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Thursday, February 13, 2014 • Vol. 48, No. 38 • Verona, WI • Hometown USA • ConnectVerona.

com • $1
The
Verona Press
The
Verona Press
VAHS basketball player fights rare cancer on, off the court
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
A roar comes from the stu-
dent section at Verona Area
High School as they shout,
“Team 10,” and junior guard
Ebony Nettles-Bey comes
out on the court with her bas-
ketball teammates.
There are high-fives and
smiles as several girls wear
headbands that read, “No
one has to Fight Alone.”
The whistle blows, and Net-
tles-Bey gets the tipoff and
bounces the ball up the court
as the cheers get louder.
The struggle Nettles-
Bey is having with stage IV
rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare
form of cancer that affects
the brain, sensory organs
and muscle tissue, is noticed
throughout the game as she
is subbed in and out to allow
her energy levels to regener-
ate.
Before this game on Jan.
30, Nettles-Bey received
radiation therapy for five
days. So just being able to
play was a small victory. But
that wasn’t enough. Nettles-
Bey made two baskets and
collected four assists as the
team rolled to its 15th win of
the season.
Since that game, her inspi-
ration to the community and
the surrounding area has
been rewarded with support
through fundraisers all over
the state, a Make-A-Wish
Foundation shopping spree
and even a Twitter-based
campaign to try to help her
meet professional NBA play-
er LeBron James.
And to think that doctors
told her basketball was not
going to be a part of her life
when she was diagnosed last
summer.
“They told me that I
wouldn’t be able to, and I
was like, ‘Yeah, I am going
to play,’” Nettles-Bey said
Sunday. “It means a lot,
especially now. It is my out-
let to get away from every-
thing. It is nice because you
just forget about everything
else and just go out there and
play.”
Coming together
Net t l es- Bey’ s det er -
mi nat i on has not onl y
inspired the whole Verona
Verona Residents
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$500-$1,000 listing with us.
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Dr. Steven Reinen & Dr. Steven Beyler
Photos by Anthony Iozzo
Above, Verona Area High
School junior – and start-
ing guard for the varsity
girls basketball team –
Ebony Nettles-Bey gets a
hug from freshman for-
ward Alex Luehring during
Supoort for Ebony Night
Jan. 30.
Left, Nettles-Bey is inter-
viewed by WKOW at
her Make-A-Wish party
Sunday. She is battling a
rare form of cancer, rhab-
domyosarcoma, and her
fight has become an inspi-
ration to her teammates
and to the community.
Turn to Nettles-Bey/Page 10
City of Verona
$10M plan
for fire station
advances
There are still plenty of opportunities
for public feedback, alders say
JIM FEROLIE
Verona Press editor
Worries about beating next winter’s frost trumped
a proposed delay for additional public input Monday
as the Common Council advanced plans for a $10
million fire station.
Though bot h concerns
were incremental and poten-
tially of little significance at
this point in the process, the
council spent a large part
of the hourlong debate on
the topic in front of more
than 20 firefighters trying
to decide which was most
important.
On one hand, plans for the
station are about a month behind initial projections,
and a severe winter like this year’s could increase
costs and cause delays if the building’s structure isn’t
up in time. On the other, several alders felt the need to
reach out to citizens about what likely will be the most
expensive project the city has ever undertaken.
Verona Area School District
Teacher wins $5k
national science award
Grant will buy classroom equipment
SCOTT GIRARD
Unified Newspaper Group
Angie Midthun-Hensen joined the National Sci-
ence Teachers Association last fall.
Already, that has paid off with a $5,000 grant for
her Verona Area High School class-
room, which she’ll use for equipment
to assist with in-class experiments.
Midthun-Hensen, a science teach-
er and FFA adviser, told the Verona
Press she was “very surprised” to
learn she won the national DuPont
Pioneer Excellence in Agricultural
Science Education Award. The award
is given to one teacher each year.
“I couldn’t believe it,” she said.
But the credit for the award is spread among the
teacher and her students, who took major roles in pro-
ducing a video that’s required in the application process.
Midthun-Hensen said seeing the two classes put so
Midthun-Hensen
See the plans
Schematics, renderings
and comparable stations
are on the city’s website:
ci.verona.wi.us
Turn to Fire/Page 3
Turn to Science/Page 8
nspirational battle
2
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Puttin’ on the Ritz
The Verona Area High School Prom Committee held a fashion show Sunday to show off different
options students have for prom fashion in April. VAHS will hold its prom April 26 from 8-11:30 p.m.
at the Alliant Energy Center. The 2014 prom theme is “Bright Lights, Big City.” Parents and students
are invited to attend meetings to help plan the event from 6:30-7:45 p.m. March 3 and April 7 in the
K-Wing library at the high
school. The committee is also
looking for donations to help
cover costs for the dance,
post-prom activities and prizes.
Donations can be dropped
off at the K-Wing or mailed
to VAHS, 300 Richard St.,
Verona, WI 53593, Attention:
Sarah Greenlaw.
Right, Case Baio strikes a pose
with Kassidy Steuer on his
arm.
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YOU WON’T BELIEVE ALL THE BRIGHT IDEAS
WE PICKED UP ON THE WAY HERE.
Introducing the new E-Series Skid Steers and Compact Track
Loaders. When we asked operators like you to design them,
there was no shortage of bright ideas. Like a fat foor
with 25-percent more foot room. Up to 10-percent more
horsepower. Switchable controls for large-frame models
that let operators choose between ISO, H-pattern, and
foot controls. And easier attachment hookup. You
challenged us to make them great, and we didn’t
disappoint. See us for more bright ideas.
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Contact us today.
A0B01GGCU3JM0656
YOU WON’T BELIEVE ALL THE BRIGHT IDEAS
WE PICKED UP ON THE WAY HERE.
Introducing the new E-Series Skid Steers and Compact Track
Loaders. When we asked operators like you to design them,
there was no shortage of bright ideas. Like a fat foor
with 25-percent more foot room. Up to 10-percent more
horsepower. Switchable controls for large-frame models
that let operators choose between ISO, H-pattern, and
foot controls. And easier attachment hookup. You
challenged us to make them great, and we didn’t
disappoint. See us for more bright ideas.
DOWNLOAD THE SLOANS APP
iTunes & Android
www.sloans.com
www.facebook.com/sloanimplement
6 5 6 0 M J 3 U C G G 1 0 B 0 A 3 3 7 4 0 4 0 0 -
Contact us today.
A0B01GGCU3JM0656
YOU WON’T BELIEVE ALL THE BRIGHT IDEAS
WE PICKED UP ON THE WAY HERE.
Introducing the new E-Series Skid Steers and Compact Track
Loaders. When we asked operators like you to design them,
there was no shortage of bright ideas. Like a fat foor
with 25-percent more foot room. Up to 10-percent more
horsepower. Switchable controls for large-frame models
that let operators choose between ISO, H-pattern, and
foot controls. And easier attachment hookup. You
challenged us to make them great, and we didn’t
disappoint. See us for more bright ideas.
DOWNLOAD THE SLOANS APP
iTunes & Android
www.sloans.com
www.facebook.com/sloanimplement
6 5 6 0 M J 3 U C G G 1 0 B 0 A 3 3 7 4 0 4 0 0 -
Prom Fashion Show 2014
Photos by Kristin Kellerman
Left, Liam Schmitt
spins Miranda Kemper
on stage.
Above left, Grant Smith
and Delaney McCabe
show off their prom
gear.
Above right, Nick
Hanson and Allison
Armstrong.
Right, Cole Droster and
Trevin Geier get ready
for the show.
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
3
Ultimately, the council
voted 6-1 to follow the lead
of alders like Luke Diaz
(Dist. 3), who suggested
that the more important
public input will come after
the project is farther along
and the plans are more fully
formed. The city’s contract
with Five Bugles design
includes funding for two
public forums.
Most alders were uncom-
fortable rushing the project
along, however, despite a 6-1
vote in favor of accepting the
schematics and moving on to
Phase 2. Before voting, sev-
eral made a point to clarify
that they weren’t setting a
budget or locking the city
into any decisions other than
to allow Five Bugles to get
more detailed in its planning.
But Five Bugles architect
Steve Gausman and con-
struction manager Bob Pen-
noyer noted that the work
they have done so far actual-
ly exceeds their authorization
at this point, going beyond
conceptual and bringing in
LEED consultants to dis-
cuss energy performance. So
without further instruction,
the project would essentially
languish.
That created a conundrum,
as alders weren’t entirely
convinced about even major
points of the design, such as
whether the 40,000-square-
foot station should have
seven apparatus bays or eight
and whether a basement is
a good idea given difficult
soil conditions. But with a
couple of quick, somewhat
tentative choices (an eighth
bay and starting to design a
basement), alders were able
to move plans along.
After all, the council was
not divided over the approxi-
mate size of the station or
major features, like being a
joint fire-EMS facility, hav-
ing dormitories for interns
and including an indoor
training area. All agreed it
needed to be planned for
future growth and be built
to encourage lower-paid
employees to spend more
time there.
Wants vs. needs
There was debate over
smaller items that became a
matter of “wants vs. needs.”
as Ald. Dale Yurs (D-2) put
it.
Yur s asked why t he
ad hoc committee that’s
been planning the station
removed an earlier plan for
a return loop off Lincoln
Street but instead included
a fire pole where there were
already stairs. Each would
cost about $25,000.
Fire chief Joe Giver said
t he pol e coul d sl i ght l y
improve response times,
though not nearly as much
as the far more expensive
four-fold apparatus doors
that open in about four
seconds (as opposed to 45
seconds for overhead sec-
tionals). Rather, he said,
it would make for “good
PR” because kids visiting
the station tend to fixate on
such traditional features.
The return loop, mean-
while, was deemed unnec-
essary since front-line fire
trucks would instead back
in to the front of the station
– which would be on East
Verona Avenue – using the
large apron in front of the
apparatus bay doors.
Alders generally agreed
t hat such opt i ons as a
4,200-square-foot basement
and an additional apparatus
bay were good bang for the
buck and clearly preferable
to build now, not later. But
either would push the project
beyond the 40,000-square-
foot cap city staff were
directed to aim for. And Ald.
Brad Stiner (D-3) had major
reservations about the base-
ment, given the moisture
problems Verona City Cen-
ter’s basement is suffering.
Pennoyer repl i ed t hat
soil borings would tell the
architect a lot about how
it would need to build the
basement to keep that from
being an issue.
Regardless of those items,
city residents can expect debt
service for the station to add
more than $100 to their taxes
in some years. Any increases
likely will be offset early on
by the defeasing of the Epic
tax-increment financing dis-
trict and later by the retiring
of other city debt, such as
that of the $7 million library
and, later, the $7.5 million
City Center.
Much to consider
Council president Mac
McGilvray, chairing the
meeting in the absence of the
mayor, suggested that all of
this information was a lot to
take in and a two-week post-
ponement might be in order.
But several alders noted
that not building a replace-
ment for the city’s 40-year-
old, 12,000-square foot fire
station isn’t really an option,
and most reported that their
discussions with constituents
did not turn up real opposi-
tion to the expense.
So the only debated deci-
sions that mattered at that
stage were the extra bay
– likely requiring a slight
change in the building’s
shape – and the basement.
And in both cases, design
work could be started and
then reversed if public com-
mentary exposed resistance
or other concerns.
It was also noted that
some lost time can be made
up by having the construc-
tion manager bid out sepa-
rate pieces – such as dig-
ging the foundation – to be
completed before the design
and construction documents
are ready. But alders pre-
ferred not to risk having an
incomplete structure slow
down wintertime work.
“There’s still plenty of
opportunities for input,”
Ald. Elizabeth Doyle said.
“If we can save the public
money, we should have that
vote.”
Al ds. Heat her Reeki e
(D-4) and Scott Manley
(D-2), both members of the
ad hoc committee, pushed
for movi ng t he proj ect
along sooner and gather-
ing public input despite
wanting to hear more from
constituents at some point.
Reekie, in particular, want-
ed to make sure plans could
still be changed if “some
major grievances” came up.
Ald. Mike Bare (D-2)
was t he l one di ssent er,
insisting that “two weeks
is just two weeks” and not
a big risk in terms of con-
struction. He said the size
of the project begged for
a formal public hearing
(which is not required by
city ordinance) and he was
“disappointed” that one is
not automatically planned.
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Thank You
A heartfelt thank you to the Council
of Catholic Women and to Miller’s
Supermarket for generously donating
their time, God-given talent & food
items for the funeral luncheon of
Monica Grace Bischoff. Your contributions
truly enhanced our celebration of
Monica’s life. May God bless all of you
and all of your loved ones.
The family of
Monica Grace Bischoff
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Fire: City not locked into budget, size or particular design
Continued from page 1
City hires senior center director
The city hired its second
senior center director in the
department’s two-decade
history.
The coun-
c i l v o t e d
unanimously
Monday t o
a c c e p t a n
employment
c o n t r a c t
wi t h Mar y
Hanson, the
c o m m u -
nity development manager
for Capitol Lakes Retire-
ment Community, a nearly
40-year-old development in
downtown Madison.
“I n t hi s r ol e s he i s
responsible for program
development for the inde-
pendent living residents,
volunteer coordination, and
(oversight of) transporta-
tion services,” city adminis-
trator Bill Burns explained
in an email to the Press.
Capitol Lakes also has
assisted living, memory
care and skilled nursing
components.
Hanson wi l l succeed
Diane Lanaville, who was
hired on a part-time basis
in 1991 and quickly moved
into a full-time role, even-
tually overseeing the devel-
opment of a program that
expanded in 2002 to its
current 12,000-square-foot
facility on Paoli Street.
Though the most vis-
ible elements of the Verona
Senior Center are activities
and lunches, its most critical
function is case management
– working with area seniors
to ensure they get access to
resources and assistance to
either live independently or
find new homes that pro-
vide the necessary level of
care. This is expected to be
a growing need all over the
United States as the Baby
Boomers age.
Hanson also serves as the
administrator of the Capitol
Lakes Foundation, which
generates and disburses
funds for programs and
amenities for the communi-
ty’s residents and employ-
ees.
She has a bachel or’s
degree i n busi ness and
experience as marketing
director for two different
assisted living facilities in
the Madison area.
– Jim Ferolie
Hanson
POLICE REPORTS
Information from Verona
police logs:
Dec. 17
8:08 a.m. A 60-year-old
woman reported that her
lawn ornament deer had
been placed in inappropriate
positions on the 300 block
of North Nine Mound Road.
