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CRAFTS VILLAGE

AT MADHYAPUR THIMI

BY

Rupesh Shrestha
(062 / B.Arch / 231)

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the Requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture In the Department of Architecture Tribhuvan University Institute of Engineering Pulchowk Campus

January 2011

Kathmandu,Nepal March 2010

Thesis on Crafts Vlllage, Madhyapur Thimi.

CERTIF ICATE
This is to certify that this thesis entitled CRAFTS VILLAGE at Madhyapur Thimi submitted by Mr. Rupesh Shrestha has been examined and it has been declared successful for the partial fulfilment of the academic requirement towards the completion of the Degree of Bachelor of Architecture.

.. Ar. Rajesh Thapa (Thesis Supervisor) Date: .

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DECLARATION
I declare that this dissertation has not been previously accepted in substance for any degree and is not being concurrently submitted in candidature for any degree. I state that this dissertation is the result of my own independent investigation/ work, except where otherwise stated. I hereby give consent for my dissertation, if accepted, to be available for photocopying and understand that any reference to or quotation from my thesis will receive an acknowledgement.

. Rupesh Shrestha Date: ...

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I would like to express my sincere gratitude to all who have offered their help in accomplishing this thesis.

I would like to thank my teachers; my guides who have continuously helped me with their guidances and brainstorming ideas. I would like to thank my guide Ar. Rajesh Thapa for his continuous support and his valuable inputs. Also I would like to thank Prof. Dr. Sudarshan Raj Tiwari, Prof. Sri Niwas Bir Singh Kansakar for their valuable ideas that has been helpful to shape this project.

Also I would like to mention a special thanks to Ar. Deepak Pant and Ar. Punya Sagar Marahatta for their suggestions and continuous encouragement and gestures.

Also I am indebted to the reputed personnel of various craft centres for their valuable co-operation during the case study. Also I want to express my gratitude towards Mr. Leela Mani Paudyal- Secretary at Office of Prime Minister and Council of Ministers (OPMCM) and Mr. Gopal Kalapremi Shrestha a renowned artist for their support while doing case study and programme formulation.

I would also like to extend my gratitude to my seniors Ar. Abhishek Mananda Bajracharya, Ar. Monika Maharjan, Ar. Jeny Shrestha, Ar. Manisha Shilpakar, Ar. Timila Bajracharya and juniors Shashi Mandal, Selma Vaidya and Lona Gm, Anuj, Nirajan, Zubin, Nayan and my friend Prabin Man Baidya for their assistance and without who m this project couldn't have fully materialised.

A word of appreciation also goes to my friends who have supported me in this endeavour and to all whose names I couldn't mention here. Thank you . Rupesh Shrestha 062 / B.Arch / 231
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Thesis on Crafts Vlllage, Madhyapur Thimi.

ABSTRACT
A craft is a branch of profession that requires some particular kind of skilled work. In historical sense, particularly as pertinent to the Medieval history and earlier, the term is usually applied towards people occupied in small- scale production of goods. The meaning of craft and its values are ever-changing with development of new techniques and methods. Craft village is a one-stop craft destination which offers visitors a unique variety of craft-related activities and programmes. It is intended to be a must visit" tourist destination. In this village, visitors will learn about Nepali handicraft through craft demonstrations & hands-on interactive sessions. Visitors will experience the interactive handicraft making besides viewing the techniques in which they make such fine masterpieces. It also accommodates various trading units. This project intends to provide spaces with forms and functions to foster the development of crafts that Nepal is known for. The art and craft gallery housed in its premises displays wide collections of handicraft products/artefacts based on time-honoured Nepali craft traditions. The core concept of the Craft gallery is education and highlights the craft heritage of Nepal and local handicraft production technologies.

There are many handicrafts promoting agency in Nepal. They are private, semigovernment and government agency with different scope and scale. But the y lack adequate space which truly acknowledges the production, promotion and display of crafts. The project has opted for traditional principles in architectural design character of a traditional settlement (tole).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CONTENTS PAGE NO

1. Chapter 1: Introduction 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Historical Background.. 1 3

1.3 Objective of the Study... ........ 4 1.4 Scope of project . 6

1.5 Project Justification.. 7 1.6 Methodology ........ 9

2. Chapter 2: Literature Review 2.1 Literature Review 12 2.2 Objective... 12 2.3 Introduction 2.3.1 General Consideration .... 13

2.3.2 Design of Multifield workspace

.. 16

2.3.3 General requirement of studios . 19 2.3.4 Detailed study of studios 20 2.3.5 Library ... 23 2.3.6 Conference rooms and restaurants .. 2.3.7 Display Spaces .. 24 25

2.3.8 Energy Efficient Studies 31

3. Chapter 3: Site Analysis 3.1 Site Analysis 3.1.1 Location ... 34 3.1.2 Physical features .. 34

3.1.3 Site surroundings 35 3.1.4 Site area 35 3.1.5 Access and approaches .. 35 3.1.6 Vegetation . 36 3.2 Physical infrastructure . 36 3.2.1 Infrastructure ... 36 3.2.2 Geology . 36 3.2.3 Climate .. 36 3.3 Few facts about Madhyapur Thimi 37 3.4 Site Justification .. 37 3.5 Bye Laws ..... 37 3.6 SWOT Analysis .. 37

4. Chapter 4: Case studies 4.1 Case Study .. 39

4.1.1 Introduction to Handicraft Association of Nepal 40 4.2 Wood craft 4.2.1 Wood Carving Industries . 41 4.2.2 Wood carving at Bhaktapur .. 44 4.3 Metal Craft 4.3.1 MahaBuddha Handicraft . 45 4.4 Stone Craft 4.4.1 Arniko Stone Carvers 48 4.5 Clay Craft 4.5.1 Pottery Square . 50 4.5.2 Thimi Ceramics . 53 4.6 Gallery and Exhibition Space 4.6.1 Nehru Memorial Pavillion .. 54 4.6.2 National Craft Museum . 56

4.7 Exhibition and Commercial space 4.7.1 Babar Mahal Revisited . 60 4.7.2 Siddhartha Art Gallery .. 62 4.8 Training and Development Center 4.8.1 Handicraft Design and Development center .. 63 4.9 CRAFT VILLAGE 4.9.1 Folk arts and Crafts Museum .. 4.10 Energy Studies 4.10.1 Piano's Beyeler Foundation Museum .. 68 66

5. Chapter 5: Design Inferences 5.1 Elements of Newar settlements . 70

6. CHAPTER 6: Programme and Area formulation 74

7. CHAPTER 7: CONCEPT 7.1 Concept 79 7.2 Design theme 80 7.3 Zoning and site planning . 80

7.4 Proposed Utility and services .. 82 7.5 Fire hazard protection plan . 83

8. CONCLUSION

..

84 85

9. BIBLIOGRAPHY .

Thesis on Crafts Vlllage, Madhyapur Thimi

CHAPTER 1
1.1 INTRODUCTION
Arts and crafts comprise a whole host of activities and hobbies that are related to making things with one's own hands and skill. These can be sub-divided into handicrafts or "traditional crafts" (doing things the old way) and the rest. Some crafts have been practised for centuries, while others are modern inventions, or popularisations of crafts which were originally practiced in a very small geographic area. (Word IQ.com 2010) The specific name Arts and Crafts movement was also given to a design movement of the late 19th and early 20th century, whose proponents included William Morris and Edwin Lutyens. They believed that medieval craftsmen achieved a joy in the excellence of their work, which they strove to emulate. These activities are called crafts because originally many of them were professions. Adolescents were apprenticed to a master-craftsman, and they refined their skills over a period of years. By the time their training was complete, they were well-equipped to set up in trade for themselves, earning their living with the skill of their hands. The Industrial Revolution and the increasing mechanisation of production processes gradually reduced or eliminated many of the roles professional craftspeople played, and today 'crafts' are most commonly seen as a form of hobby. Most crafts require a combination of skill and talent, but they can also be learnt on a more basic level by virtually anyone. Many Community centres and schools run evening or day classes and workshops offering to teach basic craft skills in a short period of time. Many of these crafts become extremely popular for brief periods of time (a few months, or a few years), spreading rapidly among the crafting population as everyone emulates the first examples. The term craft also refers to the products of artistic production or creation that require a high degree of tacit knowledge, are highly technical, require specialized equipment and/or facilities to produce, involve manual labor or a blue-collar work ethic, are accessible to the general public and are constructed from materials with histories that exceed the boundaries of western art history, such as ceramics, glass, textiles, metal and wood. These products are produced within a specific community of practice and while they differ from the products

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produced within the communities of art and design, the boundaries of such often overlap resulting in hybrid objects. Additionally, as the interpretation and validation of art is frequently a matter of context, an audience may perceive crafted objects as art objects when these objects are viewed within an art context, such as in a museum or in a position of prominence in ones home. Art and Craft are inter-related in many aspects. They are a form of expression of ideas and solutions through items they create. Different items that craftsmen have made, during their civilization has brought a masterpiece and stated about the period of their times. Nepal is a country with diversified cultures, art and traditions. It is a colorful country. It is because of these cultures and tradition Nepal is known to the world today. These diversified cultures and traditions are reflected on the art and crafts of the country, which not only specifies the identity but has become one of the most important financial gains of the country. As stated in Wikipedia
(2010) Handicraft is known as craftwork is a simple craft. It is a type of work where useful and

decorative devices are made completely by hand or by using only simple tools. Usually the term is applied to traditional means of making goods. They are usually labour intensive specialized skills and uses indigenous raw material and resources. In the India Crafts (2010) it states usually, what differentiates handicraft from arts and crafts is a matter of intent, i.e. handicraft items are intended to be used, worn, etc, having a purpose beyond simple decoration. According to Handicrafts are generally considered more traditional work, created as a necessary part of daily life, while arts and crafts implies more of a hobby pursuit and a demonstration/perfection of a creative technique. In practical terms, the categories have a great deal of overlap (Malcolm Tatum 2010).

