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HoltMcDougalModernChemistryDoDEAChemistryIndicatorsCorrelation

Modern Chemistry
Chapter 1 Matter and Change
Safety in the Chemistry Laboratory (Pgs. xxii-xxvii) Section 1: Chemistry is a Physical Science (Pgs. 3-5) Section 2: Matter and Is Properties (Pgs. 6-15) Cross Disciplinary Connection: Secrets of the Cremona Violins (Pg. 15) Section 3: Elements (Pgs.16-18) Why It Matters: Superconductors (Pg. 18) Math Tutor: Converting SI Units (Pg. 21) Chapter Summary (Pg 22) Chapter Review (Pgs. 23-24) Standards Based Assessment (Pg 25) Section 1: Scientific Method (Pgs.27-30 )
Ca.2: Use appropriate laboratory apparatuses, technology, and techniques safely and accurately when conducting a scientific investigation. Ca.8: Use appropriate safety procedures when conducting investigations. Course Introduction (defining Chemistry) Cd.10: Explain the role of collision frequency, the energy of collisions, and the orientation of molecules in reaction rates. Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. (Pre-requisite) Cf.11: Use a variety of procedures for separating mixtures (including distillation, crystallization filtration, paper chromatography, and centrifuge).

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). (Pre-requisite)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Ca.3: Use scientific instruments to record measurement data in appropriate metric units that reflect the precision and accuracy of each particular instrument. (Pre-requisite) Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). (Pre-requisite) Cd.10: Explain the role of collision frequency, the energy of collisions, and the orientation of molecules in reaction rates. Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. (Pre-requisite) Cf.11: Use a variety of procedures for separating mixtures (including distillation, crystallization filtration, paper chromatography, and centrifuge).

Chapter 2 Measurements and Calculations


Ca.4: Design a scientific investigation with appropriate methods of control to test a hypothesis (including independent and dependent variables), and evaluate the designs of sample investigations. Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Ca.6: Evaluate the results of a scientific investigation in terms of whether they verify or refute the hypothesis and what the possible sources of error are. Ce.6: Use density to determine the mass, volume, or number of particles of a gas in a chemical reaction.
(Pre-requisite)

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HoltMcDougalModernChemistryDoDEAChemistryIndicatorsCorrelation
Why It Matters: Models in Chemistry (P. 30) Section 2: Units of Measurement (Pgs 31-41) Quick Lab: Density of Pennies (P. 37) Chemistry Explorers: Classical Ideas about Matter (Pg. 41)
Ca.6: Evaluate the results of a scientific investigation in terms of whether they verify or refute the hypothesis and what the possible sources of error are. Ca.3: Use scientific instruments to record measurement data in appropriate metric units that reflect the precision and accuracy of each particular instrument. Ce.6: Use density to determine the mass, volume, or number of particles of a gas in a chemical reaction.
(Pre-requisite)

Ce.6: Use density to determine the mass, volume, or number of particles of a gas in a chemical reaction.
(Pre-requisite)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Ca.1: Apply established rules for significant digits, both in reading a scientific instrument and in calculating a derived quantity from measurement. Ca.3: Use scientific instruments to record measurement data in appropriate metric units that reflect the precision and accuracy of each particular instrument. Ca.4: Design a scientific investigation with appropriate methods of control to test a hypothesis (including independent and dependent variables), and evaluate the designs of sample investigations. Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Ca.6: Evaluate the results of a scientific investigation in terms of whether they verify or refute the hypothesis and what the possible sources of error are. Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Ca.1: Apply established rules for significant digits, both in reading a scientific instrument and in calculating a derived quantity from measurement. Ca.3: Use scientific instruments to record measurement data in appropriate metric units that reflect the precision and accuracy of each particular instrument. Ca.4: Design a scientific investigation with appropriate methods of control to test a hypothesis (including independent and dependent variables), and evaluate the designs of sample investigations. Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Ca.6: Evaluate the results of a scientific investigation in terms of whether they verify or refute the hypothesis and what the possible sources of error are. Ce.6: Use density to determine the mass, volume, or number of particles of a gas in a chemical reaction.
(Pre-requisite)

Section 3: Using Scientific Measurements (Pgs 42-55)

Math Tutor: Scientific Notation (Pg 56) Chapter Summary (Pg. 57) Chapter Review (Pgs.58-60) Standards Based Assessment (P. 61)

Chapter 3 Atoms: The Building Blocks of Matter


Section 1: The Atom: From Philosophical Idea to Scientific Theory (Pgs. 63-65) Careers in Chemistry: Physical Chemist (Pg 66)

Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size).

