You are on page 1of 14

Table of Contents 1. RECENT NEWS 2. VICTIMS PICTURE 3. VICTIMS STORY 4. THIS MONTH IN HISTORY 5. EDUCATIONAL 6. WALL OF SHAME 7. GANG INJUNCTION FACTS 8.

 UPCOMING EVENTS

RECENT NEWS
Californians Mobilize Statewide against Killer Police By Carl Muhammad This Oct. 22, the National Day of Protest to Stop Police Brutality, Repression and the Criminalization of a Generation, marked another historic day for Californians as several hundred people rallied at the state capital of Sacramento.  Some came from as far as Utah; others traveled from various cities in California as far way as San Diego and Los Angeles.  Many of the attendees and organizers of this event also attended the historic “Justice for Our Communities! Families Organizing to Resist Police Brutality” meeting in Oxnard, Calif., back on April 27. The event's Facebook page reads: “We are a statewide network of 50+ families affected by police brutality, joining with labor, educators, lawyers, students and community organizations to unite Californians to address the epidemic of police brutality & killer cops.” The page also lists dozens of attending coalitions formed by the families, each one bearing the name of their slain loved one. The rally was staged on the steps of the capitol building with families and organizations lining up on either side of the mall. Most displayed banners and pictures of their loves one and tables were filled with buttons and literature.  In one corner of the mall stood a scale replica of Pelican Bay state prison’s infamous security housing unit or “SHU” (pronounced “shoe”).  Currently thousands of California prisoners spend 22.5 hours isolated in an 8 by 10 foot windowless cell with a concrete slab for a bed, a toilet, a concrete stool and a small shelf. “My cousin Ernest Duenez Jr. was murdered on June 8, 2011, by John Moody of the Manteca Police Department. And since that day my family has fought every single day to try to get justice,” event organizer and co­chair Christina Arechiga told the crowd in her opening remarks.  She talked about the need to demand random drug testing when an officer is involved in an incident such as car accidents, shootings or killings. Many who spoke at the event demanded a change to the police officer Bill of Rights, saying

officers accused of crimes invoke the Bill of Rights to escape public accountability. “The police officers' Bill of Rights has got to go!” said Cephus “Uncle Bobby” Johnson, uncle of Oscar Grant, who was killed by Bay Area Rapid Transit police officer Johannes Mehserle in Oakland in 2009. Ron Thomas, father of Kelly Thomas, who was beaten to death by six Fullerton police officers on July 5, 2011, talked about continuing his fight for justice for his son.  His son's killing was recorded by digital audio recorders the officers wore as well as nearby city surveillance video cameras. “So for the first time in Orange County’s history … on­duty police officers have not only been charged with murder, they’re now going to trial and it starts next month.” He attributed the remarkable feat to the tenacity of “Kelly’s Army,” a group of activists and organizers who rallied in the streets of Fullerton on behalf of Kelly.  “Two chiefs of police, a mayor, two city council members, a captain all gone.” He concluded, “None of it could have been done without the people.” The morning rally included more family members telling their stories, speakers and entertainers, some of who sang, rapped or recited poetry about police brutality and the need to fight back. Jeralynn Blueford, mother of Alan Blueford, killed by Oakland police officer Miguel Masso on May 6 of last year, riled the crowd up and prepared them to march through the streets of the state capital.  “You came here to march. You came here to hear us speak. Nobody wants to march around all sad and dragging around.  You better get some pep in your step!” The crowd roared its approval. “They don’t care about my kids, they don’t care about your kids. But they do care when we all come together and take a stand. All power to the people!” And with that, hundreds of people stepped into the streets of Sacramento chanting “No justice, no peace!” and “The whole system is guilty!”  The spirited marchers stopped and rallied in front of the office of state Attorney General Kamala Harris.  They carried a small black coffin to the doors of the building, and each family was invited up and given a rose to place in the coffin as a symbol of their fallen loved ones.  When a rose was placed and the name of a police brutality victim was read, marchers responded with “Justice!” each time. Marchers then continued back to the capital where more families continued to tell their stories. The day concluded with organizers urging people to continue the fight for justice in their own cities.

BOBBY HENNING Murdered by Paramount Police Department February 21, 2012

BOBBY’S STORY “The Golden Child”
Robert “Bobby” Henning, according to his mother Elizabeth Henning­Adam, was “like the golden child growing up, just the most perfect kid. Very active in sports; he was a skateboarder. He lived up in Tahoe and he was a competitive snowboarder. He really had a passion for that.” On Tuesday, February 21st 2012, Bobby was traveling from his parents’ home in Auburn through the Los Angeles area on his way to see his 2 year old daughter in Oklahoma when his car broke down. Bobby developed mental health issues in his youth and may have had a psychotic break when his car broke down according to Elizabeth.  Somehow he wound up miles away from his car in the city of Paramount, just east of Compton. An older Latino man saw Bobby lying in the street near a church with without a shirt, one shoe missing and talking to himself.  The man became concerned for Bobby and called 911.  When an officer arrived he radioed for back up and in moments 3 or 4 more police cars showed up.  The officers formed a half circle around Bobby and two of them went over to Bobby and picked him up by his arms.  And then, in an instant the witness saw a third officer approach and then he heard shots, but his vision was blocked by the other officers standing in the semi­circle.  Later it was revealed that officers had shot Bobby in the chest. Officers later claimed that Bobby grabbed an officer’s gun, though none of Bobby’s DNA was found on the gun.  The eyewitness says though Bobby was acting strange, he was not acting aggressively towards the officers. After shooting Bobby, officers drag him over near the gutter then handcuff and search him.  Officers do not administer any medical aid to Bobby and he bleeds to death in the street. Currently, a federal lawsuit has been filed on Bobby’s behalf.  The discovery phase is scheduled to begin around the beginning of next year (2014). Please show support for Bobby and visit his his facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Justiceforbobbyhenning Bobby Henning…presente!