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1.2

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

Gajurel and Vaidya (1994) suggest that history of Nepalese Handicraft is an old saga. Traces of Nepalese handicraft dates back to Stone Age, where any kinds of tool were inadequate. During 5th Century AD, different religions began to form their bases amongst the people, along with the history of handicraft. Thus handicraft began with faith; a lot of religion influence can be seen in Nepalese Handicraft. People from different spheres of life following different religion from Hinduism to Buddhism influenced so much of Nepalese art and craft. Documentary evidences indicate that Nepalese handicraft dates back to the period of Kautilya. In 4th century, Nepal was known for quality rainproof woolen blankets, known as "bhiringisi", as referred in Kautiliyam Arthashastra. Various Chinese travellers like Wanghunshe and Huansang, in 648 A.D. have greatly appreciated Nepalese arts and crafts and the skills of Nepalese craftsmen and artisans, in their travelogues. Terracotta toys, dolls and figurines discovered at Tilaurakot in western Nepal and bronze peacock at Lumbini are among the few best examples of the Nepalese handicrafts used by the people during and after the 6th century B.C. Production of various handicrafts and their use in the society has been an integral part of Nepals rural life. Agricultural and other tools(khukuri, Kuto Kodali, Halo, Chulesi etc), rugs and blankets (Radi Pakhi), Bhangro (Hemp cloth) and Wickerwork (Gundri, Doko, Namlo etc) have always been the part of rural life. In the same way, hand made paper, handloom cloth, woolen knitwear and rugs have their own historical background that cannot be confined to a specific era. In Lichhavi period, development of artistic handicraft reached its height in various form of metal/wood/stone craft. The Thangka, which is believed to be Tibetan origin, was also developed as Pauva from Nepal. After 1951, when Nepal opened its door to foreigners, such craft products meant for domestic market also noticed the possibility of exporting to countries in Europe, USA and other Asian countries. One walking down the streets of Kathmandu cannot fail to notice the abundance religious buildings in the city. These religious building became the source of traditional handicraft. Almost every nook and corner space occupied religious artifacts. The temples were the sites of magnificent stone and wood carvings. Most of the stone carvings were from the
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eleventh and twelfth centuries and reflect the influence of Indian art from the Gupta (5 and 6th century A.D.) and the Palasena (10th to 12th century AD.) periods. Wood carvings are predominantly from the eighteenth century used to decorate pillars, door and window frames, cornices and supporting struts (Craft News 1999). These evidences showcase some of the magnificent craft of the country proving the skill and ancient techniques still used today; they are a source of inspiration.

1.3

OBJECTIVE

The main objective of this project would be to share crafts information through workshops, gallery and exhibitions, and provide innovative craft design classes through latest technology. In trend, we accumulate all different activities in a rented building with a single character which results in loss of active participation of dwellers. Objective of this project will be to transgress from this trend into providing an apt environment of healthy promotion of Nepali crafts. The project at end will be a place of amalgamation of various trade guilds distributed in Nepal and provide a platform for creative learning for people interested in craft sector. This will also act as a community center to promote tourism as there will be a collection of Nepali cultural traits. The development functions are determined to satisfy three different parts of community requirements. The first would be an employment / facility center for village. The second one would be the tourist related functions such as viewpoint and view decks, and third one would be common for community and for tourists such as bank, information center, etc. In FHAN (12 May 2010) it describes that in Nepal there are clusters of crafts such as metal crafts, handmade paper crafts, wooden crafts, thangkas and modern painting, potteries, stone carving and so on. They are the basic livelihood of the people. As Nepal is a developing country one cannot expect a huge global industry in the area but one which survives are small cottage industry that we are more skilled in. Therefore a handicraft village can be a good platform for those using them.

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So the main objectives are as follows:

1.3.1 Social
An interaction place for craftsmen. To provide a good working environment for the creation, workshop, exhibition and presentation. To fulfill the solitude environment required by artists and craftsmen, coherent with their way of living and working style. As a socialization ground for craftsmen.

1.3.2 Cultural
To promote Nepalese culture through crafts. A cultural center that justifies the Nepali lifestyle. To blend with the culture of different generations.

1.3.3 Physical
To provide an adequate, controlled and ideal environment for craftsmen. To promote Nepalese handicraft, both within inside and outside Nepal. To provide space for seminars and exhibitions, for exchange of their views and ideas. To create a new attraction for tourist.

1.3.4 Economical objectives


To enable people to understand the relationship between economics, culture and aesthetics The place maybe developed as a part of tourist spots in the Kathmandu Valley that would in turn help in generating certain revenue Addition of employment.

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1.4

SCOPE OF PROJECT
The project basically comprises of Crafts which are contextual to Kathmandu. Nepal is

diversified nation and so is its crafts industry. Thus all of the crafts is impossible to be accommodated in a single complex. Thus taking this into account, crafts such as a. Wood Craft b. Stone Craft

c. Textile Craft d. Clay Craft e. Metal Craft and

f. Thanka g. Mask making has been attempted to be accommodated.

Crafts Village includes A. Administration : overall management and supervision of activities B. Research and training: R & D, knowledge sharing, advancement C. Workshop: demo rooms on prototype designs D. Craft gallery: craft display, exhibitions E. Exhibit, Sales and promotion: showrooms, shops F. Supporting units: To manage the complex an administrative body is required. G. Facilities and recreation: Such as restaurants, parking and rest rooms.

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1.5

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION
Nepal is suffering for serious drawbacks such as poverty and brain-drain. We have not

been able to uplift Nepal and provide even basic requirements for our people. Although Nepal boasts of a rich civilization and culture we have not been able to fully catch its potential and develop it into a income generating source. We possess artists renowned in the world for their craft but still they lack a formal way of training and a platform for information dissemination / publicity of their skills. Present status of Handicraft (source:FHAN) Nepalese handicraft is not curio any more. Although produced in households, some handicraft products have taken the shape of small industry. Volume of business / export Handicraft export from Nepal is to the tune of 2.75 billion Nepalese rupees. Although there is not any survey on local sales of handicrafts, on the basis of discussion with peoples engaged in this sector, their sale is estimated to at 4.12 billion rupees. Thus, total business of handicraft is estimated to at 6.87 billion rupees. Revenue to Government Import, Export, Income Tax Handicraft business contributes to national revenue from various ways. Tariff for imported raw materials, fees paid for Custom clearance and income tax from profit generated by numerous enterprises are the major forms of revenue from handicraft sector. Furthermore, enterprise registration and renewal also contribute to national revenue. Number of family engaged / population Population census 2001 indicates that Nepal has a population of craft workers to the tune of 1 million. Working environment As most of the handicraft production is done in household scale, the working condition is not ideal. In urban areas, space at household scale is felt inadequate to expand production.

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Handicraft industrys problems Due to lower scale of economy, handicraft industry faces the problem of low

productivity, high cost of production, inconsistent quality and inadequate volume of production. Each product has their own specific problems too. Absence of proper infrastructure has been major problem marketing of handicraft goods. Contribution to GDP Handicraft sector contributes around 1% to the national GDP. Contribution in the employment Handicraft sector contributes around 9% in the total employment of the country. Moreover, it has been a solid base for self employment. in the areas of production, processing and

Craft industry is taking a developing route which must be preserved for its sustainability. As said earlier a good designed environment is provided for creation, workshop, exhibition and presentation. It employees and trains the people living in a society which in turn will also promote the national craft to the world. If there is any such medium to grasp their creative ingenuity then the present situation of poverty and brain-drain may come to a steep decrease. Further it will be an asset for tourism industry of Nepal in which tourists can perceive Nepal in form of its natural beauty and also in terms of its culture and crafts.

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1.6

METHODOLOGY

Essential academic steps conducted during the study are simply pointed out as shown below.

1. Preliminary stage: A. Collection of data and information relevant to the project. a. From various government and non-government authorities. b. References from library and Internet. c. Interview with the craftsmen.

B. Visit proposed site a. Site analysis i. ii. iii. iv. v. Site parameters/ field visits and study Data required for site planning shall be recorded diligently. Soil investigation Assessment of locally available construction materials. Funtional parameters relevant to the design according to the user requirement i.e, external and internal communication. vi. vii. viii. ix. x. Planning and design parameter deals with planning code and design code. Climatic analysis Traffic flow analysis Weather, fire and damp resistances Thermal and sound insulation

C. Empirical enqiry a. Field case study b. Library case study c. Internet case study

After collecting all the data from the preliminary stage, the proposed requirement of the design was formulated based on all above studies. From the above preliminary

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stage the size, shape and function of the particular element of the whole project was determined.

2. Secondary stage: A. Planning a. Development of master planning i. ii. Conceptual planning of site. Traffic management and parking

b. Conceptual design of building i. General layout of building as per requirements B. Building a. General layout/arrangement b. Architectural plans/elevations/sections c. Perspective views/model.

Design development variables Need Context Site Zoning Services Macro-Climate Adjacent Building Geological factors Vehicular Access
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Space Relationships Priorities Processes Objective Maintenance Access Equipment Environment

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Form Zoning Circulation Structure Enclosure Construction type Construction process Energy Climate control Image

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2.0
2.1

CHAPTER 2
LITERATURE REVIEW
A literature review is an evaluative report of information found in the literature related

to your selected area of study. The review should describe, summarise, evaluate and clarify this literature. It should give a theoretical base for the research and help you (the author) determine the nature of your research. Works which are irrelevant should be discarded and those which are peripheral should be looked at critically ( Dr Barbara Webster, 2000) A literature review is an account of understanding particular topic or a preface to and rationale for engaging in primary research. Generally a literature review is done to identify the general topic, issue or area of concerns. For proceeding any project, proper and adequate knowledge is a must. Almost theoretical knowledge for proper understanding of the project is gained through study of literature such as books, journals, reports, articles and so on.

