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THEORY AND PRACTICE OF EXPOSITORY WRITING

Benjamin Miller email: benjamin.miller@hunter.cuny.edu o##ice hours: M$h 1:00%":00&m, and by a&&ointment o##ice: (unter )est 1"3* English 301, Section 001 3 hours; 3 credits. rere!: English ""0 S&ring "011, M$h 11:10am%1":"'&m class location: (unter )est '0+,

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CO)RSE DESCRIPTION By engaging directly 5ith articles &ublished in academic journals, students in this course 5ill learn some o# the core claims and central debates in the #ield o# com&osition and rhetoric. Students lea6ing the course 5ill be able to recogni>e many o# the common re#erences that o#ten ma?e such articles o&a!ue to no6ices, and to understand such genre con6entions as literature re6ie5s, citations, and 6arious ?inds o# e6idence and reasoning. 3n addition, because the content o# these articles o#ten has im&lications #or the &ractice and &edagogy o# 5riting, students 5ill broaden their re&ertoires #or generating and re6ising their o5n &rose, as 5ell as #or teaching 5riting to others. ,long 5ith #re!uent lo5%sta?es, in#ormal 5riting, students 5ill com&lete and re6ise se6eral major assignments, or @sha&ed &iecesA: :1; a li$er&%* n&rr&$i+e, rendering an eB&erience 5ith 5riting &resent on the &age; :"; an &%&"emi% lens ess&*, analy>ing the literacy narrati6e in light o# the claims o# com&osition theory; :3; a r,e$#ri%&l &n&l*sis o# a &ublished academic article, ma?ing claims about 5hat that teBt does and ho5, including ho5 it res&onds to an ongoing con6ersation; and :1; a %ri$i%&l sel(-&ssessmen$. analy>ing and introducing the contents o# a &ort#olio o# re6ised 5or? &roduced o6er the course o# the semester.

O)TCO/ES STATE/ENT By the end o# English 301, students 5ill % recogni>e the names and general intellectual &rojects o# se6eral o# the most%re#erenced scholars in com&osition and rhetoric :com&9rhet;; % understand academic argument as a moti6ated inter6ention 5ithin an ongoing con6ersation; % recogni>e se6eral #orms such an inter6ention can ta?e; % #eel com#ortable determining the Main -laims and Moti6ating roblems o# scholarly articles in com&9rhet; % understand the lit re6ie5 as essential conteBt%setting #or academic argument; % #eel e!ui&&ed to &er#orm a lit re6ie5 in com&9rhet, using -om& ile, CS$/8, and 2oogle Scholar; % understand, through eB&erience, the relationshi& bet5een 5riting and critical thin?ing; % understand the rationales and a&&licable conteBts #or 6arious generati6e and re6ision techni!ues in 5riting; % share a 6ocabulary #or discussing sentence%le6el style and grammatical structures; % use a 6ariety o# grammatical structures to re6ise #or em&hasis and coherence.

WE0CO/E 0ETTER .ear students, 3D6e just &osted a document to the 3n#ormed 8egistration site, 5hich loo?s li?e this: 3# youDre reading this, youD6e either already signed u& #or my section o# English 301, or youDre trying to decide 5hether itDs right #or you E or both. Either 5ay, youDre entitled to some more in#ormation. 3Dll s?i& straight to the essentials, then #ollo5 u& 5ith #uller eB&lanations: • $his is not a course in memoir 5riting or journalistic creati6e non#iction. :3# youDre interested in those, chec? out English 30*.; 3t is, rather, an introduction to the academic study o# 5riting and the teaching o# 5riting. $here are t5o re!uired teBtboo?s #or this class. o Cohnson, $. 8., ed. Teaching Composition: Background Readings. 3rd ed.
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o Bacon, Fora. The Well-Crafted Sentence: A Writer's Guide to Style . Boston:
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$hese ha6e been ordered at Sha?es&eare H -o., on 0eBington ,6enue at 7+ th St, and should be &retty easy to #ind online, too. • $here 5ill be some 5riting to do be#ore and during just about e6ery class meeting, and o#ten some reading, too. $hat said, 3Dll try to ?ee& the 5or?load manageable: 3 &re#er my home5or? reliable and steady, rather than coming in 5a6es 5ith high &ea?s and lo5 troughs. $he eBercises 5ill be cumulati6e, though, leading to at least three longer :i.e. more than ' &ages; &ieces o# 5riting. 3ndi6idual assignments 5ill not be graded. 3# you &ut in a good #aith e##ort to do all the eBercises, your minimum grade E a &ersonal minimum, not a course a6erage E 5ill be a B. :, #ull eB&lanation o# ho5 this 5or?s is attached.; <ou can re6ise anything you 5rite as many times as you 5ant until youDre satis#ied. Fot only 5ill you not be &enali>ed #or this, youDll be re5arded.

