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United States Coast Guard Grade Insignia Since 1834

United States Coast Guard Grade Insignia Since 1834

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Published by Preston B. Perrenot
A detailed look, in color plates, at the evolution of the grade insignia worn by officers, enlisted personnel and cadets of the United States Coast Guard and Revenue Cutter Service since 1834. Includes the warrant officer specialty marks and enlisted rating badges.
A detailed look, in color plates, at the evolution of the grade insignia worn by officers, enlisted personnel and cadets of the United States Coast Guard and Revenue Cutter Service since 1834. Includes the warrant officer specialty marks and enlisted rating badges.

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Published by: Preston B. Perrenot on Oct 07, 2009
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UNITED STATES COAST GUARD GRADE INSIGNIA SINCE 1834

by Preston B. Perrenot Revised in 2011

Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................…………….…..4 THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD .......................................................…………….…..9 LINE OFFICERS.................................................................................................……………….10 ENGINEERING OFFICERS..............................................................................…………….…45 STAFF OFFICERS.............................................................................................…………….…61 WARRANT OFFICERS .....................................................................................…………….…72 ENLISTED PERSONNEL .................................................................................…………….…81 CADETS………………………………………………………. ..........................…………..….98 U.S. COAST GUARD WOMEN’S VOLUNTEER RESERVE “SPARS”..……………..103 WARRANT OFFICER SPECIALTY MARKS AND ENLISTED RATING BADGES……………………………………………………………………………….….108 COAST GUARD AUXILIARY OFFICER GRADE INSIGNIA .....................……………..114 U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE OFFICERS IN THE COAST GUARD………………121 U.S. LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE .........................................................................……………..123 SOURCES ...........................................................................................................……………..133

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INTRODUCTION
There is no definitive date on when the concept of rank identification came into being but it probably occurred when groups of warriors grew large enough that not everyone knew each other. In this case, there was a need to identify the leaders on the battlefield. These methods may have been as simple as feather in a helmet or a particular weapon carried only by leaders. In any case, rank identification more than likely pre-dates uniforms. In ancient cultures, such as the Assyrians and Egyptians, military rank was tied directly to royal titles so the rank methodology was whatever trappings the nobility wore. Basically, you could tell the leaders by the quality of their clothes. The Roman Republican and Imperial armies developed fairly standardized armor and military dress even though the concept of uniforms was unknown to them. For example, legionaries wore red cloaks while senior commanders were known to wear white cloaks and helmet plumes. In the middle ages the king or queen’s knights and noblemen served in capacities that are akin to what modern day military officers do. It was easy to identify them as they generally were the ones in armor. M ost common soldiers could not afford armor. The custom of blazoning the armor with a family coat of arms was so that the person in the armor could be easily identified by both friend and foe. During the European Renaissance Period, armies began wearing uniforms and those uniforms themselves became the principal method of identifying the rank. As the rank increased, so did the gold lace, finery and accoutrements. By the late 1700s, this system of uniforms had expanded from identifying the wearer as a member of a national army to identifying the wearer of a unit within the army. As a result, the basic uniforms of officers and enlisted men began to become similar in style and color. Officers simply wore more gold or silver lace than the enlisted men, which was the state of affairs when the American colonies rebelled against Great Britain in 1776. Those men who took up arms in the American cause were, for the most part, educated in England and, if they had any prior military experience, it was in the British Navy. Consequently, the American Continental Navy adopted the British military structure, organization, and rank insignia system. It should be noted that there are two very important terms when discussing authority and responsibility in the military. Rank refers to a soldier’s status and authority in relation to other soldiers. Grade is used for personnel and pay purposes. A particular Sergeant has been a Sergeant for three years. Thus, he or she is a higher rank than any sergeant that has less than three years as a sergeant. Terms like Petty Officer, Captain, Colonel, etc. are grades within the hierarchal structure in which the grades themselves can outrank one another. So, the terms “rank and grade” wind up being used interchangeably. The words “Sergeant”, “Captain”, “Lieutenant” etc. are titles used by military organizations around the world to identify a member of that organization’s grade within the organizational structure. When we hear these words, we know what or who they identify and how they fit into the structure. What most of us do not know is how these words originated and what they really mean. Since these titles are words, the study of their meaning is just etymology.

The word chevron is a French word used to describe two straight lines that meet at an angle. In this case, a rafter or roof. In heraldry, a chevron is an Honorable Ordinairie and has been recognized as a symbol of strength and honor since the 12th century. In the middle ages, two pieces of wood were affixed to the front or back of warrior’s shield to provide support and reinforce the shield. As a military insignia, chevrons were first used by the French and British armies in the 18th century as good conduct or years of service chevrons. In fact, the first use of chevrons in the American military was not as grade insignia but service stripes. In 1782, General George Washington, Commander of the American Continental Army ordered that men who had “served for three years with bravery, fidelity and good conduct” could wear a badge of honor. This badge was described as “a narrow piece of white cloth in angular form.” M ore often than not, this wound up being a chevron. Today, enlisted sailors wear angled bars or “hash marks for every four years of service on the lower sleeves of the dress and service coats. The French word Warant, means authorization. The English created the Warrant Officer as a military grade in the 11th century when English ports began providing ships and crews to the crown for military purposes. The crews of these ships were led by the M aster who was assisted by the Boatswain, Carpenter, and Cook. These early billets were recognized as the “ship’s officers”. The agreement between the ports and the crown stipulated that English soldiers, under command of commissioned English army officers, would embark on the ships for transport or seaborne warfare. The battle and tactics were the responsibility of the commissioned army officers while the ship’s officers were concerned with running the ship. Since these members of the crew normally answered to the ship owner, it was necessary to place them under the authority of the government when acting in that capacity. The crown granted them a Warrant and made them subordinate to the commissioned army officers. When the Royal Navy was established, the crown began commissioning naval officers to handle tactics and strategy as well as run the ship. But the warrant officers stayed on in their particular areas of expertise. Warrant Officers were part of the Continental Navy but would not be officially recognized until the U.S. Navy was born in 1797. In European militaries, the term Warrant Officer has evolved into a senior non-commissioned officer grade that does not serve in a line unit, but in the U.S. Navy, the original tradition lives on. In French, Lieutenant means assistant. In the early navies, there were only two officer grades on a ship. The Captain and his assistant, the Lieutenant. The word Captain may be a derivation of the word Chieftain or the Latin word Capitaneus which comes from an older Latin word, Caput, meaning Head. Or Headman, in this case. The term Captain is also used as an adjective. It is applied to commanding officer of a ship, regardless of their grade.

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a petty officer in the navy is equivalent to a Non-Commissioned Officer in the land forces. Carpenter’s M ate. The term first made its way into the naval lexicon in the 17th century with the Royal Navy term “M aster and Commander. In Spanish. a Petty Officer was an enlisted assistant to the warrant officer. The British eventually adopted the title. The word “command” is derived from the Latin word mandare which literally means “to give into one’s hand” or to put some in charge of something. they were responsible for the training and discipline of the crew as well as their regular duties. as did the Americans. The term Lieutenant Commander appears to be one of those rare instances where the Royal Navy adopted something from the U. it would be shortened to commander and this officer could also be placed in command of smaller vessels that did not rate a full captain. Navy’s history. it is used as an honorific to identify the captain who commands a flotilla or group of ships. petit. The British did not adopt the term until 1914. By the time. In the navy. . Over the years. they became “M aster’s M ates” in the U. secondary or subordinate.S.S. etc. Today. meaning something small. which is where the rest of Europe got it.A Commander describes a person who gives commands or has command over others. This term would go through two evolutions (Lieutenant Commanding and Lieutenant Commandant) before becoming Lieutenant Commander in 1862. As navies grew and became more professional. it came to mean minor. The Italians shortened into the Italian translation “Amiral”. came about. the word “mandar” means to send or to order. The grade of Commodore was developed by the Dutch in middle of the 17th century and described a captain who had command of more than one ship. Botswain’s M ate. In time.S. Navy. During the Revolutionary War. The grade of Commodore has had the status as a permanent grade only a few times in the U. It first became known to the west in the 11th century. Navy.” At that time. Today. Petty Officers can trace their lineage back to the old French word. The word Admiral comes from the Arabic word amir-al-bahr which means commander of the seas. a M aster and Commander was an officer under the captain who was in charge of sailing the ship. the grade of Senior Lieutenant was created to identify the captain of a small 10-20 gun vessel. This is how the terms Gunner’s M ate. The term “M ate” identified the assistant. the role of the Petty Officer increased in responsibility and importance.

S.S. UPPER HALF REAR ADMIRAL.S.S. LOWER HALF OFFICERS CAPTAIN COMMANDER LIEUTENANT COMMANDER LIEUTENANT LIEUTENANT JUNIOR GRADE ENSIGN O-6 O-5 O-4 COLONEL LIEUTENANT COLONEL MAJOR CAPTAIN COMMANDER LIEUTENANT COMMANDER LIEUTENANT LIEUTENANT JUNIOR GRADE ENSIGN COMPANY GRADE OFFICERS O-3 O-2 O-1 CAPTAIN FIRST LIETUENANT SECOND LIEUTENANT CAPTAIN FIRST LIEUTENANT SECOND LIEUTENANT CAPTAIN FIRST LIEUTENANT SECOND LIEUTENANT WARRANT OFFICERS W-5 W-4 W-3 W-2 W-1 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 5 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 4 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 3 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 2 WARRANT OFFICER 1 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 5 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 4 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 3 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 2 WARRANT OFFICER 1 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 5 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 4 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 3 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 2 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 4 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 3 CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 2 7 . NAVY U. ARMED FORCES GRADE EQUIVALENCY CHART OFFICERS U. AIR FORCE U.S. UPPER HALF REAR ADMIRAL.U. MARINE CORPS U. ARMY GENERAL OFFICERS O-10 GENERAL O-9 O-8 O-7 LIEUTENANT GENERAL MAJOR GENERAL BRIGADIER GENERAL GENERAL OF THE ARMY GENERAL LIEUTENANT GENERAL MAJOR GENERAL GENERAL OF THE AIR FORCE GENERAL LIEUTENANT GENERAL MAJOR GENERAL U. LOWER HALF ADMIRAL VICE ADMIRAL BRIGADIER BRIGADIER GENERAL GENERAL FIELD GRADE OFFICERS COLONEL LIEUTENANT COLONEL MAJOR COLONEL LIEUTENANT COLONEL MAJOR REAR ADMIRAL. COAST GUARD FLAG OFFICERS ADMIRAL OF THE FLEET ADMIRAL VICE ADMIRAL REAR ADMIRAL.S.

