Team #: 1 Type of Information Organization: Academic Team Leader: Allison Barr Researcher: None Action Plan Leader #1: Brett

Petrie Action Plan Leader #2: Alexandria Equiarta Action Plan Leader #3: Tiffany Roberts

Salem College Library at The Salem College of Wizardry Strategic Plan

Submitted for LIBR 204 On April 7, 2013

Section #1: Overview The External Environment: The Salem College of Wizardry is located on the outskirts of Salem, Massachusetts, a small seaport city north of Boston. With a population of approximately 40,000, the city is not a typical “college town”. Most of the students come from out of state (and a sizable portion from overseas), the school is very private. The local residents of Salem know that a school for wizardry is directly on their boarders, but both the school and the town operate independently of each other. The school was founded in 1692, during the infamous Salem Witch Trials. The college has several “sister schools” with collaborative international partnerships in New Orleans, Dublin, Ireland and Bangkok, Thailand. The Salem College Library has one main building on campus. At the Salem College Library, the majority of the users are post-secondary students. Although many students are from North America, the college also has a large international community. Most students come to Salem College for the special programs that are not taught at other wizarding colleges. Almost all students are non-local residents. Due to the sensitivity of the studies, all students are required to live on campus, either in dormitories, or student housing. The Library typically has a user base of 3,000 students during the fall and winter semesters, and 1,000 during the slower summer semester. The user base does not typically vary as the college campus is restricted and the Library is not open to the public unless under the most unusual of circumstances. As mentioned above, the majority of the Library users are students who range in age from 18-25. Some students and faculty will range up to 800 years old. The sex ratio is 55% female and 45% male. Due to the large amount of international students (40% international to 60% North American), the library prides itself on its ethnic and cultural diversity. Caucasians are the largest group by a small percentage (27%), followed closely by Latinos (24%). Following are Asians with 17%, Africans with 15%, First Nations with 10%, 5% other ethnicities and finally all others at 2%. All others include: giants, fairies, elves and any other magical folk. The college does not have a division between “undergraduate” and “graduate” but a linear (and endless) pursuit of knowledge, with students choosing to graduate when they have progressed far enough into their studies. For example, to become a wizarding librarian, 10 years of progressive study at Salem College is required. For those only interested in the pursuit of knowledge, the eldest student is 450 years old and has been attending classes for the past 312 years. Only faculty and students may use the library, although there is an interlibrary loan program so other students from similar establishments may borrow books.

The Internal Environment: The Salem College Library employs 25 full time and part time employees. The full time staff includes one head librarian, and four specialist librarians. The four specialist librarians are experts in their particular fields of Spell-casting, History, Potions/Herbology and Dark Arts. The head librarian has substantial training in all four of the main departments of the library. The part time employees are all students at Salem College and their role s include student assistants, clerks and pages. As there is only one location of the Salem College Library, all employees work within the same main building. After the head librarian, each position is ranked depending on the amount of knowledge needed for the role, and seniority is given. The Spell-casting specialist librarian is second in command to the head librarian as it is necessary for them to have knowledge of History, Potions/Herbology and Dark arts. Following that role is History specialist, then Potions/Herbology, then Dark Arts. While there is seniority in the library, every specialist librarian is directly in charge of their own staff and department. Each specialist librarian has a team of 5 (assistants and pages), and oversees the upkeep of the reference material in their department.

Head Librarian

Spell-Casting Specialist

History Specialist

Potions/Herblore Specialist

Dark Arts Specialist

oversees new student orientation, reference process, 5 assistants/pages

5 Student Assistants/pages

5 Student Assistants/Pages

5 Student Assistant/Pages

The total budget of the Salem College Library for the year of 2012 was $1,125,000. The largest expenditure by far was the cost of salary for 5 full-time employees and 20 part-time. Salem College attempts to keep up to date with the rising cost of living in the area, as well as compensate their full time staff for their increased knowledge and workload as they advance through the positions. The Salem College Library spends a large portion of the budget to acquire and maintain their collection. As the Library is much older than many libraries in North American, the collection needs constant maintenance and upgrading to ensure the books and scrolls are still in good condition. A unique expense that the Salem College Library has is the Carrier Animal Care. The animals that distribute and collect the library books are not housed in the library, but the library does pay for their care, including housing, food and veterinary care.