Sound goodI (a6e !uestionsI Either 5ay, 3Dm ha&&y to hear itJ 3Dm sorry that you didnDt get a chance to see this be#ore you signed u&, but 3 #igured the least 3 could do 5as to ma?e sure you see it no5, 5ith a #e5 5ee?s still to go E es&ecially since my a&&roach may not be !uite 5hat you eB&ected. <ou see, thereDs a lot o# room #or di##erence in ho5 5e can de#ine K$heory and ractice o# EB&ository )riting.K 3n #act, one could build a course entirely around the !uestion o# ho5 to de#ine that course title. ,nd, arguably, thatDs just 5hat 3D6e done. My section E our section, i# youDll join me E is designed as an introduction to the academic #ield ?no5n 6ariously as composition theory, composition and rhetoric rhetoric and composition :a subtle di##erence there, but &al&able to some o# us;, and the more straight#or5ard !riting studies. Scholars in this #ield ha6e been 5or?ing #or decades to #igure out 5hat ha&&ens 5hen &eo&le 5rite: )hy do some &eo&le #ind it so much easier than others to &roduce teBtI )hat are &eo&le actually doing or thin?ing as they 5riteI )hen 5e call someone a 5riting eB&ert, 5hat is it they ?no5 that no6ices donDtI (o5 do 5e learn or teach these thingsI ,nd 5hy is 5riting so common in schoolsI )hat ma?es it 5orth learning and &racticingI My o5n attitude to5ard 5riting has im&ro6ed tremendously since 3 began studying the disco6eries and theories o# these scholars, as has my ability to 5rite 5ell, e6en under &ressure. -om&osition theory has both eB&anded my range o# strategies #or 5riting and re6ising, and gi6en me a better gri& on the reasons behind these strategies E and, relatedly, behind the 5riting assignments 3 so o#ten ha6e to com&lete or com&ose. 3Dm teaching this course because 3 thin? it can bene#it you in the same 5ays. $o5ard that end, 5eDll reconstruct some o# the debates that still animate the most engaged teachers and students o# 5riting, by engaging 5ith the articles theyD6e 5ritten to one another. $hese articles 5ill #orm the bul? o# the reading material #or the course, and most o# them 5ill be dra5n #rom the #irst o# t5o re!uired teBtboo?s:

1#,ns#n. T. R.. e". Teaching Composition: Background Readings. 2r" e". Ne Y#r!. NY3 4e"(#r"5S$. /&r$ins. 2006. Prin$. 0ist &rice: G11."0 :com&are &rices; ,s the title im&lies, Cohnson has gathered teBts that he belie6es could su&&ort a ne5 teacher learning to design a course in com&osition E i.e., 5riting. 3 belie6e they 5ill ser6e e!ually 5ell to su&&ort students, too, because they can teach us ho5 to teach oursel6es. ,#ter all, 5riting eB&ertise doesnLt ha&&en o6ernight, or in a month, or in a semester; but 5hat 5e can learn in a semester are habits o# mind, 5ays o# seeing and as?ing !uestions that 5ill continue to yield bene#its as time goes on. $hatLs one o# my goals #or you all in this course, and in #act itDs one o# my reasons #or using an anthology as eBtensi6e as this one, e6en though 5e 5onDt get through the 5hole thing: 3 ho&e youDll be able and interested to return to this boo?. Because the articles in TCBR 5ere 5ritten by &ro#essors #or &ro#essors, some o# the con6entions and re#erences in these readings might be challenging at #irst; donDt be alarmed i# that #rustrates you :or sur&rised i# it doesnDt E 3D6e had both eBtreme reactions #rom students in the &ast, along 5ith !uite a bit o# middle;. By the end o# the course, you should ha6e all the tools you need to #eel com#ortable e6en in an article li?e the one lin?ed to here. /ur second teBtboo? ta?es us in #or a closer loo? at that essential tool o# any 5riter, the sentence, using 5hat com&osition scholars ha6e come to call rhetorical grammar: that is, grammar in the ser6ice o# e##ect. 4&%#n. N#r&. The Well-Crafted Sentence: A Writer's Guide to Style. 4#s$#n3 4e"(#r"5S$. /&r$ins. 2007. Prin$. 0ist rice: G1".70. :com&are &rices; .ra5ing on eBam&les #rom some o# the "0th centuryDs best &rose stylists in both #iction and non% #iction, Bacon de#tly highlights the structures that allo5 them to build coherence and shi#t em&hasis, and &ro6ides eBercises designed to hel& readers :mysel# included; add these structures to their o5n re6ising re&ertoires. racticing these local mo6es, 5e might also #ind ins&iration and 6ocabulary #or thin?ing about the construction o# larger units o# discourse, at the &aragra&h le6el and beyond. <ou can eB&ect to do a lot o# 5riting in this course: youDll get not only theory and &ractice, but theory in &ractice. $hroughout the course, 3 5ill call on you to test the claims in the readings against your o5n eB&eriences as 5riters and readers: to connect the abstract to the concrete and 6ice 6ersa, learning more about both in the &rocess. 3n addition to #re!uent lo5% sta?es, in#ormal 5riting, o6er the course o# the semester youDll com&lete se6eral longer &ieces in 5hich you analy>e and9or res&ond to the articles youD6e read, deri6ing and then imitating the strategies they em&loyed to mo6e beyond ea6esdro&&ing to actual &artici&ation. By the end o# the term, 5ho ?no5sI <ou may ha6e a 5riting study o# your o5n to submit to the journals. ,ttached to this email is a #our%&age document that s&ells out my grading &olicy, as 5ell as my rationale #or grading this 5ay. 4our &ages is a bit much, &erha&s, but 3D6e #ound it better to be clear u&%#ront; essentially, 5hat 3D6e done is lay out a set o# beha6iors, or &rocesses, that 5ill guarantee you a B, along 5ith some suggestions #or ho5 you can get abo6e a B E and ho5 you can get belo5, should you &re#er. (a6e a loo?, and #eel #ree to email me 5ith any !uestions. 3#, li?e me, you #ind all o# this an eBhilarating challenge, 5orthy o# your curiosity and your e##orts, 3 loo? #or5ard to meeting you in classJ ,nd i# not, 3 5ish you luc? in 5hate6er &ursuits you choose, 5ith no hard #eelings at all. :M;