COAST GUARD NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS COMMAND SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY COMMAND SERGEANT MAJOR SERGEANT MAJOR CHIEF MASTER SERGEANT OF THE AIR FORCE COMMAND CHIEF MASTER SERGEANT CHIEF MASTER SERGEANT SENIOR MASTER SERGEANT CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS MASTER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER OF THE NAVY MASTER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER OF THE FORCE/FLEET COMMAND MASTER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER MASTER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER SENIOR CHIEF PETTY OFFICER MASTER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER OF THE COAST GUARD AREA COMMAND MASTER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER COMMAND MASTER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER MASTER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER SENIOR CHIEF PETTY OFFICER E-9 MASTER GUNNERY SERGEANT E-8 FIRST SERGEANT MASTER SERGEANT GUNNERY SERGEANT FIRST SERGEANT MASTER SERGEANT SERGEANT FIRST CLASS E-7 MASTER SERGEANT CHIEF PETTY OFFICER CHIEF PETTY OFFICER PETTY OFFICERS E-6 STAFF SERGEANT NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS SERGEANT STAFF SERGEANT TECHNICAL SERGEANT PETTY OFFICER FIRST CLASS PETTY OFFICER FIRST CLASS E-5 SERGEANT STAFF SERGEANT AIRMEN PETTY OFFICER SECOND CLASS PETTY OFFICER SECOND CLASS E-4 CORPORAL CORPORAL SOLDIERS SPECIALIST SENIOR AIRMAN PETTY OFFICER THIRD CLASS PETTY OFFICER THIRD CLASS E-3 MARINES LANCE CORPORAL PRIVATE FIRST CLASS PRIVATE E-2 AIRMAN FIRST CLASS AIRMAN SEAMEN SEAMAN/FIREMAN/ AIRMAN/ CONSTRUCTIONMAN SEAMAN/FIREMAN/ AIRMAN/ CONSTRUCTIONMAN APPRENTICE SEAMAN RECRUIT SEAMAN/FIREMAN/ AIRMAN/ CONSTRUCTIONMAN SEAMAN/FIREMAN/ AIRMAN/ CONSTRUCTIONMAN APPRENTICE SEAMAN RECRUIT E-2 PRIVATE FIRST CLASS E-1 PRIVATE PRIVATE AIRMAN BASIC .S.S. ARMY U.S. ARMED FORCES GRADE EQUIVALENCY CHART ENLISTED PERSONNEL U. AIR FORCE U.S.U. MARINE CORPS STAFF NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE MARINE CORPS SERGEANT MAJOR U.S.S. NAVY U.

Navy.S. the Coast Guard moved from the Department of the Treasury to the newly formed Department of Transportation.THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD The roots of the Coast Guard lie in the United States Revenue Cutter Service established by Alexander Hamilton under the Department of the Treasury on 4 August 1790. Lighthouse Service was brought under its purview. The last time the Coast Guard operated as a whole within the Navy was in World War II. in which the cutter Harriet Lane fired the first naval shots attempting to relieve besieged Fort Sumter. 9 . In times of war. military and combat units within the Coast Guard will operate under Navy or joint operational control while other Coast Guard units will remain under the Department of Homeland Security. the Revenue Cutter Service was the only naval force of the early United States. The modern Coast Guard can be said to date to 1915. there was no United States Navy and the cutters which were the predecessor of the U. Coast Guard were the only warships protecting the coast. the U. the Bureau of M arine Inspection and Navigation was transferred to the Coast Guard. In 1942. . In 1939. when the Revenue Cutter Service merged with the United States Life-Saving Service and Congress formalized the existence of the new organization. M ore often. It was established to collect taxes from a brand new nation and to crack down on piracy. they might as well rescue anyone in distress. although there is no indication that the United States has ever officially used this designation with reference either to the Coast Guard or any element of the U. This arrangement has a broad historical basis. trade.S. the Coast Guard or individual components of it can operate as a service of the Department of the Navy. The informal appellation honors the fact that between 1790 and 1798. Until the reestablishment of the United States Navy in 1798. "First Fleet" is a term occasionally used as an informal reference to the U. as the Guard has been involved in wars as diverse as the War of 1812. In 1967.S. the M exican-American War. and the American Civil War. an arrangement that lasted until it was placed under the Department of Homeland Security in 2002. Coast Guard. while they were at it.S. and maritime interests of the new republic.

LINE OFFICERS .

The first regulations regarding Revenue M arine uniforms appeared in 1830. There is no record of any official regulations prior to 1830 but it is known that Revenue officers wore uniforms. Up until 1832, navy officers were allowed to hold commissions in the Revenue M arine while on furlough from the navy. These officers were known to have worn their navy uniforms. REVENUE M ARINE UNIFORM REGULATIONS 1830 CAPTAIN Dark blue with nine gold colored buttons on each lapel, two on the collar, four on the cuffs and six on the skirts; the seams of the coat to be closed by ½” gold braid. VEST: Buff with nine gold colored buttons. TROUSERS: Dark blue with ½” gold lace on the outer seams. COAT: HAT: High crowned black with black cockade. EPAULETS: A gold lace epaulet on each shoulder. FIRST LIEUTENANT As for a Captain but three buttons on the cuff and an epaulet on the right shoulder only. SECOND & THIRD LIEUTENANT As for a Captain but with two buttons on the cuff and an epaulet on the left shoulder only. A year later, this uniform was altered so that the gold braid, collar buttons and sleeve buttons were removed. In 1833 the high hat was replaced by a chapeau. Rank was now designated by gold lace cuff stripes rather than buttons. Captains wore one stripe an inch wide; first lieutenants one stripe a half-inch wide; second lieutenants two half-inch stripes; and third lieutenants wore three one- quarter inch stripes. This new uniform was fine until the navy said that naval officers could no longer serve in the Revenue M arine. The navy now began to jealously guard its uniform conventions and the Revenue M arine would suffer for it until the turn of the century. In 1834, the navy complained that the Revenue M arine uniforms were two similar to the navy uniforms and the Secretary of the Treasury (who just happened to have previously been the Secretary of the Navy) promptly ordered Revenue M arine officers into a gray uniform. COAT: TROUSERS: EPAULETS: CAPTAIN Dark gray with a rolling collar, worn with a black cravat, nine button lapels and four buttons on the cuffs and pocket flaps, one on the hip and three on the skirts. A 1” band of black lace on the cuff above the buttons. Gray or white with a 1” strip of black lace on the outer seams. A gold lace epaulet on each shoulder 3” long by 3/8” wide bullion fringe.

FIRST LIEUTENANT As for a Captain but three buttons on the cuffs and seven buttons on the lapels. A gold lace epaulet on the right shoulder only with 2 ½” long by 1/8” wide bullion fringe.

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SECOND LIEUTENANT As for a Captain but three buttons on the cuffs and seven buttons on the lapels. A gold lace epaulet on the left shoulder only. THIRD LIETUENANT As for a Captain but three buttons on the cuffs and seven buttons on the lapels. A gold lace epaulet on the left shoulder only and the black cuff lace is omitted. The gray uniform was extremely unpopular and was changed to dark blue in 1836. All other distinctions, however, remained unchanged. In spite of the navy’s obsessive desire to keep the Revenue M arine uniforms different from theirs, when the navy made changes to its uniforms, the Revenue M arine usually followed. The navy began adding devices to their epaulets in the 1830s and in 1844, the Revenue M arine did as well. Revenue M arine epaulets were now decorated with an embroidered silver anchor surmounting the Treasury shield in the crescent. The epaulets were changed in 1853 so that all line officers wore an epaulet on each shoulder. Epaulets were distinguished by varying sizes of bullion fringe. Captains wore fringe 3” long by 3/8” wide while other officers wore 2 ½” by 1/8” wide fringe. This year also saw the introduction of the passant or shoulder strap for the undress uniform. For years, officers in the French Army had been making their dress uniform into an undress uniform by simply removing the epaulets. The epaulets were held in place by a gold or silver lace strap, called a passant, sewn at the end of the shoulder, parallel to the shoulder seam. The epaulet strap slid under this small strap and buttoned at the neck end of the shoulder. When in undress, the epaulet was gone but the passant was still there identifying the person as an officer. In 1832, the U.S. Army had expanded this system by making the passants larger and adding devices to them to identify rank. The navy followed suit in 1841 and used the same devices that were developed for the army. The Revenue M arine passants adopted the army grade insignia devices like had done in the 1840s. The passants had the silver Anchor and Treasury Seal device in the center. A Captain was identified by two gold bars and the First and Second Lieutenants by a single gold bar at each end of the passant. The Third Lieutenant’s passant was unadorned except for the Anchor and Treasury Seal Device in the center. By 1862, the Civil War had been raging for a year and the massive changes to the navy couldn’t help but trickle into the Revenue M arine. As always is the case during war time, the emphasis changes from dress uniforms to functional fatigue and service uniforms. The effect on the Revenue M arine was that they were placed into the same uniform as the navy, distinguished only by their insignia. The distinctions on the epaulets disappeared and the black sleeve braid was replaced by gold. Captains wore two ½” bands of gold lace; First Lieutenants wore one such band, and the other officers continued to wear the three gold buttons on the cuffs. The undress shoulder straps changed so that the Captain wore a pair of gold crossed anchors in the center of the strap. The First Lieutenant adopted the double gold bars that had previously identified a Captain while the Second Lieutenant wore the single gold bar. The Third Lieutenant’s shoulder straps remained un changed. The growth of the Revenue M arine during the Civil War was reflected in the changes to the uniform of 1864. Captains now wore four gold lace ½” stripes, placed ¼” apart except for the top stripe which was placed ½” from the next stripe. A First Lieutenant wore three ½’ gold lace stripes,