THIS MONTH IN HISTORY

NOVEMBER
● ● ● ● November 11, 1989 ­ Civil Rights Memorial is dedicated in Montgomery, Ala. November 14, 1915 ­ Booker T. Washington, educator and writer, died. November 18, 1787 ­ Abolitionist and women's right activist Sojourner Truth born. November 11th 1887 Anarchists Albert Parsons, George Engel, August Spies and Adolph Fischer were hanged, for charges of murder during a bombing at the first May Day protest on May 1st 1886 November 4, 1952 Malcolm LIttle released from prison, changed name to Malcolm X November 5 Guy Fawkes Day / Bank Transfer Day November 6, 1949 Earth First Activist Judi Bari born November 9 1989 Berlin wall torn down November 11, 1895 MIlitant Anarchist Barbieri Briattica born November 13, 1956 Supreme Court upholds district ruling making segregated busses illegal in US. November 14, 1986 White House secretly sold weapons to Iran November 15 1992 BART police murder unarmed Jerrold Hall at Hayward BART Station. November 15 1930 Police kill 12 workers at copper miners’ strike in Peru. November 18 2011 University Police pepper spray sitting students at Occupy UC Davis protest November 20 1969 Alcatraz Island Occupied by 78 Native Americans. November 22 1744 Early Women’s Rights Advocate Abigail Adams born. November 24 1865 MIssissippi passes “Black Codes” barring blacks from juries, guns and schools. November 26 1970 American Indian Movement Occupies Plymouth Rock (Mayflower II) November 29 Black Friday / Buy Nothing Day November 29 1964 Sand Creek Massacre of Cheyenne & Arapahoe. November 30 1999 Thousands shut down World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle.

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

EDUCATIONAL

YOUR RIGHTS WHEN FILMING POLICE

1. When in public spaces where you are lawfully present you have the right to photograph anything that is in plain view. 2. When you are on private property, the property owner may set rules about the taking of photographs. 3. Police officers may not generally confiscate or demand to view your photographs or video without a warrant. 4. Police may not delete your photographs or video under any circumstances. 5. Police officers may legitimately order citizens to cease activities that are truly interfering with legitimate law enforcement. 6. Note that the right to photograph does not give you a right to break any other laws. If you are stopped or detained for taking photographs: ● Always remain polite and never physically resist a police officer. ● If stopped for photography, the right question to ask is, "am I free to go?" If the officer says no, then you are being detained, something that under the law an officer cannot do without reasonable suspicion that you have or are about to commit a crime or are in the process of doing so. Until you ask to leave, your being stopped is considered voluntary under the law and is legal. ● If you are detained, politely ask what crime you are suspected of committing, and remind the officer that taking photographs is your right under the First Amendment and does not constitute reasonable suspicion of criminal activity.

WALL OF SHAME Officer Phillip Bozarth

Killer cop Bozarth has a long trail of dead bodies behind him. Most cops rarely draw their guns in their entire careers, however to date Bozarth has killed no less than five people.   Early in his career, he shot a “suspect” who allegedly had a knife.  According to the police, the alleged suspect lunged at Bozarth, a common ruse used by law enforcement.  For his troubles, the unnamed man received 8 bullets from Bozarth and another officer. Bozarth’s next victim was Robert Jennings, age 35 killed on July 10th 1993. Bozarth again said Jennings lunged at him. Kill no. 3 happened on Jan. 17, 1998 when Bozarth killed 17 year old Martin Santos Castro Jr. by shooting him 4 times, twice in the back. He claimed Castro tried to shoot him. Victim no. 4 is Rene Lopez Vizzuett killed on Feb. 12th 2001. Bozarth again claimed Rene had a gun that turned out to be a toy. However, witnesses to the shooting told reporters that Rene had no gun in his hand when he was killed. Bozarth’s fifth known victim is Ricardo Morales Carbajal, 24, on June 25th 2005. Bozarth killed Ricardo claiming he was holding something in his hand as he exited his car. They claimed a gun was found on the seat still inside the car. All of Bozarth’s killings have been deemed justified. Bozarth is member of a religious law enforcement group named the Christian Law Enforcement Fellowship; He uses his belief in religion to justify his violent behavior towards the citizens of San Diego. In particular, he uses Roman 13: verses 1,3 and 4 which read: ‘Everyone must submit himself to governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established….For rulers hold no terror for those who do right, but for those who do wrong….But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword for nothing. He is God’s servant, an agent of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer.’ Bozarth says these words of scripture give him great comfort. According to him, these words unambiguously mean the “Christian” (sic) cop has been given the right from “God” to use deadly force. To further rationalize his brutality and assuage his guilt, Bozarth also decided to alter the commandment ‘Thou shall not kill’ to ‘Thou shall not murder’.