Sincerely, strange though that may seem, Benjamin Miller :&lease call me Ben;

GRADING CONTRACT8 ,s com&osition theorist eter Elbo5 has 5ritten in a number o# &laces :see es&ecially his @8an?ing, E6aluating, and 0i?ingANN;, grades are a sur&risingly crude 5ay o# measuring or &roducing learning: they reduce com&leB &henomena to a single letter or number, and thus obscure the di##erences bet5een, say, &roo#reading s?ills and ability to su&&ort an argument. Some teachers might try to get around this by assigning &ercentages o# their grades to &articular s?ill%sets, but 3 #ind 3 canLt ?no5, in ad6ance, 5hat any one o# you 5ill need to 5or? on: 3 5ant to be #ree to gi6e more targeted #eedbac?, and set more targeted goals, than any &re%set &ercentage allo5s me to do. ,s 3 see it, you each are here to become better than yoursel#, not better than anyone else. 2rades distract #rom that, and distract #rom the &articular reactions and suggestions that can hel& you im&ro6e. So to shi#t our attention a5ay #rom grading E and there#ore to!ard thought#ul assessment E 3Lm going to cut you a deal. 3# you #ul#ill all the terms o# the contract belo5, 3 5ill guarantee that your grade is no lo5er than B. 3# your 5or? is consistently eBcellent, it can go u& #rom there; i# you canLt com&lete all o# the terms o# the contract, your grade may go do5n. ,s you read, youLll notice that these B%le6el eB&ectations are based on concrete o"ser#a"le "eha#iors, not subjecti6e judgments o# !uality. Fo matter 5here you start out, the &laying #ield is le6el. Moreo6er, because the contract is based on good 5riting &rocesses, not on mastery o# s?ills, you can #ocus on a #e5 manageable goals at a time, rather than #eeling &ressure to master e6erything at once. 3 ho&e you ta?e this as an o&&ortunity to eB&eriment, to ta?e ris?s in your 5riting, and to trust that you 5ill learn something in the &rocess: e6en i# you try a ne5 5riting%mo6e and #ail, you can :in the 5ords o# Samuel Bec?ett; K#ail betterK neBt time, 5ithout being &enali>ed. lease initial each item to signal you'!e read it" and sign at the !ery end# Students 5ho ha6e not turned in a signed contract by the end o# the #ourth class may not remain in the course. T# e&rn & 4 (#r $,is %#9rse. *#9 m9s$3 1. Engage acti6ely during e6ery class &eriod, and use class time &roducti6ely. E6eryone has an o## day #rom time to time, but #or nearly e6ery class meeting, to the best o# your ability, your brain should be 5or?ing #rom 11:10 to 1":"'. $his means you must also be consistently &re&ared #or class: read, annotate, and bring any re!uired readings, and bring your noteboo? and 5hate6er dra#ts, eBercises, or research youDll need. OOOOOOO ". artici&ate acti6ely during e6ery 5or?sho&, and &ush yoursel# to &ro6ide your class% and grou&%mates 5ith consistently thorough, thought#ul, hel&#ul #eedbac?. <ou should hel& your grou&%mates to become better 5riters throughout the course. $a?ing their 5or? seriously enough to thin? hard about ho5 it can be im&ro6ed is crucial #or your success, and theirs, in
$his grading contract, including some o# the language, has been ada&ted #rom .aniele5ic>, Cane and eter Elbo5. K, Pnilateral 2rading -ontract to 3m&ro6e 0earning and $eaching.K College Composition and Communication 71." :.ecember "00+;: "11%"7*, as 5ell as the online a&&endiB to that article :see their note 1;. $he contracts and rationales &ublished there 5ere made a6ailable #or the &ur&oses o# such ada&tation. N Elbo5, eter. @8an?ing, E6aluating, and 0i?ing: Sorting out $hree 4orms o# Cudgment.A College $nglish ''." :1++3;: 1*=%"07.