2.2

Objective of the study


To collect required data on various aspect Analysis of requirements and developing concepts Theoretical standards for general requirement Theory based on experience and researches, giving guidelines.

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2.3

INTRODUCTION
The general idea behind the production of craft related items is the production, display,

sales. Thus related studies were undertaken to understand these aspects. Various layouts and working environment were studied thereafter to get knowledge about craft related works. Following studies were done to understand and review basic design space and consideration for specific purposes. 1. General Considerations 2. Design of Multifield workspace 3. Display Spaces 4. Energy related studies

2.3.1 GENERAL CONSIDERATION


The following gives guidelines to designing and maintain relation with other activities:

Freedom and Flexibility of Space: As most of the handicraft production is done in household scale, the working environment is not ideal. In urban areas, space at household scale is felt inadequate to expand production. Hence, for ideal working condition - large ventilated rooms, with high ceiling and transitional areas such as courtyard, or open to sky spaces should be well appreciated in the studios and work areas. The link between indoor and outdoor space should be maintained as far as possible.

Freedom of space

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Visual Environments: Studios must have good amount of natural daylight, with high level windows equal to at least 25-30% of the floor area. Roof lighting is also preferred. All windows should have some sort of daylight control. Artificial light comes into use in absence of natural light, where detail work and displayed images are to be focused. Lighting should be such that it does not produce any glare, less maintenance, much saving of wall and ceiling space.

Natural Lighting

Buffer Zones: It is possible that noise producing workspace can affect the other. So buffers can be created by additions of walls or vegetations.

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Locating space with respective to activities:

Spaces should be provided according to functional requirement. Work which requires huge machinery or supply of materials should be placed on the ground floor.

Safety measures: Fire hazardous activities should be separated and isolated from other activities.

Thermal comfort: A workspace should be thermally, mentally and physically comfortable. Thermal comforts can be gained by application of passive techniques. It is quite difficult to maintain the thermal environment in a workspace. As there is frequent opening for supply of raw materials, heat produced by machine and vibration, heat gain and loss are frequent. Use of proper ventilation, growing vegetation as shading devices, using double glazing can be the solutions.

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Space inter-relation:

Spaces created should be inter-related- studios, gallery, caf, outdoor space should be interesting and inter-related. One cannot sit alone or isolated for longer time, it needs communication and transition of space.

2.3.2 DESIGN OF MULTIFIELD WORKSPACE:


Generally a multifield workspace includes three basic units of accommodation: Workspace area which includes various workspace such as machine room, planning and designing. Storage area for raw material, finished work, storage space for tools and small, moveable equipments, workers belonging Services & amenities such as staff room, locker room, wash room. The flow sequence should be uninterrupted and carefully arranged such as in and out of the raw material from store, to the workspace, to the finished store and out. The space provided should have comfortable working environment in respect with illumination, thermal comfort,
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scale of furniture and fittings. There should be provision for services so as any possible user are adaptable and comfortable. As workspace mainly deals with machinery items, the construction of the building should be such as to allow admission of any sorts of machinery.

Workspace for individual and group work: General considerations should be:a. Peaceful environment b. Feeling of freedom c. Outdoor setting d. Space arrangement e. Protective equipment / measure f. Locating workspace with respect to activities g. Buffer zone between workspace h. Lighting Generally a work space required to be designed is calculated as per place area. The calculation is based on common combination of fields of study. Per place work space calculation for any field of activity will have to take an account on: Individual workspace area plus circulation about the area The areas for common activities plus the associated circulation areas An area near one of the individual or other work spaces for tools and temporary work store and an area for work space. General practicing per place areas for work area in different countries are given below. It suggest work space per person Field of Activity Wood Working Metal Working Electricity and electronics Spinning and weaving Area Per Place in sq.m. 4.7 5.3 3.3 7.2

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Ceramics Rattan and Bamboo work Leather work Masonry

5.0 3.9 2.8 3.1

Technical requirements are: Mechanical exhaust Dust removal system Step by step progress Related areas should be nearby Sound absorbents Furnishing equipments Display racks Lockers Tables

Artificial Lighting

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2.3.3 GENERAL REQUIREMENT OF STUDIOS


The workshops for each craftwork are likely to have sufficient number of students to justify separate accommodation. One

lecture hall is usually adequate except for the large departments. Craft workshops do not need true north light and since many involve noise in their use, they may be placed on the noisier part of the site. The control of
Diagrammatic layout showing functional requirement of a typical workshop

noise emanating from craft room must be carefully considered in order to prevent disturbance in other rooms. Various craft rooms are better to be grouped together to facilitate the concentration and distribution of services. General foundation level studios require floor area of about 50 sq.ft. per person and height about 3.8m. If really good side light is available, top light may be omitted but when circumstances permit, some top light should be provided. Although large windows are essential, blinds for the control of lights should also be installed. For windows, the blinds should be arranged to lift from sill in preference to being pulled down from the window head. Sink is another integral part in any studio and workshop. As an alternative to the sink in the studio itself, it is advantageous to have a small sink room adjoining the studio and entered from it so that all the water and untidiness may be kept away from the studio itself. A store for works- both finished and in progress- may be planned adjoining each studio. In ceramics studio, the whole space for sink room should be given to sink and clay bins. The amount of top light should be 1/3rd of the floor area. The windows on the side wall should have a sill height of about 3. Blind boxes in studios should be sixed at sill level and the blinds made to draw upwards.

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2.3.4 DETAILED STUDY OF STUDIOS


It is very important to learn about the final product that comes out from the studio. The character of each studio depends on the final process involved in the studio works. Each step and process involved in the studio work demand separate consideration while planning the studio. The planning depends on furniture required for studio work, materials, tools and also equipments used during the process. Space planning is very much dependent on these requirements. It gives the idea of the studio area and storage area.

2.3.4.1 Pottery studio Pottery is made by forming a clay body into objects of a required shape and heating them to high temperatures in a kiln to induce reactions that lead to permanent changes, including increasing their strength and hardening and setting their shape. It ranges from valuable works of created by

professional potters to simple items made by amateurs. The industrial product obtained by baking clay is called ceramics and when an artist creates something by baking clay, it is called pottery. The traditional ceramic items can be classified into following groups. a. Ceramic Building Materials - Bricks, Tiles, Doors and Windows made of clay, b. Utensils - Cooking Pots, Stoves, Plates etc. c. Decorative items - Idols, Flower Vase etc

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The following were the technique used in traditional ceramic. a. Pinch Touch Technique - by pressing with hands. b. Slab Technique - By joining the slabs to give desired shape. c. Beating Technique - Preparing items by beating with hammer. d. Wheel Technique - To give shape with the help of wheel. e. Coil Technique - by joining the different pieces in a line. f. Mold Technique - To prepare item with the help of mold. g. Craving Technique - Giving artistic design to the product.

Materials, Furniture, Tools and Equipment Requirements (With reference to pottery in Thimi, Bhaktapur)

Basic raw materials for pottery: Clay, water, colors, glazes etc. Types required: of furniture Tools equipments: and Portable clay cabinets Damp-proof drying cabinets Work tables and counters Spray booth Kneading table sinks

Wedging boards Kiln carts Gas ceramic kiln

Electric ceramic kiln Enamel kilns

2.3.4.2 Drawing Studio Drawing is the basic tool, with the help of which an artist can make a design or image, using line or tone on any suitable surface. The design or image itself is called drawing. Design requirement for drawing studio Drawings can be carried out in general studio space. No special machinery is required. As a rule, dust proof cubicle and store is required with a spray room about 30 sq.m. An area of 120 sq.m. is sufficient for 20 students. Benches should be 46 length & 28 width per student

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Natural north and east light is preferred for drawing activities. If daylight is not enough, artificial light should be provided in preferred way.

Display boards should be provided on the walls. Moreover, studio area should not be obstructed by any kind of structural member like pillar.

Design requirement for drafting studio Design requirement is similar to drawing studio except for the furniture. The layout of the room should be such that each student can work on his own drawing table Display boards are required for teaching Storage area for papers, drawing is required Natural north and east light is preferred for drawing activities. If daylight is not enough, artificial light should be provided in much preferred way.

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2.3.5 LIBRARY
The total need may be divided into five categories, viz. a) Books b) Readers c) Staff d) Group meetings e) Mechanical operations

Space for Books Open reading rooms 7 volumes per lineal foot, or 50 books per foot of standard height wall shelving, or 100 books per foor of double-faced shelving Book stack areas, 15 books per square foot or 2 books per cubic foot

Space for Readers As an establishment rule of thumb, minimum allowances are made of 30 sq.ft. per adult reader seating are in terms of net space for readers, chairs, tables, aisles and service desk. Seating requirements should be listed according to the several areas of the building.

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Space for Staff There are striking differences in requirements between libraries open 20, 38 or 72 hours per week. Staff space requirements should be calculated on the basis of 100 sq.ft per staff member. It includes space for desk, chair, books and equipment. A checklist of staff work areas should include: Administrative offices Work rooms Staff lunch and lounge rooms

2.3.6 CONFERENCE ROOM & RESTAURANTS


2.3.7

Cafe layout

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2.3.7 DISPLAY SPACES


Generally, display refers to show or attract attention. Displaying Spaces are a source of communication. Craft made and displayed are made commutable through these displays spaces. Exhibit and display area are important in art and craft centers. Display spaces can be in the form of a Museum, Gallery, showroom, shops and so on.