Staff compensation and development: $627 000  $ 80 000 Head Librarian  $ 70 000 Spell Casting Librarian  $ 60 000 History Librarian  $ 55 000 Potions and Herbology  $ 50 000 Dark Arts  Assistants @ 15$ an hour for 20 hrs a week: $ 312 000 Collections: $295 000  Acquisition: $ 200 000  Repair and maintenance: $ 95 000 Services: $90 000 Facility and Utilities: $56 000 Marketing: $15 000 Carrier Animal Care: $42 000

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Modern technology is not used in the library, however, some magical devices mimic the technology found in non-magical college libraries. All books are catalogued based on the standards set in 1692, shortly after the founding of the college. The books and manuscripts are organized into one of the four overarching departments (Spell-casting, History, Potions/Herbology and Dark Arts), then by author. Although this system has many flaws, the College Library values the traditions set by their founders. Instead of a card catalogue system, the library uses a large book with magical proprieties that is very similar to a search engine on a computer. Students take the quill pen provided and inscribe the subject, title, author or research query and the book automatically (and magically) searches for any information relating to the initial request. The book “catalogue” requires maintenance and regular updates as would any traditional technology. The head librarian is charged with ensuring the catalogue is up to date with the new acquisitions. Salem College also requires its students to complete a mandatory “Introduction to Library and Research Strategies” during their first year at school. They learn how to best use the research book with their magic, as well as being introduced to how the library is laid out. The library also produces tutorials on topics such as quill-sharpening, parchment cutting, and advanced research. Communication in the library is mostly pen and parchment based. It is either directly spoken or through written messages delivered by hand or animal. Carrier animals (such as birds and cats) are taught to deliver messages and books for the library. They deliver books and manuscripts that have been reserved by students, and pick up overdue books from the student dormitories. The carrier animals are not the only part-time workers. Every department has 5 student employees that work as assistants or pages. The students also spend time working at the front desk in addition to their usual tasks. Senior employees help to run the mandatory library introduction course for all new students. All part-time employees are students interested in pursuing magical librarianship, or studies focus on scrolls, parchment and book-binding.

Section #2: Vision and Mission Vision Statement: The Salem College Library is committed to the lifelong pursuit and exploration of all aspects of witchcraft and wizardry, and to develop the inquiring minds of wizards by providing information, services, cultural programs and library instruction, in support of the evolving curriculum of Salem College of Wizardry. Mission Statement: The Salem College Library seeks to be the “heart” of the academic and research culture of the campus, and to contribute to the intellectual activities of the Salem College of Wizardry. The Library envisions that it will fulfill its unique role as a major contributor to the academic, cultural, and social development of the college community. The Library is committed to the study and pursuit of magical knowledge in order to contribute to the wizarding world by acquiring and maintaining adequate information resources, offering effective instruction on the retrieval and use of materials in all formats.

Section #3: SWOT Internal Strengths: 1. Innovative 2. Established Collection 3. Dedicated and well trained staff capable of magic 4. Effective internal communication 5. Reputation Internal Weaknesses: 1. Isolation 2. Rooted in tradition 3. Some of collection no longer relevant 4. Programming is lacking. 5. High turn-over rate for Dark Arts Librarian External Opportunities: 1. Publication of student wizarding magazine 2. Shared knowledge through the distribution of materials with other wizarding schools through the interlibrary loan program 3. Staff and students are devoted to the research and further development of magical studies, leading to the contribution and benefit of wizarding world 4. Presence at town council meetings to maintain communication with the external community. 5. Grants and funding from powerful alumni External Threats: 1. Lack of funding due misconception that money is not necessary in a magical library 2. Outside competition including bookstores of the dark arts. 3. Depending on a student’s background in technology usage, they may be too dependent on modern technology upon arrival to properly use the library materials 4. Curious non-students routinely attempt to break into the library 5. Lack of understanding by non-magical community leaves certain departments of the library open to verbal and sometimes physical attack