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


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HoltMcDougalModernChemistryDoDEAChemistryIndicatorsCorrelation
Quick Lab: Constructing A Model (Pg.67) Section 2: Structure of the Atom (Pgs 68-72) Section 3: Counting Atoms (Pgs. 73-83) Math Tutor: Conversion Factors (Pg. 84) Chapter Summary (Pg. 85) Chapter Review (Pgs. 86-88) Standards Based Assessment (Pg.89) Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards
Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size). Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size). Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Cb.6: Explain the concept of half-life, its use in determining the age of materials, and its significance to nuclear waste disposal. (Pre-requisite) Cb.5: Compare alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of mass, charge, penetrating power, and the release of these particles from the nucleus. Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size). Cb.5: Compare alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of mass, charge, penetrating power, and the release of these particles from the nucleus. Cb.6: Explain the concept of half-life, its use in determining the age of materials, and its significance to nuclear waste disposal. (Pre-requisite) Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships.

Chapter 4 Electrons in Atoms


Section 1: Development of New Atomic Model (Pgs. 91-97) Section 2: Quantum Model of the Atom (Pgs. 98-104) Why It Matters: Fireflies (Pg.96) Quick Lab: The Wave Nature of Light: Interference (Pg. 100) Section 3: Electron Configurations (Pgs. 105-116) Chemistry Explorers: The Noble Decade (Pgs 108-109) Math Tutor: Weighted Averages and Atomic Mass (Pg. 117) Chapter Summary (Pg. 118)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cb.1: Illustrate electron configurations by using orbital notation for representative elements. (Pre-requisite) Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size).

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards
Cb.1: Illustrate electron configurations by using orbital notation for representative elements. Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size).

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size). Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology.

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Chapter Review (Pgs. 119-122) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 123)
Cb.1: Illustrate electron configurations by using orbital notation for representative elements. Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size).

Chapter 5 The Periodic Law


Section 1: History of Periodic Table (Pgs.125-129) Quick Lab: Designing your Own Periodic Table (Pg. 128) Section 2: Electron Configuration and the Periodic Table (Pgs. 130-141) Careers in Chemistry: Materials Scientist (Pg. 137) Section 3: Electron Configuration and Periodic Properties (Pgs 142-156) Math Tutor: Writing Electron Configurations (P. 157) Chapter Summary (Pg. 158) Chapter Review (Pgs. 159-162) Standards Based Review (P. 163)
Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). (Pre-requisite)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity).

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cb.1: Illustrate electron configurations by using orbital notation for representative elements. Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers. (Pre-requisite) Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Cb.1: Illustrate electron configurations by using orbital notation for representative elements. Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers. (Pre-requisite)

Chapter 6 Chemical Bonding


Section 1: Introduction to Chemical Bonding (Pgs. 165-167) Section 2: Covalent Bonding and Molecular Compounds

Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers. Cc.3: Explain how the types of intermolecular forces present in a compound affect the physical properties of compounds (including polarity and molecular shape). Cc.8: Explain the effect of electronegativity and ionization energy on the type of bonding in a molecule. (If time
Permits)

Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers.

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(Pgs. 168-179) Why it Matters: Ultra Sonic ToxicWaste Destroyer (Pg 170) Section 3: Ionic Bonding and Ionic Compounds (Pgs.180-184) Section 4: Metallic Bonding (Pgs. 185-186) Why it Matters: Explosives (Pg. 540) Section 5: Molecular Geometry (Pgs. 187-197) Careers in Chemistry: Computational Chemist (Pg 194) Math Tutor: Drawing Lewis Structures (Pg. 198) Chapter Summary (P. 199) Chapter Review (Pgs 200-204) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 205) Section 1: Chemical Names and Formulas (Pgs. 207-219) Careers In Chemistry: Pharmacist (Pg. 210) Section 2: Oxidation Numbers (Pgs. 220-223) Why It Matters: Mass Spectrometry: Identifying
Cc.4: Explain the unique bonding characteristics of carbon that have resulted in the formation of a large variety of organic structures.

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers. Cc.3: Explain how the types of intermolecular forces present in a compound affect the physical properties of compounds (including polarity and molecular shape). Cc.3: Explain how the types of intermolecular forces present in a compound affect the physical properties of compounds (including polarity and molecular shape). Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. Cc.3: Explain how the types of intermolecular forces present in a compound affect the physical properties of compounds (including polarity and molecular shape).