5:53 p.m. After an
18-year-old man was cited
for failing to stop at a stop
sign at the intersection of
East Harriet and North Jef-
ferson streets, a knife was
observed in the glove com-
partment while searching
for his insurance. The man
recieved a verbal warning
for the weapon, which was
handed over to his parents.
9:23 p.m. Firefighters
were called to a home on
the 500 block of Military
Ridge Drive. Upon arrival, a
woman stated it smelled as
if something was burning
in the basement. The fire
department later determined
a baseball card on top of a
light fixture was the cause of
a brief fire.
Dec. 18
3:31 p.m. A 34-year-old
Verona woman was cited
for an OWI 1st offense after
causing a rollover accident
on the 300 block of Richard
Street. Two other vehicles
were damaged in the acci-
dent but no one involved was
injured.
Dec. 20
5:21 p.m. A 62-year-
old man reported his rear
license plate was stolen on
the 700 block of Forest View
Drive. He was then advised
to remove his front plate so
police could continue their
search for the missing plate.
11:54 p.m. A 23-year-old
woman reported her wallet
stolen out of her purse in the
breakroom of a business on
Horizon Drive.
Dec. 21
12:33 a.m. Three men
were reported running
around a silver SUV at the
corner of Richard Street and
RIchard Circle. One was seen
swinging a shovel around.
2:46 a.m. A 62-year-old
man was cited for an OWI
2nd offense after his vehicle
was observed stopped in his
driveway with the reverse
lights still on at the 700 block
of Whalen Road.
1:55 p.m. A woman
reported a road rage incident
near exit 79 between Madi-
son and Verona. The driver
of the vehicle involved got
out and started yelling swear
words at the woman.
Dec. 22
2:05 a.m. A 23-year-old
man was cited for domestic
disturbance after allegedly
cornering his mother in the
kitchen by pushing her into
a chair on the 300 block
of South Franklin Street.
She became so fearful she
opened a window and yelled
out for help. Her son was
later cited for disorderly
conduct.
Dec. 23
4 p.m. A woman was
reported stealing a bottle of
lotion at BP gas station on
the 900 block of Kimball
Lane. She returned the lotion
after an employee’s daughter
confronted her in the park-
ing lot.
5:14 p.m. A woman called
the fire department to her
home after she saw smoke
when she was done cooking.
By the time the fire depart-
ment arrived there was no
sign of smoke or flame.
Dec.25
8:32 a.m. A clerk at the
Kwik Trip on the 400 block of
Verona Avenue reported two
drive-offs. Seven gallons of
gas had been pumped before
employees shut off pumps.
One got away without paying.
Both registered owners are
self admitted gang members.
Dec. 26
1:45 p.m. A 22-year-old
man reported a note on
his car at the 600 block of
Hometown Circle, which
stated that it had been hit
by a van. No damage was
found.
Dec. 27
10:03 a.m. A witness
reported a man having a
black .357 revolver under the
driver’s seat of his car.
9:20 p.m. Police cited a
55-year-old Madison man for
no proof of insurance after he
backed into a light pole in the
Badger Ridge Middle School
parking lot. Police had initially
observed him going the wrong
direction (clockwise) in the lot.
No damage was done to the
vehicle.
Jan. 1
1:22 a.m. A 35-year-old
man was cited for verbal
domestic abuse at the 200
block of Military Ridge Drive
when he got into an argu-
ment over the placement of
a Christmas Tree. He took a
man’s phone away and was
using profane language. No
one was injured.
4:03 p.m. A caller report-
ed a white semi driving vehi-
cles off the road toward Blue
Mounds on Hwy 18-151.
Police followed the semi
from Epic Lane past exit 81
with no observation of reck-
less driving.
Jan. 2
3:50 p.m. Police pulled
over a 60-year-old woman
on West Verona Avenue
after nearly causing an acci-
dent while turning. She was
reported earlier that day for
leaving the McDonald’s park-
ing lot intoxicated. She was
cited with OWI 1st offense.
8:54 p.m. Two condos
were evacuated on the 500
block of Enterprise Drive
after a gas leak was report-
ed. Police stood by as MG&E
fixed the cause.
Jan. 3
12:27 p.m. A 27-year-
old man was stopped for a
cracked windshield at the
corner of U.S.18-151 and
East Verona Avenue. A felo-
ny was shown on records so
the man was then arrested,
while 23-year-old passenger
was searched. A marijuana
pipe was found in his shoe
as well as an unused heroin
kit in the car. The passenger
received a citation for adult
possession of paraphernalia.
12:49 a.m. A woman
reported annoying and
harassing phone calls from
her ex-boyfriend, after which
he threatened to post com-
promising photos on Face-
book. The two were advised
by police to no longer have
contact with each other.
– Cailynn Hensen
4
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Verona Press
Thursday, February 13, 2014 • Vol. 48, No. 38
USPS No. 658-320
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Victoria Vlisides
communityreporter@wcinet.com
Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo,
Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
Letters to the editor
Legislative opinion
Downtown study
is a starting point
The downtown is the heart of the
community, and as Verona contin-
ues to grow it is important to plan for
the future to ensure that it remains
strong.
Over the past
year the city has
gone through an
extensive plan-
ning process for
the downtown
area. Hundreds
of residents and
business owners
have provided
their input and
feedback through
several public informational meet-
ings, a community visioning session,
stakeholder interviews, a community
survey and recently, a public hearing
before the Plan Commission.
This process has generated a lot
of discussion and many positive and
negative reactions to some of the
options suggested in the study. It is
great to see that the community has
been engaged in this project and is
talking about how to best maintain
and enhance the downtown in the
future.
As the community considers the
recommendations coming from the
downtown study, it is important to
remember that they are a starting
point. As the city and property own-
ers consider future improvements,
the plan provides information on
what could happen. Not considering
alternatives would be short-sighted,
but that doesn’t mean that everything
in the plan will happen as shown.
Some property owners have raised
concerns about the future of their
properties in situations where the
plan shows the potential for future
street connections, parking areas or
redevelopment.
I would like to be clear that the
downtown study does not recom-
mend that the City try to acquire
property without working with land
owners. Rather, the study recom-
mends that, that as potential projects
are considered the city should work
with property and business owners
to discuss alternatives and try to find
agreeable solutions.
Some of the recommendations in
the plan may take years to implement
or may never be implemented, and
that is OK. However, that doesn’t
mean that those ideas shouldn’t be
considered and discussed.
The Plan Commission will be
reviewing the downtown study again
at its meeting on March 3 and the
Common Council will be consid-
ering the plan after it gets a recom-
mendation from the Plan Commis-
sion. However, adoption of a plan is
just the first step in the process. The
City Council and Plan Commission
will need to continue to work with
residents, property owners, and busi-
nesses on specific projects over the
coming years.
One thing that everyone can agree
on is that it’s important for Verona to
continue to have a vibrant and thriv-
ing downtown. This community will
continue to grow, and that growth
with bring opportunities and chal-
lenges.
I am excited to see that so many
people have been engaged in this
process. I hope that energy continues
as we work together to find ways to
improve the downtown and the rest
of the City.

Jon Hochkammer is the mayor of
the City of Verona.
Downtown planning effort needs better communication
As a property owner in Verona,
I have been following the down-
town traffic plan.
I received a letter inviting me to
attend a public meeting last sum-
mer, which I went to. Since then I
have only followed it through the
Verona Press.
To my surprise I received a
phone call on Friday, Jan. 31
from my tenant at 104 E. Verona
Ave. who was very upset that she
was going to lose her business
because my building that I’ve
owned for around 9 years was
going to be turned into a parking
lot.
I immediately called some
friends and tried to find out what
was going on. I found out that
indeed the new proposed traffic
plan had my property slated to be
a parking lot and I was never con-
tacted about it and neither was
my tenant.
What kind of a community do
we live in anymore?
I moved to Verona in the late
1990’s because of the small town
feel and now 16 years later peo-
ple and businesses are disregard-
ed because some people think we
need to drastically change our
downtown look and feel. I don’t
believe this is what Verona is all
about.
Mike Franklin
Town of Verona
Hochkammer
Adverse weather makeup schedule hurts quality of education
I have a concern for the pre-
paredness that seniors will have
for their finals when the bulk of
the time missed due to weather is
being made up at the end of the
year, which the seniors will miss.
Also, extending the day by two
minutes and shortening a passing
time around lunch does not help for
that first hour AP class or the other
hard classes that students are taking.
What Verona is doing satisfies
the law; however, it is a total dis-
service to the students that need
the anticipated time to learn and
to the teachers that are expected
to teach them everything in a
timely manner in order for the
students to pass their exams.
Perhaps utilizing late starts and
future days off should have been
taken into consideration when
it comes to the actual amount
of time that the students and
teachers need in order to realis-
tically learn something. The stu-
dents don’t need an extra day to
clean out their locker, watch a
movie, or have a party.
Somet i mes peopl e are t oo
focused on satisfying the require-
ments rather than focusing on the
quality of the education.
Carrie Haack
City of Verona
Farm bill reduces support for those who need it most
I am saddened that the recent
Farm Bill passed by Congress
included reductions in nutrition
aid for needy Americans.
It is also disturbing that U.S.
legislators failed to extend long-
term unemployment compensa-
tion for people who are strug-
gling to find jobs.
Basic nourishment for Ameri-
cans was used as a bartering chip
in passing the Farm Bill. The
reduction in Supplemental Nutri-
tion Assistance Program benefits
(food stamps) was a short-term
fix that will have a long-term
negative effect on society.
Likewise, failure to renew
unemployment benefits will not
just place jobless individuals in
economic peril; it will adversely
affect the communities in which
they live. Benefit recipients will
have less money to spend on
food, housing, goods, and servic-
es--to the detriment of local busi-
nesses.
Millionaire/billionaire legisla-
tors have chosen to ignore the
needs of people on the social
pavement, while providing wel-
fare to those on the top rung of
the economic ladder. There are
hardliners who will celebrate the
loss of the funding for the needy.
The same people will ignore the
tax breaks, which corporations
and the wealthiest Americans
employ to cheat the commons.
Folks, we need to realize that
we’re all in this together. When
we look after those at the bottom,
it also floats the boats of every-
one above them.
Everybody does better, when
everybody does better.
P.S.: In 2012, Verizon Com-
munications paid (minus) 3.8 per-
cent tax , General Electric paid
(minus)18.9 percent, and Boeing
paid (minus) 5.5 percent.
The combined profit of these
three companies is $54.2 bil-
lion. There are another 23 major
American corporations, which
pay no net federal tax. It is
important we realize who the real
“welfare queens” are!
Tim White
Town of Springdale
The Verona Press encourages citizens to engage in discussion through letters to the editor. We take sub-
missions online, on email and by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and phone
numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high letter volume, and the editorial staff
reserves the right not to print any letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take priority over submissions from recent-
ly printed authors. Please keep submissions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions on our editorial policy, call editor Jim
Ferolie at 845-9559 or email veronapress@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
5
Beer and Cheese Pairings With
2013 Edelweiss Award Winning Cheese
Feb. 21 - Gray’s Brewing Company and
Edelweiss Cheese 2013 Winners
Feb. 28 - Lake Louise Beer Company
with cheddar and blue cheese pairing
Both events will be held at
Edelweiss Cheese Shop • 5 pm - 7 pm
Call for a Reservation (608) 845-9005
16 Spaces
available at
$10.00/person
u
n
3
3
4
8
7
8
Verona Explorer Post #368
Pancake Breakfast
Saturday, February 15th
Verona Senior Center
7:00-11:00am
Pancakes, Scrambled Eggs, Sausage,
Fruit, Coffee, Juice, and Milk
$5.00 per Person
$4.00 Ages 3-12 and Over 60
Free to Children Under 3
U
N
3
3
0
9
9
0
Obituaries
GERRY L. BISHELL
Gerry L. Bishell, age 78,
of Verona, passed away on
Monday, Feb. 10, 2014 at
the Four Winds Manor in
Verona.
Gerry was born on Octo-
ber 22, 1935. After gradu-
ation from beauty school,
she opened Bishell’s Beau-
ty Shop in Verona which
she ran for 25 years.
Gerry i s survi ved by
daughters: Connie (Jim)
Evenson, Fort Atkinson,
and Cathy Bishell, Vero-
na; Grandchildren: Jason
Erickson, Holly Henn, and
Kortney Bishell, and sev-
eral great-grandchildren.
Gerry was preceded in
death by her parents and a
son Kelly.
Gerry’s wishes for a pri-
vate service were honored.
I n l i eu of donat i ons
please do a good deed.
Thanks to all who cared.
The Ni t ar dy Funer al
Home, Cambridge, Wiscon-
sin assisted the family,
nitardyfuneralhome.com
Gerry Bishell
ELINORE M. VALLESE
Elinore M. Vallese 82,
of Port Clinton, Ohio, and
Verona passed away on
Monday, Feb. 10, 2014,
with her husband, Tony, by
her side.
El i nor e was bor n on
Mot her ’ s Day, May 9,
1931, to Mary and Michael
Migala, Jr. She was a 1949
graduate of Port Clinton
High School. On Thanks-
giving Day, 1954 she mar-
ried Anthony Vallese, who
has been her partner and
soul mate for nearly 60
years.
Mom was talented and
vivacious with many hob-
bies and interests includ-
ing gardening and canning.
However, she was most
passionate about her family
and friends.
She never missed a high
school band performance
or an academic ceremony
of her daughter, Jane. When
granddaughters Gina and
Sonia were born, friends
and acquaintances would
be shown a stack of pho-
tos accompanied by anec-
dotes. Also, Elinore always
enjoyed coffees or lunches
with her gal pals.
Elinore was preceded in
death by her mother and
fat her and her brot her,
Edward. She is survived by
her husband, Tony of Vero-
na; daughter, Jane Vallese
Carrola, son-in-law Steve
Carrola and granddaughters
Gina and Sonia Carrola, all
of Fitchburg; and nephew
Michael Migala, III of Bro-
ken Arrow, Okla.
A funeral service will
be held at 11 a.m. on Fri-
day, Feb. 14, 2014, at Ryan
Funeral Home, Verona
Chapel, 220 Enterprise Dr.,
with the Rev. Sheryl Erick-
son officiating. Visitation
will be on Friday at the
funeral home from 10 a.m.
until the time of service.