¼” apart; a Second Lieutenant, two stripes, and a Third Lieutenant, one stripe. In 1864, navy line officers began wearing a gold five pointed star above their sleeve stripes to identify them as line officers. Revenue M arine line officers adopted a U.S. shield for the same purpose. A Captain’s shoulder straps retained the crossed anchors but added the gold oak leaves of a navy Lieutenant Commander at each end of the strap. The silver Anchor and Treasury Seal device was replaced on the shoulder straps of the lieutenants with a gold anchor with three gold five pointed stars superimposed on it. The stars were probably placed on the anchor to distinguish it from navy line officer’s shoulder straps, who also wore an anchor. It appears that this was an attempt to change the Revenue Cutter Service Corps device because it was also removed from the dress uniform epaulets. The next major change to the uniform regulations came in 1871 when the silver Anchor and Treasury Seal device was brought back and placed on the dress epaulets. The epaulets were also changed to conform to the navy practice of the day. Officers began wearing the grade insignia devices and the Anchor and Treasury Seal Device in the crescent. The controversial change, however, was the removal of the shoulder straps and sleeve lace in favor of collar rank insignia on the rolling collar of the undress coat. The rolling collar was decorated with a horizontal foul anchor, with the grade insignia device perpendicular to the anchor's shank and the letters U. S. R. M . in Old English letters forming an arc around the upper part of the grade insignia. This innovation proved to be unpopular and officers simply refused to comply with the regulation. In 1873, the collar insignia was eliminated and the sleeve lace and shoulder straps restored. This time, the captain replaced the crossed anchors with the same Anchor and Treasury Seal device like the other officers. In 1891, the uniform was changed to conform to the fashions of the day. The navy had introduced a dark blue high collared tunic in the 1880s and the Revenue M arine adopted it in 1891. It was a tight-fitting, single-breasted coat with low-standing collar and a black mohair fly-front. Grade was displayed on the standing collars in the form of the grade insignia device and a corps device. Previously, the corps device was the silver Anchor and Treasury Seal device. This was replaced by a gold anchor with a silver U.S. shield superimposed on it. This new device was also used on the epaulets and shoulder straps. The tunic also displayed rank on the sleeves in the form of black lustrous versions of the dress uniform gold sleeve lace. A white version of this uniform was authorized for the summer and used white mohair sleeve stripes but no collar insignia. In 1891, at long last, the name of the organization was established. The title of U.S. Revenue Cutter Service was established as the only name and the terms, Revenue M arine and Revenue M arine were discarded. The Spanish-American War of 1898 had, almost overnight, transformed the United States into a world power. As a result, the U.S. military had to change into organizations that could project power around the world rather than just concern itself with defense. Organizational structures, procedures, regulations, etc. saw many changes in a short period and uniforms were no exception. In 1902, Revenue Cutter Service officers were given relative rank with officers of the navy. The sleeve rank insignia was briefly changed to a combination of ½” and ¼” gold lace stripes. Captains wore two ½” gold lace stripes with two ¼” gold lace stripes between them, all placed ¼” apart. A First Lieutenant wore a ½” gold lace stripe under two ¼” stripes; a Second Lieutenant, one ½” gold lace stripe under a ¼” stripe and A Third Lieutenant wore a ½” gold lace stripe. Engineers sleeve stripes also conformed to the new pattern.

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In 1905, the sleeve rank was again changed to conform to the navy grade structure but the titles did not change. With the establishment of relative rank, a Revenue Cutter Service Captain was equal to a navy Lieutenant Commander; a First Lieutenant with a navy lieutenant; a Second Lieutenant with a navy lieutenant junior grade, and a Third Lieutenant ranked with a navy ensign. Other changes in 1905 were that replacement of the gold lace and bullion epaulets with gold shoulder knots with a gold velvet pad at the end. On this pad, were displayed the grade insignia device and the anchor and shield device. The Revenue Cutter Service had adopted a dress white uniform in the 1890s and in 1905, special blue felt shoulder boards were introduced to mark grade. These shoulder boards had the grade insignia and the anchor and shield device embroidered on them. Since the end of the Spanish-American War, the Revenue Cutter Service had been experiencing a spurt of unprecedented growth. In 1908, it was reorganized to include a Commandant who was equivalent in grade to a navy captain. This officer was called the CaptainCommandant and wore four ½” gold lace stripes on the sleeve and used a silver spread eagle device rank device on the shoulder knots, undress coat collars and shoulder boards. Directly beneath the Captain-Commandant, the grade of Senior Captain was created. This officer was equivalent to a navy commander and wore three ½” gold lace stripes and a silver oak leaf as a grade insignia device. In 1915, the Revenue Cutter Service merged with the U.S. Light House Service and the U.S. Lifesaving Service to become the United States Coast Guard. The officer’s grade insignia devices had been all gold until the creation of the two top grades which had silver devices. In 1915, all of the devices except for the Captain’s oak leaf were changed to silver. Additionally, the colors of the corps devices were reversed, the anchor and being changed to silver and the corps device to gold. This brought Coast Guard insignia in line with those of the navy. The changes of 1918 finally brought the Coast Guard completely in line with the navy. The previous rank titles were eliminated and navy titles were adopted. The previous dress white shoulder boards with the grade insignia devices were replaced by the navy style shoulder boards with the same gold lace that appeared on the coat. The structure was changed in 1918 so that the grade of Commodore was added giving the Coast Guard its first flag officer. A Commodore wore the navy epaulets instead of the shoulder knots on the dress uniform. A commodore’s epaulets were a navy commodore’s epaulets with a Coast Guard button instead of a navy button. Officers began wearing the army type grade miniature insignia on the collars of the service uniform shirts. These grade insignia were slightly different than the army grade insignia and became known as the “NavyM arine Corps” style of officer grade insignia. GRADE TITLE TABLE 1918 PREVIOUS GRADE Captain-Commandant Senior Captain Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Third Lieutenant NEW GRAD E Commodore Captain Commander Lieutenant Commander Lieutenant Lieutenant Junior Grade Ensign

Constructor officers also expanded into all of the officer grades up to Commander in 1918 and were identified by light brown colored velvet between the stripes and a two oak leaf collar device. During the First World War, Coast Guard pilots began wearing the navy forest green aviation uniform with Coast Guard distinction and would continue to do so until the navy style uniforms were abolished in 1972. Personnel of the former U.S. Lifesaving Service maintained their separate chain of command within the Coast Guard and their officers were identified by olive green colored lace between the sleeve stripes and a life ring and anchor collar device. In addition to the rank titles, these officers were also referred to as “District Superintendants” or “District Commander”. Between 1918 and 1930, the undress tunic uniform was eliminated and replaced by the double-breasted blue service coat. The full dress uniform, with its gold epaulets and shoulder knots would gradually fall into disuse and was not even issued after 1930. The full dress uniform was worn only by a select few Coast Guard officers and then, only for very special occasions. The 1930 regulations, however, describe the full dress uniform. In fact, this regulation replaced the shoulder knots of the previous regulation with dress epaulets. It is interesting to note that the epaulets of all officers were navy epaulets with a Coast Guard button replacing the navy button. This meant that the anchor on the epaulet strap of all officers and flag officer’s shoulder boards did not have the Coast Guard U.S. shield on it. In 1940, the full dress uniform was abolished. By the Second World War, the only difference between navy and Coast Guard Uniforms were the insignia. Between 1936 and 1941, the distinctions for Constructors and Lifesaving Service officers were abolished. Also in 1936, the grades of Vice Admiral and Rear Admiral were added to the structure. The grade of Commodore was removed from the structure in 1948 which enabled Captains to be promoted directly to Rear Admiral. In 1943, the navy briefly experimented with a slate gray service uniform that used gray shoulder boards with black lace stripes and devices. The Coast Guard was part of this experiment and typically, used the navy uniform with their distinctive insignia. When it became clear that officers of both services were unwilling to give up the blue service coat uniform, the gray uniform was abolished in 1947. In 1985, the previous single star grade of Commodore was brought back into the structure as Rear Admiral, Lower Half and the grade of Rear Admiral was changed to Rear Admiral, Upper Half.

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It is a short jacket with three gold CG buttons up each front side. The winter dress uniform was the double breasted navy blue coat on which officers used the gold sleeve lace to denote rank. DINNER DRESS WHITE It is a short white jacket with three gold CG buttons up each front side. Initially. DRESS WHITE . The jacket has black satin lapels on the men’s jacket and satin swallow-tail lapels on the women’s jacket. The khaki and white shirts were replaced with a light blue shirt. and a long black skirt for female officers. Coast Guard personnel wore navy uniforms and were distinguished only by the insignia.S. The miniature grade insignia on the collars was replaced by the enhanced shoulder boards in the 1980s. The jacket has white satin lapels on the men’s jacket and satin swallow-tail lapels on the women’s jacket. Women wear a soft pleated long sleeve blouse and black neck tab. and a long black skirt for female officers. closed with a pair of gold connector CG buttons. closed with a pair of gold CG connector buttons. For service uniforms. The jacket is worn with black trousers with a satin stripe on the side. The summer dress white uniform was the high collared single breasted coat on which officers wore shoulder boards. Coast Guard officers wore the miniature grade insignia pinned to the collars of the shirt when in working dress and the hard shoulder boards when a more formal appearance was required. officers used the khaki service coat and the khaki service shirts.COAST GUARD UNIFORMS Prior to 1972. the uniform regulations published for the Coast Guard in 1941 were the U. Navy regulations with a policy describing the replacement of the navy insignia with Coast Guard insignia. Officers wear a gold cummerbund with this uniform. In fact. The shirt is a soft pleated long sleeve blouse and black neck tab or bow tie. Officers used the shoulder boards on the coats and the miniature metal grade insignia on the shirt collars. officers may substitute a white soft pleat shirt and black bow tie or black neck tab. For less formal occasions. The jacket is worn with black trousers with a satin stripe on the side. the Coast Guard adopted the service-wide single breasted service coat in a lighter blue shade and matching trousers or skirt. Grade on this uniform is shown in the form of the hard shoulder boards. M en wear a white pique long sleeve shirt with wing tip collar and white bow tie. In 1972. Grade on this uniform is shown in the form of the gold lace sleeve stripes. COAST GUARD UNIFORMS CURRENT REGULATIONS FORMAL DRESS BLUE The Dinner Dress Blue jacket is actually black. Officers wear a gold cummerbund with this uniform.

S. A light blue shirt with a blue neck tab. Women: A blue open collared coat with three CG buttons and matching pants or knee length skirt. WINTER DRESS BLUE Men: A blue closed collared blue long sleeved shirt with blue trousers. white shoes and a white knee length skirt. single-breasted coat with large gold CG buttons. Officers denote grade with the hard shoulder boards. BATTLEDRESS UNIFORMS The U. Women: A blue closed collared blue long sleeved shirt with blue pants or knee length skirt. Worn with a white shirt with blue neck tab. Grade is shown with enhanced shoulder boards. OPERATIONAL DRESS UNIF ORM A blue battledress uniform shirt with blue battledress trousers. A light blue shirt with a blue four-in-hand necktie. May be worn with a white female combination cap. military woodland or desert camouflage combat uniforms. ball cap or blue overseas cap. Women: A white open collared coat with four CG buttons. May be worn with a white female combination cap or blue overseas cap. Worn with white trousers.Men: A white high collared. white combination cap and white shoes. ball cap or blue overseas cap. May be worn with a white female combination cap. 17 . TROPICAL BLUE Men: A blue open collared light blue short sleeved shirt with blue trousers. Women: A blue open collared light blue short sleeved shirt with blue pants or knee length skirt. May be worn with a white combination cap. May be worn with a white combination cap. ball cap or blue overseas cap. May be worn with a white combination cap or blue overseas cap. Grade insignia is worn on the collars in the form of embroidered cloth representations of the collar grade insignia. SERVICE DRESS BLUE Men: A blue open collared coat with four CG buttons and matching trousers. Grade is worn on the collars in the form of subdued (black or brown) metal grade insignia. ball cap or blue overseas cap. Grade is shown by the gold sleeve lace. Grade is shown with miniature metal collar insignia.