Section #4: Strategic Outcomes and Strategies Strategic Outcomes 1. Become the leading wizarding library in North American for academic research 2. Develop a variety of magical library services which meet the diverse needs of students and faculty. 3. Maintain library services that reflect the ever changing research needs of the students and the wizarding community. 4. Salem College Library aspires to become one of America’s premier locations for esoteric collections of books and literature. Strategies and Support Statements Strategy Area #1: Library Services (#2, #3) Supporting Statement: Salem College Library will continue to develop new spell and magicbased services, such as Interlibrary Loan and Tutor services, to assist students and faculty with their ongoing information-seeking needs. Additionally, we will promote the Salem College Library as a center for magical university-related activities. This includes the use of the library for university clubs and societies, as well as for the promotion of social and cultural events. Strategy Area #2: Database Maintenance (#1, #2, #3) Supporting Statement: Salem College Library will continue to invest in developing the magical research databases and guides through frequent updates and collecting inventory. Strategy Area #3: Academic Research (#1, #4) Supporting Statement: At the Salem College Library, we will continue to encourage our students to become leaders in the academic research field. The students will receive initial instruction in proper research methods during their first academic year at the College, and library staff will also provide one-on-one training in advanced research methods Strategy Area #4: Academic Development (#1, #4) Supporting Statement: Salem College Library will continue to serve as the information center for the Salem College community through its development of a local collection, its access to other sources of information and its encouragement of independent learning and research. This will be an internal Wizard/Witch built collection that will maintain collections of all materials of sorcery and forgotten lore that helps support faculty and students in their teaching, learning, and research of the uncanny arts.

Section #5: Action Plans Strategic Action Plan for a Tutoring Center at Salem College Library Action Plan Leader: Tiffany Roberts 1.) Rationale A Tutoring Center at the Salem College library would provide inquiring young wizard minds with information and access services to assist them in developing a thorough ongoing knowledge of their curriculum. Such a center would also ensure that the library acts on the central tenet of its mission statement, to serve as the heart of the academic and research community at Salem College. A Tutoring Center would directly answer one of potential issues identified in the SWOT: that of incoming students’ lack of understanding regarding technology in the wizarding world. 65% of witches and wizards transitioning from the outside world to the scholarly community of Salem College have little experience using quills and parchment to take notes and write out assignments. Many also lack knowledge on the proper use of quill selection and sharpening, ink and ink blotting, and the use of hot wax stamping to seal their parchment assignments with. Consequently, many fall behind in their classes. Students often have a poor grasp of English and Latin grammar, the latter being a necessary tool used to write out spells and potions. Professors from the English department (which oversees the Latin department), along with student assistants, will tutor students in these areas. Finally, many students lack the proper spell-casting techniques necessary to produce desired results. This is due mainly to poor wand selection, conjuring (maintaining a visual image of the spell), and focusing techniques. Professors from the Spell-casting department, along with student assistants, would tutor students in proper spell-casting. A tutoring center would address these issues and thereby ensure students success. The Tutoring Center would be an ongoing joint project managed by the library, the English department, and Spell-casting department. The Tutoring Center itself would be located in a set of 3 unused conference rooms located next to the library offices. In two of the rooms, there would be long desks and chairs for the students and tutors use, as well as multiple candle stations with quills, parchment, hot wax, ink and ink pots, and ink blotters for the students to practice with. Books on English grammar, Latin grammar, and Spell-casting would be placed on the tables for students use. In the final room, there would be wand holders and introductory spell-casting books shelved on the walls by the librarians in order for the students to have plenty of room to conjure their spells. Students will be notified of the Tutoring Center operating hours via a large, magically twinkling piece of parchment located at the front desk of the library. 2.) Steps/Timeline/Responsibilities  Step #1: Discuss idea of tutoring center at monthly library staff meeting in order to gather feedback and determine what hours of operation work best with the library’s needs. Determine what books and parchments would be of most benefit to students for the tutoring center. Timeline: September 2013 Responsibility: Tutoring Center Development Chairperson and Development Team

 Step #2: Visit tutoring centers in 3 different university libraries located near Salem, Massachusetts. Observe tutor center operating hours, methods of instruction, and materials used. Remember to factor in differences in technology. Timeline: October 2013 Responsibility: Tutoring Center Development Chairperson and 2-3 members of the Development Team.  Step #3: Meet with Department Heads from English, Latin, and Spellcasting departments to determine which professors would be willing to work in the tutoring center. Discuss how tenured professors could divide their time between classes, office hours, and the tutoring center. Also discuss various methods of advertising the tutoring center in each department and communicating to the students the various advantages of using the tutoring center. Timeline: November 2013 Responsibility: Tutoring Center Development Chairperson, Development Team, and Department Heads  Step #4: Meet with professors selected by development team and department heads. Discuss their ideas for the tutoring center and determine their available hours in order to start organizing a schedule for the tutoring center. Ask each professor to select 1-2 potential student assistants based on experience in required field, and to speak to the student about applying to work in the tutoring center. Timeline: December 2013 Responsibility: Tutoring Center Development Chairperson, Development Team, and 3 selected professors.  Step #5: Interview selected student assistants recommended by the department professors. Several questions to ask include: what is his/her experience in helping other students? Does he/she have experience in teaching, or desire to pursue this career path? What is his/her expertise in the particular field? Focus specifically on students who are fluent in Latin spell-writing, are English majors, and/or are dexterous and experienced in spells and spell-casting. Future graduate students and teachers would be excellent candidates. Determine candidates availability and construct a potential work schedule for he/she with his/her specific departmental professor. Timeline: January-February 2014 Responsibility: Tutoring Center Development Chairperson and Development Team  Step #6: Meet with selected professors, the Head Librarian, and student assistants to determine what types of supplies are needed for the tutoring center. Timeline: March 2014 Responsibility: Tutoring Center Development Chairperson and Development Team, selected professors and student assistants  Step #7: Present a Tutoring Center Outline that includes hours of operation, location, list of professors, names of student assistants, tutoring subject descriptions, and supplies to be included and stocked in the tutoring center at all times to library staff for review and feedback at monthly library staff meeting. Review and adjust items as necessary. Timeline: April 2014 Responsibility: Tutoring Center Development Chairperson and Development Team