Burial will take place at a
later date.
The family would like to
thank Senior Helper Aides
Maria del Rios and Judy
Gartman for the loving care
they bestowed on Elinore as
well as Agrace Hospice for
their compassionate care
during mom’s final days.
In lieu of flowers, the
family suggests donations
be made to Agrace Hos-
pice (Fitchburg), Verona
Senior Center, or St. John’s
Lutheran Church, Port Clin-
ton, Ohio.
Elinore, you will always
have a very special place in
our hearts.
To view and sign this
guestbook, please visit:
ryanfuneralservice.com.
Ryan Fuenral Home & Cremation Services
Verona Chapel
220 Enterprise Drive
845-6625
Elinore M. Vallese
Library hosts King speech performance
“Dr. King’s Dream,” an acclaimed
celebration of the life and career of
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., will be
presented by Minneapolis’ Mixed
Blood Theatre at the Verona Public
Library at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 20.
Starring actor Warren C. Bowles
in a solo performance, this produc-
tion draws from Dr. King’s own let-
ters, sermons, books and speeches,
including the timeless “I Have a
Dream” speech.
King led American society through
some of its most profound changes.
This biography illuminates why he is
recognized as one of the greatest lead-
ers and orators in American history.
The play begins at the Lorraine
Motel in Memphis on April 4, 1968,
as King answers a young colleague’s
question with an anecdote from the
Montgomery bus boycott. Both the
external events in his career, includ-
ing the Selma and Birmingham
demonstrations, the 1962 March
on Washington, winning the Nobel
Peace Prize and his wide-ranging
thoughts and opinions on fear, non-
violence, his children, the police,
and Malcolm X, are included in “Dr.
King’s Dream.”
Apart from the historical signifi-
cance, what emerges is the spirit of
a man dedicated to racial equality
through non-violence, and dedicated to
an ideal and a dream. This special per-
formance is made possible by a grant
from Beyond the Page, an endowment
dedicated to promoting the humanities
in Dane County Libraries.
This program is free and open to
the public. To register, or for infor-
mation, visit veronapubliclibrary.
org or call 845-7180. The library is
located at 500 Silent St.
If you go
What: “Dr. King’s Dream” solo
stage performance
When: 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 20
Where: Verona Public Library, 500
Silent St.
Info: 845-7180
Historical society continues school talks
The weather may still be bitterly
cold, but the conversation and camara-
derie are always warm at the meetings
of the Verona Area Historical Society.
The group will gather at 3 p.m.,
Wednesday, Feb. 19 at the senior
center, where the topic of discus-
sion will be the “White School,”
and memories shared by those who
attended it.
At last month’s meeting, Fitch-
burg Historical Society president
Catherine Schneider talked about her
experiences and memories of Stoner
School, one of 10 Fitchburg schools
at the time, located at the junction of
Fitchburg, Vroman and Grandview
roads, near Seminole Highway.
The school opened in 1850 and
closed in 1938 before changing pop-
ulations caused the school to reopen
from 1953-65, when it became
part of the Verona School District.
The school was named after the first
white settler in Fitchburg, John Ston-
er, who also owned the second farm
established in Dane County.
The Vroman family donated the
land for the school in 1839 with the
stipulation that it would revert to the
family when no longer used for a
school. The building is now a private
residence, but the land is still being
farmed by the seventh generation of
the Vroman family.
As was t rue wi t h most rural
schools, Stoner was the center of
the community. At the well-attended
annual meeting, the school policy
and teacher’s salary would be deter-
mined. The building was also used
for many events: card parties, danc-
es, and pictures shown from trips
taken by neighbors.
The year-end picnic on a Sunday
afternoon was a community affair.
Library Internet gets high-speed tuneup
Federal grant pays for it
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Slow Internet connections are
kind of the radio static of the 21st
century.
Just like finding your favorite
station used to be an iffy propo-
sition on some radios, for many
people, using a computer at a
public library to download infor-
mation or music can be just as
frustrating because of sluggish
speeds.
As a result of a $4.2 million
federal “Technology for Edu-
cational Achievement” grant,
though, things will be running
faster and more smoothly on
computers at the Verona Pub-
lic Library, one of around 350 in
the state that will receive a fiber
broadband upgrade this spring.
More than 60 percent of pub-
lic libraries in Wisconsin report
“inadequate” Internet speeds, said
State Superintendent Tony Evers
in a Feb. 4 press release announc-
ing the funding program, which
he called a “welcome improve-
ment.”
“Many of our libraries are the
only public Internet access in
their small, rural communities,”
he said. “Our libraries provide
online education resources for
students of all ages … services
for job-seekers and information
on government services.”
The project reduces the cost
for libraries to carry faster Inter-
net connections. Fiber installa-
tion will begin this April, and
is scheduled for completion in
November.
Verona Public Library Direc-
tor Brian Simons said the change
will essentially double the speed
of computers there, allowing the
library to maintain its ability to
provide a variety of online learn-
ing experiences.
“With the increase of online
classes and distance learning, we
see people using the computers,
either the library computer lab, or
their own, or watching video for
class,” he said.
Simons said getting even “min-
imal” extra bandwidth for Bad-
gerNet was costly for the South
Central Library System in the
past, and the library was already
at the maximum level allowed.
Moving from a connection on
BadgerNet to Charter Communi-
cations, allows them to upgrade
in the future to larger bandwidth
increases, but could leave their
system more vulnerable to out-
ages, Simons said.
“The stability of BadgerNet
was the thing we had to sacrifice
to get more bandwidth,” he said.
“We haven’t gone down yet, and
we hope it won’t be an issue, but
the possibility is greater. ”
If you go
What: Verona Area Historical
Society meeting
When: 3 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 19
Where: Verona Senior Center, 108
Paoli St.
Knights of Columbus
Pancake chairman Knight
Bill Cassel is putting out a
call for volunteers for the
Feb. 23 Charity Pancake
Breakfast. He needs workers
for the opening and closing
times. Setup begins around 7
a.m., and closing around 10
a.m.
Contact Cassel with your
volunteer times.
Bo wl i n g Ch a i r ma n
Kni ght James Esser i s
ready for the upcoming
State KC bowling tourna-
ment in Marshfield. The
knights have two teams
and are looking for a pos-
sible third team. Contact
Esser if you would like to
be a part of the event.
Youth Chairman Knight
Bill Kuchenbecker thanked
everyone for the help at the
District Free Throw Contest
held on Jan. 26. Fourteen
Knights helped at the event.
The knights submitted
their Knight of the Year
DD- Sir Knight Bill Parr’s
entry and Family of the
Year, Davonna and Knight
Steve Runde’s entries into
t he St at e KC compet i -
tion. The results will be
announced in early March.
Knights interested in join-
ing the Leadership Team for
2014- 2015 Fraternal Year
can contact Grand Knight
Ken Lubich, who has lots
of information available for
all individuals interested in
being an officer.
Many Knights donated
blood or plasma on Feb. 1 at
the St. Andrew blood drive,
and others volunteered at
Badger Ridge in a drive to
help a young person suffer-
ing from cancer. They were
looking for a match for a
donation of bone marrow.
Founder and chaplain
monsignor Delbert Schmel-
zer celebrated a birthday
Jan. 4.
Our prayers go out to the
family of Sir Knight Alfred
Russell. He passed away in
late January.
–Brad Stiner
6
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
Social security meeting
People are welcome to come to
the Marriott Madison West at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 13 and Monday, Feb.
17 for a free presentation on social
security options. Call 262-278-0461
for information.
Muslim Journeys
Participants will explore the his-
tories, faith and cultures of Muslims
around the world and within the Unit-
ed States in this five-part, scholar-led
reading and discussion series hosted
by the Verona Public Library, one
of 125 libraries and state humanities
councils across the country selected
to participate in this project.
The next i nst al l ment i s from
10-11:30 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 15 at
the library,
Caregiver support group
Drop-in visitors are welcome to
join a caregiver support group at the
Verona Senior Center at 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 18. The group meets
at 10:30 a.m. on the third Tuesday of
the month. Contact Becky Losby with
questions at 845-7471.
Glacier Edge personalized
learning
Parents can go to the Glacier Edge
cafeteria on Thursday, Feb. 20, from
6-7 p.m. to hear about personalized
learning and collaboration teams at
the school.
School officials will share a Power
Point about personalized learning,
what it looks like at GE and what it
will look like in the future. There will
also be time for questions, reflections
and suggestions. For more informa-
tion, contact principal Theresa Taylor
at 497-2110.
‘Making Our Marks’
Verona studio artists Bea Neal and
her group “3150 Studio Artists,” will
have their mixed media and fiber
art works on display from March
1 to April 11 at the Madison Senior
Center, 330 W. Mifflin St. For more
information, contact Neal at 848-9519
or visit 3150studioartists.com.
Technology for small business
Technology can make your a busi-
ness thrive. Become more efficient,
productive, and responsible to cus-
tomer needs by correctly implement-
ing the latest technologies. The infor-
mation will be presented at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, March 4 at the library, in
partnership with the Wisconsin Wom-
en’s Business Initiative Corporation.
To register, call 257-5450.
Social Security 101
At 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 18,
the library will host this informational
session.
There are more than 500 different
combinations of Social Security ben-
efits for married couples. Jesse Grutz,
from the Retirement Classroom, will
be available to help you decipher this
government program.
Coming up
Community calendar
Call 845-9559
to advertise on the
Verona Press
church page
430 E. Verona Ave.
845-2010
Friday, Feb. 14
• Deadline for elementary school choice forms
Saturday, Feb. 15
• 10-11:30 a.m., “In the Country of Men” book discus-
sion, VPL
• 5 p.m., Child Adoption fundraiser, Memorial Baptist
Church
Sunday, Feb. 16
• 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Homemade sauerkraut and
pork hock dinner, St. James Catholic Church, 1128 St.
James Court, Madison, 271-1571
Monday, Feb. 17
• 7 p.m., Verona Area School District, administration
building
Tuesday, Feb. 18
• 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Strollin’ Colon exhibit, VPL
• 6:30-7:30 p.m., Colon cancer speech, VPL
Thursday, Feb. 20
• 5:30 p.m., “Books ‘N Booze” discussion, “Big
Trouble” by Dave Barry, Pasqual’s Cantina, 100 Cross
Country Rd.
• 7 p.m., “Dr. King’s Dream” performance, VPL
Friday, Feb. 21
• 7 p.m., St. Ambrose Academy presents “Annie,”
VPAC
Saturday, Feb. 22
•7 p.m., St. Ambrose Academy presents “Annie,”
VPAC
Sunday, Feb. 23
•7 p.m., St. Ambrose Academy presents “Annie,”
VPAC
Monday, Feb. 24
• 7 p.m., Common Council, City Center
Wednesday, Feb. 26
• 6:30-8:30 p.m., Planning for Your Retirement, VPL
Resistance
Bacterial infections, cancer cells, and pests all have some-
thing in common, besides the fact that they are all seen as
hostile to human life and our interests, and that is that all of
them have the tendency to develop resistance, to antibiotics,
chemotherapy drugs, and to pesticides, respectively. This
is a result of the fact that they all evolve rapidly, mutating
and thus changing so rapidly that the original weapon used
against them no longer works for that purpose. Mutation,
and thus evolution, seems built into the very fabric of
nature as a protective mechanism. It may seem odd to say
that cancer is somehow built into the fabric of life, but that
seems to be the upshot of oncogenes, which are abundant
in nature. What allows life to adapt and change rapidly, thus
protecting our species from toxins and infectious agents is
also what makes us prone to cancer. Life is resilient, and not
easily vanquished, just like cancer, the common cold, and
the cockroach. But don’t be too quick to lament that fact, for
what makes it hard to annihilate cancer is also what makes it
hard to annihilate us.
– Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
“Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits,
who forgives all your iniquity, who heals all your diseases,
who redeems your life from the pit.”
Psalm 103:2-4
Churches
ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN
CHURCH
2951 Chapel Valley Road, Fitchburg
(608) 276-7729
allsaints-madison.org
Pastor Rich Johnson
8:30 and 10:45 a.m. worship times
THE CHURCH IN FITCHBURG
2833 Raritan Road, Fitchburg, WI
53711
(608) 271-2811
livelifetogether.com
Sunday Worship: 8 and 10:45 a.m.
THE CHURCH IN VERONA
Verona Business Centre
535 Half Mile Rd. #7, Verona.
(608) 271-2811
livelifetogether.com
Sunday Worship: 9 a.m.
FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008 • memorialucc.org
Phil Haslanger
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
(608) 271-6633
Central: Raymond Road & Whitney
Way
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Worship
West: Corner of Hwy. PD & Nine
Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Worship
LIVING HOPE CHURCH
At the Verona Senior Center
108 Paoli St. • (608) 347-3827
livinghopeverona.com, info@living-
hopeverona.com
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
201 S. Main, Verona
(608) 845-7125
MBCverona.org
Lead pastor: Jeremy Scott
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Worship
REDEEMER BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
102 N. Franklin Ave., Verona
Pastor Dwight R. Wise
(608) 848-1836 www.redeemerbible-
fellowship.org
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Family Worship Service
RESURRECTION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Wisconsin Synod, 6705 Wesner
Road, Verona
(608) 848-4965 • rlcverona.org
Pastor Nathan Strutz and Assistant
Pastor: Jacob Haag
THURSDAY
6:30 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship Service
ST. CHRISTOPHER CATHOLIC
PARISH
301 N. Main St., Verona
(608) 845-6613
Stchristopherverona.com
Fr. William Vernon, pastor
SATURDAY 5 p.m. Sunday Vigil,
St. Andrew, Verona
SUNDAY 7:30 a.m., St. William,
Paoli
9 and 11 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona
Daily Mass: Tuesday-Saturday at 8
a.m., St. Andrew, Verona
ST. JAMES EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
427 S. Main Street, Verona
(608) 845-6922
www.stjamesverona.org
Pastors Kurt M. Billings and Peter
Narum
Services 5 p.m., Saturday, 8:30 and
10:45 a.m., Sunday - office hours
8-4 Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday; 8 a.m. to noon Wednesday
SALEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
502 Mark Dr., Verona, WI
Phone: (608) 845-7315
Rev. Dr. Mark E. Yurs, Pastor
Laura Kolden, Associate in Ministry
www.salemchurchverona.org
9 a.m. Sunday School - 10:15 a.m.
worship service - Staffed nursery
from 8:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. - 11:30
a.m. Fellowship Hour
SPRINGDALE LUTHERAN
CHURCH-ELCA
2752 Town Hall Road (off County
ID)
(608) 437-3493
springdalelutheran.org
Pastor: Jeff Jacobs
SUNDAY
8:45 a.m. Communion Worship
SUGAR RIVER
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
130 N. Franklin St., Verona
(608) 845-5855
sugar.river@sugarriverumc.org,
sugarriverumc.org
Pastor: Gary Holmes
SUNDAY
9:00 & 10:30
Contemporary worship with chil-
dren’s Sunday school.