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers. Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers. Cc.3: Explain how the types of intermolecular forces present in a compound affect the physical properties of compounds (including polarity and molecular shape). Cc.4: Explain the unique bonding characteristics of carbon that have resulted in the formation of a large variety of organic structures. Cc.8: Explain the effect of electronegativity and ionization energy on the type of bonding in a molecule. (If time
Permits)

Chapter 7 Chemical Formulas and Chemical Compounds


Cc.2: Interpret the names and formulas for ionic and covalent compounds. Cf.7: Represent common acids and bases by their names and formulas. (Pre-requisite)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers. Cc.2: Interpret the names and formulas for ionic and covalent compounds.

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


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HoltMcDougalModernChemistryDoDEAChemistryIndicatorsCorrelation
Molecules (Pg. 224) Section 3: Using Chemical Formulas (Pgs 225- 232) Section 4: Determining Chemical Formulas (Pgs. 233-237) Math Tutor: Calculating Percentage Composition (Pg. 238) Chapter Summary (Pg. 239) Chapter Review (Pgs.240-244) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 245)
Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Cc.2: Interpret the names and formulas for ionic and covalent compounds. Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Ca.5: Organize and interpret the data from a controlled scientific investigation by using mathematics (including formulas, scientific notation, and dimensional analysis), graphs, models, and/or technology. Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). Cc.1: Predict the type of bonding (ionic or covalent) and the shape of simple compounds by using Lewis dot structures and oxidation numbers. Cc.2: Interpret the names and formulas for ionic and covalent compounds. Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Cf.7: Represent common acids and bases by their names and formulas. (Pre-requisite)

Chapter 8 Chemical Equations and Reactions


Section 1: Describing Chemical Reactions (Pgs. 247-261) Why It Matters: Carbon Monoxide Catalyst (Pg. 261) Section 2: Types of Chemical Reactions (Pgs. 262-270) Why It Matters: Fluoridation and Tooth Decay (Pg. 269) Quick Lab: Balancing Equations Using Models (Pg. 270) Section 3: Activity Series of the Elements (Pgs. 271-273)
Cd.1: Analyze and balance equations for simple synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, double replacement, and combustion reactions. (Pre-requisite) Cd.3: Analyze the energy changes (endothermic or exothermic) associated with chemical reactions.

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cd.1: Analyze and balance equations for simple synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, double replacement, and combustion reactions.

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cd.1: Analyze and balance equations for simple synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, double replacement, and combustion reactions. Cd.2: Predict the products of acid-base neutralization and combustion reactions. Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity).

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Why It Matters: Combustion Synthesis (Pg. 274) Math Tutor: Balancing Chemical Equations (Pg. 275) Chapter Summary (Pg. 276) Chapter Review (Pgs. 277-280) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 281) Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards
Cd.1: Analyze and balance equations for simple synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, double replacement, and combustion reactions. Cb.3: Summarize the periodic tables property trends (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, ionic size, and reactivity). Cd.1: Analyze and balance equations for simple synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, double replacement, and combustion reactions. Cd.3: Analyze the energy changes (endothermic or exothermic) associated with chemical reactions. Cf.7: Represent common acids and bases by their names and formulas. (Pre-requisite)

Chapter 9 Stoichiometry
Section 1: Introduction to Stoichiometry (Pgs. 283-285) Careers in Chemistry: Chemical Technician (Pg. 284) Chemistry Explorers: The Case of Combustion (Pgs. 286-287 ) Section 2: Ideal Stoichiometric Calculations (Pgs. 288-295) Section 3: Limiting Reactants and Percentage Yield (Pgs. 296-302) Quick Lab: Limiting Reactant in a Recipe (Pg. 300) Math Tutor: Using Mole Ratios (Pg. 303) Chapter Summary (Pg.304) Chapter Review (Pgs. 305-308) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 209)
Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships.

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards
Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Cd.5: Predict the percent yield, the mass of excess, and the limiting reagent in chemical reactions. Cd.5: Predict the percent yield, the mass of excess, and the limiting reagent in chemical reactions. Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships Cd.5: Predict the percent yield, the mass of excess, and the limiting reagent in chemical reactions.

Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships Cd.5: Predict the percent yield, the mass of excess, and the limiting reagent in chemical reactions.