Gallery Gallery is a formal space for displaying various items of art and craft. Spaces provided can be for permanent, semi-permanent or special exhibits that are held from time to time. Care should be taken while fixing devices and furniture in walls, floors and ceilings so that maximum space is left vacant. For planning and designing of an exhibition hall, following considerations have to be made: A clear idea of what would be exhibited Number of exhibits planned per year Change in the kind of exhibits Number of pieces in view in case of permanent exhibits Scale of displays 3-d objects to be displayed in cases or pedestal

Circulation pattern A gallery space should have well planned circulation pattern. The entry space should guide the visitors to the gallery area, so that they are able to survey what is there to see, select a starting point and moving to it as directly as possible. The circulation pattern should be continuous and uninterrupted that allow the visitors to move from object to the other, from one gallery to the other. Dead end should be avoided in the circulation pattern with exhibits mainly on one side or with windows in one wall only. The visitors may pass along one side and return along the other wall, if the lighting permits.
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It is human nature that, when visitors enter a gallery he/she tends to turn right, so the circulation pattern as such should be kept in mind. Visitors should be able to move as such that one is not forced to walk past object he has already seen. There should also be enough space for visitors to move at different speed so that few viewers can move continuously, while others stop to take a detailed look.

Possible Gallery Arrangements Source: - Time Saver Standard, Fifth edition

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Lighting Light is the main source of visual perception. It is important to every living creature on earth. So lighting any space or area is very necessary. Lighting can be of two types - Natural and - Artificial Lighting. In gallery and display space too, lighting play a vital role. The method of lighting and the purpose of the space are the major ruling planning factors in a gallery. Every exhibits are different from one another, and require separate kind of lightings- a room designed to provide lighting for any art object may not be suitable for the other three dimensional object. Different intensity of illumination carries an interesting visual effect, it keeps the observer occupied and interested. To light different objects at the gallery, different types of high and low intensity lighting is provided. Variation in ceiling height and different wall colors throughout a sequence of galleries avoid fatigue and keep them interested. For the display of pictures the source of light should be limited and so controlled that it is strongest on the parts of the wall which are used for actually display and weakest where the viewer stands. The source of light should be behind the observer as possible. Use of Natural light The level of illumination suggested for different tasks in school are S. No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. SPACES classroom & lecture room(desk) classroom and lecture room ( chalk boards) laboratories art room work shops libraries offices staff room staircases ILLUMINATION 300 lux 400 lux 400 lux 600 lux 600 lux 400 lux 450 lux 250 lux 100 lux

In case of admittance of natural light, windows sill level should be kept about 3ft. to 3ft.6in. from the floor and should reach up to 12ft. from the ceiling if flat, or springing line if segmental. However in some galleries high side light may be
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need and in such case, sill level is about 6ft to 8ft from the floor level, and hence allowing medium sized wall art or exhibit cases to be placed below the windows. Such lightings generally imply that the major objects are displayed in the centered position or on the wall of the gallery opposite to the light source. Top light is also a preferred lighting in galleries, although the light must be controlled to suite the object to be displayed. Direct strong daylight must be avoided on pictures but at the same time there must not be too great or uneven reduction of light on the picture. Often objects to be displayed are light sensitive, and will deteriorate if exposed to continuous high levels of light. Due to the corroding nature of u-v radiation of day lighting, artificial light is better preferred over natural lighting as it is easier to manipulate and control the artificial lighting system.

Gallery Side Lighting

Use of Artificial light To accommodate changing displays, the lighting design should be flexible. This can be achieved with track-mounted lights which can be easily adjusted. The quality of light must be suitable for all objects displayed. Displays can be flat, two dimensional objects on vertical surfaces, three dimensional objects or display cases.

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Two dimensional lighting


Steep angles emphasize texture, but may cause shadows from fame 30 degree angle from vertical is preferred Shallow angles enhance color, may cause reflected glare

Framing projector can make objects look internally illuminated Adjust light cutoff precisely match illuminated image

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Three Dimensional Lighting:

Aim luminaire down at sharp angle to minimize direct glare Keep light within mass of display object Use uplights recessed into floor to highlight object.

Lighting large objects may cause glare. So use of ambient diffused light in combination with narrow beam light is preferred for highlight.

30 degree angle for small, low object

High-reflectance pedestal

Light coming from different direction can reveal shape and texture. Use of direct light to add shadow and to express depth, diffuse light helps to add detail in the shadow

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2.3.8 ENERGY EFFICIENT STUDIES:


Efficient Energy is simply using less energy to provide the same level of energy service. Due to global energy crisis, alternative efficient energy has taken the priority in saving and using energy efficiently. So studies of following were made:

RAIN WATER HARVESTING WASTE WATER TREATMENT SOLAR ENERGY

Elements of typical Water Harvesting system

RAIN WATER HARVESTING harvesting is the gathering,

Rainwater

accumulating and storing, of rainwater. Rain water harvesting is essential because surface water is inadequate to meet our demand and we have to depend on ground water. Due to rapid urbanization, infiltration of rain water into the sub-soil has decreased drastically and recharging of ground water has diminished.

Rainwater collection and simple filtration system

RAIN WATER HARVESTING TECHNIQUES: There are mainly two main techniques of rain water harvestings. Storage of rainwater on surface for future use: storage of rain water on surface structures such as underground tanks, ponds, check dams, weirs etc Recharge to ground water: n Pits, Trenches, Dug wells, hand Pump and so on. The harvesting technique consists of the following principal:
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1.

Catchment Area: The catchment of a water harvesting system is the surface

which directly receives the rainfall and provides water to the system. It can be a paved area like a terrace or courtyard of a building, or an unpaved area like a lawn or open ground. 2. Conveying System: The collected water is conveyed for filtration in a filter. The

filter is used to remove suspended pollutants from rainwater collected over roof. A filter unit is a chamber filled with filtering media such as fibre, coarse sand and gravel layers to remove debris and dirt from water before it enters the storage tank or recharge structure. Charcoal can be added for additional filtration. 3. 4. space. Collection Space: the water is stored in small or big reservoir. The tap system: a simple water tap or a pump, used to extract water from storage

WASTE WATER TREATMENT THROUGH Reed Beds Method

Reed beds are a tertiary treatment with the process aim of removal of suspended and dissolved matter. They remove 60 - 80% solids from the secondary effluent. In the operation of horizontal flow reed beds secondary treated effluent is passed uniforml y over vegetation so that suspended solid matter is retained in the vegetation. Reed beds have are very good at removing BOD, ammonia and nutrients, therefore this is one of the few forms of tertiary treatment that can be used to improve poor quality secondary effluent. Very simply, it consists of an area of reeds planted in a soil or gravel medium. It traps the solids from the effluent during its travel across the bed. Reed beds planted in a soil medium are capable of removing BOD and suspended solids up to 95% with potential removal of ammonia, nitrate and phosphate. SOLAR ENERGY
Reed Bed Effluent Treatment Plant

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Solar power is the generation of electricity from sunlight. This can be direct as with photovoltaics (PV), or indirect as with concentrating solar power. Photovoltaic cell (PV) is a device that converts light into direct current using the photoelectric effect. The PV cell consists of one or two layers of a semi-conducting material, usually silicon. When light shines on the cell it creates an electric field across the layers causing electricity to flow. The greater the intensity of the light, the greater the flow of electricity. PVs will only produce electricity whilst there is daylight. A typical solar panel of 193.75 sq.ft, on a clear day (noon), produces 129 watt/sq.ft. The amount energy collected is 372000 watt hr, i.e. 372 units per day.

*Source: Small scale solar electrical (photovoltaics) energy and traditional buildings, English Heritage.

Schematic Diagram for off grid electric system

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3.0 CHAPTER 3 3.1 SITE ANALYSIS


3.1.1 Location: is located at Kamerotar,Madhyapur Thimi, ward no. 9 at

The proposed site

Bhaktapur district. The site is an agricultural land which has been planned by the government for the future land pooling project. The site lies just below the traditional city of Thimi. It is situated 10 Km east from Kathmandu and 3 Km west from Bhaktapur.

Location Map (Courtesy: Google earth)

3.1.2

Physical features: Latitude 27 o4015 and Longitude 85o1633. The site has

Geographically:

altitude varying from 1330m above sea level to 1320m to the lowest at the southern boundary. Orientation: South with advantage of slope align southern direction.

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3.1.3

Site surroundings:

The site lies in the gorge of a dense residential zone. The site can be referred as the transitional zone as it has been surrounded by modern feature dwellings more than traditional ones as traditional buildings are located in the core area only. Araniko highway lies at the southern side of the site which is 650m away. Tuberculosis Center is located at the south west side of the site. SOS Childrens Village and Underprivileged Technical Training Center lie at the north western side of the site. The site has been facilitated with the presence of post office, health post, police station, cinema hall in a short distance which further enhances its significance.

Site view

3.1.4

Site area:

The total area for the project is approximately 47 ropanies (24414.1671 sq.m.) . The slope has an elevation difference of about 6 meters with three levels of contours. It has a flat land with gradual slope at three sides. The site is elongated in north south direction.

3.1.5

Access and approaches:

Currently there is no particular road linking the site and the highway but according to the Planning Commission, 9m wide black topped road will be

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approaching the site. The secondary road joining the site and the city is 11m wide which is located 10m above the site. People often use a stone track passing through the site to get to their homes.

3.1.6

Vegetation:

The site is being used for agricultural purpose. Few number of trees can be seen within the western side of the site.

3.2

Physical infrastructure:
The site lies in the urban expansion zone and is facilitated with the amenities like electricity, telephone and water supply. The site however lacks the drainage system so an alternative means of disposal has to be sorted out. The site has the benefit of natural surface drainage system due to its sloping character.