Refreshments and fellowship are
between services.
WEST MADISON BIBLE CHURCH
2920 Hwy. M, Verona, WI 53593
Sunday (nursery provided in a.m.)
9:15 a.m. - Praise and worship
10:45 - Sunday School (all ages)
6 p.m. - Small group Bible study
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST – Located at Hwy. 92 & Ct.
Road G, Mount Vernon
(608) 832-6677 for information
Pastor: Brad Brookins
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST –
At Hwy. 69 and PB, Paoli
(608) 845-5641
Rev. Sara Thiessen
SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Family Worship
Thursday, Feb. 13
7 a.m. – United Way 211 at Senior
Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. - Kat Trio at Senior Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Shelley Peterman Schwartz at
Senior Center
5 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
6 p.m. - Salem Church Service
7 p.m. - Words of Peace
8 p.m. - Daily Exercise
9 p.m. – Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. – Stoner School at Historical
Society
Friday, Feb. 14
7 a.m. – Shelley Peterman Schwartz at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. – 911 Information at Senior
Center
4 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
5 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
8:30 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior
Center
10 p.m. - United Way 211 at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Kat Trio at Senior Center
Saturday, Feb. 15
8 a.m. – Common Council from 2-10-14
11 a.m. - 911 Information at Senior
Center
1 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
4:30 p.m. – Stoner School at Historical
Society
6 p.m. – Common Council from 2-10-14
9 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior Center
10 p.m. - Stoner School at Historical
Society
11 p.m. - Kat Trio at Senior Center
Sunday, Feb. 16
7 a.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour
9 a.m. – Resurrection Church
10 a.m. - Salem Church Service
Noon - Common Council from 2-10-14
3 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior Center
4:30 p.m. - Stoner School at Historical
Society
6 p.m. – Common Council from 2-10-14
9 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior Center
10 p.m. – Stoner School at Historical
Society
11 p.m. - Kat Trio at Senior Center
Monday, Feb. 17
7 a.m. – Shelley Peterman Schwartz at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. - 911 Information at Senior Center
4 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
5 p.m. - 2012 Wildcats Football
7 p.m. – Committee of the Whole Live
9 p.m. - Hindu Cultural Hour
10 p.m. – United Way 211 at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Kat Trio at Senior Center
Tuesday, Feb. 18
7 a.m. – United Way 211 at Senior
Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. - Kat Trio at Senior Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Shelley Peterman Schwartz at
Senior Center
5 p.m. – A Taste of Theater
6 p.m. - Resurrection Church
8 p.m. - Words of Peace
9 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. - Stoner School at Historical
Society
Wednesday, Feb. 19
7 a.m. – Shelley Peterman Schwartz at
Senior Center
1:30 p.m. - Chatting with the Chamber
3 p.m. – 911 Information at Senior
Center
6 p.m. – Committee of the Whole from
02-17-14
7 p.m. - Capital City Band
8 p.m. – 911 Information at Senior
Center
10 p.m. - United Way 211 at Senior
Center
11 p.m. – Kat Trio at Senior Center
Thursday, Feb. 20
7 a.m. – United Way 211 at Senior
Center
9 a.m. - Daily Exercise
10 a.m. – Kat Trio at Senior Center
3 p.m. - Daily Exercise
4 p.m. – Shelley Peterman Schwartz at
Senior Center
6 p.m. - Salem Church Service
8 p.m. - Daily Exercise
9 p.m. – Chatting with the Chamber
10 p.m. – Stoner School at Historical
Society
What’s on VHAT-98
Watch city meetings online: cityofveronameetings on youtube.com
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
7


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Biking, not
bullying
X Games champion BMX
biker Matt Wilhelm visited
Core Knowledge Charter
School Thursday, Jan. 30,
where he showed off some
of his bike tricks and talked
to the students about anti-
bullying. He shared that
he was bullied in his child-
hood and had a tough time
overcoming some of what
was said to him, but thanks
to friends and others who
stood up for him, he was
motivated to prove the bul-
lies wrong. The assembly
was a treat for the students
for the school’s fundraiser.
Photos by Scott Girard
Wilhelm rides his bike across the Badger Ridge Middle School gym
while holding onto only the handlebars to cheers from the audience
of Core Knowledge students.
Above, Wilhelm signs autographs for students who participated
most in the school’s fundraiser.
Below, Wilhelm performs a trick.
Above, Wilhelm jumps over three teachers and CKCS director Brett Stousland (right), who was “volunteered” by students. Below, students
cheer Wilhelm on as he performs in the Badger Ridge gym.
8
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
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much effort into the proj-
ect, and take ownership
and pride in it, was a “great
experience” in itself.
In addition to the class-
room grant, the award win-
ner receives a paid trip to
the NSTA national con-
ference, mentoring with a
DuPont Pioneer scientist,
classroom resources and
access to a DuPont Pioneer
product plant or research
facility.
It’s “a dream that’s now
being realized,” she said.
Making the video
While the application
requires many traditional
items, such as letters of rec-
ommendation and a written
description of how the grant
could help the teacher’s
program, it also asks for a
more technological compo-
nent.
Teachers must submit an
up-to-20-minute video must
show themselves and their
students participating in an
agricultural science activ-
ity. There, Midthun-Hensen
needed some help.
M i d t h u n - H e n s e n
assigned topics to the stu-
dents and let them decide
how they would portray
those in the video. From
paper bees illustrating pol-
lination to diagrams about
cell cloning, the students
got creative with their ideas
for the 13 ½-minute video.
“It was a cool opportu-
nity for us to do something
together as a class,” junior
Alex Hofstetter said.
The s t ude nt s s pe nt
between two and three class
days filming the video, and
collaborated and planned
out their sections for home-
work.
One student, junior Joey
King, volunteered to spend
nearly 18 hours editing the
video after it was filmed,
without Midthun-Hensen
even asking.
“I would’ve had to figure
it out myself,” she said. “He
jumped in full force. They
all just really wanted to
make it happen.”
Using the money
When she won the award,
Mi dt hun- Hensen knew
exact l y how she woul d
spend the money.
She knew her classroom
could use a stealth fume
hood, something that will
help improve the results of
their in-class experiments.
Fume hoods are designed
to protect the product of a
scientific experiment by
keeping out elements that
could affect results. The cur-
rent class fume hood doesn’t
offer full sterility for experi-
ments, she explained.
“(Students) have seen
their hard work not turn
out because of contamina-
tions,” she said.
Hofstetter said he's excited
to get more “exact and pro-
fessional results” once the
fume hood is purchased,
whi ch Mi dt hun-Hensen
expected to be before the end
of the school year. Midthun-
Hensen’s students are also
simply happy for their teach-
er, who will travel to Boston
in April to receive the award
and money in person.
“Of all the teachers to get
it, she deserves it,” senior
Ben Feller said.
Science: Students helped produce video for application
Continued from page 1
Your dream is out there.
Go get it. We’ll protect it.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
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204 W. Verona Ave.
Verona, WI 53593-1101
(608) 845-8304 Bus
bwagne1@amfam.com
Available evenings & weekends (by appt)
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Photos by Scott Girard
A mural dedication
Fitchburg Mayor
Shawn Pfaff talks
with a Stoner
Prairie student at
the dedication or
the school’s mural
last Friday.
Right, Artists
Emida Roller, left,
and Sharon Kilfoy
speak to Stoner
Prairie students
about how much
they enjoyed
working on the
project with them,
and how much
pride the students
should take in the
mural.
Photo by Scott Girard
Angie Midthun-Hensen helps students with an in-class experiment last week.
USAF graduation
Air Force Airman Benja-
min Lewis graduated from
basic military training at
Joint Base San Antonio-
Lackland in
Texas.
L e w i s
earned dis-
tinction as an
honor gradu-
ate. He is the
son of Kim-
berly Lewis
of Ver ona
and Wendy
Broadhead of Brooklyn and
a 2012 graduate of Verona
Area High School.
Lewis completed an inten-
sive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies,
Air Force core values, physi-
cal fitness, and basic warfare
principles and skills.
VANN gets Dane
County donation
Verona Area Needs Net-
work has received a $750
donation from the Dane
County Dairy Program.
The program donated to
six area food pantries in
Dane County. These food
pantries represent commu-
nities that have supported
the Dane County Dairy Pro-
motion’s annual Breakfast
on the Farm event, drawing
in over 4,000 people to area
communities every year,
according to a news release
by the DCDP. These areas
are comprise Waunakee,
Mount Horeb, Verona, Bel-
leville and Middleton.
Michelle Keller, secre-
tary of the program, visited
the VANN and donated the
money to Karen Fletcher.
Lewis
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectVerona.com
The
Verona Press
9
Wrestling
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Adam Francis anchored the Verona/Mount Horeb 200-yard medley relay to sixth place in 1 min-
ute, 44.18 seconds Saturday in the Big Eight Conference meet at Beloit Memorial High School.
Boys swimming
Seniors excel at Big 8 meet
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Seni or s Kade McGi l -
vray and Erik Wickstrom
have led the Verona/Mount
Horeb boys swimming team
all season both in the pool
and out.
“They’re our ret urni ng
state qualifiers,” Wildcats
head coach Bill Wuerger
said of his seniors. “They’ve
been t hr ough an ent i r e
season and know what to
expect. They know what it
takes to make it to that level
and have tried to bring their
teammates up to that point.”
Saturday McGilvray and
Wickstrom reached the Big
Ei ght Conf er ence medal
podium a combined seven
times, with both helping the
Wildcats to a team-best sec-
ond place finish on the 200-
yard freestyle relay.
Trailing Madison Memo-
r i al and Madi s on Wes t
throughout the race, Wick-
strom posted a lifetime best
split of 22.15 seconds on
the final leg to move Vero-
na into second place with a
1:30.27. Sophomore Bryce
Anga r a n a nd f r e s hma n
Jacob Wellnitz joined Wick-
strom and McGilvray to fin-
ish about a second behind
the Spartans.
“Today’ s per f or mance
raises the bar for me at sec-
tionals next week because
this wasn’t even my taper
meet and I went pretty fast,”
McGi l vr ay sai d. “I was
pretty proud of myself today
and with a little rest next
week, I think I will do even
better.”
McGilvray earlier in the
meet had already posted an
individual best third-place
finish for the Wildcats with
a time of 22.31 seconds in
the 50 free. He later fin-
ished fourth overall in the
Photo by Mary Langenfeld
Sophomore Trayvonn Johnson wrestles with Janesville Parker’s Scotty Van Der Haegen in the heavyweight class at the Big 8 Conference tournament Saturday. Johnson
took first place in the weight class, defeating Sean Benedict of Middleton 3-1. Verona finished fourth overall with 203 1/2 points.
Schmid, Johnson earn Big
Eight Conference titles
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
It onl y t ook 16 mont hs for
sophomore heavyweight Tray-
vonn Johnson to go from begin-
ner to conference champion at
Saturday’s Big Eight Confer-
ence meet at Verona Area High
School.
Johnson knocked of f Sean
Benedict (Middleton), who is
ranked as an honorabl e men-
tion on wiwrestling. com, in a
3-1 decision in the finals. That
moment coupled with the chants
of his home crowd were a big
deal to Johnson in his young
career.
“Toward the end of the match,
I was l i ke, ‘Don’t get t aken
down, and I have t hi s. ’ So I
wasn’t taking many chances at
the end,” Johnson said. “It was
a good feeling, especially in the
final five seconds when I knew I
had it.”
Johnson, who is also a standout
defensive player for the varsity
football team, entered wrestling
because coaches, including co-
head coaches Bob Wozniak and
Jason Ott, talked to Johnson in
class to make sure he was in the
wrestling room to join the sport.
Johnson said he enjoyed that
kind of attention and support,
and he put in extra work over this
past summer to be able to get to
where he is today.
Hometown champs
Turn to Big 8/Page 13
Turn to Conference/Page 13
If you go
What: Division 1 Sun Prairie
regional
When: 10:15 a.m. Saturday
Where: Sun Prairie High School
Photo slideshow to be attached
to the story online on Friday
ConnectVerona.com
If you go
What: Division 1
Middleton sectional
When: 1 p.m. Saturday
Where: Middleton High
School Natatorium
Girls hockey
Lynx earn
No. 3 seed
for playoffs
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Despi t e shari ng t hei r
first Badger Conference
title and splitting this sea-
son with the Sun Prairie
co-op this season, the Mid-
dleton Metro Lynx girls
hockey co-op was unable
to leap over the Cap City
Cougars for the coveted
second seed l ast week
when the WIAA sectional
seeding was announced.
Fifth-ranked Onalaska,
as expected, earned the
top seed, while Sun Prairie
ended up as the No. 2 and
wouldn’t have to face the
Hilltoppers (14-6-0) until
the sectional finals inside
Madison Ice Arena at 8
p.m. Saturday, March 1.
Middleton (13-6-3) hosts
the Rock County Fury (12-
9-2) at 8 p.m. Friday inside
t he Madi son Ice Arena
with the winner moving on
to face Sun Prairie (10-10-
2) or seventh-seeded Black
River Falls (6-15-0).
Metro Lynx 8, Viroqua 1
Fr eshman goal t ender
Erin Webb needed to only
st op fi ve shot s on goal
Friday inside Madison Ice
Arena to help the Metro
Lynx t o an 8-1 Badger
Conference win over Viro-
qua.
The Met ro Lynx (13-
6-3 overall, 7-1-1 Bad-
ger Conference) got goals
f r om Samant ha Di ngl e
and Barneveld’s Carolyn
Karls.
Junior reserve forward
Maya Mendoza scor ed
t wi c e , wh i l e Ve r o n a
r es er ve f or war d Anna
Bresnahan added a goal
and an assist in the blow-
out for the Metro Lynx.