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Full Color M etal Grade Full Size. M etal Subdued . Full Color. M etal Subdued Full Size. Cloth Grade M iniature.COAS T GUARD OFFIC ER GRAD E INS IGNIA TABLE INS IGNIA Dress Shoulder Board UNIFORMS Dinner Dress White Jacket Dress White Coat Reefer Coat Bridge Coat Light Blue Long or Short Sleeve Shirts Service Sweaters Blue Service Coat Dinner Dress Blue Jacket Windbreaker (Shoulder straps) Trench Coat (Shoulder straps) Blue Winter Service Shirt (Collars) Right Front Side of Garrison Cap Operational Dress Uniform (Collars) Woodland BDU & Desert BDU collars Woodland BDU & Desert BDU field jacket shoulder straps Enhanced Shoulder Boards Sleeve Lace Full Size. Full Color M etal Grade M iniature.

ENGINEERING OFFICERS 45 .

On the epaulets. The tab had the letters U S R M in old silver English script embroidered in an arc at the top with the silver four-bladed propeller in the center. but wore the Treasury arms embroidered on the collar in gold. A First Assistant Engineer wore a Second Lieutenant’s uniform and the Second Assistant Engineer. A Chief Engineer wore the three stripes of a First Lieutenant. A new assistant engineer grade was added to the structure in 1862 which caused the assistant engineer grades to be divided into First Assistant Engineer and Second Assistant Engineer. that of a Third Lieutenant. Under the propeller. The regulations of 1873 brought back the sleeve lace and shoulder straps of the previous regulations but maintained the silver four bladed propeller as a corps device. Assistant engineers used silver collar embroidery instead of gold. The paddle wheel was the main propulsion method for a steam powered vessel at the time. the people responsible for maintaining and operating these engines were considered highly qualified specialists.In 1842. began wearing the new insignia of that grade: two gold bars on the shoulder strap and a single band of gold lace on the sleeve. The Chief Engineer. Engineering officers began wearing the same passants or shoulder straps that had been prescribed for line officers on the undress uniform in 1853. Assistant Engineers wore an unadorned passant shoulder strap. always considered on par with a First Lieutenant. engineering officers used the grade insignia and propeller in the crescent. As an additional distinction. the rank devices were placed horizontally. steam engines had been introduced to the Revenue M arine. Instead of the traditional rank titles. This innovation lasted until 1873. In 1864. and a Second Assistant Engineer wore one. shield over their sleeve lace in 1864 but engineers were distinguished from them by a lack of a device. The next change to the uniforms came in 1871 and proved to be so unpopular that most officers simply ignored it. The First Assistant Engineer adopted the previous shoulder strap of the Chief Engineer. they became commissioned officers but not of the line and their uniform distinctions reflected this. Initially. This regulation also allowed engineering officers to wear the same gold dress uniform epaulets as their line counterparts. they were called Chief Engineer. a Chief Engineers was given a device consisting of a silver paddle wheel on a gold anchor. The black sleeve lace of the previous regulations was removed. a First Assistant Engineer wore two stripes. engineers were civilians hired by the Revenue M arine. the Revenue M arine was called on to assist the navy in blockading southern ports which caused a dramatic increase in the service’s size. Since this was a new science. A Chief Engineer wore a first lieutenant’s uniform without the epaulette. Line officers had begun wearing a U. During the Civil War. the paddle wheel device was replaced with a silver four-bladed propeller or screw. engineers replaced the buttons on their sleeves with gold sleeve lace. Revenue M arine officers were ordered to replace the shoulder straps and sleeve lace with embroidered rank tabs on the rolling collars of the frock coat. First.S. First Assistant Engineer and Second Assistant Engineer. In 1845. conforming to the changes of the line rank structure. . The Chief Engineer wore the passants with the same bars that were prescribed for a First Lieutenant the Anchor and Treasury Seal device with a gold embroidered paddle wheel.

the sleeve stripes changed so that Chief Engineers wore a ½” gold lace stripe under two ¼” stripes. The dress shoulder knots were abolished and the undress tunic would eventually be replaced by the open collar double-breasted coat on which grade was determined by the sleeve stripes. the Revenue Cutter Service adopted the military undress tunic that the navy had introduced in 1883. The sleeve stripes on this uniform were in lustrous black mohair. The titles of the previous century were replaced with new titles that were more in line with the titles used by line officers as the table below illustrates. 47 . The regulations of 1918 made this permanent. Coast Guard officers began wearing the miniature metal versions of the grade insignia on service uniform shirt collars. On the dress uniform. The same insignia that was used by navy engineering officers. In 1900. First Assistant Engineers wore a ½” stripe under a ¼” stripe and Third Assistant Engineers retained their single ½” stripe. During the First World War. most of the dress uniform trappings were set aside for the more practical and less expensive service uniforms. The Revenue Cutter Service went through some major changes in 1905 that were probably a result of the service the Service provided during the Spanish-American War of 1898. This coat had a wrap around collar on which Cutter Service officers wore their grade and corps device. In 1908. Revenue Cutter Service officers were finally given relative rank with navy officers and the changes to the rank structure reflected the change. The sleeve lace also changed to conform to the new grades. The Engineer-In-Chief wore three ½” lace stripes and a silver oak leaf. The pad bore the grade insignia and corps device. These boards bore the grade insignia and corps device. Engineers wore the silver four bladed propeller on the collar. The only remaining distinction for engineering officers was the fact that they did not wear a U. It was during this time period that the stripes on the undress tunic became gold instead of black.S. This regulation also changed the engineer corps device to four oak leaves in the shape of a cross. a new grade was introduced for the senior engineer of the Revenue Cutter Service. The dress white shoulder boards were changed from the corps device and grade insignia to the gold lace rank stripes in the navy pattern. the epaulets were replaced with gold shoulder knots with a gold velvet pad at the end. OLD TITLE Chief Engineer First Assistant Engineer Second Assistant Engineer NEW TITLE Captain of Engineers First Lieutenant of Engineers Second Lieutenant of Engineers Third Lieutenant of Engineers Officers began wearing blue shoulder boards on the dress white uniform. shield above their sleeve stripes.In 1891.

engineering officers were rolled into the line. This made engineering more mainstream and as a result. By 1930. PREVIOUS TITLE Engineer in Chief Captain of Engineers First Lieutenant of Engineers Second Lieutenant of Engineers Third Lieutenant of Engineers NEW TITLE Commander Lieutenant Commander Lieutenant Lieutenant Junior Grade Ensign The days of sail were gone and the only propulsion method a ship had was its engines. .The rank titles changed throughout the Coast Guard to conform to navy rank titles. all of the uniform distinctions for engineers were gone.

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STAFF OFFICERS 61 .

DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR Coast Guard Contruction officers were experts in the design and construction of ships and cutters. copied the idea from the British Royal Navy. and the lack of a the Coast Guard shield. Staff Officer uniforms were disitnguished from those of the line with distinctive corps devices. had staff officers. . shield and had light brown velvet backing behind their sleeve stripes. A Contructor was distinguished by a corps device that replaced the shield and anchor with a two-leaved oak sprig and anchor device. in turn. a Contructor was commissioned with a grade equivalent to a First Lieutenant. all of the officers of the department were rolled into the line and the distinctions disappeared. the Revenue Cutter Service opened a shipyard in Baltimore. officers who performed a specialized function that did not require knowledge necessary for sailing a ship. the Revenue Cutter Service and subsequently. In the navy. it was very important to distinguish staff officer uniforms from those of the line. By 1941. This oak sprig was also the navy’s corps device for its Bureau of Construction. While not as extensively as the navy. Apparantly. It is likely that one or more officers had been assigned to this task since the founding days of the Revenue M arine. In 1930. In 1899. were an institution in the navy since the beginning. but they were not considered staff officers and eventually came to exist in a class by themselves. The U. Initially. staff officers were given relative rank with line officers and expanded to all of the officer grades. the Coast Guard. In 1915.The concept of Staff Officers. M ost likely because they were ususally appointed from a civilian job directly to an officer grade and were not in the chain of command. M aryland specifically for the purpose of building and repairing its vessels. Construction officers also did not wear the U. Construction officers adopted the line officer titles but retained the corps device and colored backing of their sleeve stripes.S. In 1908. Officers appointed to the department were naval architects who specialized in that area and were not sea officers. staff officers were authorized to wear the Coast Guard shield above the rank stripes like the line officers.S. colored backing behind the sleeve stripes. Navy. A Contructor wore a First Lieutenant’s gold ½” lace stripes on the sleeves and the double gold bars on the shoulder strap and dress shoulder knot. they were even called “civil officers” for many years. the Department of Construction and Repair was established to administer this function. when the Coast Guard was formed. The first “non-line” officers in the Cutter Service were the engineers.