3.1.7 Infrastructures: Electricity available from NEA lines. Water supply available from public supply. Telephone lines available from NTC. 9m wide road approaching the site. Natural drainage is possible due to its topography.

3.1.8 Geology: The site lies in medium liquefaction zone in terms of seismic susceptibility according to the environmental mapping report by NSET.

3.1.9

Climate: Mean max. temp.: 29 32 c Avg. minimum temp.: 12 14 c Annual rainfall: 1205 mm Wind direction: North West to South East direction

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3.3

Few facts about Madhyapur Thimi:


It is an ancient medieval city, also known as Nikosera. It is famous for terracotta work, pottery, molded candlesticks, ashtrays, mask making and dolls. Western part of the city is still traditional but slowly transforming into modern with rapid urbanization being taken place.

3.4

Site Justification:
Enhancement of socialization is more prominent through a traditional and settled community. The site has very strong social and cultural potentials. It is near to the culture, nature and community. It is far away from the hustle and bustle of the city yet easily accessible.

3.5

Bye Laws:
According to the bye laws of Kathmandu Metropolitan City, the site lies in Urban

Expansion Zone. Following are the regulations for the project as per the bye laws: F. A. R.: 2 Max. Ground Coverage: 40 % of the total plot

3.6

SWOT ANALYSIS
STRENGTH Facility of Amenities Natural Surface Drainage 9m wide road Less Pollution

WEAKNESS Drainage system

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OPPORTUNITY Flat at middle Material availability Traditional settlement Tourist route East slope

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CHAPTER 4
4.1 CASE STUDY

As according to Soy, Susan K. (1997) case study research excels at bringing us to an understanding of a complex issue or object and can extend experience or add strength to what is already known through previous research. Case studies emphasize detailed contextual analysis of a limited number of events or conditions and their relationships. Researchers have used the case study research method for many years across a variety of disciplines. Social scientists, in particular, have made wide use of this qualitative research method to examine contemporary real-life situations and provide the basis for the application of ideas and extension of methods. Researcher Robert K. Yin defines the case study research method as an empirical inquiry that investigates a contemporary phenomenon within its real-life context; when the boundaries between phenomenon and context are not clearly evident; and in which multiple sources of evidence are used (Yin, 1984, p. 23). It is almost impossible to design or propose any project without studying similar cases. The study will help to analyze the existing case and design a better space to solve the short comings of the existing building. To gain appropriate knowledge about the subject matter, cases studies will be performed on: Various working studios of the artists and craftsmen Different craft Centers Different Art Galleries and Museums Industrials areas Psychology with respect to audio-visual stimulation

Research on Working spaces (clay, metal, wood, stone etc) Display spaces (lighting, circulation, space arrangements, etc.) Research on the existing traditional forms in the valley.

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4.1.1

Introduction to Handicraft Association of Nepal

Handicraft Association of Nepal was established in the year 1971 to promote the handicraft sector by some group of business men. As it was related to my thesis project I had an opportunity to visit the place and get some handful information about the handicraft scenario of Nepal. The main aim of this association is that it helps members to improve their product nationally and internationally. It is estimated to have export 40 different handicraft to about 70 different countries FHAN (12 May 2010).

Some of the case studies done: 4.2 Wood craft 4.2.1 4.2.2 Wood Carving Industries Wood carving at Bhaktapur

4.3 Metal Craft 4.3.1 Maha Buddha Handicraft

4.4 Stone Craft 4.4.1 Arniko Stone Carvers

4.5 Clay Craft 4.5.1 4.5.2 Pottery Square Thimi Ceramics

4.6 Gallery and Exhibition Space 4.6.1 4.6.2 Nehru Memorial Pavillion National Craft Museum

4.7 Exhibition and Commercial space 4.7.1 4.7.2 Babar Mahal Revisited Siddhartha Art Gallery

4.8 Training and Development Center 4.8.1 4.9 Handicraft Design and Development center Folk arts and Crafts Museum

CRAFT VILLAGE 4.9.1

4.10 Energy Studies 4.10.1 Piano's Beyeler Foundation Museum

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4.2 4.2.1

WOOD CRAFT WOOD CARVING INDUSTRY

Location: Patan Industrial Estate Area: 5 Ropanies Crafts: Wood work, carving detailing, souvenir

General: Six sections- sale area, workshop, store, carpentry, seasoning room and temporary sheds store. The numbers of workers are 38 out of which 14 are administrative and 24 are laborers.
View of the Work area: Wood Carving Industry

Building Description: The industry has 3 entry- side entry, showroom entry and service entry. The side entry leads to the administration. Reception, designing, account, marketing, waiting room is managed in the hall with removal partitions. Managing directors room is separated from the hall which is nearby
Plan of Work Space

showroom. One has to go through the administration to get in the workshop. Showroom acts as the spine to connect administration and workshop from the elevation i.e. it can be accessed either from administration or workshop. It can also be accessed from the main road as it exposes its faade to the main street. The showroom is a double storey building where only the ground floor comes into use.

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Area provided and stage of work: S NO. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. WORK STAGE RAW MATERIAL STORE SEASONING MACHINE STORING SKETCHING CARVING FLOOR SPACE (SQ.FT.) 4750 900 1875 3750 150 1200

Machines and tools used (Machine room with size of base for each machine) S NO. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. MACHINE SEASONING MACHINE PLANNER HACKSAW CIRCULAR SAW DRILLING GRINDING LATHE SIZE CAPACITY 5 CU. M. 5X4 2X4 4X3 3X2 3X2 8X4

Infrastructure: Buildings Large open to sky space and covered semi covered spaces for the storage of raw materials and finished products. Large open hall for machine room and workspace. Workshop and machine room are of load bearing type with finishes such as plaster, mud motar and brick finishes. The halls have sloped roof which uses queen post truss to hold the GI sheeting slope roof (less than 35) Indoor workspace ht. 16 ft

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Large openings Sill ht.-3 , Lintel ht. 9

Working environment Lighting and Ventilation: Workshop and machine room requires more light than others. Both natural as well as artificial lights are provided. The openings provided for natural light is approximately 35% of the floor area while 16% opening in machine room. As most of the operations are performed in main workshop, natural light is sufficient. Ventilation is provided in work area but is not sufficient as the space is heated during summer season, so electrical fans are used.

Thermal environment: Floor is the main working surface and is made of cement finish. For 18m deep room, sunlight penetrates mainly from south of window height of 2.7m, sunlight just penetrates up to 6.5m of the depth.
Blow up Workshop plan

Roofing is with GI sheet, and there is no thermal insulation so heat loss is more than heat gain.

Security: Separate industrial zone. Separate rooms for workers and guards.

Safety: No fire extinguishers. Segregation of fire prone areas. Open area acts as spill out area.
Adequate Natural Light

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Pros Workspace (80 sq. ft / person) Daylighting (Opening : Ventilation = 1:1.45) White painted walls Separation of fire prone areas Open area, spill out area Circulation continuous for easy escape

Cons Many Operations Wall surfaces with no recess. No Locker room. Sill ht. at table ht. No thermal insulation No skylight

4.2.2 Wood carving at Bhaktapur


Location: Bhaktpur Area: 5 Ropanies Crafts: Wood work, carving detailing.

General Room less ventilated Less lighting Storage in dark, damp place Top lighting Insufficient space.
View of the work area : Wood Carving at Bhaktapur

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Schematic layout of the center

Like wood, metal is also an integral part of traditional Nepalese culture and art. It is stated that bronze figures, sometimes alloyed with copper, appeared in the valley around 8th century AD. These images usually represented religious deities or legendary figures. The most frequently used production technique is that of a form of wax casting. Images often contain embedded semi-precious stones, usually coral or turquoise, or are gilded with gold.

4.3

Metal Craft

4.3.1 MAHA BUDDHA HANDICRAFT


Location: Patan Industrial Estate

Specialization: Metal works include images of god and goddess, metal carving detailing, utilitarian utensils, religious items, souvenir.

General: Maha Buddha Handicraft was established in the year 2025. Like other industry in the industrial area it deals with handicrafts that are made out of metal. The industry has four section- sales area, workshop, staff room and store.
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Building Description: The industry has two entry points, one leading to the show room while the other to the workspace. The showroom can be entered from workshop as well. There is an open court which is surrounded by semi open spaces i.e. workspaces, offices and stores. The workspace is provided for series of work in process casting, cutting, carving, buffing, finishing and storing.
Distributed workspace of the industry

Lost Wax Process The process of lost wax makes it a unique handicraft, which is why metal crafts are popular in and outside the country. The process involves: Firstly a key is prepared of wax model, and then it is covered with varieties of clay. The piece is then heated so that the wax is melted; the melted wax is then extracted creating a cavity. The cavity is then poured with melted metal syrup. It is then cooled and the original model is translated into the metal image. The metal image out of the casting is very rough. The rough images are made smooth by buffing; chiseling is done to bring out precision. The metal image is then painted or plated with gold as per clients requirement.

Infrastructure:

Buildings Open to sky space and semi covered spaces for workspace. Both workspace and showroom are of frame structure with rough plaster and brick finishes.
Kiln

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Ceilings are flat with cement mortar finishes. Working Environment: Lighting and Ventilation: Natural light is sufficient in work as workspaces Showing kiln space (coal kiln) in workspaceare semi open space facing the open to sky court. While artificial lights are used in show rooms and office areas where light is insufficient. Ventilation are provided on the walls of workspace, which acts as a cross ventilation. Thermal environment: Floor is the main working surface and is made of cement finish. Workers sit down on the floor over straw mat or wooden stools. During summer, due to semi open space and cross ventilation, it is thermally comfortable but during extreme winters workers have a hard time. Safety: No fire extinguishers have been provided. Fire kiln are not separated or isolated to another room but are visible. In case of fire break out, one can directly run to open areas.