Verona freshman Brenna
Turn to Lynx/Page 13
10
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
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1
Nettles-Bey: Fundraisers, Make-A-Wish Foundation offer support and positivity
community – youth play-
ers, teammates, students,
parents, coaches – but her
story continues to make
an impact across much of
the basketball community
and with people across the
state in general.
Jan. 30 was Verona Area
High School’s fundraiser
night to help raise money
for Ebony. Teams from
across the state, from Lodi
High School to the UW-
Whitewater women’s bas-
ketball program, gave their
support.
Close to 1,000 T-shirts
wer e sol d. They r ead,
“Beat Cancer” on the front
and have “Team 10” on
the back. These shirts have
been worn by t he t eam
and by the crowd in every
game since.
Th e r e wa s da nc i n g
and smi l i ng and l augh-
ter. There were even large
cardboard cutouts of Ebo-
ny’s face maki ng t hei r
debut in the crowd. But
most of all, there was love,
not just for basketball but
for a girl who has more
than just beating the oppo-
nent on her mind.
All the support surprised
and overwhelmed Nettles-
Bey. She never pictured
herself in the spotlight, let
alone being a role model.
“It means a lot that you
can have an effect on other
people in their lives and
how they do stuff and how
they keep going,” Nettles-
Bey said.
Sunday at t he Ni t t y
Gritty in Middleton, the
Make-A-Wish foundation
set up a party for her after
the shopping spree she had
been granted, made possi-
ble by sponsors Chris and
Stacy Tierney from Merrill
Lynch.
As Nettles-Bey walked
up the stairs by the front
door, she had no idea that
several gi rl s basket bal l
players and coaches were
crouched down, ready to
scream, “Surprise!”
After a look of shock,
some hugs, a few extra
gift openings – including a
LeBron James jersey – and
some interviews and pho-
tos, she was finally able to
sit down with her friends
and family and take it all
in.
“I thought it was really
cool and supportive that
people took time out of
their schedule to do that,”
she said.
He r t e a mma t e s a nd
coaches said they wanted
to be there, to smile with
Ebony, to show that they
care.
“It took her a while to let
her guard down and real-
ize that this team loves
her, that she loves them,”
Murphy said. “It is like
one big family. It is what
it is about. They support
each other. … She is not in
the classroom on a regular
basis, so this is her Vero-
na community and it has
grown exponentially by the
students.”
Wishes come true
Make-A-Wish is just one
of many stories of support
for Nettles-Bey. There is
also the ongoing story of
t he #LebronMeet Ebony
hasht ag on Twi t t er and
another fundraiser planned
for her at Oregon High
School on Feb. 18.
For the Tierneys, Net-
tles-Bey’s story was one
t hat moved t hem. That
made the decision to spon-
sor her wish -- a shopping
spree at Johnson Creek
mall -- an easy one.
Chris Tierney, an inves-
tor with Merrill Lynch,
sai d t hat hi s company
chooses an organization
every year for its grand
gala, which will be the
eighth this year. Last sum-
mer, that organization hap-
pened to be Make-A-Wish.
That left finding a story
to sponsor. Tierney said.
As more of a sports-page
reader than a front-page
reader, he saw Ebony’s
story in the sports section
and decided her story was
unbelievable and deserving
of a wish.
“That i s why we are
he r e . We ha dn’ t me t
Ebony before. We j ust
got a chance to meet her
tonight,” said Tierney, who
was able to observe the
impact of his sponsorship
Sunday. “Just to be a small
part of granting her that
wish is pretty fun for us.”
There was also a surprise
by the University of Wis-
consin-Madison as Nettles-
Bey found out she gets to
spend a day with the men’s
and women’s basketball
team and be an honorary
coach.
And i f t ha t wa s n’ t
enough, a few weeks ago,
the hashtag was started
on Twitter to try and get
Nettles-Bey to meet James,
her idol.
While there isn’t any-
t hi ng of f i ci al yet , t he
Miami Heat visit Chicago
on March 9 and Milwaukee
on March 29, putting those
two days on everyone’s
watch list.
The Heat have already
sent a jersey and an auto-
graphed picture, but there
is much speculation that
t he bi ggest part of t he
wish – being able to talk
with LeBron in person – is
going to come true in the
future, as well.
That is something that
would mean everything to
Nettles-Bey, though she
said she hasn’t yet thought
of anything to say and may
be speechless at first.
A change in playing
styles
Net t l es- Bey was t he
leading scorer for Madison
West in 2012-13, and she
transferred to Verona over
the summer.
She didn’t find out about
her diagnosis until after
transferring and she was
unsure how her treatment
would affect her ability to
play for Verona this sea-
son.
With her energy levels
down, she cannot partici-
pate as much as the oth-
er girls. She’ll do some
shooting drills and some
up-and-down drills, but is
only able to get about 30
percent of the reps at prac-
tices.
So when she hit the court
for the first time, it was
obvious she would have
to find other ways to con-
tribute. She changed her
style, becoming more of a
facilitator and also a vocal
leader.
Nettles-Bey might not
get on the stat sheet every
night, but she has forced
t ur nover s on def ens e,
picked up steals and made
no-look passes to wide-
open 3-point shooters in
the corner, as she still has a
quick dribble to the inside.
Asked if she knew if she
would be able to contribute
and help the team win from
the beginning, she smiled
and nodded.
Murphy wasn’t so sure.
She found out before var-
sity tryouts and expected
Nettles-Bey to take the
year off and focus on her
health.
But t hat was not on
Nettles-Bey’s mind. She
wanted to play, and even
through chemotherapy and
radiation treatment, noth-
ing was going to stop her.
And she didn’t consider
that anything special. It
was something she always
believed she would do.
“Her spirit and her abil-
ity to play on little to no
energy and just pure adren-
aline day in and day out is
amazing,” Murphy said.
Road to a cure
While it is fun to follow
Nettles-Bey as a basketball
player, that is only a small
part of the bigger picture,
which is to see her get
healthy. That’s something
the Tierneys and others in
the community who have
followed her story believe.
The granted wishes are
ways to give positivity and
allow Nettles-Bey to cope
with her ongoing battle
with cancer. She said that
helps, but she also said just
like succeeding on the bas-
ketball court, it’s a matter
of just going out there and
doing it.
Murphy and others who
know Nettles-Bey know
that if anyone can beat can-
cer, she can. And judging
by her determination to go
out on the court even when
people said she couldn’t
do it, that would just be
another inspirational story
by an inspirational person.
“Statistically, odds are
against her, but what she
is already doing now is
statistically against her,”
Murphy said. “Her attitude
toward it is to fight. She
just fights. I wouldn’t be
at all surprised if she beats
the odds.”
Continued from page 1
Photos by Anthony Iozzo
(clockwise from top left) Junior guard Ebony Nettles-Bey takes the ball up the court Thursday, Feb.
6, in a Big Eight game against Middleton at Verona Area High School; Nettles-Bey hugs Make-A-Wish
sponsors Chris and Stacy Tierney Sunday at her wish party at the Nitty Gritty in Middleton; Several
teams from around Dane County and beyond show their support with posters for Nettles-Bey.
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
11
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9
Girls basketball
Cats get bested by Middleton for 2nd loss
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Defense has been a sta-
ple of the Verona Area
High School girls basket-
ball team this season, but
Thursday’s 65-60 loss to
Middleton was a little dif-
ferent.
It wasn’t that the Wild-
cats (17-2 overall, 13-2 Big
Eight) played bad defense.
Instead, it was that the Car-
dinals (16-2, 14-0) were
making their shots.
And wi t h Mi ddl et on
wi nni ng t he offensi ve-
rebound battle and earning
second chances, Verona
just couldn’t get enough
stops in the end.
“They bring their ‘A’
game for us,” head coach
An g i e Mu r p h y s a i d .
“They were really dialed
in tonight, so we got beat
by a really good team. We
gave up too many offen-
sive rebounds, and we had
some breakdowns at some
bad times. But overall, I
am happy with how we
played. They were just bet-
ter than we were tonight,
so they deserved to win the
game.”
The Wildcats trailed by
five at halftime, but the
third quarter was not the
start they wanted, falling
behind by 12 three minutes
in.
Seni or f or war d Lexy
Ri char dson and f r esh-
man forward Alex Lueh-
ring both knocked down
baskets to stop the bleed-
i ng and make i t 46-38,
but Middleton sophomore
Grace Douglas was able
to get a basket on a third
chance on the other end.
The fourth was similar
with Richardson knocking
down a basket on a put-
back to cut the deficit to
59-52 only to have fresh-
man guard Alexis Thomas
get a basket after an offen-
sive rebound.
Senior forward Marley
Campbell cut the deficit
back to seven afterward,
but this time it was junior
forward Cole Jordee get-
ting a second-chance bas-
ket on the other end.
“The first shot wasn’t as
bad as the second shot,”
Murphy said. “Give (head
coach Jeff Kind) credit, he
coaches them to get right
to that spot. When they
prepare all season, they
prepare to beat us just like
we prepare to beat them.
That is the way we treat
every game. You play to
beat the best. “
Campbel l di d knock
down a 3-pointer with 27
seconds left and later con-
nected on three free throws
with 11 seconds left, but
there just wasn’t enough
time.
The game was back-
and-forth in the first half
with Verona and Middle-
ton exchanging leads nine
times. But after Richardson
scored to tie the game at
31, the Cardinals were able
to win a few possessions
on loose balls and capital-
ized with a few baskets to
go up 37-32 at halftime.
Murphy said that was
just one thing of many that
all seemed to happen at
once.
“We didn’t get a 50-50
ball all night, so let’s call
t hem 5- 95 bal l s, ” she
joked. “We didn’t get a
single one, and we didn’t
hit free throws, which has
been our nemesis all year.
There were a couple of
missed travels at crucial
times that kind of hurt us.
It just seemed like every-
t hi ng happened at t he
wrong time.”
Ri chardson came out
on fire in the first quarter,
scoring the first nine points
f or t he Wi l dcat s. She
finished with 17 points.
Campbell led Verona with
18, while senior guard Jen-
ni LaCroix chipped in nine.
Se ni or f or wa r d Li z
McMahon and Jordee led
Middleton with 14 points
each. Junior guard Eliza-
beth Norregaard added 13
points.
The loss makes a Big
Eight Conference title a
long shot, but there is a
chance these two teams
meet agai n deep i n t he
playoffs. It also helps that
the crowd was so large and
supportive, giving Thurs-
day’s game a sectional feel
to it, Murphy said.
“I woul d r at her pl ay
a game like this in front
of a crowd like that and
come out on the losing end
then to play in front of no
one and win by 30,” she
said. “It was a fun game
to be a part of. It is about
competing. We competed.
We have to get better to
beat them.”
She added that the day
could come when it is a
one-and-done game against
Middleton.
“That is our goal, every
single game we are going
to play like it is our last
because you never know,”
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior forward Lexy Richardson flys up for a runner Thursday, Feb. 6, in a Big Eight Conference game
against Middleton at Verona Area High School. Richardson finished with 17 points in a 65-60 loss.
Big Eight
Team W L
Middleton 15 0
Verona 13 2
Janesville Craig 9 4
La Follette 9 4
Janesville Parker 8 5
Sun Prairie 6 7
Mad. Memorial 4 9
Madison West 2 11
Beloit Memorial 1 12
Madison East 1 12
Boys basketball
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior guard Mitch Flora goes up for a layup Friday, Feb. 7, in a
Big Eight Conference game at Madison Memorial. The Wildcats
lost 76-66.
Shooting not enough in loss
at Madison Memorial
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The 3-pointers arced and
swished for an entire half,
and the Verona Area High
School boys basketball
team was pushing the host
Madison Memorial Spar-
tans.
But there were a few
points in the game that
caught up with the Wild-
cats in a 76-66 loss.
In the fourth quarter,
Verona (9-10 overal l ,
6-9 Big Eight) trailed by
four points, but Spartans
senior point guard Reggie
Roemer was able to add
a layup and a 3-pointer to
build Verona’s deficit to
nine. On the other end, the
Wildcats missed a couple
of layups and lost a couple
of loose ball opportunities
to allow Memorial to keep
its lead.
But before t hat , t he
Wildcats, which led 35-29,
let the Spartans (16-3,
14-1) get back into the
game before halftime with
a couple of quick shots
and a couple of turnovers,
whi l e seni or f or war d
Tyler Lindquist and junior
guard Koko Songolo each
drained 3-pointers to make
it 35-35.
“I thought our guys were
ready to play, and I think
they believed they could
win. Unfortunately, we
had a lead and made some
bad decisions and let them
Turn to Boys BB/Page 12
Turn to Girls BB/Page 12
12
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Boys hockey
Top seed goes to Cats
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Ver ona boys hockey
clinched its third straight Big
Eight Conference outright
Tuesday evening with a 9-0
shellacking of Beloit Memo-
rial inside the Eagles Nest Ice
Arena.
Seni or capt ai n Char-
lie Parker scored once and
assisted on the Wildcats three
first-period powerplay goals.
He also added a short-handed
goal in the second period as
Verona closed out the confer-
ence season with a spotless
14-0 record for the second
straight year.
In fact, the Wildcats haven’t
lost a conference game since
falling 4-3 against Middleton
back on Dec. 23, 2011.
Senior defenseman Philippe
Fromberger, who scored the
first of four-consecutive pow-
erplay goals, also added two
assists in the win.
In total, six different play-
ers scored for the Wildcats.
Senior Grant Smith chipped
with two goals and an assist,
while Brogan Baker (1G, 3A)
and Zach Miller (1G, 2A) and
Joe Stevens (2G) all had mul-
tiple-point games.
Sophomore goaltender
Alex Jones turned aside just
nine saves in the blowout,
while John Marks II stopped
38 for the Purple Knights.
The Verona boys hockey
team, which knocked off
archrival Notre Dame in
the state semifinals last year
before running out of gas
in the championship game
against Eau Claire Memo-
rial, earned the top seed last
week for its WIAA sectional
bracket.
As such, the second-ranked
Wildcats receive a first-round
bye in regionals and will face
the winner between eighth-
seeded Oregon (12-10-1)
and ninth-seeded Sun Prairie
(5-15-1) at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Feb. 20, inside the Eagles
Nest.
Madi s on Edgewood,
which has won seven games
since losing 4-0 against the
Wildcats, wrapped up at least
a share of the Badger South
title and earned the No. 2
seed. Edgewood (13-9-0) fac-
es either McFarland (6-14-0)
or Waunakee (13-9-0) at 5:30
p.m. Feb. 20.