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Chapter 10 States of Matter
Section 1: The Kinetic - Molecular Theory of Matter (Pgs. 311-314) Section 2: Liquids (Pgs. 315-318) Section 3: Solids (Pgs. 219-323) Section 4: Changes of State (Pgs. 324-330) Why It Matters: Surface Melting (Pg. 328) Section 5: Water (Pgs. 331-333) Math Tutor: Calculations Using Enthalpies of Fusion (Pg. 334) Chapter Summary (Pg. 335) Chapter Summary (Pgs. 336-338) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 339)
Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. (Pre-requisite) Ce.2: Explain the behaviors of gas; the relationship among pressure, volume, and temperature; and the significance of the Kelvin (absolute temperature) scale, using the kinetic-molecular theory as a model. Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. Ce.4: Illustrate and interpret heating and cooling curves (including how boiling and melting points can be identified and how boiling points vary with changes in pressure). (Pre-requisite) Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. Ce.4: Illustrate and interpret heating and cooling curves (including how boiling and melting points can be identified and how boiling points vary with changes in pressure). (Pre-requisite) Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. Ce.4: Illustrate and interpret heating and cooling curves (including how boiling and melting points can be identified and how boiling points vary with changes in pressure). Ce.5: Analyze the energy changes involved in calorimetry by using the law of conservation of energy as it applies to temperature, heat, and phase changes (including the use of the formulas q = mcT [temperature change] and q = mLv and q = mLf [phase change] to solve calorimetry problems). (Pre-requisite If time Permits)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards
Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. Ce.2: Explain the behaviors of gas; the relationship among pressure, volume, and temperature; and the significance of the Kelvin (absolute temperature) scale, using the kinetic-molecular theory as a model. Ce.4: Illustrate and interpret heating and cooling curves (including how boiling and melting points can be identified and how boiling points vary with changes in pressure). Ce.5: Analyze the energy changes involved in calorimetry by using the law of conservation of energy as it applies to temperature, heat, and phase changes (including the use of the formulas q = mcT [temperature change] and q = mLv and q = mLf [phase change] to solve calorimetry problems). (Pre-requisite If time Permits)

Chapter 11 Gases
Section 1: Gas and Pressure (Pgs. 341-348) Why It Matters: The Gas Laws and Scuba Diving (Pg. 348) Section 2: The Gas Laws (Pgs. 349-355)
Ce.2: Explain the behaviors of gas; the relationship among pressure, volume, and temperature; and the significance of the Kelvin (absolute temperature) scale, using the kinetic-molecular theory as a model. Ce.3: Apply the gas laws to problems concerning changes in pressure, volume, or temperature (including Charless law, Boyles law, and the combined gas law). (Pre-requisite)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Ce.2: Explain the behaviors of gas; the relationship among pressure, volume, and temperature; and the significance of the Kelvin (absolute temperature) scale, using the kinetic-molecular theory as a model. Ce.3: Apply the gas laws to problems concerning changes in pressure, volume, or temperature (including Charless law, Boyles law, and the combined gas law).

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HoltMcDougalModernChemistryDoDEAChemistryIndicatorsCorrelation
Chemistry Explorers: Chemistrys First Law (Pgs. 356-357) Section 3: Gas Volumes and the Ideal Gas Law (Pgs. 358-365) Why It Matters: Automobile Air Bags (Pg. 360) Section 4: Diffusion and Effusion (Pgs.366-368) Quick Lab: Diffusion (Pg. 367) Math Tutor: Algebraic Rearrangements of Gas Laws (Pg. 369) Chapter Summary (Pg. 370) Chapter Review (Pgs. 371-376) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 377) Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards
Ce.3: Apply the gas laws to problems concerning changes in pressure, volume, or temperature (including Charless law, Boyles law, and the combined gas law). Ce.6: Use density to determine the mass, volume, or number of particles of a gas in a chemical reaction. (If time
Permits)

Ce.7: Apply the ideal gas law (pV = nRT) to solve problems. (If time Permits)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards
Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. Ce.2: Explain the behaviors of gas; the relationship among pressure, volume, and temperature; and the significance of the Kelvin (absolute temperature) scale, using the kinetic-molecular theory as a model. Ce.3: Apply the gas laws to problems concerning changes in pressure, volume, or temperature (including Charless law, Boyles law, and the combined gas law). Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. Ce.2: Explain the behaviors of gas; the relationship among pressure, volume, and temperature; and the significance of the Kelvin (absolute temperature) scale, using the kinetic-molecular theory as a model. Ce.3: Apply the gas laws to problems concerning changes in pressure, volume, or temperature (including Charless law, Boyles law, an d the combined gas law).

