You are on page 1of 15

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. RECENT NEWS 2. VICTIMS PICTURE 3. VICTIMS STORY 4. THIS MONTH IN HISTORY 5. EDUCATIONAL 6. WALL OF SHAME 7. FEATURED ARTICLE 8.

 UPCOMING EVENTS

RECENT NEWS
Border Patrol and SDPD shoot man in leg 1.2.14 ­ 30 year old Carlos Romero was shot by San Diego Police and Border Patrol after he was spotted driving a stolen vehicle, police say.  When the police tried to pull him over, he fled and led them down to the international border at San Ysidro where he became stuck in traffic.  When officers tried approaching on foot, Romero rammed a police cruiser and a border patrol vehicle and managed to make a U­turn.  At that point a police officer and a border agent opened fire striking the man in the leg.  He was taken into custody a short time later. (Another) Latino man dies in Mount Hope shooting 1.11.14 ­ Jose Luis Navarro of Lemon Grove died after two days on life support from gunshot wounds he suffered when police shot him after an hour­long chase for talking on his cell phone.  A video of the shooting shows Navarro coming to a stop on 41st near Hilltop Drive and almost instantly multiple officers open fire.   Officers later claimed Navarro pointed a weapon at them. Outrage! Kelly Thomas’ killers acquitted! 1.13.14 ­ “I’m just horrified. They got away with murdering my son,” said Kelly’s mother Cathy Thomas, after the verdict was read. “It’s just not fair. I guess … it’s legal to go out and kill now.”  Former Fullerton California police officers Manuel Ramos and Jay Cicinelli were both acquitted in the killing of Kelly Thomas, a homeless with mental disabilities. In the video of the incident, Ramos is seen pulling on some gloves and saying to Thomas “Now, you see my fists? They’re getting ready to fuck you up.” BP invades home to destroy evidence of wrongdoing, but… 1.16.14 ­ Seven Border Patrol agents stormed the private residence of man who videotaped an agent repeatedly punching a man while he was lying prone on the ground. They entered his home after midnight and demanded he turn over the cell phone footage. But unfortunately for them before the agents could confiscate the cell phone, the unidentified man who is a fourth waiver managed to download the video and send it to local news.  He was later “violated” by his parole officer and returned to prison. Officer who killed passenger in car ID’d 1.29.14­  Police say Aaron DeVenere was killed by SD police officer Richard Butera on Jan. 25th when the former took a female driver hostage after they were pulled over for a traffic violation.  Police claim DeVenere first exited the vehicle aggressively but then reentered the vehicle.  He then forced the driver to flee, leading police on a chase that ended when Butera killed him with a single shot. Police claim DeVenere told them via cell phone he had a gun and explosives but neither was found at the scene.

SD Police to start collecting racial data on stops 1.29.14 ­ At committee meeting hosted by city council member Myrtle Cole, Police chief Bill Lansdowne asked the council to authorize use of body cameras to collect racial data. In an earlier statement, Lansdowne said controversy over New York's "stop and frisk" program led him to reinstate the policy started in 2000 to collect traffic stop information. However, at the committee meeting, community members were skeptical of the chief’s plan.  "Those lapel cameras that you're talking about, they are only going to work if you have proper policy and procedure with them," said one resident of southeast. "Not to where you can just turn them on and off." In 2000, the SD police department tapped SDSU to conduct a survey to track racial data on traffic stops.  The media reported that preliminary results showed that people of color were pulled over 9 times more than whites.  However, the police deemed the survey ‘inconclusive’ and the survey was completely abandoned.