Today, Bozarth is still on the force and assigned to SDPD’s Use of Force Task Force Committee.

GANG INJUNCTIONS
What is a "Gang Injunction?"
Gang injunctions are civil court orders that attempt to address crime by using a lower legal

standard than required by the criminal justice system, resulting in serious civil liberties violations. Law enforcement use them as a tool to label people gang members and restrict their activities in a defined area. Gang injunctions make otherwise legal, everyday activities–such as riding the bus with a friend or picking a spouse up from work late at night–illegal for people they target.A gang injunction is obtained by the City attorney or District attorney who asks a judge to declare that a particular gang is a "public nuisance" and impose permanent restrictions on the targeted individuals' daily lives.The ACLU of Northern California has long opposed gang injunctions as an ineffective and inappropriate method of addressing safety concerns.

What's at Stake?
Gang injunctions raise a number of civil liberties concerns, both for specific, targeted individuals, as well as any community member who lives in or visits the designated area. One of the most troubling aspects is that they often give police overly­broad discretion to label people gang members without having to present any evidence or even charge someone with a crime. Police are left to rely on things like what someone looks like, where they live, and who they know. As a result, there is a great potential for racial profiling, with a particular impact on young people of color. Despite the documented existence of white gangs, no California gang injunction has targeted a white gang.People targeted by gang injunctions are not guaranteed their legal right to be notified or given the opportunity to defend themselves in court prior to being bound by restrictions of the injunction, nor are they provided with an attorney.Additionally, many gang injunctions do not provide a clear way out for people who are either mistakenly identified as gang members or for those who have turned their lives around. This means that the injunction could follow them the rest of their life, which can make it more difficult to avoid gang activity.

Are they Effective?
Gang injunctions are an ineffective law enforcement tool that does not address the root problems of crime and violence. Los Angeles has numerous gang injunctions – more than any other city, yet lost more than 10,000 youth to gang violence in the last 20 years. New York is a major city with the potential for serious gang problems, yet in 2005 Los Angeles had more than 11,000 gang­related crimes, while New York faced 520. What has been shown to work at reducing violence and gang activity is funding social services, such as gang intervention and prevention programs, providing jobs and job training, and providing better educational opportunities for young people.

What Can You Do?
In many instances, organized opposition to gang injunctions only begins once a proposed gang injunction has been filed in court. However, the California Supreme Court has held that gang injunctions are constitutional – despite well­founded concerns about the violation of individual rights. Accordingly, opposing a gang injunction in court at best results in limiting the terms and scope of the gang injunction and historically has not prevented a gang injunction from being issued.Communities have an essential role in organizing in advance of a proposed gang injunction being filed in court. Activities opposing gang injunctions may include:Public education regarding gang injunctions, including what they are, the problems they pose, and the need for real solutions.Political opposition targeting city officials, including the City Attorney, the Chief of Police, members of City Council, and the Mayor.Political pressure to adopt prevention and intervention solutions for a community to stop the criminalization of individuals, while providing real services and solutions that address the root causes of crime and violence.

UPCOMING EVENTS
Nov. 1st (6:00­9:00pm)­ Annual Muertos Candlelight Procession Sherman Heights Community Center to the Historic Chicano Park in Barrio Logan. We encourage guests to bring a candle and/or pictures of departed loved ones as we march in their memory. Location: Sherman Heights Community Center 2258 Island Avenue, San

Diego, California 92102 Nov. 3rd 10:00am­6:00pm)­ Muertos Festival (Day of the Dead Festival) San Diego's most authentic and longest standing Dia de los Muertos Celebration in the heart of Sherman Heights! Come embrace Mexican culture and experience a traditional celebration, honoring our departed loved ones. Location: Sherman Heights Community Center 2258 Island Avenue, San Diego, California 92102 Nov. 8th (7:00­9:00pm)­ Queer Latinidad: Voices from Nueva York Emanuel Xavier and Charles Rice González debut reading in SD. The two authors will be reading sections from their novels. Help us celebrate the queer Latino experience and literature by queer people of color! (donations of $6­8  accepted to support our writers and the Centro)  Location: Centro Cultural de la Raza, 2004 Park Blvd., San Diego, 92101 Nov. 9th (6:00­10:00pm) ­ We Are Here An explosion of Queer & Ally Art. Dance­Music­Spoken Word­Visual Art. / Una explosión de arte Queer y Aliado. Baile­Música­Poesía­Artes Visuales. Location: Centro Cultural de la Raza, 2004 Park Blvd., San Diego, 92101 Nov. 16th. (12:00­3:00pm)­ March Against Mainstream Media San Diego
Location: NBC 7 San Diego, 225 Broadway, San Diego, California 92101