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this course. Fote that this is not just about &raise or criticism: as? !uestions, ma?e connections, eB&lore &ossibilities. /&en s&ace #or them to do or say more. OOOOOOO 3. )or? 5ith your grou&%mates to com&lete grou& assignments and eBercises, to the satis#action o# e6eryone in the grou&. .i6ide grou& assignments and time #airly, and com&lete, on time, all the 5or? you ta?e on. Fote that this also means demanding satis#action from your grou& mates: i# one o# you is slac?ing o##, the 5hole grou& su##ers. 0et that &erson ?no5. OOOOOOO 1. 4or e6ery assignment, &roduce substantial, thought#ul 5riting that #ollo5s the guidelines in the &rom&t E including deadlines. OOOOOOO '. 8e6ise thoroughly and thought#ully a#ter e6ery 5or?sho&. $hought#ul re6ision means substantially clari#ying your ideas, reorgani>ing your argument, rethin?ing your claims, adding to or eB&licating your e6idence, dee&ening your research, adjusting your style, or9and re%imagining your relationshi& to your audience. : roo#reading and s5a&&ing out indi6idual 5ords, 5hile they can be im&ortant, are not 5hat 3Dm tal?ing about here.; E6en i# you ha6e not recei6ed thorough #eedbac? during a 5or?sho&, ma?e at least one substantial re6ision be#ore the neBt 5or?sho& and be#ore turning in the #inal dra#t. OOOOOOO 7. Pse the #eedbac? &ro6ided by your instructor and your grou&%mates to im&ro6e your 5riting. <ou donDt ha6e to ma?e e6ery change suggested, o# course, because your 5riting is yours, and a#ter all, readers 5ill sometimes disagree. But you must ta?e all #eedbac? seriously, and your dra#ts :or notes; c#. Q=; should sho5 e6idence o# your care#ul consideration o# your readersL suggestions: i# a reader is con#used or has an objection, donDt ignore it, but instead try to clear u& the con#usion or incor&orate and res&ond to the objection. OOOOOOO =. )hen turning in #inal dra#ts and subse!uent re6isions :as 5ell as #or any earlier dra#t on 5hich it #eels a&&ro&riate to you;, attach a brie# note eB&laining 5hat in &articular you 5ere trying to achie6e in that dra#t. e.g., )ere there &articular reader comments you 5ere trying to addressI , sentence or &aragra&h style you 5ere trying to emulateI <ou can also use this note to ac?no5ledge suggestions you consciously decided not to ta?e, eB&laining your reasons. :$his may, in #act, hel& you to disco6er your reasons.; 3Dll distribute a handout 5ith some more suggestions 5hen the time comes. OOOOOOO *. roo#read #inal dra#ts to eliminate distracting sur#ace errors and ty&os. 4inal dra#ts do not ha6e to be &er#ect, but you should learn any grammar rules that consistently cause you trouble, by tal?ing 5ith a classmate, using a guide such as (ac?erDs %ocket Style &anual, and9or through meetings 5ith me or the 8eading9)riting -enter sta##. OOOOOOO +. ,ttend all scheduled con#erences 5ith me and your 8eading9)riting -enter -onsultant :i# a&&licable;, and come &re&ared to use the con#erence time &roducti6ely. 3# 3 indicate on a dra#t that 3 5ould li?e you to schedule an a&&ointment to tal? 5ith me, do so 5ithin the 5ee?. OOOOOOO 10. ,6oid &lagiarism by :a; ta?ing care#ul notes to hel& you distinguish bet5een your o5n ideas and language and those you ha6e borro5ed #rom sources; :b; being generous about attributing ideas and ac?no5ledging those 5hose 5or? has in#luenced your o5n, i.e. by attem&ting to cite all sources correctly, e6en in #irst dra#ts; :c; mastering citation con6entions and citing all sources correctly in all #inal dra#ts; and :d; ne6er attem&ting to disguise anotherLs 5or? as your o5n, ne6er &urchasing essays online, and ne6er engaging in any other act o# academic dishonesty.

$his is a collaborati6e class, in 5hich 5e o##er each other suggestions and constructi6e criticism. But 5e do so to clari#y the eB&ression o# original ideas E ne6er to substitute someone elseDs ideas #or our o5n, or to im&ose our ideas on someone else. OOOOOOO 11. Sho5 res&ect #or your classmates and your instructor. $his includes using res&ect#ul language, ta?ing each othersL ideas seriously, and re#raining #rom distracting beha6iors, such as #alling aslee&, reading the &etro, or chec?ing teBt messages during class. Ensure that your cell &hone doesnDt ring during class. OOOOOOO 1". Be consistently on time #or class, and be absent 6ery rarely. $hree latenesses e!ual one absence. Missing more than "0 minutes one o# class counts as an absence :though youDre still al5ays 5elcome to come in, !uietly;. SiB absences throughout the semester, three absences during any one unit, or absence on a day 5hen your 5or? is scheduled to be 5or?sho&&ed 5ill brea? the contract :as eB&lained in the neBt section;. Missing more than se6en classes :R o# the classes #or the term; 5ill result in a grade o# )P :Pno##icial )ithdra5al;. OOOOOOO 13. Submit a com&lete, #ully re6ised &ort#olio that meets all outlined re!uirements by the due date. $he &ort#olio #or this class 5ill consist o# all major 5riting &rojects, 5ith mar?ed%u& dra#ts, &lus your selection o# in?sheds or eBercises that re&resent your best thin?ing or 5riting in the course. More details to #ollo5, closer to the deadline. OOOOOOO 3# you #ul#ill all o# these eB&ectations, you are guaranteed a grade o# at least a B o6erall. 3 5ill do my best to ?ee& you in#ormed and a#loat 5ith regard to your success#ul &artici&ation. 3# youDre e6er in doubt about your contractual status, #eel #ree to email me and9or dro& by my o##ice hours. Gr&"es 4el# & 43 3# you brea? the contract, your contracted grade #or the course 5ill be lo5ered as #ollo5s: • 4or minor breaches :e.g. missing or not bringing in a short home5or? eBercise, #ailing to &artici&ate in #ull%class discussion, or lea6ing assigned reading at home, etc;: in each Pnit, 3 5ill &ermit you one @MulliganA E one minor misste& that 5ill not brea? the contract. But t5o minor breaches during any Pnit 5ill lo5er your contracted grade by S o# a letter, i.e. to a BE; another breach in the same unit or t5o minor breaches during the neBt Pnit, and your contract grade 5ill be lo5ered #urther to a -T, and so on. $hese lo5ered grades can still be im&ro6ed by an eBce&tionally strong &ort#olio. OOOOOOO 4or major breaches :e.g. turning in nothing #or an essay dra#t deadline, #ailing to &artici&ate in &eer re6ie5, or #ailing to ac?no5ledge direct re6ision%suggestions in all subse!uent dra#ts and notes;: no Mulligans; your contracted grade 5ill immediately be lo5ered to a BE a#ter the #irst major breach, -T a#ter the second, and so on. $hese lo5ered grades can still be im&ro6ed by an eBce&tionally strong &ort#olio. OOOOOOO 4or the #inal &ort#olio: each day it is late, the contracted grade dro&s U o# a letter. $he attendance &olicy is outlined abo6e, in item 1". OOOOOOO OOOOOOO