Kelly’s Story
“Now, you see my fists? They’re getting ready to fuck you up.” On July 10, 2011 Kelly Thomas a houseless schizophrenic man died from the beating he endured from Fullerton police. The entire incident was captured by audio and video devices. 5 days earlier police were called by the manager of a local establishment to investigate a report of someone burglarizing cars and upon arriving they encountered Kelly.  A former bouncer, Michael Reeves later told investigators that the manager lied to police about Kelly breaking into cars to get them to respond quicker.  He said the manager had a policy to do "anything necessary" to keep loiterers out of the area. Shortly after arriving, Fullerton police officer Manuel Ramos is heard on the video questioning Kelly about “trying door handles on cars”. Kelly is heard repeatedly saying “I don’t know what you’re talking about.” After awhile Ramos commands Kelly to sit on a curb with his legs stretched out in front of him.    At one point Ramos tells him to put his hands on his “fuckin’” knees while maintaining the position and Kelly eventually follows his command. Ramos dons some rubber gloves and then says to Kelly, “Now, you see my fists?” Kelly responds, “Yeah? What about them?” “They’re getting ready to fuck you up.” At one point he strikes Kelly and curses at him to keep his hands on his knees.  Kelly stands and begins walking away with his hands in a defensive position when Ramos and another officer began striking him with their batons. Ultimately 6 Fullerton officers would join in the fracas and throughout the beating Kelly can be heard giving in to officers (“okay, okay, okay!”) gasping “I can’t breathe!”  and calling for his father. His last words were “help me”. Medical records later showed he was beaten so badly, the bones in his face were broken and he choked on his own blood. He was taken to the hospital where he slipped into a coma.  He died five days later after his parents removed him from life support.  The coroner ruled that compression of the thorax is why Kelly couldn’t breathe and his brain was ultimately deprived of oxygen. Ramos was charged with second­degree murder and involuntary manslaughter; Corporal Jay Cicinelli and Officer Joseph Wolfe were both charged with felony involuntary manslaughter and excessive force.  Ramos and Cicinelli were tried and on Jan. 13th they were found not guilty on all charges. Charges against Wolfe were later dropped. Fullerton erupted with protests and on Jan. 18, a few hundred Kelly supporters rallied and more than a dozen protesters were arrested when they refused dispersal orders. More

protests are being planned as Kelly supporters vow to keep fighting for justice for Kelly. “We do not accept a NOT GUILTY verdict in the murder of Kelly Thomas! We DEMAND the murderers to be imprisoned or FULLERTON will continue to feel the wrath of the people!”

THIS MONTH IN HISTORY FEBRUARY
Feb 1, 1932­ Augustin F. Marti, Mario Zapata & other revolt leaders executed in El Salvador. Feb 1, 1980­ 7,000 march to protest KKK in Greensboro, NC Feb 2, 1808­ Foreign slave trade outlawed Feb 3, 1870­ The 15th Amendment was passed, granting blacks the right to vote. Feb 3, 1919­ 32,000 textile workers strike in Lawrence Mass. Feb 8, 2001­ Black Panther Robert King Wilkerson of Angola 3 released after 29 years falsely imprisoned. Feb 9, 1995­ Mexican government tries to ambush EZLN Leaders & claim to know identity of Marcos. Feb 11, 1990­ Amnesty announced for all political prisoners in South Africa. Feb 13, 1921­ Kropotkin’s funeral, last anarchist gathering in USSR. Feb 14, 2006­ 11 Food Not Bombs organizers arrested & tortured in the Philippines. Feb 15, 2003­ 10 million people in 800 cities protest invasion of Iraq Feb 17, 1984­ Workers at a Coke plant in Guatemala, seize it for collective operation. Feb 18, 1970­ Chicago 7 found guilty of conspiring to incite riots at ‘68 DNC Convention Feb 21, 1965­ Malcolm X assassinated, Audubon Ballroom, NYC. Feb 23, 1868­ W. E. B. DuBois, important civil rights leader and co­founder of the NAACP, was born. Feb 23, 1903­ Cuba leases Guantanamo Bay to US “in perpetuity” Feb 28, 1973­ AIM occupation of Wounded Knee, SD begins, Feds launch full scale military siege .

EDUCATIONAL YOUR  RIGHT TO DEFEND YOURSELF AGAINST UNLAWFUL ARREST
“Citizens may resist unlawful arrest to the point of taking an arresting officer’s life if necessary.” Plummer v. State, 136 Ind. 306. This premise was upheld by the Supreme Court of the United States in the case: John Bad Elk v. U.S., 177 U.S. 529. The Court stated: “Where the officer is killed in the course of the disorder which naturally accompanies an attempted arrest that is resisted, the law looks with very different eyes upon the transaction, when the officer had the right to make the arrest, from what it does if the officer had no right. What may be murder in the first case might be nothing more than manslaughter in the other, or the facts might show that no offense had been committed.” “An arrest made with a defective warrant, or one issued without affidavit, or one that fails to allege a crime is within jurisdiction, and one who is being arrested, may resist arrest and break away. lf the arresting officer is killed by one who is so resisting, the killing will be no more than an involuntary manslaughter.” Housh v. People, 75 111. 491; reaffirmed and quoted in State v. Leach, 7 Conn. 452; State v. Gleason, 32 Kan. 245; Ballard v. State, 43 Ohio 349; State v Rousseau, 241 P. 2d 447; State v. Spaulding, 34 Minn. 3621. “When a person, being without fault, is in a place where he has a right to be, is violently assaulted, he may, without retreating, repel by force, and if, in the reasonable exercise of his right of self defense, his assailant is killed, he is justified.” Runyan v. State, 57 Ind. 80; Miller v. State, 74 Ind. 1. “These principles apply as well to an officer attempting to make an arrest, who abuses his authority and transcends the bounds thereof by the use of unnecessary force and violence, as they do to a private individual who unlawfully uses such force and violence.” Jones v. State, 26 Tex. App. I; Beaverts v. State, 4 Tex. App. 1 75; Skidmore v. State, 43 Tex. 93, 903. “An illegal arrest is an assault and battery. The person so attempted to be restrained of his liberty has the same right to use force in defending himself as he would in repelling any other assault and battery.” (State v. Robinson, 145 ME. 77, 72 ATL. 260). “Each person has the right to resist an unlawful arrest. In such a case, the person attempting the arrest stands in the position of a wrongdoer and may be resisted by the use of force, as in self­ defense.” (State v. Mobley, 240 N.C. 476, 83 S.E. 2d 100).