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and houses of refuge. Superintendents became (Lifesaving) District Commanders. The Life-Saving Service operated under a dual chain of command. The other channel of command was the Inspector of Life Saving Stations. Revenue M arine. The inspector assigned assistant inspectors. and Florida.S. The Life-Saving District Superintendents reported directly to the General Superintendent and were responsible for most of the administrative matters of the stations. Remember. if any.S. The service increased in size in 1871 to include more full-time personnel. the U. The service officially became known as the U.S. In 1848. As maritime trade increased. Houses of refuge made up the third. Lifesaving Service in 1878. a Captain in the U.S . It was felt that along this stretch of coastline. The position of General Superintendent was eliminated and the Lifesaving Service was integrated into the Coast Guard Chain of Command. These stations were administered by the Treasury Department. Coast Guard.S. Coast Guard's image as a lifesaver was the U. they were required to launch their boats from the beach into the surf. A paid keeper and a s mall boat were assigned to each house. hired the Surfmen. The crew of any ship running aground could expect very little.S. in turn. including such matters as pay and supply. deep water and piers allowed the launching of heavy lifeboats directly into the water. Lifesaving stations were manned by full-time crews during the period when wrecks were most likely to occur. lifeboat. Life-Saving Service. and last.S. The Superintendents appointed the Keepers who. There were initially. The stations were manned by a full-time keeper who had to call on volunteers when the need arose. so did the demand for assistance for those wrecked near the shore. Congress approved the creation of shore-based stations for the purpose of providing assistance to ship wrecked sailors. not Search and Rescue. Revenue M arine Service. Lifesaving Service personnel became members of the Coast Guard but retained their organization because of their specialized knowledge in rescue. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries large sections of the United States' eastern seaboard were sparsely populated. Stations were now made up of a Keeper and a six man life boat coat crew who were called Surfmen. Georgia. That is. In ports. specifically. The stations of the Service fell into three broad categories: lifesaving. only shelters would be needed. The Lifesaving Service was merged with the Revenue Cutter Service in 1915 to form the U. M ost stations were in isolated areas and crewmen had to be able to perform open beach launchings. the Revenue Cutter Service’s priority was law enforcement. These stations were located on the coasts of South Carolina. usually lieutenants of the U. Therefore.S. The Lifesaving Service was ordered into a naval style uniform in the 1880s but was not widely used since the Surfmen and Keepers were required to purchase it. two Superintendents appointed to supervice the stations. help. prior to this merger. LIFES AVING S ERVICE The organization that contributed the most to the U. but the organization did not include active manning and rescue attempts. Revenue M arine Service. Lifeboat stations were located at or near port cities. with the 67 . class of Life Saving Service units.U. shipwrecked sailors would not die of exposure to the cold in the winter as in the north. to each district and they were responsible for the operational matters concerning the Service.

Coast Guard grade of Commander. The ranks of Ensign to Lieutenant Commander were all District Superintendents. The corps device for the Lifesaving Service officers was a life ring superimposed on an anchor. Lifesaving Service officers also wore sleeve stripes without a shield and olive green velvet behind their sleeve stripes. By 1941, all Lifesaving Service personnel were integrated into the line and the distinctions disappeared.

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WARRANT OFFICERS

S. In 1950.S. Chief Warrant Officer 2 Chief Warrant Officer 3 and Chief Warrant Officer 4. In 1975. the grade of Warrant Officer 1 was abolished from the both the navy and the Coast Guard’s structure. The Coast Guard used the same silver or gold and blue bars that the navy used. Keeper. a Chief Warrant would become a Commissioned Warrant Officer. Warrant Officers did not come onto the scene until the creation of the Coast Guard in 1915. the Coast Guard adopted the same system that had been established for the navy by the Career Compensation Act of 1949. Warrant Officers wore the same lace but ¼” wide. Coast Guard did not follow the navy insignia pattern at first in that they did not immediately adopt the gold and blue sleeve stripes and there was only one grade of warrant officer. Shield under their specialty mark. The Keeper was the integration of the U. Warrant officers wore an officer’s uniform with their corps device on the collar and two ½” stripes of black lace on the sleeve of the blue coat and two similar stripes of white lace on the white coat. Lifesaving Service Station Keeper. The bars were worn on the right shirt collar and the specialty device on the left collar. Botswain. the Career Compensation Act was passed which had the effect of standardizing the pay and grades of the armed forces. A Chief Warrant Officer was given a gold bar with a blue square in the center while a Warrant Officer was given a like bar with a blue stripe in the center. Warrant Officer 1. Chief Warrant Officers were given the same ½” gold lace with light blue square segments that the navy was wearing. There were now four grades of Warrant Officer and each one had its own grade insignia. The bar was worn on the right collar and the specialty marks was worn on the left. In 1920. The first Warrant Officers in the Coast Guard were the M aster’s M ate. When the khaki shirt service uniforms were approved.The Revenue Cutter Service never had warrant officers. All specialty devices were now gold. giving the Coast Guard two grades of Warrant Officer grades. 73 . This act applied only to those organizations in the Department of Defense so the Coast Guard did not immediately put this act into action. Coast Guard Warrant Officers added the U. Chief Warrant Officers wore their insignia in silver and Warrant Officers wore theirs in gold. Eventually. M achinist and Carpenter. this act separated the Warrant Officer grades into four separate grades. After World War II. Among other things. Coast Guard Warrant Officers followed the navy custom of using the specialty mark on the collars as a rank insignia. the Coast Guard created a distinct rank collar rank insignia of its own for the warrant officers. In 1954. Gunner. the Coast Guard adopted the same Warrant Officer grades that were found in the navy.

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M etal Subdued Full Size. Cloth Grade M iniature. M etal Subdued . Full Color M etal Grade Full Size.COAS T GUARD WARRANT OFFIC ER GRAD E INS IGNIA TABLE INS IGNIA Dress Shoulder Board UNIFORMS Dinner Dress White Jacket Dress White Coat Reefer Coat Bridge Coat Light Blue Long or Short Sleeve Shirts Service Sweaters Blue Service Coat Dinner Dress Blue Jacket Windbreaker (Shoulder straps) Trench Coat (Shoulder straps) Blue Winter Service Shirt (Collars) Right Front Side of Garrison Cap Operational Dress Uniform (Collars) Woodland BDU & Desert BDU collars Woodland BDU & Desert BDU field jacket shoulder straps Enhanced Shoulder Boards Sleeve Lace Full Size. Full Color. Full Color M etal Grade M iniature.

ENLISTED PERSONNEL 81 .

preceded by the letters U. in white. The name of the vessel to which the wearer is attached. Neckerchief: Black silk of Navy regulation pattern. run through four eyelets in each side. The cap ribbon shall be of black silk ribbon 1 1/4 inches wide.S . Shoes: Black kip or calf. The first mention of insignia came in 1891 when the petty officers were devided into two classes. Cap: Dark navy-blue cloth. There were no specific insignia prescribed for them and no mention of uniforms for other enlisted men. The petty officers were identified as Boatswains. equally spaced. fastened with ten small size black navy buttons. double-breasted sack pattern.. UNIFORM FOR OTHER ENLISTED M EN Overshirt: Dark navy blue flannel or white duck. rolling collar.R. They wore white trousers in the summer or blue trousers in the winter.The first uniform regulations for Revenue M arine were published in 1834 and called for petty officers to wear dark blue jackets with five buttons. crown from 91/2 to 10 inches in diameter. Gunner and the Carpenter. Cravat: Black ribbed silk. A pocket in the left breast. Signal Quartermasters. black patent leather. heels to be broad and low. band 1 1/2 inches wide. bound with same. of double thickness. M aster-At-Arms. Petty Officers of the First Class wore their gold embroidered rating badge on the upper right sleeve of the coat. Cap: Dark navy blue cloth. cuffs. Waistcoat: Dark navy blue cloth. quarter pieces 2 inches in width with fullness as per pattern. Gunners. front and back of skirt to descend to top of inseam of trousers. near the bottom. Two small eyelet ventilating holes. the outer strip to be 1/4 of an inch from the edge. cut high in front. will be woven in gilt thread through the center of the ribbon. Shirt : White linen or cotton of ordinary pattern. lustrous black mohair: visor. Revenue M arine buttons. black silk lacing. black patent leather 1/2 inch wide fastened at the side with two small gilt navy buttons and provided with one gilt and one leather slide.S . in each side of the quarters. in plain block lettering one half inch in height. Oilers and Coxwains were Petty Officers of the Second Class. the strips extend down in front to the bottom of the opening. tied with a double bow knot in front. green underneath chin strap. Around the collar of the overshirt shall be stitched three strips of white tape. The Petty Officers of the First Class were the Boatswain. single breasted without collar. a star 3/4 of an inch in diameter. Five gilt Revenue M arine buttons. Under this dark blue jacket was a white frock with blue facings on the collar and on the breast with a blue star in each corner of the collar as well as on the breast. and laced behind with a flat. of the same material. Carpenters. UNIFORM FOR PETTY OFFICERS OF THE FIRST CLASS Coat: To be of dark navy-blue cloth. . 3/16 of an inch wide and 3/16 of an inch apart. in each corner of the collar there shall be worked. and M asters-At-Arms. with six small size gilt. Trousers: Dark navy blue cloth with inner and outer seam two pockets and a broad flap. and one in each front. the upper button to be not more than 4 inches below the collar-button in the neck band of the shirt Trousers: Dark navy-blue cloth. soft flax or manila grommet and with sweat-leather. band. large square collar. of large size on each breast.

1 Surfman. These sailors wore the same uniform but with a single 3/16” band of lace on the cuffs. The grade of rating of Quartermaster was elevated into the key ratings as was the Oiler. The former Lifesaving Service grade of No. the term “Chief Petty Officer” was still a few years away. The distinctive white chevrons of the previous regulations had been replaced with the red on blue for blue uniforms and blue on white for white uniform chevrons or crows of the navy. Lifesaving service enlisted men. The highest enlisted grade in the Service was First Class Petty Officer. rating and eagle were blue. the number of ratings and badges for them had increased and the Service began to use navy style enlisted grade insignia. On the cuffs. Electrician and Ship’s Writer acted more like warrant officers than enlisted men. First Class Petty Officers in the rates of M aster-At-Arms. Warrant officers had been approved in 1915 and were doing the jobs that were previously done by the “gold” First Class Petty Officers. was made a First Class Petty Officer. As such they wore the officer type uniform and three gold chevrons under a gold arc. However. By 1908. Fireman. and Coal Passers. Chief Petty Officers in the Lifesaving Service would wear a distinctive hat badge until World War II. The regulations of 1900 exapnded the petty officer grades to include the new ratings of Second and Third Oilers and Buglars. The ranks below petty officer were Seaman. They even adopted the same navy tradition of allowing petty officers with 12 years good conduct service to wear gold chevrons. Wheelman. On the white uniform. These men wore the same uniform as the Second Class Petty Officers without the rating badge and with only two 3/16” bands of white lace around the cuffs. In fact. The ratings of Oiler and Signal Quartermaster were First Class Petty Officers but did not occupy the same status as the other First Class Petty officers. more key First Class ratings were added. the tradition of gold chevrons with an arc for the key ratings remained. however. arc. wore uniforms similar to what the senior first class petty officer wore instead of the traditional navy style jumper uniform that the rest of the enlisted personnel wore. the chevrons. While the Revenue Cutter Service used the navy insignia of a Chief Petty Officer. they did not use the title. The lowest rank was simply known as Boy. changed to M achinist.Petty Officers of the Second Class wore their rating badge on the upper right arm in navy blue embroidery on the white uniform and white embroidery on the blue uniform. Rating badges were still being worn on the upper right sleeve but now had a spread eagle over the device. Later. The Oiler was. 83 . The creation of the Coast Guard in 1915 had the effect of bringing the enlisted grade insignia coloser to those of the navy. they wore three 3/16” bands of white lace. those other than the No. a person in charge of a rescue boat crew. 1 Surfman. The Signal Quartermaster became simply Quartermaster and the M aster At Arms rating badge was changed to a star. Other enlisted men continued to wear overshirt/jumper type uniform with navy type sleeve insignia. The insignia for them was slightly different from the navy insignia in that the chevrons were white with red trim. The Lifesaving Service had been integrated into the Coast Guard but would remain a specialty branch for many years.