3.) Budget Since the tutoring center is jointly operated and managed by 3 different departments, the financial burden is shared by all 3 departments as well. Each contributor will be responsible for a portion of the budget.  Staff hours estimate: Library staff: 3-5 hours per week English department professors: 2 professors, 10-15 hours per week English department student assistants: 4 student assistants (2 per room), 15-20 hours per week Spell-casting department professors: 2 professors, 10-15 hours per week Spell-casting department student assistants: 2 student assistants, 10-15 hours per week The library staff will be paid for by the regular library staff budget. One of the 5 student assistants reporting to the Spell-casting specialist will be responsible for stocking, opening, and closing the student center. The English department and the Spell-casting departments will oversee the budgets for their professors and assistants. They will make budgetary adjustments as needed.  Travel Reimbursement: The Tutoring Center Development Chairperson and Development Team will each receive a reimbursement of $.50/mile for travel expenses incurred while visiting other academic library tutoring centers.  Supplies: The cost of the supplies will be borne by the library. The supplies will be divided as follows: Ostrich/Peacock Quills: $500 Quill Sharpeners: $250 Scrivener’s Ink: $500 Ink wells: $200 Wax sealing sticks: $500 Siver wax seals: $300 Wax candles: $400 Candle holders: $200 Parchment: $500 Pine Wands: $200 Hickory Wands: $250 Oak Wands: $300 Latin Grammar reference books, dictionaries, and thesaurii: $300 English Composition books, dictionaries, and thesaurii: $300 Spellcasting Beginner’s Tutorials: $350 Cauldrons with Salem College monogrammed lettering to prevent cauldron thievery: $500.

Total cost: $5,550. The funds may be allocated from the Materials and Supplies budget of $170,000. This estimate is based on a 6-month supply of all items listed and may be revised at any given time.  Marketing There will be a large, magically twinkling piece of parchment placed on the front desk of the library advertising the Tutoring Center. This parchment will be magically updated every week with the hours that the professors and student assistants will be available for consultation. Students may choose to write in their name on the parchment at a certain time and make an appointment, or they may drop in during one of the scheduled available times. The tutor center will also be advertised the English, Latin, and Spellcasting departments on campus. The English and Spell-casting departments will be responsible for advertising the Tutoring Center via a similar large piece of parchment in their respective offices, and maintaining up-to-date information about the Tutoring Center as well. The budgetary needs for the marketing efforts is expected to range between $5-$10 and will be financed by each department, respectively. 4.) Evaluation The Tutoring Center will be evaluated every 6 months by the Tutoring Center Development Team plus the head of the English and Spell-casting departments, in order to determine its effectiveness and usefulness for students. The departments and the library will base their decision on feedback from the professors and student assistants, records of attendance used by the Tutoring Center, as well as by a survey handed out randomly to different students who come to the Tutoring Center at the end of their session. This survey will ask him/her why he/she came to the Tutoring Center, who tutored him/her, and whether s/he felt that s/he had his/her questions answered and felt that his/her knowledge was stronger in the area that s/he felt needed improvement. The Tutoring Center Development team will take necessary action based on the results of these evaluations. 5.) Documentation Demeter, M. (2011). The Florida state university's learning district: A case study of an academic library-run peer tutoring program. Taylor & Francis Ltd. doi: 10.1080/15228959.2011.623601 Ferer, E. (2012). Working together: Library and writing center collaboration. Reference Services Review, 40(4), 543-557. doi: 10.1108/00907321211277350 http://www.library.sfsu.edu/services/index.html http://library.ucla.edu/service/ucla-library-services http://library.ucmerced.edu/research http://library.sjsu.edu/services