Chapter 12 Solutions
Section 1: Types of Mixtures (Pgs. 379-384) Quick Lab: Observing Solutions, Suspensions and Colloids (Pg. 383) Section 2: The Solution Process (Pgs. 385-395)
Cf.1: Summarize the process by which solutes dissolve in solvents, the dynamic equilibrium that occurs in saturated solutions, and the effects of varying pressure and temperature on solubility. Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases. (Pre-requisite) Cf.1: Summarize the process by which solutes dissolve in solvents, the dynamic equilibrium that occurs in saturated solutions, and the effects of varying pressure and temperature on solubility. Cd.3: Analyze the energy changes (endothermic or exothermic) associated with chemical reactions. Cf.1: Summarize the process by which solutes dissolve in solvents, the dynamic equilibrium that occurs in saturated solutions, and the effects of varying pressure and temperature on solubility. Cf.2: Compare solubility of various substances in different solvents (including polar and nonpolar solvents and organic and inorganic substances). Cd.10: Explain the role of collision frequency, the energy of collisions, and the orientation of molecules in reaction rates. (If time Permits)

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Careers in Chemistry: Environmental Chemist (Pg. 386) Cross Disciplinary Connection: Artificial Blood (Pg. 395) Section 3: Concentration of Solutions (Pgs. 396-402) Math Tutor: Calculating Solution Concentration (Pg. 403) Chapter Summary (Pg. 404) Chapter Review (Pgs. 405-408) Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards
Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Cf.4: Carry out calculations to find the concentration of solutions in terms of molarity and percent weight (mass). Cf.13: Use the calculated molality of a solution to calculate the freezing point depression and the boiling point elevation of a solution. (Pre-requisite If time Permits) Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Cd.3: Analyze the energy changes (endothermic or exothermic) associated with chemical reactions. Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships. Cf.1: Summarize the process by which solutes dissolve in solvents, the dynamic equilibrium that occurs in saturated solutions, and the effects of varying pressure and temperature on solubility. Cf.2: Compare solubility of various substances in different solvents (including polar and nonpolar solvents and organic and inorganic substances). Cf.4: Carry out calculations to find the concentration of solutions in terms of molarity and percent weight (mass). Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases. (Pre-requisite) Cd.10: Explain the role of collision frequency, the energy of collisions, and the orientation of molecules in reaction rates. (If time Permits) Cf.13: Use the calculated molality of a solution to calculate the freezing point depression and the boiling point elevation of a solution. (If time Permits) Cf.6: Distinguish between strong and weak common acids and bases Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases. (Pre-requisite) Ce.9: Analyze a chemical process to account for the weight of all reagents and solvents by following the appropriate material balance procedures. (If time Permits) Cf.8: Use the hydronium or hydroxide ion concentration to determine the pH and pOH of aqueous solutions.
(Pre-requisite -If time Permits)

Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 409)

Chapter 13 Ions in Aqueous Solutions and Colligative Properties


Section 1: Compounds in Aqueous Solutions (Pgs. 411-419) Chemistry Explorers: The Riddle of Electrolysis (Pgs. 420-421) Section 2: Colligative Properties of Solutions (Pgs. 422-438) Why It Matters: Water Purification by Reverse Osmosis (Pg. 429)

Cf.12: Use solubility rules to write net ionic equations for precipitation reactions in aqueous solution.

(If time Permits)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cf.3: Illustrate the colligative properties of solutions (including freezing point depression and boiling point elevation and their practical uses). Cf.13: Use the calculated molality of a solution to calculate the freezing point depression and the boiling point elevation of a solution. (If time Permits)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Revised:February6th,2014|ChemistryStandardsCorrelation 10

HoltMcDougalModernChemistryDoDEAChemistryIndicatorsCorrelation
Math Tutor: Boiling and freezing Points of Solutions (Pg. 433) Chapter Summary (Pg.434) Chapter Review (Pgs.435-438) Standards Based Assessment (Pg.439)
Cf.3: Illustrate the colligative properties of solutions (including freezing point depression and boiling point elevation and their practical uses). Cf.13: Use the calculated molality of a solution to calculate the freezing point depression and the boiling point elevation of a solution. (If time Permits) Cf.3: Illustrate the colligative properties of solutions (including freezing point depression and boiling point elevation and their practical uses). Cf.6: Distinguish between strong and weak common acids and bases Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases. (Pre-requisite) Ce.9: Analyze a chemical process to account for the weight of all reagents and solvents by following the appropriate material balance procedures. (If time Permits) Cf.8: Use the hydronium or hydroxide ion concentration to determine the pH and pOH of aqueous solutions.
(Pre-requisite -If time Permits)

Cf.12: Use solubility rules to write net ionic equations for precipitation reactions in aqueous solution. (If time Permits) Cf.13: Use the calculated molality of a solution to calculate the freezing point depression and the boiling point elevation of a solution. (If time Permits)

Chapter 14 Acids and Bases


Section 1: Properties of Acids and Bases (Pgs. 441-451) Quick Lab: Household Acids and Bases (Pg. 446) Cross-Disciplinary Connection: Acid Water A Hidden Menace (Pg. 451) Section 2: Acid-Based Theories (Pgs. 452-456) Section 3: Acid Based Reactions (Pgs. 457-463) Cross-Disciplinary Connection: Its a Bitter Pill (Pg. 458) Math Tutor: Writing Equations for Ionic Reactions (Pg. 464) Chapter Summary (Pg. 465)
Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases. Cf.6: Distinguish between strong and weak common acids and bases. Cf.14: Represent neutralization reactions and reactions between common acids and metals by using chemical equations.(If time Permits) Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases.