and a long black skirt for females. It is a short jacket with three gold CG buttons up each front side. The jacket has black satin lapels on the men’s jacket and satin swallow-tail lapels on the women’s jacket. closed with a pair of gold connector CG buttons. Navy and Coast Guard enlisted uniforms had become so close that the only way to distinguish Petty Officers First Class and below was to put an embroidered white U. M ost of the ratings in the Coast Guard now allowed for progression through all of the enlisted grades. DINNER DRESS WHITE It is a short white jacket with three gold CG buttons up each front side. It was not until 1959 that Chief Petty Officers and above began wearing the anchor and U. COAST GUARD UNIFORMS CURRENT REGULATIONS FORMAL DRESS BLUE The Dinner Dress Blue jacket is actually black. In 1972. Petty officers in the grades of E-6 and below wear red chevrons and Chief Petty Officers in the grades of E-7 and above wear gold chevrons. and a long black skirt for female officers. the Coast Guard replaced the navy style uniform with the current lighter blue single breasted coat for all ranks. Shield on the lower sleeve of the jumper. Grade on this uniform is shown in the form of the gold or red sleeve chevrons or “crows” on the left upper sleeve. at which time the grades of M aster Chief Petty Officer and Senior Chief Petty Officer were added. Also. M en wear a white pique long sleeve shirt with wing tip collar and white bow tie. The M aster Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard and its accompanying insignia were created in 1969.S. The jacket has white satin lapels on the men’s jacket and satin swallow-tail lapels on the women’s jacket. The Coast Guard did not apply this act to the enlisted grades until 1959. shield device on the collars of service uniform shirts.The Coast Guard finally took the plunge in 1920. The Career Compensation Act of 1949 created the current armed force enlisted pay grade system of E-1 through E-9. there is no longer a situation where a petty officer with 12 years good conduct may wear gold chevrons. The jacket is worn with black trousers with a satin stripe on the side. Enlisted rank in the Coast Guard was no longer rate or job specific. The jacket is worn with black trousers with a satin stripe on the side. The chevron specific rates of First Class Petty Officer were abolished and the three chevrons under an arc became Chief Petty Officer. Personnel wear a gold cummerbund with this uniform. . Women wear a soft pleated long sleeve blouse and black neck tab. Personnel wear a gold cummerbund with this uniform. The shirt is a soft pleated long sleeve blouse and black neck tab or bow tie. closed with a pair of gold CG connector buttons. the grades for seaman came off the cuff and onto the upper sleeves in the form of colored diagonal stripes. Today.S. Grade on this uniform is shown in the form of the gold on white or blue on white sleeve chevrons or “crows” on the left upper sleeve.

May be worn with a white combination cap. ball cap or blue overseas cap. ball cap or blue overseas cap. TROPICAL BLUE Men: A blue open collared light blue short sleeved shirt with blue trousers. WINTER DRESS BLUE Men: A blue closed collared blue long sleeved shirt with blue trousers. May be worn with a white female combination cap. A light blue shirt with a blue four-in-hand necktie. May be worn with a white combination cap. Women: A blue open collared coat with three CG buttons and matching pants or knee length skirt. military woodland or desert camouflage combat uniforms. Grade is worn on the collars in the form of subdued (black or brown) metal grade insignia. OPERATIONAL DRESS UNIF ORM A blue battledress uniform shirt with blue battledress trousers. Grade insignia is worn on the collars in the form of embroidered cloth representations of the collar grade insignia. May be worn with a white female combination cap or blue overseas cap. Grade is shown with miniature metal collar insignia. BATTLEDRESS UNIFORMS The U. May be worn with a white combination cap or blue overseas cap. May be worn with a white female combination cap. A light blue shirt with a blue neck tab. ball cap or blue overseas cap. Women: A blue closed collared blue long sleeved shirt with blue pants or knee length skirt. Women: A blue open collared light blue short sleeved shirt with blue pants or knee length skirt.SERVICE DRESS BLUE Men: A blue open collared coat with four CG buttons and matching trousers. Grade is shown with metal collar insignia.S. Grade is shown by the gold or red on blue rating cloth crows on the left sleeve. 85 . ball cap or blue overseas cap.

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Small M etal Subdued UNIFORMS Dinner Dress White Jacket Dinner Dress Blue Jacket Blue Service Coat Light Blue Long or Short Sleeve Shirt Collars Blue Winter Service Shirt Collars Light Blue Long or Short Sleeve Shirt Collars Blue Winter Service Shirt Collars Left Front Side of Garrison Cap On Combination Hat Band Operational Dress Uniform (Collars) Woodland BDU & Desert BDU collars 97 . Cloth Grade.COAS T GUARD EN LIS TED GRADE INS IGNIA TABLE INS IGNIA Gold or Blue Sleeve Chevrons on a White Background Gold or Red Sleeve Chevrons on a Dark Blue Background Gold or Red Sleeve Chevrons on a Dark Blue Background or White. or Red Diagonal Sleeve Bars on a Dark Blue Background M iniature Full Color M etal Grade Insignia E-2 to E-6 15/16” E-7 to E-9 Full Color M etal Grade Insignia 1 3/8” E-7 to E-9 Full Color M etal Grade Insignia 1 ¾” E-7 to E-9 Full Color M etal Grade Insignia Full Color. Light Green.

CADETS .

thinner than those by ensigns of the Coast Guard. Class refers to the acadmic grade of the wearer. Collar rank insignia is in the form of gold bars. Cadets aslo wear soft shoulder epaulets with the grade or class insignia on them in the same placement as on the shoulder boards. Today. It is located at the M AST Academy in Florida. 99 . there are no enlisted grades in the cadet structure.S.S.S . Enlisted cadets wear the U. Naval academy. in a pattern that matches the sleeve stripes. and a 4th classman is a freshman. display their class on the collars in the form of colored shields. A First Classman is a senior.S. shield. 2nd classman is a junior. there is only one U. a third classman wears a similar red shield. Enlisted cadets wore their grade insignia on the upper right sleeves of the coats. a first classman wears a blue shield with the cadet anchor and star on it. 3rd classman is sophmore. Coast Guard Academy wore the same navy style uniforms that were being worn by midshipmen at the U. Currently.S.S. The shoulder boards that designate class were thinner than those that designate cadet officer rank. Coast Guard enlisted collar insignia. cadets of the U. COAS T GUARD CAD ETS During World War II.U. Cadet officers wore 3/8” wide gold lace stripes on the sleeves and shoulder boards under a the U. a second classman wears a similar white shield. The grade insignia system was also the same as that used by naval academy. Cadets other than cadet officers. and a fourth classman wears no insignia on the collar. Coast Guard Junior Reserve Officer’s Training Corps unit in the United States. All of the cadet officers are in the first class and occupy the leadership positions within the cadet regiment. U SCG/JROTC cadet officers wear a Coast Guard Academy Fourth Classman’s embroidered soft epaulet with the addition of the brass cadet officer collar insignia and a brass JROTC cypher.

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U.S. COAST GUARD WOMEN’S VOLUNTEER RESERVE “SPARS”

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Women had been associated with Coast Guard since the 1830s. M any women had been appointed as Light House Keepers since that time. In 1918, a pair of twin sisters, who had been in the National Coastal Defense Reserve, became the first female uniformed members of the Coast Guard. In 1942, the Coast Guard established the U.S. Coast Guard Women’s Reserve, Informally known as SPARS. The term SPARS was derived the Latin motto of the Coast Guard, Semper Paratus, which translates to Always Ready. They were called upon to serve was during World War II when they filled positions to free male coast guardsmen up for combat. Women were enlisted or appointed as officers under the same criteria as the men. SPAR uniforms were designed along female fashions of the time and were similar to the coastguardsmen uniforms only in the insignia. There was a winter dress uniform and a summer dress uniform and they were the same for officers, chiefs and enlisted personnel. Both of the uniforms were very similar in design. The winter dress uniform was a blue single breasted blue coat, white shirt, and blue skirt. The summer dress uniform was basically the same but the skirt and coat were white. Enlisted women wore the same ratings as the men: Red on blue for the winter uniform and navy blue on white for the summer dress uniform. SPARS in the grades of Seaman First Class, Seaman Second Class and Seaman Third Class wore the diagonal stripes on the upper sleeves. On the dress blue coat uniform, SPAR officers wore ultra-marine blue sleeve stripes and shield instead of gold. This particular color was refferred to as “Reserve Blue” and was worn by female officers in both the navy and the Coast Guard to denote their reserve status. As a service uniform, SPARS were provided with the navy gray pinstripped seersucker type suit modified for military service. Officers used the navy sleeve stripes and enlisted personnel wore navy blue on white and gray pinstripped crows. The SPARS were de-activated in 1946 and most of the women were mustered out of the Coast Guard. The few women who remained on active duty began wearing the gold sleeve stripes on the blue and white dress uniforms in the 1950s. Women in the Coast Guard were granted full active status in 1972 and all of the special SPAR uniforms were abolished. In 1973, the SPARS were eliminated and women were integrated into the regular Coast Guard. The female specific uniforms, such as the light blue working uniform were eliminated and women wear the same uniform combinations as their male counterparts.

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WARRANT OFFICER SPECIALTY MARKS AND ENLISTED RATING BADGES .