Improving technology needs at The Salem College Library Action Plan Leader: Alexandria Equiarta 1. Rationale: Our goal is to provide the tools and information that our students need while pursuing their studies at The Salem College of Wizardry. While the use of technology increases in the nonwizarding world, we are discovering that many of our newer students are struggling to adapt to the “no technology” policy we have adopted at our school. We plan to meet this need by adopting tools that function similarly to the technological objects found in the non-wizarding world, that will ultimately help students in their pursuit of advanced wizarding knowledge. Independent Reader (I-Read): A small book filled with blank pages. Similar to the grand reference book found in the library, students will write in the term or relevant key words for the information they are looking for. Once the necessary information is provided, the book will “respond” with the provided information relevant to the topic on the same page. If the user needs more detailed information, they will write it inside the reader, and more detailed information will be provided. The key to this is that it will be personal researching tool. If a student is unable to make it to the library, they will be able to use their Independent Reader. Multiple pages allow the user to conduct multiple searches and save information at the same time. Once the user is finished, they tap the page and say the spell, and that page is clean and ready for a new search. 2. Steps/Timeline/Responsibility: Step #1: Give the twenty Independent Readers to the Specialist Librarians to enchant and provide detailed research information. Each Specialist Librarian will enchant the Readers with information that the users may be utilizing the readers for. Once completed, the Head Librarian will review the Readers for accuracy and consistency. Timeline: September 2013 Responsibility: Specialist Librarians (Spell-casting, History, Potions/Herbology, Dark Arts), Head Librarian Step #2: Research how non-wizarding schools launched similar test programs with relevant technology. Timeline: October 2013 Responsibility: Higher ranking library students, Specialist Librarian: Spell-casting Step #3: Begin sign-up process for students interested in volunteering for the I-Read program. Students must either be a higher ranking wizarding student, or a current library student (preferably ten of each). Timeline: November 2013 Responsibility: Library clerks, Specialist Librarian: Dark Arts

Step #4: Select student volunteers. Introduce them to the program and inform them of the goals of the project and what we are specifically looking for from the users. Timeline: December 2013 Responsibility: Specialist Librarian: Potions/Herbology Step #5: Administer pilot I-Read program. Troubleshoot any immediate issues. Collect Independent Readers quarterly for updates and program evaluation. Re-issue readers during next quarter with mix of new student volunteers with previous volunteers. Timeline: Quarterly (January-April, May-August, September-December) Responsibility: Specialist Librarian: History, Library Students 3. Budget: For this project, The Salem College Library will need to hire two more library staff assistants specializing in the Independent Reader in order to troubleshoot and field any questions the student volunteers may have. They will work forty hours the first week the Readers are issued. They will also work forty hours during the weeks when the Readers are collected and information about the students use is surveyed. Between these time periods, they will work twenty hours a week and work with the other library assistants in regular daily tasks. They will be paid $15. Staff: $19,600 Supplies: $10,400 (books, survey materials) Total Budget: $30,000 4. Evaluation: The Independent Readers will be collected quarterly for review while student volunteers are surveyed on the following information: 1. Ease of use 2. Relevancy of information (for your desired topic) 3. Number of hours using the I-Read for research compared to the library 4. Other ways you used the I-Read 5. Would you use again or recommend to another person We will review the Readers to see what information were students most likely to request as well as type of use (academic, leisure, creative, etc). During this time, we will also be updating the readers with more information (both based on feedback from the surveys, as well as based on current wizarding world updates) in order to maintain relevancy throughout the project.

5. Documentation: Clark, D. (2009). Lending kindle e-book readers: first results from the Texas A&M University project. Collection Building. 28 ( 4), 146-149. http://dx.doi.org.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/10.1108/01604950910999774 E-readers now, e-readers forever!. (2012). Library Technology Reports, 48 (3), 14-20. http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=li h&AN=76923895&site=ehost-live Goodwin, S. (2012). Assessing an e-reader lending program: from pilot to mainstream service. Library Review, 61 (1), 8-17. http://dx.doi.org.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/10.1108/00242531211207389