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards PLEASE NOTE: Knowledge of Lewis Acids needed for AP Chemistry

Cd.2: Predict the products of acid-base neutralization and combustion reactions. Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases. Cf.6: Distinguish between strong and weak common acids and bases. Cf.14: Represent neutralization reactions and reactions between common acids and metals by using chemical equations. (If time Permits) Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases.

Cf.12: Use solubility rules to write net ionic equations for precipitation reactions in aqueous solution. Cd.2: Predict the products of acid-base neutralization and combustion reactions. Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases.

(If time Permits)

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Chapter Review (Pgs. 466-468) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 469) Section 1: Aqueous Solutions and Concept of pH (Pgs. 471-482) Cross-Disciplinary Connections: Liming Streams (Pg. 482) Section 2: Determining pH and Titrations (Pgs. 483-486) Quick Lab: Testing the pH of Rainwater (Pg. 486) Careers in Chemistry: Analytical Chemist (Pg. 488) Math Tutor: Using Logarithms and pH (Pg. 494) Chapter Summary (Pg. 495) Chapter Review (Pgs 496-498) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 499)
Cf.6: Distinguish between strong and weak common acids and bases. Cf.12: Use solubility rules to write net ionic equations for precipitation reactions in aqueous solution. (If time Permits) Cf.14: Represent neutralization reactions and reactions between common acids and metals by using chemical equations. (If time Permits)

Chapter 15 Acid Base Titration and pH


Cf.8: Use the hydronium or hydroxide ion concentration to determine the pH and pOH of aqueous solutions. (If time
Permits)

Cd.2: Predict the products of acid-base neutralization and combustion reactions. Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases. Cf.8: Use the hydronium or hydroxide ion concentration to determine the pH and pOH of aqueous solutions. (If time
Permits)

Cf.9: Explain how the use of a titration can determine the concentration of acid and base solutions. (If time Permits) Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cf.8: Use the hydronium or hydroxide ion concentration to determine the pH and pOH of aqueous solutions. (If time
Permits)

Cf.5: Summarize the properties of salts, acids, and bases Cf.8: Use the hydronium or hydroxide ion concentration to determine the pH and pOH of aqueous solutions. (If time
Permits)

Cf.9: Explain how the use of a titration can determine the concentration of acid and base solutions.
(If time Permits)

Chapter 16 Reaction Energy


Section 1: Thermochemistry (Pgs. 501- 514) Why It Matters: Self-Heating Meals Does not support required Chemistry Standards (Please Omit Chapter). (Pg. 515) Section 2: Driving Force of
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Reactions (Pgs. 516-520) Why It Matters: Diamonds are Forever (Pg. 519) Math Tutor: Hesss Law (Pg. 521) Chapter Summary (Pg. 522) Chapter Review (Pgs. 523-526) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 527)

Chapter 17 Reaction Kinetics


Section 1: The Reaction Process (Pgs. 529-535) Section 2: Reaction Rate (Pgs. 536-546) Why It Matters: Explosives (Pg. 540) Quick Lab: Factors Influencing Reaction Rates (Pg. 546) Why It Matters: Catalytic Converters (Pg. 547) Math Tutor: Writing Rate Laws (Pg. 548) Chapter Summary (Pg. 549) Chapter Review (Pgs.550-552) Standards Based Assessment (Pg.553)
Cd.6: Explain the role of activation energy and the effects of temperature, particle size, stirring, concentration, and catalysts in reaction rates. Cd.10: Explain the role of collision frequency, the energy of collisions, and the orientation of molecules in reaction rates. Cd.6: Explain the role of activation energy and the effects of temperature, particle size, stirring, concentration, and catalysts in reaction rates. Ce.1: Explain the effects of the intermolecular forces on the different phases of matter. (Recommended to use this
activity with chapter 6 to support bonding)

Cd.6: Explain the role of activation energy and the effects of temperature, particle size, stirring, concentration, and catalysts in reaction rates. Cd.6: Explain the role of activation energy and the effects of temperature, particle size, stirring, concentration, and catalysts in reaction rates.