Four t h- seeded Madi -
son West (17-4-0) and No.
4 Monona Grove (16-5-0)
round out the teams getting
first round byes.
Verona 6, Sun Prairie 1
Senior captain Charlie
Parker racked up two more
goals to run his team-leading
total to 26 Saturday as Verona
rolled to a 6-1 victory over the
Cardinals inside the newly
constructed Sun Prairie Ice
Arena. The win locked up the
Wildcats’ third straight con-
ference title.
Sophomore Nathan Cleg-
horn fell one save shy of a
fifth shutout of the season,
making 11 saves in the win.
Senior forward Brogan
Baker (1G, 2A) and junior
forward Brodie Roehrig
(1G, 1A) each netted mul-
tiple points in the win, while
sophomore Josh Novotny and
freshman Jake Keyes both
added a goal.
Verona travels to Home-
stead to face Arrowhead (12-
7-2) in a make-up game at
3:45 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15.
Verona 6, Mad. Memorial 3
The Wildcats locked up
at least a share of its third
straight conference title with a
6-3 victory over the Madison
Memorial Spartans earlier in
the week.
Parker scored twice and
senior defenseman Joe Ste-
vens recorded a goal and
assist to help Verona rally
from a 2-1 deficit in the
first period Thursday inside
the Madison Ice Arena.
Roehrig and Baker and
freshman forward Jackson
Anderson all added a goal,
while Stevens assisted on
three scores.
Verona sophomore Alex
Jones only faced 10 shots
on goal in the win, stopping
seven.
get back into the game,” head
coach Alan Buss said. “In the sec-
ond half, we got a little soft defen-
sively, and we missed some 50-50
balls that could have changed
everything.”
Verona fell behind early in the
third, but a 3-pointer by sophomore
guard Cole Schmitz made it 45-44
Verona with three minutes to play.
Roemer made a couple of baskets
near the end of the quarter, howev-
er, and the Spartans led 54-49 after
three.
The first half was much differ-
ent from the second as the shots
from beyond the arc kept dropping
for Schmitz and junior guard Will
Kellerman. The two players com-
bined for six of seven 3-pointers
in the first half, including one by
Kellerman at the buzzer of the first
quarter that tied the game at 16.
“I told the guys at halftime that
if they hit 14 3-pointers, they are
probably going to beat you so we
better defend the 3-point shot,”
Memorial head coach Steve Col-
lins said. “We can go on runs too.
We aren’t quite as flashy with the
runs, but when we get the ball out
on the court, we are pretty good at
it.”
Schmitz ended up with 20 points,
while Kellerman finished with 18.
Junior forward Jake Toman added
15, while senior forward John
Tackett picked up seven. Senior
guard Mitch Flora chipped in six
points.
Senior forward Darral Willis led
Memorial with 21 points, while
Roemer added 17.
The Wildcats continue the sea-
son against Middleton Thursday
and travel to Janesville Parker Sat-
urday. Both games are at 7:30 p.m.
Buss said that, even through
some tough losses, he is encour-
aged with how the guys keep work-
ing toward making a run down the
stretch.
“They are willing to continue to
work, and that is all you are able
to do,” he said. “You have to keep
plugging away, and they showed
with their attitude that they are
willing to do that.”
Boys BB: Schmitz leads Verona with 20 points
Continued from page 11
Girls BB: LaCroix hits GW
3-pointer at Janesville Parker
she said.
Verona hosts Madison East in
the final home game of the regu-
lar season at 7:30 p.m. Friday. It
finishes the season on the road
with games at Madison West
(Feb. 20) and Beloit Memorial
(Feb. 28).
Both of those games are slated
for 7:30 p.m.
Verona 29, Parker 27
The Wi l dcat s t r avel ed t o
Janesville Parker Saturday and
eked out a 29-27 win.
Verona trailed by a point with
under 10 seconds to go, and
Campbell grabbed an offensive
rebound after two missed free
throws only to find LaCroix in
the corner.
Lacroix, who led Verona with
seven points, drained the game-
winning 3-pointer to allow the
Wildcats to escape Parker on the
winning side.
Luehring and Richardson each
added six points.
Parker was led by junior for-
ward Paige Smith who had 17
points.
Continued from page 11
Gymnastics
Gymnasts’ balance leads to fourth
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Despite struggling on balance beam
and floor Saturday at the Middleton
Invitational, the Verona/Madison Edge-
wood gymnastics team sprang back to
finish fourth overall.
The host Cardinals dominated the
rest of the field, posting a 140.050 to
finish well ahead of second place Mad-
ison Memorial (138.950) and third-
place Westosha Central/Union Grove
(132.925).
“This was a huge meet for us,” said
co-head coach Rachael Hauser, who
saw her team break 130 for the first time
all season, finishing with a 130.075.
“We had a ton of new skills to show
off.”
Sophomore Mandy Michuda and
junior Hannah Semmann were the
team’s top two all-around finishers,
placing 12th and 13th, respectively.
Middleton senior Aryn Skibba won the
vault (9.65), floor exercise (9.350)and
balance beam (9.550) to finish atop the
field with a combined score of 37.70.
Sun Prairie’s Abby Millard (36.550)
and Madison Memorial’s Carolyn Smith
(36.20), who took the bars with a 9.275,
rounded out the top three.
The Wildcat/Crusaders, however,
struggled out of the gate on beam.
“Seeing a couple girls fall twice is
very unusual for our team,” Hauser said.
Counting so many falls put the team
at the bottom of the list for event scores
following beam and things didn’t get a
lot easier after that as the girls also had
some trouble staying inside the lines on
floor.
“We weren’t the only ones,” Hauser
said. “I saw an unusually high number
of girls out of bounds yesterday, includ-
ing standout Caroline Smith (of Madi-
son Memorial).
“Luckily, the .1 deduction for going
out isn’t a major fault, so it didn’t hurt
us too badly.”
Vault is where things got really excit-
ing for the Wildcat/Crusaders.
“As I have said before, our low-
difficulty vaults were really holding
us back,” Hauser said. “We put a huge
focus on vaults in practice Thursday and
Friday, and everyone was able to com-
pete a new vault at Middleton.”
Instead of the standard front hand-
spring, the girls added a half-twist onto
the table, and then a half twist off (with
the exception of Rachel Samz who just
added a half-twist off the table).
“The twisting brings the start value of
each vault up .4 from an 8.6 to a 9.0,”
Hauser said. “I still think we are capable
of harder vaults, but I can’t be more
proud of these girls’ performance on the
event, considering they learned these
vaults two days before the competition.”
The Wildcat/Crusaders also made
some changes on the uneven bars as
well, but the biggest change of all was
adding sophomore Lexi Alt back to the
lineup.
”She is still not able to bear a lot of
weight on her ankle, so she is only com-
peting a basic routine with no release
and no dismount.”
Despite the lack of some requirements
though, she was still able to put up an
8.35, only .05 behind Verona’s top bar
score by Semmann, who finished eighth
with an 8.40.
“The girls’ ultimate team goal this
year was to score a 130, and that was
with a varsity team at full strength and
ability,” Hauser said. “Yesterday, they
were able to meet that goal with only a
little bit of help from Lexi.
“I am truly impressed by how well
they have performed this year, and how
many of them have stepped up when we
realized there was a possibility of Lexi
not making it back this season.”
V/ME hosts Madison Memorial at 6
p.m. Thursday inside Glacier Edge Ele-
mentary.
The team is then off until the confer-
ence meet 10:15 a.m. on Saturday, Feb.
22, inside Madison Memorial High
School.
Sports shorts
Mathson swims to roster
spot at Carleton College
Verona resident
Alex Mathson is a
member of the Car-
leton College men’s
swimming and div-
ing team for the
2013-14 season.
Mat hson i s a
graduate of Verona
Area High School
and is currently a
first year swimmer at Carleton.
Carleton, located 45 miles south
of the Twin Cities in Northfield,
Minn., is a member of the Minne-
sota Intercollegiate Athletic Confer-
ence (MIAC) and NCAA Division
III.
Last year, the Knights finished
third at the MIAC Championships,
their best team finish since 2008,
and posted 10 All-MIAC swims.
Mathson
Grapple to
victory
Eleven Verona youth wrestlers
traveled to Mineral Point for a
tournament on Sunday, Feb. 9.
There were over 600 kids
wrestling.
Placing first for Verona were:
Will Neuroth and Jay Hanson,
while Will Scharenbrock, Josiah
Moore, Kaden Kittleson and
Carmyne Santos took second.
Logan Neuroth, Tyler Rebholz
and Trei Udelhoven added
third-place finishes, while Mike
Scharenbrock and Ben Grandau
placed fourth.
The Verona wrestling club host
a youth tournament at the high
school on March 9.
Anyone interested in helping
should contact Craig Neuroth at
cneuroth@barneveld.k12.wi.us.
Photo submitted
Trei Udelhoven finished third for the Verona Youth
Wrestling team Sunday.
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
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Johnson added pins over Scotty
Van Der Haegen (Janesville Parker)
in 1 minute, 29 seconds and Dylan
Klinger (Madison West) in 1:31.
Senior Eric Schmid (145) also
came away wi t h a conf er ence
title, notching his first goal as he
attempts to get back to a state finals
match.
Schmid defeated Zack Mulrooney
(Janesville Craig), ranked No. 10,
in a 15-0 technical fall to win his
championship.
“It i s a pi ece of t he puzzl e, ”
Schmid said. “Obviously, I have
goals for the season, and confer-
ence was one of them. But it was
a minor one. State is in two weeks,
and the goal is to win that.”
Schmid added a pin over Tim
Byington-Fish (Madison West) in
42 seconds and an 8-0 major deci-
sion over Brandon Best (Middle-
ton).
For Schmid, who is ranked No.
3, the focus shifts to winning a
regional title next week. The com-
petition doesn’t get easier with No.
1 Joe Nelson (Stoughton) in his
regional.
“I have to continue to become
fluid in my technique and become
st ronger wi t h my weaknesses, ”
Schmid said. “My top and my bot-
tom are really something I need to
focus on the next week or two to
step up my level for the next com-
petition.”
The Wildcats added nine other
players in the top eight, including
freshman Brandon Daniels (106)
and junior Dakin Coons (182) who
both also made the finals. Verona
took fourth overall at the tourna-
ment with 203 1/2 points.
Daniels lost a tough 2-0 decision
to Moziah Clark (Madison West),
ranked No. 8, in the last match to
finish second. Daniels pinned Jus-
tin Hodges (Sun Prairie) in 31 sec-
onds and Colton Best (Middleton)
in 1:51 in the quarterfinals and
semifinals, respectively.
Coons was pi nned by Wesl ey
Schultz (Sun Prairie) in 2:45 in
his finals match to take second. He
pinned Derrick Hanewold (Janes-
ville Craig) in 1:14 in the quarters
and defeated Andy Garcia (Madi-
son East) 9-2 in the semifinals.
Senior Scott Rohlfing (220) and
junior Jackson Bryant (152) each
took third place Saturday. Rohlf-
i ng defeat ed Sam Presser (Sun
Prairie) in a 14-3 major decision in
his third-place match, while Bry-
ant pinned Logan Baker (Janesville
Craig) in 2:27 in his.
Rohlfing added an injury default
win over Zach Killian (Madison
East) and a 13-2 major decision
over Brock Bennet t (Janesvi l l e
Craig). Bryant also had pins over
Ebrima Jarjue (Madison East) in
2:38 and Ty Randles (Janesville
Parker) in 56 seconds.
Senior Logan Postweiler (195)
and sophomore Dominic Sabbarese
(160) both notched fourth-place
finishes. Postweiler lost his third-
place match to Lon Yeary (Middle-
ton) in a tough 4-2 decision, while
Sabbarese was pinned by Nathan
Dresen (Middleton), ranked No. 13,
in 1:57.
Postweiler did defeat Josh Ber-
nhagen (Madison LaFollette) 3-2
and pinned Alex McNall (Janesville
Craig) in 2:22. Sabbarese defeated
Mark Hallett (Beloit Memorial)
7-4.
Garri son St auffer (170) al so
made the podium by defeating Alex
Miller (Janesville Parker) with a
pin in 3:27 in his fifth-place match.
Sophomores Egill Hegge (120)
and Tyler Udelhoven (126) both
added s event h pl aces . Hegge
defeated Noah Dregne (Madison
West) in an 11-2 major decision
in his seventh-place match, while
Udelhoven pinned Ben Ryan (Mad-
ison West) in 52 seconds in his.
Schmid said the team started off
inexperienced but the guys that did
have experience from last season,
including him, led by example to
help the younger guys learn.
That maturity of the team led to
the improved finishes at the confer-
ence meet this year, he said.
Sun Prairie was first overall with
258 points, while Middleton (253
1/2) and Janesville Craig (228 1/2)
were second and third, respectively.
Regionals begin at 10:15 a.m.
Sat ur day at Sun Pr ai r i e Hi gh
School.
100 free (49. 20), whi l e
Wickstrom finished sev-
enth in the event with a
season-best 50.4.
“ E r i k ’ s 2 0 0 I M
impressed me even more,”
Wuerger said. “He made
t he goal t i me t hat we
set for him last year and
moved from seventh up to
fourth (in 2:05.58). He had
a great day.”
Wickstrom, McGilvray,
Angaran and Wellnitz fin-
ished out the meet by tak-
ing fifth in the 400 free
relay (3:19.88).
Ei ght boys achi eved
their season goal times at
the meet, including Wick-
strom in the 200 IM and
Angaran (50 back) and
Glen Hook (50 breast) on
the medley relay, which
along with Jimmy Conway
and Adam Francis opened
t he meet i n si xt h pl ace
with a time of 1:44.18.
Angaran earned the final
medal spot on t he 100
backstroke podium, plac-
ing eighth in 58 seconds
flat.
Fr a nc i s e nt e r e d t he
meet seeded 13th in the
back. He went on to win
the third of four heats and
take ninth place in 59.42.
“That was a huge plus in
terms of points and time
drop,” Wuerger said. “It
was as pivotal race as any-
thing all day long.”
Th e p r i o r e v e n i n g ,
Verona junior Kyle Wol-
mutt placed sixth in the
diving competition.
In total, 28 of 32 indi-
vi dual ent ri es had sea-
son-best t i mes, pl us al l
six relays beat their seed
times.