Implement the Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project (ERLCP). Action Plan Leader: Brett Petrie 1. Rationale Salem College Library will continue to serve as the information center for the Salem College community through its development of a local collection, its access to other sources of information and its encouragement of independent learning and research. This will be an internal Wizard/Witch built collection that will maintain collections of all materials of sorcery and forgotten lore that helps support faculty and students in their teaching, learning, and research of the uncanny arts. To maintain the status of being a leader in learning and research the library must analyze the inner workings of the library and find ways to evaluate whether the collections are being brought to the library in a concise, financially sound manner. These determinations with be made through the implementation of group of overseers that will make up the Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis. This project will look at all aspects of creating a large based collection and determine if decisions that were previously being made in regards to creating a collection were in the best interest of the library. This includes creating guidelines and providing information and training for magical subject selectors, establishing a regular meeting schedule in Hall Of Wonders. Other aspects of the action plan include reviewing the budget allocation planning process and fund allocation procedures for a collection as taking an inventory of the previous pieces of the library’s collection. 2.) Steps/Timeline/Responsibilities Step #1: Clarify Acquisitions and Collection Development roles and responsibilities and update job descriptions. Potential interviewees must be persons from the high Wizard Order that have prior experience in dealing with large collections of sacred texts. Gather feedback from all candidates all that involved in the interview process. Determine where future monthly meetings will be held and at what time they will occur. Determine when annual staff review and report will occur. Timeline: June 1-20, 2013 Responsibility: Salem Library Board Of Directors Step #2: Update esoteric collection development policy. This will include the continuously evaluating the appropriateness of new formats for purchase consideration. The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project team will weed through the previous collection to make sure that parts of the previous collection do not resemble the subject matter that will be ordered in the future. This will be completed by the staff on a monthly basis until any new order is filled. Timeline: June 2013 – October 2013 Responsibility: The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project Chairman and 10 library staff members.

Step # 3: Create guidelines and provide information and training for magical subject selector board members, establishing a regular meeting schedule in Hall Of Wonders. There will training provided on selecting resources for adults and youth, at times that are most convenient for the majority of magical subject selector board members. Each magical subject selector will conduct at least two major subject presentations during the intervals between months in which they will make a case as to why materials should be ordered that pertain to their subject. Timeline: June 1, 2013 – July 31, 2013 Responsibility: The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project Chairman and 20 Magical Subject Selector Board Members. Step #4: Streamline procedures for the selection, acquisition, and maintenance of materials in all formats. Materials may come from other musical lands. Gain and maintain the support of the International Library Society Of Sacred Texts so that the library may distribute memos to various libraries requesting the development of a program where various materials may be shared between different libraries dealing in the dark arts. Once the International Society Of Sacred Texts allows the collaboration with other libraries, Salem Library must continue to expand on collaboration with the libraries of the region (including all libraries in New England). Timeline: June 1, 2013 – August 31, 2013 Responsibility: The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Project Chairman and 20 Acquisition board members. Step # 5: Learn about and optimize the use of statistics available from the original owner of the materials. Annual reports will be distributed which will contain the statistical data which will determine the demographics in which the any new collection will be geared to. Statistics will also include raw data such as the amount of materials that are being imported to Salem Library. Statistical board members will spend a numerous months compiling data so that any collection the library may obtain may have a proper record. This will aid when in cataloguing as well as taking a manual inventory in the future. Timeline: June 1, 2013-September 30, 2013 Responsibility: The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Project Chairman and 12 Statistical board members. Step # 6: Review the budget allocation planning process and fund allocation procedures. Steps should be taken to develop additional funding. Ideas could be something as simple as a fundraiser/magic show. Must continue to work with community organizations to help create a library fund to help in gaining new material to add to the previous collection. Budget Allocation Board Members must implement a community survey measuring citizens' preferences and suggestions for any future purchases to the library’s collection. The Budget Allocation Board must implement a library impact measurement tool which would gauge what subjects the general public is interested in. Timeline: June 1, 2013 – October 31, 2013