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COAST GUARD AUXILIARY OFFICER GRADE INSIGNIA

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed civilian volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard and was established on June 23, 1939 by an act of Congress as the United States Coast Guard Reserve, and was re-designated as the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary on February 19, 1941. The Auxiliary supports all USCG missions, other than those related to direct engagement in either law enforcement activities or military combat operations. As a volunteer, an Auxiliarist is not paid a salary and participates in activities at her or his own discretion. Auxiliarists may be reimbursed for expenses incurred when they are under orders from the Commandant. Auxiliarists who own a boat, aircraft or radio station often use their equipment on behalf of the USCG and are reimbursed for expenses incurred while under mission orders, although membership does not require ownership of a vessel. An Auxiliarist can also serve on a USCG asset once they have obtained proper training. When under orders, the member is recognized as a Federal employee and any approved vessels are recognized as property of the U.S. government. M embers use previously-acquired skills and skills obtained via approved training. Auxiliarists wear military style rank insignia to signify office held, they do not use military titles. Instead of traditional rank titles, the Auxiliary uses a position description that is associated with a particular insignia. The title most commonly used in official correspondence and reports is "Auxiliarist". Exceptions to this rule are elected or appointed Commodores, who are the only Auxiliarists who use a military style title ("Commodore") before their name. Auxiliarists do not normally render military courtesies to another Auxiliarist, but an Auxiliarist in uniform is expected to salute to the U.S. national ensign and friendly foreign flags as well as military officers who are senior in grade. Each auxiliary uniform is identical to a Coast Guard officer's military uniform, with the exception that the buttons and stripes on dress jackets and shoulder boards are silver in color, rather than gold. On dress uniforms, appointed staff officers wear insignia with a red "A" and elected officers wear insignia with a blue "A", while black "A"s are worn on insignia by both elected and appointed officers on the ODU uniform. Auxiliarists are expected to adhere to the same rules of correct uniform wear as regular and reserve Coast Guard officers. There are no enlisted grades in the Auxiliary.

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as appropriate. and shoulder boards. PHS officers. nurses. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE OFFICERS IN THE COAST GUARD The navy maintains a M edical Corps with doctors.11 ADM INISTRATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE (PHS) OFFICERS DETAILED TO THE COAST GUARD 29 Sep 2011: “Uniforms.a. in place of the Coast Guard devices on the cap. PHS officers shall wear the uniform of the day for Coast Guard officers as prescribed in Coast Guard regulations at the unit to which they are assigned. while assigned to the Coast Guard.S. The Public Health Service provides these officers to the Coast Guard. dentists and other medical professionals. wear Coast Guard uniforms with PHS insignia. but no officers. PHS devices shall be worn. The Coast Guard’s medical branch includes Physician’s Assistants. etc.” 121 .U. (5) of COM DTINST 1000. M edical Technicians. sleeves. Paragraph 7.

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As was the case at the turn of the century. U. uniforms were very specific in nature and complicated. Federal Government took control of all shore based lighthouses and other aids to navigation and placed them under the Secretary of the Treasury. LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE The United States Lighthouse Service traces its origins to 1789 when the new U. Since the Lighthouse Service was a government agency. Over the years. The Lighthouse Service was absorbed by the Coast Guard in 1939. the Lighthouse Service expanded to include light ships and tenders for the purpose of maintaining off-shore navigational aids. The entire Lighthouse Service Uniform regulations of 1920 are reproduced here. 123 . and had seagoing vessels.S.U. For the sake of simplicity. Lighthouse Service personnel were divided into two categories: The Lighthouse Keepers and their staff and the crews of Lighthouse Service vessels.S. the Lighthouse Service was issued maritime style uniforms in the 1880s.S.

Cap of the pattern shown in plate 1. or navy-blue serge or flannel in summer. and visor. There are to be no pockets on the outside of the coat. Overcoat of the Caban style. metal ornaments in the form of pins may be worn. a black mohair braid 11/2 inches wide to be worn around the cap. mohair braid. Clerks and radio operators on tenders. with five large regulation gilt buttons on each side-the top button placed close to the collar. of navy-blue cloth.-In hot weather white uniforms may be worn. a plain blue cloth cap similar to the overcoat. the length of coat to be the extended arm and hand.-A double-breasted sack coat of navy-blue cloth in winter. with six large gutta-percha buttons on each side. LIGHTHOUS E TEND ERS . or a skeleton cap with device. MACHINIS TS .Plain black socks shall be worn with black low shoes. black. except to be made of the same material as the coat. and plain black or plain white socks with white low shoes. or. shaped to the figure. with ear flaps. shall be of black calfskin or patent leather. inclosing a silver-embroidered lighthouse three-fourths inch high. single breasted. may be worn. or navy-blue serge or flannel in summer.REGULATIONS FOR UNIFORMS IN THE LIGHTHOUS E S ERVIC E. The skirt to descend to 3 inches below the knees. with rolling cellar 5 inches deep. extending 5 inches from the bottom of the coat. breast high. the coat . and to descend to top of inseam of trousers a slit over each hip. double breasted. The visor to be patent leather on the outside and green underneath. with a “fly” front fitted with plain. Pockets to be in the side seams. White shoes shall only be worn with white trousers. high or low. with pockets in hip seams all seams. laid on flat. flat. the same as the blue cap. the bottom button 18 inches from bottom of skirt. No sleeve ornaments are to be worn on overcoat. at the option of the employee. AND BOATS WAINS ON TENDERS Coat. For cold weather. 11/4 inches wide. and to have a standing collar. The collar. fastened to the sides by two small regulation gilt buttons. gutta-percha buttons. Hot weather.-Uniforms of clerks and radio operators shall conform to that prescribed for officers of tenders. the top button to be near collar seam. in the middle of the front of the cap a gold-embroidered wreath 1 inches high by 2 inches spread. Shoes. the lower button about 6 inches from the bottom. Trousers of navy-blue cloth in winter. and the others spaced equally between top and bottom buttons. cut in the prevailing styles. or of white canvas or buckskin. where a heavy cap is needed. (c) A white cover to fit neatly over the cap underneath the chin strap and the mohair braid.. edges of the coat. side seams of the back from the shoulder to the lower edge of the skirt. to be plain. S ocks. similar in cut and fit to blue coat. QUARTERMAS TERS . with adjustable chin strap of gold lace one-half inch wide. may be worn. (b) Trousers same as blue trousers. and the other buttons at equal spaces between the top and bottom buttons. and edges of the hip slips to 5 inches from bottom of coat shall be trimmed with lustrous black mohair braid. as follows: 4 a) Coat of white linen or cotton duck or similar material and trimmed with white linen or cotton braid 11/4 inches wide. 1920 OFFICERS OF TENDERS Coat of dark navy-blue cloth in winter or navy-blue serge or flannel in summer. Ornaments and marks to be of white tape or embroidery.

cut in the prevailing styles.S. not less than three-fourths inch nor more than 3/4 inches and not less than 32 inches nor more than 36 inches in length. S EAMEN ON TENDERS For working purposes. and ~southwester. with five small regulation gilt buttons and a small rolling collar.L.S. The cook to wear a cook’s cap and white apron when cooking. Hot weather. AND MESS ATTENDANTS ON TENDERS Caps same pattern as masters of tenders. Plain blue overalls may be worn when engaged in dirty work. For winter-weather work a watch cap and sweater of the Navy pattern.” five-eighths inch in length. hut with the addition of a red stripe on the sleeve or sleeves. in a circle at the base of the lighthouse. may be worn in wet weather. or navy-blue serge or flannel in summer. to have a watch pocket in the left side and a lower pocket on each side. or blue flannel shirt. Vest of navy-blue cloth in winter. felled seams. COOKS . Rain suits of oiled canvas. single-stitched edges. when waiting. except that jacket shall have plain white buttons. shall be worn. and cut singlebreasted. string. known as Cape Anns. Each sleeve to have two small buttons on the cuff seam. for dress occasions. Trousers of navy-blue cloth in winter. 125 . pantaloons. rounded corners.. a white uniform. for dress occasions. consisting of a jumper. to wear a white apron and plain single-breasted white jacket without pockets. firemen shall wear a blue dungaree uniform and blue hat. Necktie of black silk or satin. seamen shall wear a blue dungaree uniform and white hat. but without ornaments or braid band. may be worn in hot weather. but of white linen or cotton duck. Cap of the same pattern as that worn by masters of tenders. the latter to have flaps so arranged as to be worn inside the pockets if desired. of uniform width. may be worn. FIREMEN ON TENDERS For working purposes.to be provided with two inside breast pockets and two outside hip pockets.-Same as for officers of tenders. S TEWARDS . similar to that prescribed for seamen. M aterial to be 10 1/4ounce double-filled bleached duck.to the working dress of the Navy pattern shall be worn. the lower button 1 inch from bottom of cuff. a white duck uniform and white hat similar. with pockets in hip seams. similar to the working dress of the Navy pattern. The steward. M ess attendants to wear the same. or navy-blue serge or flannel in summer. so as to show about 6 inches of the shirt bosom. Shoes and socks. the device to be a silver lighthouse with gold-worked letters “U.H. The chin strap to be patent leather. The chin strap is to be patent leather. with military collar.-White uniforms of cut and fit similar to blue. knitted of dark-blue yarn. one-half inch apart. and four large regulation gilt buttons removable for laundering.

flaring outward. clerk.-Same as master. and the patch fastened to the sleeve by sewing. pointing downward. to be worn on left coat sleeve midway between the shoulder and elbow. machinist and boatswain shall be embroidered on separate patch 3 inches by 4 inches in size.-A three-bladed propeller 11/2 inches in diameter embroidered in red silk or red thread. Radio operator. Cadet engineer. fluke ends down. one blade pointing up.-Three zigzag lines. to be worn on right coat sleeve midway between the shoulder and elbow. The two outer stripes to be one half inch wide and the inner stripe to be one-fourth inch wide. and the two inner stripes to be one-fourth inch wide.-Two anchors crossed. Quartermasters.-Three stripes of thick lustrous black mohair braid laidl on at intervals of onefourth inch. OFFICERS ON TENDERS Captain.-No collar device is to be worn by clerks and radio operators on tenders. of the same material and color as the uniform. First assistant engineer. Machinists.—Same as master. Engineer officers. to be worn on right coat sleeve midway between the shoulder and elbow. First Officer. laid on at intervals of one-fourth inch. but with three stripes of one-fourth-inch black braid. but with one stripe of one-fourth-inch black braid. to be worn on right coat sleeve midway between the shoulder and elbow. Second officer. . embroidered in gold thread. Engineer. The two outer stripes to be one-half inch wide. upon each side of the collar of the blue coat.-No sleeve ornaments.-Same as chief engineer.-A steeling wheel 11/2 inches in diameter embroidered in white silk or white thread. upon each side of the collar of the blue coat. Third Officer. fluke end pointing in. Cadet officer. OFFICERS ON TENDERS Deck officers. 11/2inches long. Clerk. Boatswain. but with one stripe of one-fourth-inch black braid.-Same as master. except that each of the three stripes of black braid to lie onefourth inch wide.-A gold-embroidered anchor. Second assistant engineer.-Same as engineer.-A gold-embroidered three-bladed propeller. The sleeve insignia for radio operator. S LEEVE ORN AMENTS . but with two stripes of one-forth-inch black braid. Master. Chief engineer. each 11/2 inches long. but with two stripes of one-fourth-inch black braid. to be worn on right coat sleeve midway between the shoulder and elbow. 1 inch long lengthwise.COLLAR D EVIC ES .-A quill. Clerks and radio operators. The first stripe to be 2 inches from the bottom of the cuff.-Same as captain.-Four stripes of thick lustrous black mohair braid. 1 inch in diameter. embroidered in gold thread.-Same as engineer.-No sleeve ornaments. The first stripe to be 2 inches from the bottom of cuff. l 1/2 inches long of proportionate width. without other ornament. embroidered in white silk or white thread. except that each of the four stripes of black braid to be one-fourth inch wide. quartermaster. without other ornament.