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cd.6: Explain the role of activation energy and the effects of temperature, particle size, stirring, concentration, and catalysts in reaction rates. Cd.10: Explain the role of collision frequency, the energy of collisions, and the orientation of molecules in reaction rates.

Chapter 18 Chemical Equilibrium


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Section 1: Nature of Chemical Equilibrium (Pgs.555-561) Chemistry Explorers: Fixing the Nitrogen Problem (Pg. 562-563) Section 2: Shifting Equilibrium (Pgs.564-570) Section 3: Equilibria of Acids, Bases, and Salts (Pgs. 571-578) Cross Disciplinary Connections: Blood Buffers (Pg. 575) Section 4: Solubility Equilibrium (Pgs. 579-586) Math Tutor: Determining Equilibrium Constants (Pg. 587) Chapter Summary (Pg. 588) Chapter Review (Pgs. 589-592) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 593) Section 1: Oxidation and Reduction (Pgs. 595-599) Why It Matters: Photochromic Lenses (Pg.598) Why It Matters: Skunk-Spray Remedy (Pg.600) Section 2: Balancing Redox Equations (Pgs. 601-605)

Does not support required Chemistry Standards (Please Omit Chapter).

Chapter 19 Oxidation-Reduction Reactions

Does not support required Chemistry Standards (Please Omit Chapter).

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Section 3: Oxidizing and Reducing Agents (Pgs.606-609) Quick Lab: Redox Reactions (Pg. 608) Math Tutor: Balancing Redox Equations (Pg. 610) Chapter Summary (Pg. 611) Chapter Review (Pgs. 612-614) Standards Based Assessment (Pg. 615)

Chapter 20 Electrochemistry
Section 1: Introduction to Electrochemistry (Pgs. 671-619) Section 2: Voltaic Cells (Pgs. 620-627) Why It Matters: Fuel-Cell Cars (Pg.628) Section 3: Electrolytic Cells (Pgs. 629-633) Why It Matters: Sodium Production by Electrolysis (Pg.633) Math Tutor: Calculating Cell Potentials (Pg. 634) Chapter Summary (Pg. 635) Chapter Review (Pgs. 636-638) Standards-Based Assessments (Pg. 639)

Does not support required Chemistry Standards (Please Omit Chapter).

Chapter 21: Nuclear Chemistry


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Section 1: The Nucleus (Pgs. 641-644) Cross Disciplinary Connections: Quarks (Pg. 642) Section 2: Radioactive Decay (Pgs. 645-652)
Cb.4: Compare the nuclear reactions of fission and fusion to chemical reactions (including the parts of the atom involved and the relative amounts of energy released).(Pre-requisite) Cb.5: Compare alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of mass, charge, penetrating power, and the release of these particles from the nucleus. (Pre-requisite) Cb.9: Use the equation E = mc2 to determine the amount of energy released during nuclear reactions. (If time
permits)

Section 3: Nuclear Radiation (Pgs. 653-656) Section 4: Nuclear Fission and Fusion (Pgs. 657-659) Chemistry Explorers: An Unexpected Finding (Pgs. 660-661) Math Tutor: Calculating with Half-Life (Pg. 662) Chapter Summary (Pg. 663) Chapter Review (Pgs. 664-666) Standards-Based Assessments (Pg. 667)

Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size). Cb.5: Compare alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of mass, charge, penetrating power, and the release of these particles from the nucleus. Cb.6: Explain the concept of half-life, its use in determining the age of materials, and its significance to nuclear waste disposal. Cb.7: Apply the predictable rate of nuclear decay (half-life) to determine the age of materials. (If time permits) Cb.8: Analyze a decay series chart to determine the products of successive nuclear reactions and write nuclear equations for disintegration of specified nuclides. (If time permits) Cb.5: Compare alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of mass, charge, penetrating power, and the release of these particles from the nucleus. Cb.6: Explain the concept of half-life, its use in determining the age of materials, and its significance to nuclear waste disposal. Cb.7: Apply the predictable rate of nuclear decay (half-life) to determine the age of materials. Cb.4: Compare the nuclear reactions of fission and fusion to chemical reactions (including the parts of the atom involved and the relative amounts of energy released).