Positive Aspect: sheets. Semi open work space provides good amount of natural light Clear division of workspace for specific works Since the ceiling is flat made of cement mortar, it does not get heated like C.G.I roofs

Negative Aspect: Kiln is not isolated or separated therefore harmful smoke and dust affect the surrounding Cold winters makes difficult for workers to perform their task. Lack of changing room and lockers.

4.4

STONE CRAFTS

The history of stone goes back to at least two thousand years ago. The oldest survival sculpture in the country indicates that stone sculpture was among the fist art forms to have been developed in the country. Many sculptures of deities, animals, serpents, people, bells, vessels, garudas etc. are made of stone. The crafts men are highly creative and gifted in their profession. Generally tradition is
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to take the art from generation to generation.

4.4.1.1 ARNIKO STONE CARVERS


Location: Patan Industrial Estate

Specialization: Stone works, large stone works to small souvenirs. General: From fathers generation to the sons, Arniko Stone Carvers have been continuing the generation of stone craft from generation to generation. The stone industry basically deals with stone carving of small souvenir to large carving of images and deities. The industry has mainly three section- store, workspace and sales unit.

Machines and tools used: Saw with Rail Hand Drilling Hand Grinding Hammer and Chisel Scribers

Infrastructure: Buildings

Room for storage as well as display

Open to sky space and covered spaces for the storage of raw materials and finished products.

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Workshops are of both load bearing type and frame structure with finishes such as plaster, mud mortar and brick finishes.

Working Environment: Lighting and Ventilation: As different spaces are provided for work shop natural lighting is not sufficient for detail work. Use of artificial lighting is provides. Large workshop halls which are both deep and high have minimal penetration of natural light. Ventilation as such are not provided.
Unmanaged workspace followed with storage

Thermal environment: As stone itself is a cold item, during winter season it is much difficult for workers to work on stones. In some of the work space sue to large room height the thermal environment is satisfactory during summers.

Positive Aspects: Continuous flow of work Machine section is separated from working area Display area for the customers is properly utilized within the finished store.

Negative Aspects: Due to the waste and dust produced, it sometimes become difficult for workers to work efficiently and effectively. The spaces are not properly allocated for specific purpose. Noise producing area is not separated or isolated.

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4.5

CLAY CRAFT
Pottery is the ceramic ware made by potters. The place

where such wares are made is also called a pottery (plural potteries). Pottery can also refer to the material of which the pottery ware is made. Major types of pottery include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. Pottery is one of the oldest human technologies and art-forms, and remains a major industry today. The definition used by archaeologists tends to exclude ceramic objects such as figurines which are made by similar processes, and perhaps the same people, but are not vessels, or made on a wheel.
Potter at work

Pottery Craft flourished in Patan, Thimi and Bhaktapur. Common forms of pottery are terra cotta oil lamps used to light homes during the festival Dipawali, and flower pots decorated with peacocks and elephants.

4.5.1 POTTERY SQUARE

Location: Bhaktapur, Pottery Square. Specialization: Pots, Utensils, Decorative, etc.

General: The Pottery Square of Bhaktapur is a conserved traditional village, where the whole community is based on pottery making. Pottery is the way of their livelihood. One can see almost all the houses making pottery every day. The potters are called Kuma, a caste for potters. The whole family of Kuma is engaged in the workshop. The tradition is- the trade is handed down from father to son generation.
Plan of potters workplace

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Space Used: Work is done in ground floor which opens up to a courtyard or community gathering area. The upper portion of the house is used for residential purpose by the potters. Raw materials are stored in the ground floor, as it is damp and dark, which is good for storage. The squares are used for sun drying of pottery items. The crafts are either sold on the local souvenir shop or are taken to market.

Machines and tools used: Potters Wheel & Turntables Shaping Tools(paddles, anvils, ribs) Rolling tools(roulettes, slab rollers, rolling pins) Cutting/piercing tools(knives, fluting tools, wires) Finish Tools(Burnishing stones, rasps,

chamois)

Infrastructure:

Buildings The houses in the square are old traditional type Most of the houses are 3 bay types, in ground floor-the front part is used for Potters wheel, the second part is used for storing and the third part is used for staircase. The staircase is placed in front in case there is lack of space. Wall is made out of mud mortar and brick exposed faade. Courtyards or separate room on the ground floor are used for kiln.
View of the pottery square, Bhaktapur

Working Environment: Lighting and Ventilation: Workspace on ground floor, lights are through door openings thus found inadequate. Ventilation inadequate.
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Thermal environment: As traditional houses are thermally comfortable, extreme temperature does not affect the workers. The kiln area produces smoke and dust which may affect the dwellers

Safety: In case the kiln is located inside the house, it can be dangerous if any fire breakout. Otherwise kiln are isolated and made separate.

Positive Aspects: Whole community is based on pottery, court spaces are shared. Working environment is calm and peaceful.

Negative Aspects: Congested work space, work done in private space at the ground floor Natural light not sufficient in workspace, have to depend on artificial light Storage and workspace not separate have to depend on single room.

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4.5.2 THIMI CERAMICS


Location: Bhaktapur, Pottery Square. Specialization: Pots, Utensils, Decorative, etc.

Schematic layout

Features Production 650 ft.2 (8-9 person) Storage is 840 ft2 Glazing done in addition but is contradictory to essence of pottery craft practiced in Nepal. Is it authentic method to do????????

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4.6

GALLERY AND EXHIBITION SPACE

4.6.1 NEHRU MEMORIAL PAVILLION

Location: - New Delhi Architect :- Raj Rewal

General It is embedded in grassy mounds. Its form has been derived from Buddhist Stupas in Nepal. It has affinity with Yantra. There are two levels o Upper level with A/V room Harmonious relation between visitor and displays Glass bricks which subdue natural light o Lower level is with 4 sections o Double height enclosure There is a sense of monumentality combined with human scale. Stepped roof as amphitheatre Considerable views of Natural and artificial lights
Stepped roof provides a kind of Amphitheatre. Plan of upper level

Section

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Exterior showing how structure has been embedded in artificial mound

Staircase leading to two levels of containing exhibitions.

Interior View of the Pavilion

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4.6.2 NATIONAL CRAFT MUSEUM

Location: Pragati Maidan, Delhi. Architect: Charles Correa Built up area:- 6800 sq. m

Introduction The craft museum- set up in 1956 by the all India handicrafts board. The museum is mainly divided into three sections: Display gallery and store Village complex Crafts Demonstration area It is organized around a central pathway, going from VILLAGE to TEMPLE to PALACE, a metaphor for the Indian street. Objective to collect and display finest specimen of Indian crafts. Functions contained in the complex Museum for a large permanent collection of folk art Workshop area for the craftsmen Shop and sales area for the crafts Library Amphitheatre Administration Services Planning Concept Galleries, store, administrative areas and library situated around a series of open to sky courts.
Display of terracotta figures

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Unique rustic ambience coupled with modern functionality Analysis Spatial Character Spontaneous spaces Sequence of spaces flow Architectural Character Activity

of Each court has a display Work court off access symbolizing Eg:- Tulsi Local material. Mud plaster and terracotta tile. Contemporary expression carved windows, construction tradition. spine. Hierarchy of performing space. Open air amphitheatre for large performance.

revealed after another. Work court designed of the access spine.

perforated iron screens.

Functions held in the complex: Research and Documentation: The Museum has a specialized library of more than 10,000 books and periodicals pertaining to Indian arts and crafts. Filed research is commissioned with research scholars to document the living arts and crafts. Educational Program: Thousands of schools children and students of art colleges visit the Museum for general exposure to India's rural artistic heritage or for more exercises such as onthe-spot painting or participating in 'Creativity Workshops'.

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Committee room: capacity of 35 persons holds official seminars, conferences. Reference library: The reference library in the museum, houses approximately 10000-books/journals on Art and Culture with 35 seating capacity.

Conservation Laboratory looks after the preservation of the Museum's collection. Auditorium: Museum has an air-

conditioned auditorium, for screening of educational films, holding of lectures, seminars and conferences. It has a seating capacity of 180 persons. Exhibition Hall: for holding temporary exhibitions by the Artists. Crafts Museum Shop: The museum shop sells books and a whole range of exquisite handicrafts. The objective of the Shop is to sell original creations of the finest Indian craft persons and not to market 'souvenirs' Cafeteria: Museum has an open air cafeteria in its vicinity, where the visitor can relax in the rustic rural ambience.
Plan of Crafts Village Source:- Charles Correa, The perrenial press, Bombay

mechanically

replicated

Conclusion: The Craft Museum has stated a good example by preserving and conserving the tradition or art and culture in a modern way. The skill full art, the lost tradition must be preserved as they are our identity; we need not go out and search for our identity if it is preserved. The craft museum serves and preserves the spirit of art, making awareness. The thoughtful space planning, the human scale, the tribal and rural display all gives a sense of belonging.

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4.7

Exhibition and Commercial space

4.7.1 BABAR MAHAL REVISITED Location: Babarmahal Revisited, Babarmahal.

General: Six Courtyards of elegant shopping and eateries in historic setting. Sunken court with chautari. Narrow lanes interconnect courtyard Semi-open spaces. Eg:- Patis Neo-classical architecture.

Site plan (Source: KVPT)

Interior with open space plan

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Exposed wooden joists Difference of levels between courtyards It shows conservation and development moving side by side.

