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Wavelets and subband codding

Wavelets and subband codding

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Published by trungnt1981
Some theory in wavelet transform and multiresolution
Some theory in wavelet transform and multiresolution

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: trungnt1981 on Oct 05, 2009
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07/29/2013

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The previous section showed a completely discrete-time algorithm for the compu-
tation of the wavelet series. However, underlying this scheme are continuous-time
functions ϕ(t) and ψ(t), which often correspond to iterated discrete-time filters.
Such iterated filters are usually computed during the design stage of a wavelet
transform, so as to verify properties of the scaling function and wavelet such as reg-
ularity. Because the complexity appears only once, it is not as important to reduce
it as in the computation of the transform itself. However, the algorithms are simple
and the computational burden can be heavy especially in multiple dimensions, thus
we briefly discuss fast algorithms for iterated filters. Recall from (4.4.9) that we
wish to compute

G(i)

0 (z) =

i−1
k=0

G0

z2k

.

(6.3.1)

For simplicity, we will omit the subscript “0” and will simply call the lowpass filter

G. The length of G(i)

(z) is equal to

L(i)

= (2i

1)(L1) + 1.

From (6.3.1), the following identities can be verified (Problem 6.5):

G(i)

(z) = G(z)·G(i−1)

(z2

),

(6.3.2)

G(i)

(z) = G(z2i−1

)·G(i−1)

(z),

(6.3.3)

G(2k

)
(z) = G(2k−1

)
(z)·G(2k−1

)
(z22k−1

).

(6.3.4)

The first two relations will lead to recursive algorithms, while the last one produces
a doubling algorithm and can be used when iterates which are powers of two are
desired. Computing (6.3.2) as

G(i)

(z) = G0(z2

) +z−1

G1(z2

) ·G(i−1)

(z2

),

where G0 and G1 are the two polyphase components of filter G, leads to two
products between polynomials of size L/2 and (2i−1

1)(L 1) + 1. Calling

O[G(i)

(z)] the number of multiplications for finding G(i)

(z), we get the recursion

O[G(i)

(z)] = L·L(i−1)

+O[G(i−1)

(z)]. Again, because G(i−1)

(z) takes half as much

complexity as G(i)

(z), we get an order of complexity

O

G(i)

(z)

2·L·L(i−1)

2i

·L2
,

(6.3.5)

for multiplications and similarly for additions.

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