Responsibility: The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Project Chairman and 11 Budget Allocation Board members. Step # 7: Inventory the Library’s new pieces to the preexisting collection. While an inventory of the preexisting collection will have been taken during the summer months, this primary step would occur after the new order has been placed on Halloween night. Inventory will continue once the new order has been received and will continue until year’s end. Timeline: October 31, 2013 – December 31, 2013 Responsibility: The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Project Chairman and 10 Inventory Board Members. 3.) Budget While Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project acts as one joint effort, it is still made up of separate groups of board members that focus on the various steps of the action plan. Since separate groups of board members do exist the budget that is allotted for the Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project is split up accordingly. Because this is a magical collection it never seems to end, thus requiring the whole process to last over many months and many moons. This is the primary reason that the various boards had to work many hours over many months. Staff Hours: The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Project Chairman: 1 Chairman, 7 months, 40-50 hours per week. Library Staff Members: 10 Library Staff Members, 5 months, 10-15 hours per week. Magical Subject Selector Board Members: 20 Magical Subject Selector Board Members, 2 months, 15-20 hours per week. Acquisition Board Members: 15 Acquisition Board Members, 3 months, 15-20 hours per week. Statistical Board members: 12 Statistical Board members, 4 months, 5-10 hours per week. Budget Allocation Board members: 11 Budget Allocation Board members, 5 months, 5-10 hours per week. Inventory Board Members: 10 Inventory Board Members, 3 months, 20-25 hours a week. All Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project Board Members will be paid within the Library’s Special Interest budget that funds the whole project that is estimated to be $250,000. The library staff that helps out will be paid by the ordinary library budget that is put out quarterly. Marketing:

The Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project will actively market the project within the community at large. There will be numerous press releases that will be released to the local media so that the community may donate if they wish. Promotion will be gained through programs with guest speakers that will inform the public of what is occurring at the library. Magic shows and seminars will create public support as well. The estimated budget for marketing is $1000. 4.) Evaluation This strategic plan was created to allow the Salem Library to analyze its sacred collection and its upcoming purchases for the collection. The actions out forth by this plan and the Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis Project were ambitious and realistic. This process will continue yearly within the timeframe of the same 7 months, those being between the months of June 1 – December 31. This plan will be reviewed on a quarterly basis so that statistics can be recorded and any problems with the project may discussed. An internal evaluation will be conducted by the Library Board Of Directors who conducted the initial hiring and set the plan into action. External evaluation will be from the community in the form of surveys. 5.) Documentation: Lerner. F. A., & Lerner, F.A. (1999). Libraries Through the Ages. New York: Continuum. Little, G. (2011). Managing technology: We are all digital humanists now. Journal Of Academic Librarianship, 37 (4), 352-354. doi:10.1177/0269881105058776 Young, V.G., & American Library Association. (1988). The Library Trustee: A Practical Guidebook. Chicago: American Library Association.

Section #6: Resource List Section A: Strategic Plan Resources Books: (3) Duke, L. M. and Asher, A. D. (Eds.). (2012). College libraries and student culture: what we now know. [electronic resource] Chicago: American Library Association. Annotation: This book gives an in-depth look at academic libraries from the perspectives of both library staff and students. - Allison

Eberhart, G. M. (2000). The whole library handbook 3: Current data, professional advice about libraries and library services. Chicago: American Library Association. Annotation: This library handbook really became useful when developing data for the external and internal environments for section #1: Overview. The information contained within the handbook allowed data in the form demographics and the size and types of community. This was really useful when the group had to compare our library's information with that of a sustainable working library. Other factors were considered as well such as who our primary customers were and how they compared to the examples of customers at other libraries around the country. The handbook also contained charts of Users Base sizes of libraries around the country and we were able to compare those statistics to our own. The data that was found in the handbook really helped with the internal environment as well. We were able to use the handbook to consider factors such as the organizational structure of our library as well budget and customer service. By comparing our library to other libraries we were able to make sure that our library was based on realistic facts. - Brett Johnson, M. (2010). This Book is overdue! How librarians and cybrarians can save us all. New York: Harper. Annotation: Much like the Whole Library Handbook this book really help our group in developing our vision and mission statements for section 2. The point of this book was to try and teach the reader that the librarians serve an important role in the community. It stresses the importance of creating a mission of providing information and access to the general public. This was something that we agreed with and tried to reflect in our own vision statement. This book really talked about how it is important for any library to have a relationship with neighboring libraries in the region and to allow the public to be aware of any such relationships that may occur. This allows the patron the understanding that if the materials cannot be found at their local branch that they would be able to have the material sent from a neighboring library. This was a point that we tried to weave into our own mission statement. - Brett

Articles: (8) Denton, P. H. (2002). “What could be wrong with Harry Potter?” Journal of Youth Services in Libraries, 15 (3), 28-32.