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,gain, 3 5ill do my best to ?ee& you in#ormed and a#loat 5ith regard to beha6iors that threaten to brea? the contract: my goal is to ?ee& e6eryone engaged, acti6e, and learning. 3# you are e6er

in doubt about your contractual status, #eel #ree to send me an email or dro& by my o##ice hours. Gr&"es A'#+e & 43 ,s mentioned abo6e, grades u& to and including B are based &urely on beha6iors, 5hich is to say on process' #or grades abo6e a B, you must demonstrate EBcellence and Vuality in your #inal 5ritten products. )hile these terms are, una6oidably, rather #u>>y, in my de#ense 3 can say only this: 4irst, most grades in 5riting are arbitrary, and at least by using the contract abo6e 3Dm doing my best to limit and control the arbitrariness. Second, 3 &romise to do my 6ery best to articulate, in &articular instances, 5hat 3 thin? 5ould most hel& the &iece in !uestion achie6e EBcellence and Vuality. /ne o# the characteristics o# such 5riting is that it tends to stand out as its o5n sel#, original and o#ten sur&rising, and it is there#ore #ar harder to gi6e guidance in general terms. Still, certain a&&roaches are more li?ely to mo6e you in that direction :though, again, a gi6en essay 5ritten 5ith these &rocesses 5onLt al5ays succeed as a &roduct;: • Begin #rom &er&leBity. Moti6ate each essay 5ith a genuine !uestion, or #elt itch, that you legitimately 5ant to &u>>le through. 3n other 5ords, donDt tell me something you already ?no5, li?e Khonesty is o#ten the best &olicyK or Kreading boo?s hel&s you learn a languageK; start 5ith something you ?no5 a"out, but donDt yet understand. OOOOOOO roceed by thin?ing. $his may seem ob6ious, but itDs actually hard: ha6ing #ound a moti6ating !uestion or &u>>le, 5rite so as to thin? your 5ay to5ard greater understanding. Ma?e some intellectual gears turn; you should ?no5 more by the end o# the &rocess than you did at the beginning. 3tDs #ine #or a B to say that 1 T " T 3 W " T 3 T 1. But to get abo6e the B, aim #or 1 T " T 3 W 7. OOOOOOO 8esound 5ith grace. $he best essays 5ill not only hold together, but ta?e &leasure in their o5n un#olding language, balancing economy and &recision o# diction 5ith rhetorical &ro5ess and &oise. $he #u>>iest criterion o# them all, but throughout the term, letDs all resol6e to &oint out eBam&les o# grace#ul 5riting 5hen 5e see it. OOOOOOO

3# your 5or? is trending to5ards a better%than%B &ort#olio, 3 5ill do my best to let you ?no5 5here youD6e le6eled u& o6er that line, so you can try to reca&ture and consolidate 5hate6er 5as 5or?ing so 5ell. :.onDt 5orry, 3Dll ?ee& gi6ing suggestions #or 5here you can im&ro6e, as 5ell, because 3 belie6e that e6en the best o# us can.; /nce more, should you e6er #ind yoursel# in doubt about your contractual status E 5hether your 5or? is satis#actory #or a B, unsatis#actory #or a B, or eBcelling beyond the B%le6el, &lease #eel #ree to send me an email, dro& by my o##ice hours, or e6en to set u& a con#erence at a better time. P0EASE SIGN 4E0OW. I. $,e 9n"ersigne". ,&+e re&" &n" 9n"ers$##" $,e &'#+e %#n$r&%$ $# 'e $,e gr&"ing p#li%* (#r 4en:&min /iller;s se%$i#n #( Englis, 201. OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO name :in your most legible &rint; OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOO signature date