“One may come to the aid of another being unlawfully arrested, just as he may where one is being assaulted, molested, raped or kidnapped. Thus it is not an offense to liberate one from the unlawful custody of an officer, even though he may have submitted to such custody, without resistance.” (Adams v. State, 121 Ga. 16, 48 S.E. 910). “Story affirmed the right of self­defense by persons held illegally. In his own writings, he had admitted that ‘a situation could arise in which the checks­and­balances principle ceased to work and the various branches of government concurred in a gross usurpation.’ There would be no usual remedy by changing the law or passing an amendment to the Constitution, should the oppressed party be a minority. Story concluded, ‘If there be any remedy at all … it is a remedy never provided for by human institutions.’ That was the ‘ultimate right of all human beings in extreme cases to resist oppression, and to apply force against ruinous injustice.’” (From Mutiny on the Amistad by Howard Jones, Oxford University Press, 1987, an account of the reading of the decision in the case by Justice Joseph Story of the Supreme Court. As for grounds for arrest: “The carrying of arms in a quiet, peaceable, and orderly manner, concealed on or about the person, is not a breach of the peace. Nor does such an act of itself, lead to a breach of the peace.” (Wharton’s Criminal and Civil Procedure, 12th Ed., Vol.2: Judy v. Lashley, 5 W. Va. 628, 41 S.E. 197). You are also within your rights not to answer any questions without a lawyer present, and if possible, to demand a video recording be made of the entire encounter that you or your lawyer keep as evidence, so that federal prosecutors can’t get away with charging you with making false statements to a government investigator and testilying about what you said. See this article. As a practical matter one should try to avoid relying on the above in an actual confrontation with law enforcement agents, who are likely not to know or care about any of it. Some recent courts have refused to follow these principles, and grand juries, controlled by prosecutors, have refused to indict officers who killed innocent people claiming the subject “resisted” or “looked like he might have a gun”. Once dedicated to “protect and serve”, far too many law enforcement officers have become brutal, lawless occupying military forces.

WALL OF SHAME San Diego Police Officer, Pablo Agrio (29)
“I’m not through with her yet.”
The Agrios lived in Paradise Hills and had one son.  Alma was training to become a sheriff and Pablo a 4 year veteran of the San Diego police department, was attending night school to advance his law enforcement career. That all ended when, on the night of March 26th 1988, Agrio shot his 24 year old wife Alma Agrio in the back of the head.  Agrio, a known wife­beater with an uncontrollable temper, was angry and fought with his wife for coming home late and being intoxicated. Alma, who was struggling with an alcohol addiction, locked herself in the bedroom but Agrio kicked the door in.  He began beating her, making good on his promise to their baby sitter to make her “regret” going to the bar.  Moments before Alma was killed he tells her friend via the phone “I’m not through with her yet.” Alma pulls a gun from a dresser drawer but Agrio wrests the gun from her. Evidence presented at the trial shows that Agrio had complete control over the gun when Alma was shot despite his claim it fired when they struggled with it.  It was shown that Alma had “given up” and was kneeling and crying when he shot her in the center of the back of her head. In April 1989, Agrio was convicted of 2nd degree murder and sentenced to 17 years to life in prison. December 6, 2005, Agrio was denied parole by the Board for the fourth time. On February 17, 2006, he filed a habeas petition in the state superior court, which Order Denying Petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus denied the petition in a reasoned opinion on April 11, 2006. On July 27, 2006, petitioner filed a petition in the California Court of Appeal, which also denied with a reasoned opinion on October 6, 2006. On February 27, 2007, petitioner filed a petition for review with the California Supreme Court, which summarily denied review on July 25, 2007.