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards


Cb.7: Apply the predictable rate of nuclear decay (half-life) to determine the age of materials. Cb.2: Summarize atomic properties (including electron configuration, ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic size, and ionic size). Cb.4: Compare the nuclear reactions of fission and fusion to chemical reactions (including the parts of the atom involved and the relative amounts of energy released). Cb.5: Compare alpha, beta, and gamma radiation in terms of mass, charge, penetrating power, and the release of these particles from the nucleus. Cb.6: Explain the concept of half-life, its use in determining the age of materials, and its significance to nuclear waste disposal. Cb.7: Apply the predictable rate of nuclear decay (half-life) to determine the age of materials. (If time permits) Cb.8: Analyze a decay series chart to determine the products of successive nuclear reactions and write nuclear equations for disintegration of specified nuclides. (If time permits) Cc.4: Explain the unique bonding characteristics of carbon that have resulted in the formation of a large variety of organic structures. Cc.5: Illustrate the structural formulas and names of simple hydrocarbons (including alkanes and their isomers

Chapter 22 Organic Chemistry


Section 1: Organic Compounds (Pgs. 669-673)

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and benzene rings). (Pre-requisite)

Chemistry Explorers: The Beginnings of Organic Chemistry (Pg.673) Section 2: Hydrocarbons (Pgs. 674-687) Careers in Chemistry: Petroleum Engineer `(Pg. 678) Why It Matters: Carbon Allotropes (Pg. 683) Section 3: Functional Groups (Pgs. 688-692) Section 4: Organic Reactions (Pgs. 693-697) Math Tutor: Calculating Empirical Formulas (Pg. 698) Chapter Summary (Pg. 699) Chapter Review (Pgs. 700-704) Standards-Based Assessments (Pg. 705)

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Cc.3: Explain how the types of intermolecular forces present in a compound affect the physical properties of compounds (including polarity and molecular shape). Cc.5: Illustrate the structural formulas and names of simple hydrocarbons (including alkanes and their isomers and benzene rings). Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Cc.3: Explain how the types of intermolecular forces present in a compound affect the physical properties of compounds (including polarity and molecular shape). Cc.4: Explain the unique bonding characteristics of carbon that have resulted in the formation of a large variety of organic structures. Cc.7: Classify organic compounds in terms of their functional group. (If time permits) Cc.6: Identify the basic structure of common polymers (including proteins, nucleic acids, plastics, and starches). Cc.7: Classify organic compounds in terms of their functional group. (If time permits) Cc.9: Classify polymerization reactions as addition or condensation. Cc.10: Classify organic reactions as addition, elimination, or condensation. Cd.4: Apply the concept of moles to determine the number of particles of a substance in a chemical reaction, the percent composition of a representative compound, the mass proportions, and the mole-mass relationships.
Please note: Previous exposure to this concept in Chapter 7 Page 233.

Cc.3: Explain how the types of intermolecular forces present in a compound affect the physical properties of compounds (including polarity and molecular shape). Cc.4: Explain the unique bonding characteristics of carbon that have resulted in the formation of a large variety of organic structures. Cc.5: Illustrate the structural formulas and names of simple hydrocarbons (including alkanes and their isomers and benzene rings). Cc.6: Identify the basic structure of common polymers (including proteins, nucleic acids, plastics, and starches). Cc.7: Classify organic compounds in terms of their functional group. (If time permits) Cc.9: Classify polymerization reactions as addition or condensation. Cc.10: Classify organic reactions as addition, elimination, or condensation.

Chapter 23: Biological Chemistry


Section 1: Carbohydrates and Lipids (Pgs. 707-711) Section 2: Amino Acids and Proteins (Pgs. 712-721)
Cc.6: Identify the basic structure of common polymers (including proteins, nucleic acids, plastics, and starches). Cc.9: Classify polymerization reactions as addition or condensation. (If time permits) Cc.6: Identify the basic structure of common polymers (including proteins, nucleic acids, plastics, and starches). Cc.9: Classify polymerization reactions as addition or condensation. (If time permits) Revised:February6th,2014|ChemistryStandardsCorrelation 17

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Chemistry Explorers: Dr. Charles Drew and Blood Transfusions (Pg. 718) Section 3: Metabolism (Pgs. 722-725) Section 4: Nucleic Acids (Pg. 726-731) Careers in Chemistry: Forensic Chemist (Pg. 730) Math Tutor: Interpretation of the Genic Code (Pg. 732) Chapter Summary (Pg. 733) Chapter Review (Pgs. 734-736) Standards-Based Assessments (Pg. 737)
Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards

Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards

Cc.6: Identify the basic structure of common polymers (including proteins, nucleic acids, plastics, and starches).
Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards Does Not Support the DoDEA Chemistry Standards

Cc.6: Identify the basic structure of common polymers (including proteins, nucleic acids, plastics, and starches). Cc.9: Classify polymerization reactions as addition or condensation. (If time permits)

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