the moment and he is having a tough time,” he said, reportedly choking back tears. Thorpe is Australia’s most decorated Olympian with five gold medals at the 2000 Sydney and 2004 Athens Games, with his extraordinary success attributed partly to his abnormally large feet and hands. He became the first person to win six gold medals at one world championships, in 2001, among 11 world titles overall – along with 10 Commonwealth Games gold medals. But the demands of a celebrity lifestyle and grinding training saw him quit in 2006 before a comeback in

2012 in which he failed to qualify for the London Olympics. While every major sport in Australia runs an Athlete Career and Education Program to help prepare for life after sport, Thorpe has not been able to find a direction, dabbling in jewellory design and television while attempting a number of university courses. Former long-time rival Grant Hackett told Fairfax Media Thorpe was naturally introverted and thrived in the team environment, which was lost when he retired. “It’s not a transition many people are ready for and it is difficult and it’s hard and you’ve got to have good support around you, regardless if you’re high profile or not, to make that transition successfully,” he said. “I think Ian’s had difficulty in that, and obviously coming in and out of the sport again has probably exacerbated some of the issues that he was struggling with. My heart certainly goes out to him as one of his closest rivals but more so as a friend.” – AFP

Sport
68 THE MYANMAR TIMES february 10 - 16, 2014

SPORT EDITOR: Tim McLaughlin | timothy.mclaughlin3@gmail.com

A record 110 million viewers tune in for Superbowl
SPORT 66

Football Federation appoints Avramovic as natl coach
KYaw Zin HlainG kyawzinhlaing91@gmail.com

PARIS

THE Myanmar Football Federation (MFF) has appointed Serbian Radojko Avramovic as national team coach, it was announced on February 5 at Sedona Hotel, Yangon. Avramovic, along with his goal coach and assistant coach, signed a one-anda-half-year contract that will see him through to next June’s SEA Games in Singapore. He starts work with immediate effect, and will handle the Myanmar national team as well as its Under-23 side. Myanmar will compete in the AFC Challenge Cup competition, the Asia Under-22 qualifying matches, the Suzuki Cup 2014 and the Asia U-19 championship competition this year, and the U-23 team will take part in the Singapore SEA Games next year. “Raddy is a very experienced coach who knows ASEAN football very well. I think he is the best coach for our team. We hope he can take Myanmar football to a higher level,” said MFF president U Zaw Zaw. “I know the Myanmar people love football. I’m proud to become coach of the Myanmar national team,” said Mr Avramovic at the press conference. Radojko Avramovic is a Serbian former goalkeeper and manager. Aged 64, he was Singapore’s national football coach from 2003 to 2012, winning the ASEAN Football Federation Suzuki Cup three times (2004, 2007 and 2012).

A panoramic view of the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Photo: AFP

Winter Olympics ceremony ‘personal triumph’ for Putin
EUROPEAN commentators portrayed the opening ceremony of the Sochi Winter Olympics as a personal triumph and even an exorbitant show of power for Russian President Vladimir Putin. There was general praise for the opening spectacle in the Black Sea resort of Sochi even if commentators revived criticism of the build-up to the Games, including Russia’s gay rights record and the unprecedented $50 billion cost of staging the sporting event. “Putin demanded a wondrous launch to this 22nd edition of the Winter Olympic Games here in Sochi,” wrote Ian Chadband in The Daily Telegraph. “And with £31 billion being ploughed into making the world gasp at his ‘new’ Russia’s extraordinary reach and ambition, unsurprisingly his wish was granted with a ceremony which, even if it lacked London 2012’s humour and fun, proved a gasp-inducing, visual journey through his country’s history,” said Chadband. The Times hailed Britain’s own staging of the Summer Games in 2012, but said Sochi offered “a redhot spectacle” even if there had been a technical glitch. One of five illuminated snowflakes which were supposed to morph into the Olympic rings failed to appear, leaving an embarrassing set of just four rings. “For President Putin it is a chance to show off Russia as a resurgent superpower, but his efforts have been hampered by a plethora of problems and criticism from the gay community, human rights groups and even animal rights activists,” The Times said. Jonathan McEvoy, writing in the Daily Mail, also hailed the spectacle. “For Russia last night it marked its revival as a post-Soviet powerhouse, confident of its seat at the top table after two decades of doubt and despondency,” McEvoy wrote. “This was an unapologetic advert – history on Russia’s terms. “There was no doubt who was the all-action hero of this piece. The light on the presidential box remained on when all others were switched off, in case anyone did not get the message,” he wrote. French newspapers were harsher on Putin, seeing in him imperialist ambitions. The communist newspaper Humanite said: “The capitalist accumulation there [in the regime] is brutally piloted by the ‘Tsar’ and so much the worse for the little people.” For the sports newspaper L’Equipe, the event showed up Putin’s excessive zeal. “Rarely have Olympic Games been personified or excessive to this point. Vladimir Putin, the Tsar of the Kremlin, worked alone for Sochi’s destiny. Without worrying about the staggering costs or the flouted human rights,” L’Equipe said. In Italy, La Stampa daily said “there was a lot of Russian-tinted pride to tell the world that the power of yesteryear is back.” La Stampa called it a “a very personal triumph” for Putin, but added: “The show was too big and costly for a Winter Olympics.” Most Italian media referred to Sochi as “Putin’s Olympics”. – AFP

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