OFFICIA0 H)NTER PO0ICY ON P0AGIARIS/ $his is a collaborati6e class, in 5hich 5e o##er each other suggestions and constructi6e criticism. (o5e6er, the goal o# all this collaboration is to clari#y the eB&ression o# original ideas E ne6er to substitute someone elseDs ideas #or our o5n, or to im&ose our ideas on someone else. $o misre&resent the origins o# an idea is plagiarism, and it 5ill not be tolerated. 3# you 5ant to cite an outside source, there are 5ays o# gi6ing credit to the original author; section 3" o# the %ocket Style &anual &resents one standard method o# documenting sources. 3# you ha6e any !uestions, donDt hesitate to as?, because (unter ta?es a 6ery hard stance on &lagiarism. 3t could get you eB&elled. (ereDs an eBcer&t #rom the -PF< olicy on ,cademic 3ntegrity, to gi6e you the #la6or:
,cademic .ishonesty is &rohibited in $he -ity Pni6ersity o# Fe5 <or? and is &unishable by &enalties, including #ailing grades, sus&ension and eB&ulsion, as &ro6ided herein. XYZ Pl&gi&rism is the act o# &resenting another &ersonDs ideas, research, or 5ritings as your o5n. $he #ollo5ing are some eBam&les o# &lagiarism, but by no means is it an eBhausti6e list:

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-o&ying another &ersonDs actual 5ords 5ithout the use o# !uotation mar?s and #ootnotes attributing the 5ords to their source. resenting another &ersonDs ideas or theories in your o5n 5ords 5ithout ac?no5ledging the source. Psing in#ormation that is not common ?no5ledge 5ithout ac?no5ledging the source. 4ailing to ac?no5ledge collaborators on home5or? and laboratory assignments.

In$erne$ pl&gi&rism in%l9"es s9'mi$$ing "# nl#&"e" $erm p&pers #r p&r$s #( $erm p&pers. p&r&p,r&sing #r %#p*ing in(#rm&$i#n (r#m $,e in$erne$ i$,#9$ %i$ing $,e s#9r%e &n" <%9$$ing = p&s$ing< (r#m +&ri#9s s#9r%es i$,#9$ pr#per &$$ri'9$i#n.

(unter College regards acts of academic dishonesty )e*g* plagiarism cheating on e+aminations o"taining unfair ad#antage and falsification of records and official documents, as serious offenses against the #alues of intellectual honesty* The College is committed to enforcing the C-./ %olicy on Academic 0ntegrity and !ill pursue cases of academic dishonesty according to the (unter College Academic 0ntegrity %rocedures* ,ll cases o# deliberate &lagiarism 5ill be re#erred to the a&&ro&riate .ean #or disci&linary action.

A>AI0A40E RESO)RCES AT H)NTER
T,e Re&"ing5Wri$ing Cen$er ?RWC@

$he (unter -ollege 8eading9)riting -enter is a com&rehensi6e ser6ice #or the entire college community o##ering tutoring and com&uter%assisted instruction to students and technical su&&ort and de6elo&ment to #aculty and sta##. $he 8eading9)riting -enter o##ers tutorial assistance, #ree o# charge, to all registered students o# the college. $utors are undergraduate and graduate students #rom a 6ariety o# majors, trained to hel& you de6elo& your reading and 5riting s?ills. $he -enter 5ill not inter&ret teBts #or you, nor 5ill tutors 5rite, ty&e, or correct &a&ers. $utors 5ill hel& you de6elo& a reading%5riting &rocess you can use to im&ro6e your s?ills and negotiate the re!uirements o# academic reading and 5riting. ,s a student, you may use the -enter in se6eral 5ays:

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8egister #or a regular a&&ointment to meet 5ith a tutor #or an hour, once a 5ee? throughout the 5hole semester. Psually, you 5ill be &aired 5ith another student 5ho is enrolled in the same course.3 .ro& in to 5or? 5ith a tutor during scheduled dro&%in hours 5hen tutors are a6ailable to meet 5ith you on a #irst%come, #irst%ser6ed basis. See schedule belo5 #or dro&%in times. ,ttend 5or?sho&s on 6arious as&ects o# critical reading and 5riting. )or?sho& to&ics and schedules are &osted &eriodically throughout each semester. Pse com&uter terminals in the -enter 5ith access to -PF< lus and to the 8eading9)riting -enter 5eb &age at htt&:99r5c.hunter.cuny.edu 5here you can directly access 8eading9)riting -enter handouts, 6ie5 current 5or?sho& schedules, obtain in#ormation on the - E and ,-$ eBams, and lin? to a 6ariety o# 5riting resources on the )eb. Pse the -enterDs library o# boo?s during the hours the -enter is o&en. $he -enter does not lend boo?s; ho5e6er, they ha6e an eBtensi6e #ile o# handouts 5hich are a6ailable #or you to ta?e a5ay.

<ou 5ill learn the most i# you use the -enter at each stage o# your 5riting &rocess. )or? 5ith a tutor to clari#y an assignment, to generate material, to re6ie5 a dra#t #or organi>ation and de6elo&ment, and to learn ho5 to &roo#read. $he 8eading9)riting -enter is located in 8oom 117, $homas (unter Building. /ur tutoring schedule is as #ollo5s: $P$/83F2 (/P8S Monday through $hursday 10 ,.M. to * .M. 4riday and Saturday 10 ,.M. to 1 .M. htt&:99miller"010s&ring.5i?idot.com9&rinter%%#riendly9course%o6er6ie5%&olicies % toc