Jimmy Conway met his
goal on the 50 free portion
on the 200 freestyle relay
and Zeke Sebastian posted
a lifetime best in the 100
back. Meanwhile, Victor
Pinto and Chad Zachman-
Brockmeyer accomplished
the feat in the 100 free and
Magnus Kittleson did like-
wise in the 500 free.
Kittleson made all four
goal times he set for him-
self this year.
“All the guys that were
tapered for this meet actu-
al l y swam out of t hei r
minds,” McGilvray said.
“I was so proud of all my
teammates. No one could
have asked for a bet t er
meet.”
Out of t he 20 guys
swimming for the Wild-
cats on Saturday, 12 were
t apered for conference,
l eavi ng ei ght t hat wi l l
move onto the sectional
and hopefully state taper
group.
“Most of the guys are
done, ” Wuer ger s ai d.
“There’s room for a cou-
ple of guys, but I don’t
know who those are going
to be right now.”
Top- r anked Madi son
Memorial (652.5) domi-
nated the field through-
out t he meet , bes t i ng
second-ranked Madi son
West (482. 5) by nearl y
170 points. Eighth-ranked
Middleton finished third
wi t h 430. 5, whi l e t he
Wildcats finished 191. 5
points back of the Cardi-
nals in fourth place.
Still Wuerger was hap-
py, fi ni shi ng 23 poi nt s
ahead of Sun Pr ai r i e,
whi ch had knocked off
Verona by four points dur-
ing the dual meet season.
“I’m very, very happy
with fourth place today,”
Wuerger said. “Going into
the meet, Sun Prairie and
us were tied for fourth, so
it could have gone either
way bet ween our t wo
teams.”
Ver ona/ Mount Hor eb
was 10 points behind the
Cardinals based on seed
t i mes fol l owi ng t he 50
free before st eppi ng up
in the second half of the
meet, especially in the 100
backstroke, 200 and 400
free relays.
The Wildcats travel to
Mi ddl et on Hi gh School
for a 1 p.m. sectional meet
this Saturday. The top fin-
isher in each event auto-
matically qualifies for the
WIAA Di vi si on 1 st at e
swimming meet Feb. 22 at
the UW Natatorium. The
rest of the field (24 com-
petitors per race) is filled
based on the top 16 sec-
tional times.
“The goal for next week
wi l l be t o get t he goal
times that we’ve set for
the season,” Wuerger said.
“I t woul d be awesome
if all three of our relays
could make it to state. I
feel pretty good about two
of the three (200 and 400
free) and I’m not going to
rule the 200 medley out.”
Big 8: 13 of 14 wrestlers finish in the top seven
Continued from page 9
Photo by Mary Langenfeld
Eric Schmid wrestles with Middleton’s Brandon Best in the 145-pound weight class at the Big 8 Conference tournament Saturday.
Schmid took first place in his weight class, defeating Zack Mulrooney of Janesville Craig.
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Verona sophomore Bryce
Angaran swims the lead leg
of the 200-yard medley relay
Saturday at the Big Eight
Conference meet in Beloit.
Angaran, Glen Hook, Jimmy
Conway and Adam Francis
posted a time of 1 minute, 44.18
seconds to finish sixth overall.
Conference: Wildcats swim
to fourth place overall
Continued from page 9
Gl a ddi ng a nd f e l l ow
under cl assmen Keel ee
Th e r i n g a n d Ni c o l e
Osborn also scored.
Mal l ory Berg scored
the Blackhawks lone goal,
while Brigetta Rodriguez
stopped 33 of 41 shots on
goal.
Metro Lynx 6,
Brookfield 0
Sophomor e f or war d
Samantha Dingle netted
her first career hat trick
Sat urday at The Ponds
of Brookfield to power
the Metro Lynx to a 6-0
win over non-conference
Brookfield (6-13-1).
Verona’s Taylor Olstad,
Ellie Bohm and Maegan
Sheehan all added a goal
in the win, while Webb
st opped seven shot s t o
earn her first shut out.
Mi ddl et on pepper ed
Glacier goalie Jenna Bales
with 67 shots on goal of
which the senior stopped
61.
A Me t r o Lynx wi n
Thursday at Pierce Park
i n Baraboo agai nst t he
Badger Thunder woul d
give the Metro Lynx at
least a share of their first
conference title in pro-
gram history. Faceoff for
that game is at 7:30 p.m.
Middleton caps the reg-
ular season Saturday at
Tri-County Ice Arena in
Neenah against the non-
conf er ence Fox Ci t i es
Stars (13-8-1). The puck
drops at 4 p.m.
Lynx: Middleton co-op moves to 13-6-3
Continued from page 9
14
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
143 NOTICES
RABIES CLINIC
Small Animal Advocates
Saturday, Feb 22, Stoughton City
Garage S. Fourth St.
10-10:30 am Cats Only
10:30-Noon Cats & Dogs $11
Each Have pets on leash or in carrier
Ask about free spay/neuter
Call 608-873 9851
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tion visit www.rotary.org. This message
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PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
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TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
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150 PLACES TO GO
MONONA TULLY'S Restaurant/Bar
Vendor & Craft Show!
Saturday, Feb 15, 2pm-6pm
Arbonne - Origami Owl - Pmprd Chef
Hand Made gift items - Meat Raffle!
6401 Monona Dr.
163 TRAINING SCHOOLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
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HOME FIREARMS TRAINING
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340 AUTOS
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck, Boat to Heri-
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Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All paper-
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YOUR GENEROUS car, truck or boat
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355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
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it for FREE! Pay later! This sale will not
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360 TRAILERS
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402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
OFFICE ASSISTANT
General office knowledge.
Good computer and phone skills.
Flexible, part time position
available.
Send resume or stop by:
ROTO ROOTER
4808 Ivywood Trail
McFarland, WI 53558
608-256-5189

DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE.
The Verona Press Classifieds. Call 845-
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OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
* Above Average Pay *
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4808 Ivywood Trail
McFarland, WI 53558
608-256-5189

434 HEALTH CARE, HUMAN
SERVICES & CHILD CARE
PERSONAL CARE Giver/CNA; Bel-
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and want to put a song in their heart,
this job is for you! Bring your enthusi-
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449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
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ATTN DRIVERS:
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STRONG DRIVING CAREERS. JOIN
US FOR A CAREER SEMINAR.
WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 12 Times:
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515 West Verona Ave.
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ENTERTAINMENT AND EVENTS
Gun Show: Jackson County Fairgrounds 1212 E Quarry
St Maquoketa, Iowa February 14-15-16 Fri. Night 5-9
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Legals
CITY OF VERONA
MINUTES
COMMON COUNCIL
JANUARY 27, 2014
VERONA CITY HALL
1. The meeting was called to order
by Mayor Hochkammer at 7:03 p.m.
2. Pledge of Allegiance
3. Roll Call: M. Bare, L. Diaz, E.
Doyle, S. Manley, Wm. McGilvray, H.
Reekie, B. Stiner, and D. Yurs. Also in at-
tendance: City Administrator, B. Burns;
City Engineer, B. Gundlach; Director of
Parks & Forestry, D. Walker; Fire Chief,
J. Giver; and City Clerk, K. Scofeld.
4. Public Comment:
• Elizabeth Tucker Long, 807 Arbor
Vitae Place spoke regarding the web-
site update that was discussed at the
earlier Finance Committee meeting. Ms.
Long discussed the benefts to an open
source solution.
5. Approval of Minutes: Motion by
Yurs, seconded by Bare, to approve the
minutes of the January 13, 2014 Com-
mon Council meeting. Motion carried
8/0.
6. Mayor’s Business
• Mayor Hochkammer thanked the
Public Works Department for the fantas-
tic job that they do in snow removal and
keeping our streets safe.
• Last Thursday the Mayor had the
opportunity to speak with Glacier Edge
3rd Graders who are currently learning
about cities. He was impressed with
their knowledge about city operations
and enjoyed the time he spent with
them.
7. Administrator’s Report
8. Engineer’s Report
9. COMMITTEE REPORTS
A. Finance Committee
(1) Discussion and Possible Action
Re: Payment of Bills. Motion by McGil-
vray, seconded by Doyle to approve
the payment of bills in the amount of
$341,217.08. Motion carried 8/0.
(2) Discussion and Possible Action
Re: Agreement between Musser Ap-
praisal Service and the City of Verona
for Annual Maintenance of Commercial
and Personal Property Assessment Ser-
vices in the amount of $7,000. Motion by
McGilvray, seconded by Manley to ap-
prove the Agreement. Motion carried 8/0.
(3) Discussion and Possible Action
Re: Resolution R-14-004 Approving an
Amendment to the 2014 City of Verona
Utility Budget to Fund a General/Utility
Accountant Position. Motion by McGil-
vray, seconded by Doyle to approve
Resolution R-14-004. A roll call vote was
taken with the following voting ‘aye’:
Bare, Diaz, Doyle, Manley, McGilvray,
Reekie, Stiner and Yurs. There were no
members voting ‘no’ and the Motion car-
ried 8/0.
B. Parks, Recreation, and Forestry
Commission
(1) Discussion and Possible Action
Re: Agreement between JSD Profes-
sional Services and the City of Verona
for Park Planning Services for Cathedral
Point and Meister Park Sites. Motion by
Reekie, seconded by Stiner to approve
the Agreement for Park Planning Ser-
vices. Motion carried 8/0.
C. (1) Discussion and Possible
Action Re: Update on the Recruitment
Process for the Senior Center Director
position. The Common Council may
adjourn into closed session pursuant to
Wis. Stat. 19.85(1)(c) for the purpose of
considering employment and compen-
sation of a public employee over which
the Common Council has jurisdiction or
exercises responsibility. The Common
Council will reconvene in open session
and may take action on the closed ses-
sion item. Motion by Doyle, seconded by
Bare to convene into closed session. A
roll call vote was taken with the follow-
ing members voting ‘aye’ Bare, Diaz,
Doyle, Manley, McGilvray, Reekie, Stiner,
and Yurs. The Motion carried 8/0. Motion
by Manley, seconded by McGilvray to re-
main in closed session after discussion
of Item 9. C. (1) to discuss Item 10. (1). A
roll call vote was taken with the follow-
ing members voting ‘aye’ Bare, Doyle,
Manley, McGilvray, Stiner, and Yurs. Vot-
ing ‘no’: Ald. Diaz and Ald. Reekie. The
Motion carried 6/2 and at 7:39 p.m. the
Common Council convened into closed
session.
10. Old Business
(1) Discussion and Possible Action
Re: Case No. 13CV3717 (Local 311, IAFF,
AFL-CIO v. City of Verona and Verona
Joint Fire District) currently in Dane
County Circuit Court. The Common
Council may convene in closed session
as authorized by Section 19.85 (1)(g) of
the Wisconsin Statutes for the purpose
of conferring with City of Verona legal
counsel who is rendering oral or written
advice concerning strategy to be adopt-
ed by the City with respect to litigation in
which it is involved. The Common Coun-
cil remained in closed session from Item
9. C. (1.) for this item. No action was
taken in closed session and at 8:53 p.m.
the Common Council reconvened into
open session.
11. New Business
(1) Discussion and Possible Action
Re: Approval of Operator Licenses. Mo-
tion by Yurs, seconded by Bare to ap-
prove the licenses. Motion Carried 8/0.
12. Announcements
13. Adjournment
Motion by Manley, seconded by
Yurs to adjourn the meeting at 8:56 p.m.
Motion carried 8/0.
Kami Scofeld, Clerk
Published: February 13, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE
The City of Verona Plan Commis-
sion will hold Public Hearings on Mon-
day March 3, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. at City
Hall, 111 Lincoln Street, for the following
planning and zoning matters:
1) Conditional Use Permit amend-
ment to allow for the expansion of the
Wisconsin Brewing Company’s outdoor
seating/patio area located at 1079 Amer-
ican Way.
2) Precise Implementation Plan
(PIP) for a planned unit development lo-
cated on Lot 24 of the First Addition to
Prairie Oaks Subdivision, located east of
Enterprise Drive, west of Reddan Soccer
Park, and north of Cross Country Road.
The proposed PIP will allow for the con-
struction of 76 apartment units.
Interested persons may comment
on these planning and zoning matters
during the public hearings at the March
3rd Plan Commission meeting. The Plan
Commission will make recommenda-
tions for these matters, which will then
be reviewed by the Common Council for
fnal decisions on Monday, March 10th.
Contact Adam Sayre, Director of
Planning and Development, at 848-9941
for more information on these items or
to receive copies of the submittals.
Kami Scofeld,
City Clerk
Published: February 13 and 20, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
academic honors
Summer graduates
Clark University
Verona
Megan Webber, MSN, nursing
North Central College
Fitchburg
Claire Davenport, bachelor’s
degree, management
UW-Platteville
Verona
Ryan Viney criminal justice;
Amanda Wright, biology
UW-Stevens Point
Verona
Ian M Girdley, BA, social work,
sociology; Jessie Lambert, BS,
resource management-environmental
education/interpretationsis; Joshua T
Maurer, BS, biochemistry; Jeffrey
M Peterson, BA, Spanish; Haley M
Salaway, Master of Science in com-
municative disorders-speech and
language pathology, communicative
disorders; Lauren E. Schwab, BS,
communicative disorders; Andrew
K Smalley, BS, sociology; Keith R.