the letter “K” will be worn within the loop. large regulation gilt buttons on each side-the top button placed close to the collar. will be worn embroidered within the loop. or navy-blue serge or flannel in summer. If principal keeper. with five small regulation gilt buttons and a small rolling collar.-Same as first assistant engineer of tenders. 127 .-A gold-embroidered propeller 1 inch in diameter on each lapel of the sack coat. Assistant engineer. COLLAR D EVIC ES . one-half inch apart. fluke end pointing down. CREW OF LIGHT VESS ELS . indicating their respective rank. or navy-blue serge or flannel in summer with five.-Same as second assistant engineer of tenders. the first stripe to be 2 inches from the bottom of cuff. the coat to be provided with two inside breast pockets and two outside hip pockets. The chin strap on cap will be of leather. S LEEVE ORN AMENTS .-A gold-embroidered anchor 1 inch long on each lapel of the sack coat.-Three stripes of one-fourth-inch thick lustrous black mohair braid laid on at intervals of one-fourth inch.. to have a watch pocket in the left side and a lower pocket on each side. and cut singlebreasted. the border of loop to be one-tenth inch broad.“ etc.” “ 2. but with two stripes for first mate and one stripe for second mate. and not less than 32 inches nor more than 36 inches in length. OFFICERS ON LIGHT VESS ELS M aster. the length of coat to be the extended arm and hand. the latter to have flaps so arranged as to be worn inside the pockets if desired. and remainder of regulations for uniforms to be the same as for officers of tenders. OFFICERS ON LIGHT VES S ELS Deck officers. Mates. For assistant keepers.” “3 . Trousers. Necktie of black silk or satin. Same as crew of tenders. of uniform width. Engineer officers. They will wear on each lapel of the sack coat a loop embroidered in gold. Vest of navy-blue cloth in winter. and the other buttons at equal spaces between the top and bottom buttons. LIGHT S TATIONS AND DEPOTS Keepers of lighthouses shall wear the same uniform in all respects as the masters of light vessels. 2 1/2 inches long by three-fourths inch wide. one blade pointing up. not less than three-fourths inch nor mole than 1-~ inches.LIGHT VESS ELS OFFICERS OF LIGHT VES S ELS Coat.) No sleeve ornaments. the lower button about 6 inches from the bottom. the lower button 1 inch from bottom of cuff. each sleeve to have two small buttons on the cuff seam. Engineer. to be worn.-A double-breasted sack coat of navy-blue cloth in winter. except service insignia. except the ornaments on the collar and sleeves of coat and the gold chin strap on cap. cap. string.-Same as master. the figures “1. (See plate 3. so as to show about 6 inches of the shirt bosom.

cut in the prevailing style. or of navy-blue flannel in summer. The letters “U. An ornament. with adjustable chin strap of patent leather 1/2 inch wide. bottom of bars to be 2 inches from edge of sleeve. maybe worn on left sleeve. the body to be stippled. Ornaments and marks to be of white tape or embroidery. Lighthouse Service.-In hot weather white uniforms. with pockets in the side seams. with five large regulation buttons on each side. . to be worn by the watchmen so long as they hold their positions. and shall be surrendered by them upon their relinquishing such position. to indicate length of service. may be worn at such times and stations as the Superintendent may designate. with a turnover collar ii to 2 inches deep. Overcoat. 2 inches wide. of cut and fit similar to blue. and the rolling collar to be 5 inches deep. the proper number of stars and bars being worn to represent length of service (one star to represent 25 years’ service.-A shield of the design adopted by the Department shall be worn on the left breast of the sack coat in summer or the overcoat in winter. a black mohair braid 1 3/4 inches wide to be worn around the cap. worked in gold. Belt of adjustable black leather. Efficiency stars shall be worn omi the left-hand lapel of the coat or vest. the top button just below the collar seam. Vest of navy-blue cloth in winter or flannel in summer. and one bar to represent 5 years’ service). and star to be directly above bars. or. to be placed above the chin strap in the middle of the front of the cap. Bars to be 3/16 inch wide by 7/8 inch long. fastened to the sides by two small regulation gilt buttons.Working uniforms similar to those prescribed for seamen on yessels may be worn when engaged in dirty work. The shields are Government property. except that the ornament to be worn by the captain of the watch shall be gold plated. The skirts to descend to the knees. as shown on plate 3. The ornament to be either nickel or silver plated.” When overcoats are worn the belt will be worn outside. the bars to be placed vertically in a row.-A single-breasted sack coat of navy-blue cloth in winter. the other buttons equally spaced between the top and bottom buttons. The letter “W. and to have 5 small regulation buttons on right side. cut after the pattern of the Army blouse. to be so cut as to show about 5 inches of shirt bosom. of navy-blue cloth. as preferred. M ETAl ornaments in the form of pins may be worn. and the border of the ornament to be in relief and polished. Shield. on which in raised letters to have the word “Police. Gold service stars and bars. equally spaced between the top button at collar seam and the bottom button 18 inches from the bottom of the skirt.” the figures of the eagle and the lighthouse. WATCHMEN AT THE GEN ERAL LIGHTHOUS E DEPOT Coat. double-breasted. 1/2 inch center to center.” Q inch high. stars to be 7/8 inch in diameter. the vest to have a watch pocket on left side and a pocket on each side below. The visor to be patent leather on the outside and green underneath. These shields will be furnished by the Bureau upon request therefore. the lower button just below the waist. Trousers of navy-blue cloth in winter or flannel in summer. buttoned up to the throat. with gilt clasps. inclosed in a gold-embroidered loop of same dimensions as that worn by lightkeepers.S. Hot weather. 1 inch from bottom. with 5 large regulation buttons on the right side. Cap of the pattern shown in plate 3. with a leather stall to carry the climb. at the option of the employee. to be worn on each end of the collar. Depot keepers shall wear the same uniform and service insignia as keepers of light stations.

The collar to be fitted to turn imp and button with a strap of cloth to a small regulation button. The back middle seam to be slashed up 10 inches with a fly flap. A cloth belt of same material as overcoat to be fitted from the side seams. and two pockets with flaps cut horizontally just below the hips. may be worn. and plain black socks shall be worn with low shoes.. cut vertically. to turn down over the ears for protection in cold winter weather. day or night. Shoes and socks.-Black shoes shall be worn.Shields similar to those worn by the watchmen at the General Lighthouse Depot shall be provided for and worn by all watchmen at lighthouse depots. to button behind with a large-sized regulation button. Watchmen at depots other than the General Lighthouse Depot. under the same conditions as are prescribed for the watchmen at the General Lighthouse Depot.The pockets on each side to be breast high. Cap of blue cloth. 129 . When not needed. closed by four small-sized regulation buttons. to tie up in front with silk ties. 2 inches broad. with ear flaps.

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Government Printing Office – Washington D. – New York 1975 133 . 1930 HISTORY OF THE U.SOURCES TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: DATE: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: AMERICAN BADGES AND INSIGNIA Evans E. MARINE. AND AIR FORCE UNIFORMS OF WORLD WAR II Andrew Mollo & Malcom McGregor MacMillan Publishing Co. Kerrigan The Viking Press – New York 1967 BADGES AND INSIGNIA OF WORLD WAR II AIR FORCENAVAL-MARINE Guido Rosignoli Blandford Press . RATING SPECIALTY MARKS WARRANT OFFICER AND CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER SPECIALTY DEVICES 1915-2011 CWO Dana Lewis. East Carolina University NAVAL. BOSN.C. Tilley Department of History. COAST GUARD AUXILIARY John A.S.S. USCG (Ret) U.11 ADM INISTRATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE (PHS) OFFICERS DETAILED TO THE COAST GUARD United States Coast Guard United States Coast Guard 29 Sep 2011 ENLISTED RATINGS.London 1976 COM DTINST 1000.

S. U. UNIFORMS AND INSIGNIA OF THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD 1918 Col. Government Printing Office – Washington D. COAST GUARD U. Dion Williams. WARRANT OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN OF THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD HQ. 1930 REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE UNIFORM OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. AND ENLISTED MEN OF THE UNITED STATES REVENUE MARINE U. Treasury Department U. Bennett. CA. 1983 THE CROW’S NEST.TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE UNIFORM OF OFFICERS. U.S. 1891 REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE UNIFORM OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. WARRANT OFFICERS AND ENLISTED MEN OF THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD HQ. 1 .C.S.S. VOLS. Robert F. USCG (Ret) Naval Institute Press – Annapolis.S. MD. Government Printing Office – Washington D.C.S.72 Herbert Hillary Booker 2nd 1992 – 1994 Tujunga.C. USMC AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: . 1930 THE COAST GUARDSMAN’S MANUAL 7TH EDITION Revised by Capt. COAST GUARD U. Government Printing Office – Washington D.

6F HQ.S.S.S.S. United States Coast Guard 2004 U. USCG (Ret) 2005 UNITED STATES REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE AND UNITED STATES REVENUE MARINE UNIFORM DEVICES TO 1907 Donald Canney & CWO Dana Lewis. USCG (Ret). BOSN.C. MILITARY FORCES Jack Britton M. Treasury Department U. BOSN. 1908 UNIFORM INSIGNIA OF THE U.C.TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: TITLE: AUTHOR: PUBLISHER: YEAR: UNITED STATES COAST GUARD ENLISTED RATINGS. UNITED STATES REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE UNIFORM REGULATIONS U.S.1F HQ. United States Coast Guard 2009 U. RATING SPECIALTY MARKS AND DISTINGUISHING MARKS 1915-2005 CWO Dana Lewis.S. OK 1981 U. Government Printing Office – Washington D. Press – Tulsa. COAST GUARD AUXILIARY MANUAL COMDTINST M16790. COAST GUARD UNIFORM REGULATIONS COMDTINST M1020.N. COAST GUARD RATINGS PERSONNEL BULLETIN 76-44 Office of Personnel HQ. United States Coast Guard 1944 135 .

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