Thrust 4: RESPONSIBLE NANOMANUFACTURING

Health, Safety, and the Environment
We work under this umbrella… Bello D, Rogers E, Schmidt D, Ellenbecker (Hsieh SF, Rahke S, Rao N, Tsai C)

NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing
Director: Ahmed Busnaina, NEU Deputy Director: Joey Mead, UML Associate Directors: Glen Miller, UNH; Carol Barry, UML; Nick McGruer, NEU; Jacqueline Isaacs, NEU

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COMPLEX PROBLEMS require INTEGRATED APPROACHES

SUSTAINABLE MANUFACTURING

MAXIMIZE Technological Benefits, while MINIMIZING Health RISKS!

EXPOSURE
CLINICAL CHEM & HUMAN TOX
ASSESSMENT & PREVENTION

• Toxicity Screening • Biological Significance • Better Exposure Metrics

• Are there Exposures? • Are they Hazardous? • How to best avoid them?

MAIN RESEARCH AREAS
 High rate Tier-1 toxicity screening for NMs on biological oxidative stress;  Exposure assessment to NMs;
 Standardization of exposure protocols  Biological significance of exposures

based

 Exposure prevention
 Fume hoods and PPE

 Best Practices document

NEED 1 HIGH RATE Toxicity Screening

• Nanomaterials (NMs) are being generated faster than existing toxicity testing approaches (expensive, complex) can handle; • A critical need exists for a simple, high rate Tier 1 toxicity screening of NMs;
– Flag toxic materials – Feedback for green manufacturing
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NEED 2 Judging Biological Significance of Exposures • Characterization of the hazard of NMs exposures is hampered • Metals/Impurities by inability to measure • Surface Charge simultaneously, in real time multiple necessary • Morphology physicochemical parameters • Crystalinity implicated in their toxicity;
• Surface Area • Biopersistence •Etc…

• Biological significance of measured NMs exposures is often unclear.
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