Wixson, BA, social science
Wartburg College (IA)
Verona
Lindsey Boyke, BA, biology
Lake Forest (ILL)
Verona
Russel Pfeiffer, BA, history
Edgewood College
Fitchburg
Elena Aleman, BS, sociology;
Briana Thomas, BS, psychology
Verona
Joshua Bauernfeind, BS, Chemisty;
Terry Dvorak, BS, theatre arts; Jan
Gauger, BS, computer information
systems; Joe Kutil-Fiess, BS, crimi-
nal justice; Candice O’Neill, BS, art;
Travis Schaff, BS, business
UW-Whitewater
Verona
Jason Bowers, BBA, accounting;
Anthony Bugher, masters in busi-
ness Administration; Michael Gosser,
MBA; James Harrod, Masters of
science in education; Lindsey Kane,
BS, Education in Physical Education;
Megan Kasten, BS, education in phys-
ical education; Bryan Manning, MBA;
Chelsea Newman, BS, education in
elementary education; Bryan Nodorft,
BBA, finance; Derek Robinson, BBA,
marketing; Sarah Siegle, Masters of
Professional Accountancy Degree
in Accounting; Taylor Spitzig, BS,
Psychology; Jordan Thompson, BBA,
information technology infrastructure
UW-LaCrosse
Fitchburg
Becky Vraga, BA, communication
Verona
Michael Capenter, BS, accountan-
cy; Elizabeth Chmielewski, Master of
Education-professional development;
Abby Donskey, BA, communication;
Reema Hanna, BS, early childhood
through middle childhood education;
Jacob Hegge, BS, exercise and sport
science major: exercise science-pre-
professional track; Sarah Kroth, BA,
theatre arts; Kevin Misener, BA, soci-
ology; Nicole Pielage, BS, psychol-
ogy; Melanie Darga, BS, recreation
management; Samuel Schmidt, BS,
exercise and sport science major:
sport management; Melanie Darga,
BS, recreation management; Samuel
Schmidt, BS, exercise and sport sci-
ence major: sport management
Globe University Madison
West
Verona
Ellen J. Bass, Associates in Massage
Therapy; Paula Zenz, Associates in
Medical Assistant (Honors)
Hamline
Brad Burns, Juris Doctor, law
Luther College
Verona
Colby Engel, BA, elementary educa-
tion
Madison Area Technical
College-Fort Atkinson
Verona
Jennifer Beth, nursing assistant
Boston University
Fitchburg
Catherine M. Grotenhuis, MS, com-
puter information systems
UW-Oshkosh
Fitchburg
Tamara Luhman, BS, nursing
Verona
Jaclyn Cropp, BBA; Melissa
Franklin, BBA; Taylor Krentz, BS;
Elisabeth Pleimling, BFA
December graduates
UW-Green Bay
Fitchburg
Danielle Gervasi, bachelor’s Degree,
human development, psychology;
Verona
Lauren Sinner, bachelor’s Degree,
arts management, arts;
MNSU-Mankato
Verona
Joseph Giesfeldt, BS, Rec, parks
and leisure services; Kristen Lucas,
BA, music
UW-Milwaukee
Fitchburg
Taylor Jan Morrison, BA, letters
and sciences; Laura A. President-
Brown, BS, social welfare
Verona
Megan Mary Blaschka, BA, letters
and sciences; Latisha L. Canon, PHD,
philosophy; Quinn Ellen Cory, BA,
letters and sciences; Seth Michael
Merdler, BSE, engineering; Tannah
L. Stampfl, BA, letters and sciences;
John Fredrick Volker, BBA, business;
Lyndsey Leigh Weyenberg, BS, nurs-
ing
UW-Stevens Point
Fitchburg
Daniel Lynam, BS, physical educa-
tion
February 13, 2014 The Verona Press ConnectVerona.com
15
508 CHILD CARE & NURSERIES
LIL' STARS 22/yrs Licensed Daycare
(Stoughton), FT/PT w/Preschool Pro-
gram, Infant-Up. Open-6AM. 608-873-
0276
516 CLEANING SERVICES
HOUSE CLEANING
Quality Work
Free Estimates
Satisfaction Guaranteed
608-233-1137
524 CONTRACTORS
CONCRETE FINISHERS and Laborers.
Experienced w/valid DL. CDL preferred.
Competitive wage and benefits. Call Jeff:
608-884-9725
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Winter-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
European-Craftsmanship
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
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608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
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Free Estimates. Insured.
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554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Snow Removal
608-219-1214
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
THE Verona Press CLASSIFIEDS, the
best place to buy or sell. Call 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
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Fast and Reliable Plumbing Repairs.
Call ServiceLive and get referred to a
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RECOVER PAINTING Currently offering
winter discounts on all painting, drywall
and carpentry. Recover urges you to join
in the fight against cancer, as a portion of
every job is donated to cancer research.
Free estimates, fully insured, over 20
years of experience. Call 608-270-0440.
572 SNOW REMOVAL
PLOWING, BLOWING, Residential and
commercial. 608-873-7038
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
BUNDLE & SAVE! DirecTV, Internet &
Phone from $69.99/mo. Free 3-months
of HBO, Starz, Showtime & Cinemax.
Free Genie 4-room Upgrade. Lock in 2
year savings. Call 800-918-1046 (wcan)
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
601 HOUSEHOLD
NEW MATTRESS SETS from $89.
All sizes in stock! 9 styles. www.
PlymouthFurnitureWI.com
2133 Eastern Ave. Plymouth, WI Open 7
days a week (wcan)
638 CONSTRUCTION &
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT
FARMI 3PT Logging Winch's,
Valby 3pt PTO Chippers, New 3pt
Rototillers, Loader Attachments and 3pt
Attachments, New Log Splitters. www.
threeriversforestry.com
(866) 638-7885 (wcan)
648 FOOD & DRINK
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED, delivered
to the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
plus 4 FREE burgers - The Family Value
Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER today.
888-676-2750 Use Code 48643XMT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff79 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts for your Valentine! SAVE 20%
on qualifying gifts over $29. Fresh-dipped
berries from $19.99. Call 888-479-6008
or visit www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no
activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd
waterproof alert button for free and more.
Only $29.95 per month. 877-863-6622
(WCAN)
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 PETS
AKC COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES
Five buff females available February 5th.
608-835-2775
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
FRUIT TREES As low as $16. Blueberry,
grape, strawberry, asparagus, evergreen
& hardwood plants. Free catalog. Wood-
stock Nursery, N1831 Hwy 95, Neills-
ville, WI 54456 Toll free 888-803-8733
wallace-woodstock.com (wcan)
PROFLOWERS SHOW lots of LOVE
this Valentine's Day! Save 55% on our
Tender Hugs & Kisses bouquet with
chocolates for $19.99 plus S/H. Get
20% off your other gifts over $29. Go
to www.Proflowers.com or call 800-315-
9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 WANTED
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
696 WANTED TO BUY
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 RENTALS
3 BEDROOM, 1 bathroom, detatched
garage, Available now. $550/mo Utili-
ties not included. Evansville. Call Eric
333-2491
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
STOUGHTON- 525 W South St, Upper.
No Pets/Smoking. Heat included, stove
and refrigerator. $700/mo. 1st and last
months rent. 608-516-4400
VERONA ONE Bedroom Available
March 1st. Heat Included, $525 month.
Dave 608-575-0614
720 APARTMENTS
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS NOON
Monday FOR THE Verona Press
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
STOUGHTON 209 E Main St. Retail
or Office space. 1000 sq ft. Beauti-
fully remodeled. $766. per month utilities
included. 608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 211 E Main St. 3400 sq.
ft. Retail space plus 1800 sq. ft. display
or storage space. Beautifully remodeled
$1900/mo plus utilities. 608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest Retail or
Office Space. 400 sq ft. $299/month utili-
ties included. 608-271-0101
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
845 HOUSES FOR SALE
FARM/HORSE FARM: 35 Acres! Huge
riding arena, tack room, barn/machine
shed. Also beautiful 3 bedroom, 3 bath
completely remodeled home. Large farm
kitchen w/stand, 1st floor laundry, tiled
floors, new roof. Creek running through
property. fruit trees. $355,000 - - Call
Pat's Realty, Inc. at 608-884-4311
FOR SALE BY VILLAGE:
455 Jefferson Street, Oregon
Details at vil.oregon.wi.us
For more information and appointments
call: 835-6286 or 835-3118
870 RESIDENTIAL LOTS
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Only 8 lots remaining!
Choose your own builder
608-215-5895

965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
GRASSY HORSE HAY. Small squares
$4.50 ea. Big squares/big rounds avail-
able. 608-669-7879
970 HORSES
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
Now hiring for a variety of shifts at
our lovely senior living residence
on Madison’s west side. Shift &
weekend differentials, paid training
& an array of benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
to download
an application:
allsaintsneighborhood.org
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
Now hiring for a variety of shifts at
our lovely senior living residence
on Madison’s west side. Shift &
weekend differentials, paid training
& an array of benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
to download
an application:
allsaintsneighborhood.org
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
Now hiring for a variety of shifts at
our lovely senior living residence
on Madison’s west side. Shift &
weekend differentials, paid training
& an array of benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
to download
an application:
allsaintsneighborhood.org
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
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Now hiring housekeepers at our lovely senior living
residence located on a bus line on Madison’s west
side. Flexible scheduling is available for the right
candidate, as well as shift & weekend differentials,
paid training & an array of benefits.
download
an application:
allsaintsneighborhood.org
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
Housekeepers
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Specialized Light Assembly, full or part-time
The work requires energetic people that can work on
their feet for periods of 4-6 hours, must have excellent
eye/hand coordination and hand/finger dexterity. Work
requires assembling parts either individually or as part
of a team at the rate of 200 – 300 per hour. Work shifts
are 4 - 8 hours/day, Monday – Friday, between the hours
of 5 a.m. and 9 p.m.
Production Positions, Plastic Molding, full-time
This work requires operating plastic molding machines
in a high tech facility. Prior experience in plastic
manufacturing is required. Should be mechanically
inclined in order to help maintain the equipment as
necessary. Must have shift flexibility. EOE
Apply in person M-F, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Minitube of America, 419 Venture Ct., Verona,
845-1502, or email your resumé to
hr@minitube.com.
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Equipment Technician
MOFA is a Verona-based biotech company. We
have an opening in our Equipment Services
Department as an Equipment Technician. This
position involves assembling and repairing
a variety of equipment that is sold for use in
the breeding of animals. Previous experience
and/or training in electronics, pneumatics,
PLC controls, electro-mechanical systems is
required, an Associates degree in electronics
is preferred. This position will work at our
facility in Verona and will join a team of 7
other Technicians. MOFA provides competitive
compensation and benefits and a great work
environment. EOE
Apply in person M-F, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Minitube of America, 419 Venture Ct., Verona,
845-1502, or email your resumé to
hr@minitube.com. U
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Now Hiring Caregivers & C.N.AS!
Sienna Meadows-Oregon, has immediate
job opportunities to join our
compassionate Care Specialist Team.
We offer competitive wages designed to
attract and retain quality staff.
Various Shifts Available
BOTH Full-Time & Part-Time!
989 Park Street
Oregon, WI 53575
Download An Application:
www.siennacrest.com

For More Information
Call: (608) 835-0000
Attn: Chris Kiesz, RN
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OUTSIDE ADVERTISING
SALES CONSULTANT
Do you have excellent communication skills?
Creative ideas? The ability to develop and maintain
client relationships? An interest in print and web
based media? We have an established account list
with growth potential. If you possess excellent
communication and organizational skills, a pleasant
personality, and the ability to prospect for new
business we would like to speak to you. Previous
sales experience desired. Media experience a plus.
Competitive compensation, employee stock option
ownership, 401(k), paid vacations, holidays,
insurance and continuing education assistance.
For consideration, apply online at
www.wcinet.com/careers
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub, Verona Press,
The Great Dane Shopping News
Unified Newspaper Group is part of Woodward Community Media,
a division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
and an Equal Opportunity Employer.
POLICE OFFICER
The Verona Police Commission is accepting
applications for Patrol Officer. The 2014 salary
range is $45,260.76 to $66,367.52, depending
on qualifications. If you are a police officer who
is looking for a “lateral transfer” opportunity,
preference may be given to candidates who are
certified and/or have experience. Application
deadline is March 31, 2014. An application kit is
available from our website at www.ci.verona.wi.us.
Questions can be directed to Business Office
Manager Nilles at (608) 845-0924. Women and
minorities are encouraged to apply.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
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16 - The Verona Press - February 13, 2014
Think HOMETOWN First
Not Just a Pharmacy
Shop our excellent selection of gifts
while we fill your prescription
• Crabtree & Evelyn Products
• Freshwave Products
• Crossroads Candles
• Greenleaf Fragrances
• Willow Tree and More
(HSA cards accepted)
202 S. Main Street, Verona • 848-8020
Check out www.myhometownrx.com
Hours
M-F 9am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
Closed
Sunday
J Tires J Tune-Ups J Engine Repairs
J Alignments J Radiators J Suspensions
J Brakes J Batteries J Transmissions
J Exhausts J Oil Changes J A/C Inspections
Avenue Auto is a Full Line
Auto Repair Service Center
608-845-8328
503 W. Verona Ave.
Verona, WI 53593
www.avenueautoclinic.com
Mon-Fri 7:00-5:30,
Closed Saturday and Sunday
Come see us and
receive $15 dollars
of any smartphone!
*A new 2-yr agmt. (subject to early term. fee) required. Limit 1 per customer.
Some restrictions may apply. See store for details. Offer expires 4-30-14.
Locally owned and
operated since 1998!
VERONA
600 W Verona Ave.
Across from Holiday Inn
608-848-7600
Come to see us and
get $15 dollars of any
smartphone!
Locally owned and
operated since 1998!
We know you’re busy.
Save time ~ shop close to home!
Your locally-owned grocer for over 100 years
210 S. Main Street • Verona
(608) 845-6478
H U G H E S F L O O R I N G
C O M M E R C I A L / R E S I D E N T I A L
Family Owned and Operated Since 1978
407 E. Verona Avenue, Verona, WI
608.845.6403
Hometown People
You Know & Trust
Stop in and see us today!
Save Gas… Buy Local!
Your Hometown
Hardware Store
Winter’s Here & We Have It All!
Ice Melt • Sidewalk Salt
Snow Shovels • Window Scrapers
Windshield Wash • De-icer • Sleds
Bird Seed & Feeders • Suet
119 W. Verona Ave.
845-7920
Family Owned for 43 Years
Turn your To-Do list
into a To-Done list!
20% Off
Bag Sale*
Sat. Feb 22
nd
*Some
exclusions apply.
CELEBRATE VALENTINES DAY WITH
“PLATO DE AMOR”
Appetizer, 2 Cocktails, Dinner & Dessert
$
35/Person
BRUNCH
8am to 2pm
Saturday & Sunday
100 Cross Country Rd Call in orders to go!
Verona, WI 608-497-3333
www.pasquals.net/verona
$7 Lunch

M
onday-
Friday
11am
-2pm
1/2 Price House
Margaritas
All Day Every
Monday & Tuesday
RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL
REMODELING
Brandon Cooper
Owner
PHONE 608.845.9389
FAX 608.845.9301
WEB CooperPlumbing.com
VERONA
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1983
107 S. Main • Verona
497-1177 • driftmierdesign.com
Award Winning Kitchen & Bath Design
Custom Cabinets
Countertops
Visit Our Showroom!
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