T,e O((i%e #( A%%essA4I0ITY

3n com&liance 5ith the ,merican .isability ,ct o# 1++0 :,.,; and 5ith Section '01 o# the 8ehabilitation ,ct o# 1+=3, (unter -ollege is committed to ensuring educational &arity and accommodations #or all students 5ith documented disabilities and9or medical conditions. 3t is recommended that all students 5ith documented disabilities :Emotional, Medical, hysical and9or 0earning; consult the /##ice o# ,ccess,B303$< located in 8oom E11"1 to secure necessary academic accommodations. 4or #urther in#ormation and assistance &lease call "1"% =="%1*'= 9 $$< "1"%7'0%3"30. htt&:99miller"010s&ring.5i?idot.com9&rinter%%#riendly9course%o6er6ie5%&olicies % toc

C0ASS-4Y-C0ASS SCHED)0E
:co&ied #rom the 5i?i; the online 6ersion is the more reliableJ;

,ssignments are listed :as (); on the day they are assigned, and are "9e &$ 10pm $,e nig,$ 'e(#re1 the #ollo5ing class meeting, unless other5ise s&eci#ied. <ou should in general &ls# 'ring & %#p* $# %l&ss, so that 5e ha6e access to it #or in%class discussion and9or re6isions. )ni$ I3 EAperien%ing Wri$ing 3n this #irst unit, 5eLll introduce and &ractice mo6es that 5ill become our constant com&anions 5hen engaging in academic 5or?: in?shedding, mar?ing u& a teBt, reading structurally as 5ell as #or content, and re#lecting on these &rocesses. $he major 5riting &roject #or this unit is a narrati6e, rendering 6isible #or readers one @short story o# a long momentA in your de6elo&ment as a 5riter. • 0esson 1, Mon 1931 % 3ntroductions and Moti6ations: $he eo&le in the 8oom o (): read Murray, K)riting and $eaching #or Sur&rise,K and #ollo5 u& on K/&inionnaireK :see lesson; o () you may already ha6e done: read and sign contract; buy both teBtboo?s. • 0esson ", $hurs "93 % Structure and -ontent o (): read Bacon, 3ntroduction and -ha&ter 1 :K$he SentenceDs )or?ing artsK;, &&. 1%"1; do structure9content eBercise :see lesson &lan; o (): create a 5riter%by%5riter%archi6e home&age

0esson 3, Mon "9= % EBercises #or Sur&rises 9 Enabling -onstraints o (): read 8ose, K8igid 8ulesK etc :Cohnson 11*%17";; do sur&rise%then%re6ise eBercise :see lesson &lan; 0esson 1, $hurs "910 % [ey $erms as 0enses o (): read erl, KPnderstanding -om&osingK :Cohnson 110%11=;; do double%entry noteboo? :see lesson &lan; 0esson ', Mon "911 % Moti6ations and 3ntroductions: $he 0it 8e6ie5 o (): read Bacon, -ha&ter 3 :K)ell%Balanced Sentences: -oordination and arallel StructureK;, &&. 17%70; do a modi#ied 6ersion o# BaconDs eBercise 3E :see lesson &lan; 0esson 7, $hurs "91= % 3n%class )riting :se6eral o&tions; o (): begin S 1: eBtend todayDs 5riting into a Kshort story o# a long momentK :see lesson &lan; o 0ast day #or add9dro& 5ithout a ) on the transcri&t N# %l&sses /#n"&*. 2521 B Presi"en$Cs D&* We"nes"&*. 2522 is & C)NY /#n"&*3 %l&ss mee$s 0esson =, )ednesday "9"3 % )or?sho&

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$his early deadline is not my 5ay o# being mean, but my 5ay o# encouraging you to a; slee& and b; lea6e yoursel# some lee5ay in case the 5or? ta?es longer than you thin? it 5ill. :3t o#ten does, #or me, any5ay.;

o

(): read Bacon, most o# -ha&ter " :K)ell%4ocused Sentences: the Subject%\erb airK;, &&. "'%3*; do a modi#ied 6ersion o# BaconDs eBercise "4 :see lesson &lan;

0esson *, $hurs "9"1 % Cigsa5: ,naly>ing Style, art 1 o (): read Bacon, the rest o# -ha&ter " and -ha&ter 1 :K)ell%.e6elo&ed Sentences: Modi#icationK;, &&. 71%=1; re6ise your story to &ractice these mo6es :see lesson &lan;

)ni$ II3 Fr#m Wri$ing $# A%&"emi% Wri$ing $hus #ar, most o# the authors 5eD6e been learning #rom ha6e attem&ted to understand 5riting &rocesses and the e##ects o# 5ritten &roducts across a 5ide range o# genres and &ur&oses ] or, at least, 5eD6e been loo?ing at them in that light. .uring this second unit, 5eDll #ocus in on 5riting in Kthe academy,K and 5hat that term might mean. (o5 does 5riting #unction in a school settingI )hose goals does it :or should it; ser6eI )hat is at sta?e in the 5ay 5e teach 5riting in collegeI $he major 5riting &roject #or this unit is an essay reconteBtuali>ing and analy>ing, through an academic lens, your o5n &ast eB&erience 5ith 5riting. • 0esson +, Mon "9"* % )hat Ma?es an EssayI art 1 :-ommon&laces; o (): read Bartholomae, K3n6enting the Pni6ersityK :Cohnson &&. "%31;; do S ,888 eBercise :see lesson &lan; • 0esson 10, $hurs 393 % Engaging 5ith .i##iculty o (): reread Bartholomae; 5rite .i##iculty ,nalysis :see lesson &lan;