Birds eye-view

Site section

Birds eye-view

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4.7.2

SIDDHARTHA ART GALLERY

General The gallery inside the mahal is accessed through various souvenir shop restaurant. The gallery is a two storied building which has halls of area 750 sq. ft. It displays temporary exhibits of art from all around the world.
Focus light on pictures

Lighting: Artificial lights are used to light the displayed exhibits. Focus light, spot light with adjustable support is directly hung on the ceiling. Skylight is used to light the stair case that connects the ground floor with the upper floor. Windows have low

ceilings, but the natural light provided is not sufficient.


Gallery Space, use of artificial to lit the display

Space used: As seen, exhibits are mainly those of art that are hung on the walls. Floor space can also be used for displaying exhibits.

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4.8

Training and Development Center

4.2.4.1 HANDICRAFT DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER Location: Pulchowk, Lalitpur

General Established in 2006 focusing on the preservation and dissemination of knowledge on traditional arts and crafts Part of their mission is to bring this educational institution one step further into the future with the development of a resource center and library within the facility that collects and shares appropriate master research analysis for the archives returning the true meaning and representation of original art to Nepal.

Functions: The Center offers seminars, workshops and exhibitions on the development of

traditional art. Counseling programs offered for students on marketing, career development and skill technology. Research analysis and archive development. It offers trainings to artisans on Thanka painting, Clay sculpture, Metal carving (repousse work), wood carving and stone carving.
Section

Alongside the full 2 year degreed package and 3 month workshops, there will be 2-3 day seminars enhancing ones

knowledge on the development of traditional art. No. of students: 40 8 students in each stream For three months package: 8
Floor plan (Courtesy : Ar. Jeny Shrestha)

students in each group

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Architectural Character: In a residential bldg. Three blocks :- a) guard house, handloom workshop b) design training center c) administration 14' x 20'-6" computer lab for 20 student - 10 computer 14' x 20'-6" classroom for 22 student - 22 drawing seats

Pros Interior use of handmade products reflects craftsmanship. Provision of enough space for training purpose.

Cons Visual appearance doesn't define character Congested classroom and computer lab. Lack of toilets

Floor plan

Front view

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Floor Plans

Interior of Conference hall

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4.9

CRAFT VILLAGE
4.9.1 FOLK ARTS AND CRAFTS MUSEUM

Location: Sonargaun, Bangladesh.

General Mini Bangladesh = Crafts village Museum with maximum floors space of 75,000 sq. ft. Double storied Accommodate reception, lobby, permanent exhibition, temporary exhibition, reserve collection, conservation section, library,
Exterior View

auditorium with 500 seats capacity, offices, craft shop, cafe and other service areas. On the campus housing Typical rural houses reconstructed on the plot with maximum attention on authentic design, dimension and materials. Typical Bangladesh village style architecture Display galleries around courtyards Invisible building Low and spread out horizontally

Interior View

Concealed with trees Very little seen from outside Avoiding strong contrast

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Ground floor plan

Inner of Courtyard

Entrance View

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4.10 Energy studies


4.10.1 PIANO'S BEYELER FOUNDATION MUSEUM Architect: RenzoPiano Location: Switzerland General Naturally lit environment Museum 395 ft. (120 m ) long Pavilion running north / south, with a park to the west. The outermost element is the layer of fritted glass brise-soleil inclined and positioned to prevent direct sun penetration during all museum opening times but also to maintain optimum admittance of diffused light. When the museum is closed, for example, the louvers are closed to prevent exposure of artworks to daylight. The louver system lies in the zone between ceiling and roof, which is designed as a "loft thermal buffer zone" and combines with the exterior brise-soleil of incident solar radiation from reaching the gallery spaces below. to prevent 98 percent Thermal buffer spaces extend from the roof to the east and west sides of the facade, helping to limit the effects of climatic extremes on the building 12 degrees Fahrenheit (-11 degrees Centigrade) in winter and 91 degrees F. (33 degrees C.) in summer.

Multi-layered roof system allows for Day lit Galleries A. BRISE-SOLEIL fritted glass inclined and positioned

to prevent direct sun penetration and maintain

optimum admittance of diffused light

B.

WEATHERPROOF LAYER double glazed skin with an

ultraviolet filter that removes the parts of the electromagnetic


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spectrum

most

likely

to

damage the artwork

C.

COMPUTER

MOTORIZED

ALLUMINUM LOUVERS that control light levels in

each room
Interior View

D.

LOFT THERMAL BUFFER ZONE louver system lies in this zone between the ceiling and the roof, combined with brise-soleil prevents 98% of incident solar radiation from reaching the spaces below

E.

LAMINATED GLASS CEILING designed to support maintenance access to the louver motors and electric lights

F.

GRID OF PERFORATED METAL PANELS incorporates a paper that diffuses the light once more and hides the loft

The east facade is climatically buffered by the service and ancillary rooms, and to the west the "winter garden" performs the same task, while providing a resting place with views across the countryside.

Exterior View

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CHAPTER 5:
DESIGN INFERENCES
5.1 Elements of Newar settlements A. a. Streets The street for gods/the festival routes This street connected the palace square with major town centers. The major festivals are connected and chariots are drawn through these streets .These streets are not as wide as compared to modern streets but wide enough for chariots to pass through.

b.

The streets for people These streets connected different neighborhoods and also different major

streets.The functions of these streets are mainly for connectivity and trade along with more intimate socializing .The characters are similar to the main streets , except for the widths.

c.

The streets for dead people /the funeral route These streets system runs hiding from the major street and the royal palace .This

became a practice after a Malla king .The dead are taken through a system of alleyways between and through the dwellings ,culminating to the funerary river bank.The streets surrounding the city running along the city wall also forms a part of this hirerarchy and possess a signifcants cultural important.

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B. a.

Buildings Temple The temple by virtue of their grand

scale and ornamentation served as visual relief and also as landmarks along the streets .Most of the temples of Kathmandu follow a traditional Newari temple architecture: symmetrical with square or rectangular plan, brick clad with a single or multi-tiered overhanging and sloped roof and also odd number of fenestrations in each wall. Besides the tires temple other temple styles include the Shikhara style temples and composite types as well. These temples are generally for religious purpose.
Patan Durbar Square near Jhom Bahal

b.

Layaku (palace) Palaces are the dwellings for royal family. Layaku is the old Newari term for the

word Palace. The traditional Malla palace of Kathmandu comprise of a number of buildings surrounding a number of courtyards, these were generally three major courtyard ,along with family temples ,palace gardens, ponds or other water sources etc.

c.

Newa chen (Newari Residence) Generally, newari houses are 3 and half storied

.According to the utilization of spaces ,there is vertical arrangement of the spaces in newari houses .Ground floor called chedi,is used either as shop or for cattle raising ,the first floor ,called Matan is the beginning of the living space ,used for sleeping purposes ,the second floor of chota is the living space ,and finally the topmost or the baiga is the kitchen and the family shrine .The faade of a residential building is brick exposed with Tiki Jhya (lattice window) in the matan and Saa Jhya in the choto.The length of the house varies from house to house but normally rectangular houses are of 4 to 8 meters in length and 6m in depth.
Newa Residence in Jhom Bahal

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d.

Falcha (rest room) Rest house serves mainly for overnight

stay of the trading travelers .These are placed along the streets at strategic locations. Besides, these were also public spaces where people gathered and interacted .
Bahal with Chuka- open space in Jhom Bahal

e.

Dyo che (Priest house) Dyo chen is the house of God .It is also

known as Math and its design and activities are bound by specific rules .The form should be square with a two storied courtyard building. The design of a Math, its location, orientation and its internal planning correspond to that of a standard dwelling
Falcha Pati in Jhom Bahal

house .Math has no fixed orientation and if space allows, a Math is built with a central load bearing wall and the design of the math resembles that of residential house

C.

Open Spaces a. Public squares Public squares are large open spaces surrounding the palaces .These squares have

different components such as temples ,stone water spouts and rest houses etc . b. Bahals Bahals are the buildings with open central courtyards ; these courtyards can be public or privately owned .The purpose and specific activity of these spaces vary with its ownership ,occupancy and other religious as well as social factors .

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c. Chuka Chowks are basically courtyards, generally square in shape and surrounded by a number of houses ,either residential or others .

D. Services a. Lohan Hiti(stone water spouts) The public water spouts are the water supply system that existed in the valley long before the Malla period .The stone water spout, placed in a depressed spaced (sometimes a storey deep) ,laid in stone is provided with proper drainage and walled with brick and stone decorations. The form of the stone water spout represents the mirror image of the temple profile. This system followed gravitational flow of water. These were major urban amenities, serving the local community and also the travelers .Usually there used to be a public rest house near the water spouts

b. Water supply Water supply system was developed in Kathmandu during the Licchhavi times ,the water supply mechanism of the Licchhavi times were very well developed ,they were used for both irrigation as well as supply to the public water supply systems .Water supply was also done in the valley by wells and ponds.

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CHAPTER 6: PROGRAMME AND AREA FORMULATION


NO.

DESCRIPTION Reception Entrance lobby + Waiting (0.5 m2 per person) Information counter Ticketing Cashier's office Toilet Administration Reception Director's office Manager's room Accounts section Marketing section Meeting Room (15 Person) Toilets

SPACE REQ(sq.

m.)