FEATURED ARTICLE
Black & Pink San Diego shows moving film on imprisoned transgender women
By Gloria Verdieu San Diego, Calif. — A film showing the blatant discrimination that transgender people endure in the prison system was shown here on Jan. 12. The screening of “Cruel & Unusual: Transgender Women in Prison,” followed by a discussion about the prison­industrial complex, was hosted by Black & Pink San Diego. The moving and caring documentary describes in detail the experiences of five transgender women incarcerated in prisons in five different states. The U.S. prison system decides where to place inmates based on their genitals, not their gender identity. These women were initially placed in the general population with men. They went through inhumane and humiliating treatment, including rape, violence and solitary confinement. Medical treatment they had been receiving prior to incarceration was denied by prison authorities, who refused to recognize gender identity disorder as a legitimate medical condition. Many people who attended the screening had gone to a rally the previous day to defend the rights of transgender students. The rally urged passage of the School Success and Opportunity Act (AB 1266), a new California bill that guarantees transgender students safe access to facilities and activities in public schools. The rally was called by Canvas for a Cause. After the film, Black & Pink organizer James Messer led a discussion, starting with an update on some of the terminology used, since the film was released in 2006. The discussion included statistics noted in the film, such as 30 percent of transgender people

are incarcerated and many are held in solitary confinement. Transgender prisoners, like so many of the more than 2 million people held in U.S. prisons, are there because of economics. Many are homeless, jobless, isolated from family and lack the finances to get adequate legal representation. These women don’t deny that they should pay for the crimes they committed, but listening to the stories many conclude that their crimes are crimes of survival. The discussion also led to possible solutions, with emphasis on raising people’s awareness about the U.S. criminal injustice system. Messer gave an update on the case of CeCe McDonald, who is scheduled to be released in January. Rallies in cities across the U.S., including San Diego, helped force the justice system to reevaluate her case, resulting in her release. Black & Pink has been in existence for nine years, with chapters forming in cities across the U.S. The recently formed San Diego chapter has been meeting for three months. Black & Pink is a strong advocate for the abolition of both the prison­industrial complex and the death penalty. Its website says it is “an open family of LGBTQ prisoners and ‘free world’ allies who support each other.” One of the many B&P projects is an online pen­pal program where LGBTQ prisoners can list their names, addresses and a 25­word ad (nonsexual) describing what they want from a pen pal. The San Diego People’s Power Assembly­United for Racial Justice and the Committee Against Police Brutality sponsored this event at the Malcolm X Library as part of the ongoing struggle for unity in our community. The purpose of these assemblies is to educate our communities about local grassroots organizations and what they are doing. Verdieu gave a welcoming and a background talk on the PPA.

UPCOMING EVENTS
Feb. 9th & 23rd..­ CAPB General Meeting ­ 12:00pm City Heights Performance Annex, 3791 Fairmount ave. (next to Library) Feb. 2nd ­ CURB’s Stop the Donovan Prison Expansion: Educational & Strategic Planning Meeting ­ 2:00pm Malcolm X Library 5148 Market St, San Diego, CA 92114 Feb. 3rd – Feb. 7th ­ Call to Demand Freedom for Clarence Moses­El Call District Attorney Mitch Morrissey ­ 720­913­9000 Feb. 6th. ­ Pack LA Superior Court! Room 615. *JUSTICE FOR ALONI* 9:00am The Superior Court 111 North hill street. Los Angeles, California 90012 Feb. 9th ­ "Relief Rebuild & Remember" Hip Hop for Philippines! 7:00pm ­ WorldBeat Cultural Center 2100 Park Blvd, San Diego, California 92101 Feb. 11th ­ B.R.L.P. Childbirth Education, Building Family Wellness Classes 3:00pm ­ The Holdout 2313 San Pablo Avenue, Oakland, California 94612 Feb. 15 ­ Protest Against Bakersfield Police Brutality! 10:00am ­ McDonald's at 5410 Stockdale Hwy 5410 Stockdale Hwy, Bakersfield, California 93309 Feb. 18th ­ Court Support for the Fullerton 14 ­ 8:30am ­ North Justice Center Fullerton, California 92832­1258 Feb 23rd. ­ QUEERS AND ALLIES UNITE! A Benefit of Rockin' Resistance Against Police Brutality ­ 6:00pm ­ The Kava Lounge 2812 Kettner Blvd., San Diego, 92102