0esson 11, Mon 39= % )hat Ma?es an EssayI art " :BE,M; o (): read eter Elbo5Ds K8e#lections on ,cademic .iscourseK; re6isit and use any o# the note%ta?ing techni!ues thus #ar :S ,888, BE,M, .ouble%Entry Foteboo?, [ey $erm ,nalysis; 0esson 1", $hurs 3910 % E6erythingDs an ,rgument, But )hichI: $he Stases ,ttn seniors: last day to #ile K3ntent to 2raduateK on the 5eb N (): begin S ": 8e6ise any in?shed or eBercise into an essay by adding all #our BE,M mo6es 0esson 13, Mon 3911 % )or?sho& o (): read Sommers, K8e6ision StrategiesK etc :Cohnson &&. 1+'%"07;; re6isit and use any o# the note%ta?ing techni!ues thus #ar :S ,888, BE,M, .ouble%Entry Foteboo?, [ey $erm ,nalysis; 0esson 11, $hurs 391= % Binary $hin?ing in $eBt and SubteBt o (): reread Sommers; use her taBonomy :bottom o# &. 1+=; to analy>e your o5n re6ision mo6es :see lesson &lan; N#$e3 T9es"&*. 2522 is $,e l&s$ "&* $# #((i%i&ll* i$,"r& (r#m %l&sses 0esson 1', Mon 39"1 % E6idence and 8eason o (): read Bacon, -ha&ter 7 :KModi#iers Built #rom \erbs: \erbal hrasesK;, &&. *+%101; re6ise your essay to &ractice these mo6es :see lesson &lan; 0esson 17, $hurs 39"1 % )or?sho&

o

(): read Bacon, -ha&ter = :KFoun hrases )or?ing as Modi#iers: ,&&ositi6es and ,bsolutesK;, &&. 10'%11+; re6ise your essay or story to &ractice these mo6es :see lesson &lan;

)ni$ III3 Cri$i%&l C#n$eA$9&liD&$i#n Pr#:e%$ Many scholars and teachers o# 5riting insist that 5e should read teBts as i# theyLre &eo&le tal?ing to us, &eo&le 5ith moti6ations that may not al5ays be eB&licit but are al5ays &resent. 3n other 5ords, they 5ant you to get used to tal?ing about not only 5hat a teBt says or 5hat it means, but 5hat it does: $hro5 do5n a gauntletI Sing the &raises o# a lo6erI (ammer out a treaty bet5een 5arring #actionsI 8e#ocus e6eryoneLs attentionI )hen you read a teBt trying to #igure out 5hat it does or 5hy a &erson 5ould bother to 5rite it, youLre reading rhetorically. ,s 5e head into the second hal# o# the course, your major 5riting &roject 5ill be a rhetorical analysis o# one article o# your choice: an essay in 5hich you ma?e a claim about the authorDs moti6ation #or 5riting that article, based on your assessment o# the content, conteBt, subteBt, and style. FB: 3D6e ma&&ed out a #e5 di##erent 6ersions o# ho5 5e might select the teBts to analy>e, and there#ore ho5 5e might sca##old this unit o# the course in terms o# eBercises and deadlines. Be#ore 3 share them 5ith you, though, 3 5ant to get to ?no5 you as &eo&le and as 5riters, so that 3 can choose 5hat 5ill best match your needs, your interests, and your abilities. So 3Lll lea6e this section blan? #or no5, &ro6iding only the #iBed dates and end%&ointsY
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0esson 1=, Mon 39"* % o (): 0esson 1*, $hurs 3931 % o (): 0esson 1+, Mon 191 % FeBt Monday, 1911 is the last day to o##icially )ithdra5 #rom classes o (): 0esson "0, $hurs 19= % 4en &$ CCCC. E5F-E57. Cl&ss mee$s #nline. o (): 0esson "1, Mon 1911 % 0ast day to o##icially )ithdra5 #rom classes o (): 0esson "", $hurs 1911 % o (): Spring 4re&! E51G-E52F - n# %l&ss /#n E516. T,9rs E521. #r /#n E52H 0esson "3, $hurs 19"* E o (): 0esson "1, Mon '9" %

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():

)ni$ I>3 0##!ing 4&%!. 0##!ing F#r &r" .uring the #inal unit o# the semester, your major &roject 5ill be to com&ile a &ort#olio o# your 5or? in the class, demonstrating the degree to 5hich you ha6e met the courseDs objecti6es and your o5n: that is, you 5ill demonstrate both to yoursel6es and to me that you ha6e learned, and 5hat you ha6e learned. $he ca&stone #or the &ort#olio is a re#lecti6e introductory essay, in 5hich you 5ill dra5 on the theorists you ha6e read, to analy>e the &roducts o# the &rocesses you ha6e &racticed. :Sorry about the &o&&ing &Ds.; • 0esson "', $hurs '9' % o ():
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0esson "7, Mon '9+ % o (): 0esson "=, $hurs '91" % o (): 0esson "*, Mon '917 % 0&s$ D&* #( Cl&sses 0esson "+, $hurs '91* % Fin&l P#r$(#li# "9e #nline EBam .ate, Monday, May "3rd % 4inal resentations and arty N#$e $,e $ime %,&nge B 11320&m-1320pm B l#%&$i#n $.'.&.

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