1 A

150 14 10 30 24 228 35 20 14 18 18 25 20 150

2 Arts and Crafts Gallery I Gallery permanent collection Store area (4 @ 25sq. m.) Curator's office Toilets

500 100 15 40 655

3 a

Crafts Section Wood carving Display Area Raw Material Store Seasoning Equipment Room Design Room Carving Big ( 10 craftsman) Carving Small Assembling + Finishing Finish Store Staff Area Learner's Area Toilet Pantry

25 30 25 50 15 80 16 20 32 20 20 16 6
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355 B Metal craft Display Area Raw Material Store Design Waxing / Mud Moulding Kiln (2 electric kilns) Assembly Finishing Polishing Store Staff Area Casting Learner's Area Face painting Toilet Pantry

25 20 10 30 40 15 10 10 30 20 10 20 30 15 6 285

Clay craft Display Area Clay Storage Mixing Design Room Working area (15 artists) Kiln (2 Courtyard kilns) Unglazed Item Store Staff Area Learner's Area Toilet Pantry

25 20 25 10 250 20 25 20 20 15 6 436

Mask making Raw Material Store Frame Paint Finish store Staff Area Learner's Area Toilet Pantry 15 20 25 20 20 20 16 6 142
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E Textile weaving Raw Material Store Design Room Cone roll Beam Roll Weaving (10 looms) Cutting / Check Packing Store Staff Area Learner's Area Toilet Pantry

20 10 30 15 160 18 18 20 20 20 16 6 353

Stone Craft Raw Material Store Kiln Welding Engraving Polishing Gold & Silver Plating Face Painting Design Rm. Lab Face painting

20 40 15 42 6.8 38 30 13 6.5 30 258.3

Thanka Painting Work Studio (20 artists) Raw Material Store Preparation Store Toilet

100 20 45 10 10 185

Multipurpose Hall (100 people) Main Hall with stage (100 @ 1.5 sq. m.) Projection control room Store Green room with wash (2 @ 18

15O 25 12 36
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sq. m.) Rest rooms 35 258

B 5 a

Open air theatre Design Training and Research Administration Conference Product Development Training Halls (1 Computer Lab + Drawing Rm + A/V Rm.) (3 @ 50 sq. m.) Reference Library Main Stack area Reading area Issue counter Photocopy Catalogue + Baggage Reference area Librarian office Toilet

115 75 70

b c

150 75 50 100 12 15 125 15 30 422

Theme Restaurants / Eatery Dining Area (70 @ 2 sq. m.) Kitchen (70 @ 0.7sq m.) Store Counter Toilets

140 50 20 15 20 245 150

7 Souvenir shops 8 Sales Unit Show Room (3 X 192) Account Section Store Toilet

576 8 16 15 615

9 Quarters
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Staff Quarters (9 X110) Trainee Hostel ( 2X 240) Indoor Sitting

990 480 110 1470

10 a b C D E F G

Other Facilities Cafeteria Washrooms Toilets Store Generator/ Machine room First aid room Guard House (3 @ 20 sq. m.)

100 20 20 20 120 20 40

ANALYSIS BUILT-UP AREA . 6997.3 SQ.M CIRCULATION SPACE @ 35% OF BUILT - UP AREA = 2449.055 SQ.M TOTAL BUILT UP AREA . 9446.355 SQ.M PARKING AREA .. = 7.5% OF T.A. = 1602.45 SQ. M ACCORDING TO BYE LAW, MAX. GROUND COVERAGE AREA = 40 % OF T.A. = 0.4 X 24414.1671 (45 R0PANIES) = 9765.27 SQ.M DESIGN INFORMATIONS: NO. OF STAFFS: 90 NO. OF CRAFT STUDENTS: 48 MAX. NO. OF VISITORS EXPECTED: 450 per day DESCRIPTION TOTAL AREA: GROUND COVERAGE:) TOTAL BUILT UP AREA: PARKING AREA PARKING NO. OF VEHICLES: AREA 24414.1671 sq.m. 6997.3 sq.m. 9446.355 sq.m. 2434 sq.m 50 cars, 60bikes, 5 buses PERCENTAGE 100% 28.66 % of total area 38.69 % of total area 9.5% of total area

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CHAPTER 7
7.1 CONCEPT
Crafts Village has planning that bears attachment to the traditional architecture of the Kathmandu valley, yet being modern in terms of the function and utility. The concept has been derived from the analysis of site and functional requirements of the craft activities. The important aspects being the serial flow of the various processes systematically. The traditional outlook has been tried to be achieved with the help of square and rectangular forms, use of courtyards, slope roof, use
Eight nodes for planning

of cornices, local materials like brick, timber. It is also important to analyze that the used form is suitable not only to achieve the outlook, but it is also a appropriate shape with due consideration to material availability, environmental suitability as well as the tourism potential within the area. Since c raft requires both open / closed spaces as per the activities. So courtyard planning has been opted. For planning of overall site, different forms and doctrines have been used. The number 8 is considered as sacred both to the Hindus and Buddhists.Eg:-

The game of chess has a brahmanic origin is proved by the eminently sacerdotal character of the diagram of 8 x 8 squares (ashtpada).

" It may be recalled that the Hindus recognize eight planets: the sun, the moon, the five planets visible to the naked eye, and Rhu, the "dark star" of the eclipse; each of these "planets" rules one of the eight directions of space.

We have seen that each phase of a cycle, fixed in the scheme of 8 x 8 squares, is ruled by a heavenly body and at the same time symbolizes a divine aspect, personified by a deva. It is thus that this mandala symbolizes at one and the same time the visible cosmos, the world of the Spirit and the Divinity in its multiple aspects.

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7.2. DESIGN THEME


Design of Crafts Village revolves around four themes:a. Nepali Spirit b. A modern synthesis c. Structural Rationalism d. Tradition and Pragmatism

Design Theme

7.3 ZONING AND SITE PLANNING


The whole site has been divided into eight quadrants with centre as a mandala (Art and Craft Gallery). The entrance is made through south and the visitor reaches the a large entrance court which is symbolic to lacchi of newari settlement. The buildings are arranged in in the eight nodes in a pinwheel kind of arrangement. The serial flow of spaces has been maintained. The work areas are arranged in a way such that they can be like galleries where visitors can walk and see different craft skills being executed. Restaurants and souvenir shops are placed lastly providing refreshments or they can be entered at first also. There are hierarchy of spaces which a visitor can experience. Through the main entrance visitor can experience a public space. When they enter they experience semi-public space of workshops and display areas. Then at the rear end of the site there is placement of quarters for the craftsmen and learners. Thus basically three level of planning has been opted. Viz. a) Public b) Semi-private c) Private

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Zoning and site planning

Functional organization of spaces and its layout gives importance to the visitor flow and rapid evacuation incase of accidents. The open courts provide visitors as well as craftsmen to have a space for working and display exhibits. In and out of goods and services have also been taken into consideration. For this service road is provided.

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7.4 PROPOSED UTILITY AND SERVICES


Service roads Since the materials for each of the craftworks had to be supplied to the blocks in a more effective manner, the whole handicraft complex has been serviced by a 3m wide road. Two service gates are provided on east and north-east side. Eleectricity Electrical unit that monitors and supplies electricity to the whole complex has been placed near the service entry. It also consists of a stand by generator for continual supply of electricity Drainage Surface drainage provided along the buildings and courtyards for the easy runoff of the water from paved areas. The water would be filtered and stored in the rain water harvesting tank. Water supply Rain water is the source of all water and rain water harvesting is a technique to collect and store the rain water at the surface or sun-surface aquifers, before it is lost as surface run-off. Thus, a system of harvesting rain water from the roof and the paved areas have been proposed to be used for the craft activities, cleaning purpose and watering plants. For the purpose, rain water harvesting tanks have been at lvl +1 near service entry& lvl +2 near amphitheatre Harvesting potential: Area of the plot = 24414.1671 sq.m. Avg. Annual ht. of rainfall = 1.6m Vol of rainfall over the plot = 24414.1671 x 1.6 = 39062.67 cu.m. Capacity of water that can be harvested = 80% of total volume = 48828.3 cu.m.= 4,88,28,000 lts Soak pits would be provided at intervals for ground water recharge. This will also help to reduce the runoff from site and lessen the chances of contributing to the downstream flooding.

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7.5 FIRE HAZARD PROTECTION PLAN


Smoke sensors for fire detections are used in all public areas, which are connected to alarm sensors, at 24 hours attendant area, eg. The Guard House. Localized fire extinguishers have been provided within an interval of 45m .With due consideration to the fire safety for the studios, the major fire prone areas have been separated from the main studio space with the provision of quick access to open space. Moreover, fire hose reels would be places at an interval of 50m in major areas, like studios, that draws water from the underground water tank with pressure controlled fire pump that is connected to the fire hose reels- capacity 140,000 litres. Waste treatment Wastes coming out from the complex organic or inorganic need to be separated at first, before treatment. The inorganic wastes would be recycled through the recycling station sand the non- recyclable wastes would be taken away by the municipal vehicles. Sanitation For the sanitation, reed bed effluent treatment plant has been proposed as it requires little energy as compared to conventional mechanized plants.

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CONCLUSION
Traditional crafts, visual arts and other forms of traditional cultural expression are closely related to the identity, heritage and socio-cultural well being of indigenous and local communities. Tradition referring to cultural expression generally were first created a long time ago, which have been transmitted from generation to generation and are regarded as pertaining to a particular people or its territory. Craft as such are a source of tradition which has been passed on from one generation to the other. It is our duty to continue this generation of craft, a skill to be preserved and promote. The Crafts Village tries to achieve this continuation of generation. It will space a space for craft as well as craft people to house different craft in a single community. It will continue the culture of craft and inspire people to be indigenous. Modernization has crept into scene but it is also true, that forgetting our tradition and culture is like losing our identity. Both should go hand in hand - preserve and develop. Crafts Village is a modern achievement but the elements provided are traditional and based on culture and society. Thus the Handicraft Village has tried to achieve a communicable space for craft, craftsmen and visitors.

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12. Hamel, J. (with Dufour, S., & Fortin, D.). (1993). Case study methods. Newbury Park,
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13. Soy, Susan K. (1997). The case study as a research method. Unpublished paper,
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