Annotation: As our fictional library was inspired by the Harry Potter series, this speech that was published in the Journal of Youth Services in Libraries, was examined for the public and library opinions of “occult” literature. - Allison Duke, L. M. & Tucker, T. (2007). How to develop a marketing plan for an academic library. Technical Services Quarterly, 25 (1). DOI: 10.1300/J124v25n01•05 Holt, G. E. & Staff of the King County Library System (2013). A future-oriented budget narrative for the King County library system: A presentation and an analysis. Public Library Quarterly, 32 (1), 68-86. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01616846.2012.735161 Annotation: Examined for information on academic library budgets. - Allison Germano, M. A. & Stretch, Stephenson, S. M. (2012). Strategic value planning for libraries. Bottom Line: Managing Library Finances, 25 (2), p. 71-88. O’Connor, L. & VanHoose, J. (2012). What they didn’t tell me in library school is that students don’t care about learning to use the library. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 52 (1), 26-27. Perkins, G. H., & Slowik, A. M. (2013). The value of research in academic libraries. College & Research Libraries, 74 (2), 143-157. Rose-Wiles, L. M. (2013). Are print books dead? An investigation of book circulation at a midsized academic library. Technical Services Quarterly, 30 (2), 129-152. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07317131.2013.759496 Annotation: Examined during research for the internal system of small and mid-sized academic libraries - Allison Vinopal, J. & McCormick, M. (2013). Supporting digital scholarship in research libraries: Scalability and sustainability. Journal of Library Administration, 53 (1), 27-42. Websites: (5) http://www.mta.ca/library/about.html Annotation: This website, for a small and historical university in Atlantic Canada (Mount Allison University) was used for reference when composing ideas for sections 1-3. The college sizes are similar. - Allison http://library.brown.edu/about/ Annotation: The Brown University Library website was used as a reference for sections 1-3, particularly for the internal environment. – Allison http://www.library.cornell.edu/aboutus/inside/strategicplanning http://www.bu.edu/library/about/strategic-plan/

http://library.nyu.edu/about/Strategic_Plan.pdf

Action Plan Resources Books: (2) Lerner. F. A., & Lerner, F.A. (1999). Libraries through the ages. New York: Continuum. Annotation: This book was particular helpful when creating an action plan for our library. Each chapter was a break down of how libraries have been developed throughout the years and what actions they take in ensuring that they are developing their collections in a concise, cost effective manner. This was something that I took into consideration when developing my rationale for my action plan. This book helped me in the development of my analysis project. I was able to use the examples listed in the book to model my own system after. This project will look at aspects of creating a large based collection and things like reviewing the budget and taking a inventory must be looked at. By having the book's charts and examples readily available, I was able to make sure that my analysis program, the Association for Esoteric Research Libraries Collection Analysis, was following a structured model. - Brett Young, V.G., & American Library Association. (1988). The library trustee: A practical guidebook. Chicago: American Library Association. Annotation: This book was very valuable in my research by allowing me to to get an inside look at what amount of money an average library receives from outside sources . This was very important due to the fact that my collection analysis focuses on bringing in outside resources. This book allowed me to look at the strategies and methods other libraries use in gaining funding. - Brett Articles: (6) Clark, D. (2009). Lending kindle e-book readers: first results from the Texas A&M University project. Collection Building. 28 ( 4), 146-149. http://dx.doi.org.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/10.1108/01604950910999774 Demeter, M. (2011). The florida state university's learning district: A case study of an academic library-run peer tutoring program. Taylor & Francis Ltd. doi: 10.1080/15228959.2011.623601 E-readers now, e-readers forever!. (2012). Library Technology Reports, 48(3), 14-20. http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=li h&AN=76923895&site=ehost-live Ferer, E. (2012). Working together: Library and writing center collaboration. Reference Services Review, 40(4), 543-557. doi: 10.1108/00907321211277350 Goodwin, S. (2012). Assessing an e-reader lending program: from pilot to mainstream service. Library Review, 61 (1), 8-17. http://dx.doi.org.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/10.1108/00242531211207389

Little, G. (2011). Managing technology: We are all digital humanists now. Journal Of Academic Librarianship, 37(4), 352-354. doi:10.1177/0269881105058776 Annotation: This article was very helpful in describing various managing styles that are found in the modern library. Though it does primarily focus on the aspects of managing technology within a library, it does hit open the managing styles within a traditional library. This was very helpful in determining what steps I would take in managing my library. Things like creating monthly meetings to discuss the budget proved to be a big help. - Brett Websites: (4) http://www.library.sfsu.edu/services/index.html http://library.ucla.edu/service/ucla-library-services http://library.ucmerced.edu/research http://library.sjsu.edu/services