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Edible Wild Plants and Weeds

Auto Index To Volume 2
Cover Title Page Foreword Preface Table of Contents Introduction Warnings Key To Plant Information Botanical Names. Seed Life, Viability. Collecting Seeds Growth Cycle When to Plant Seeds Seed Depth Starting Mix Containers for Starting Seeds Temperature to Germinate: Bottom Heat Germination Time Light Growing Temperature pH Range Transplanting The Second Transplanting Previous Preparation for Transplanting Outdoors Transplanting Outdoors Time to Plant Fertilizer Sources and Mineral Availability Fertilizer Sources, Wood Ash, Mineral and Trace Mineral Proportions
Edible Native Plants and Weeds - F. Ritchie

Epsom Salts and Dolomite Mineral Availability Compost Pile Additions Keeping the Bugs Down Other Means of Propagating Miscellaneous Seed Notes Compost Pile Addition Soil Sterilization Climate Zones Zone Map Fertilizer Extending the Growing Season: Cloches, Wall-O-Water (R), Remay (R), Plant Protection. Watering: Growth and Damping Off Inhibitors. Warnings

Seed and Plant Catalog Sources. Sources Listed by Plant Names
Bibliography. Acknowledgments Disclaimer
Return To Main Index

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Edible Native Plants and Weeds - F. Ritchie

Handbook of

Edible Wild Plants and Weeds
Volume 2 Reference
Reference Guide To Available Edible Native Plants For Adventure Camping and Emergency Needs

Fern J. Ritchie
Book Two. The Incredible Edibles Series
Ritchie Unlimited Publications Springfield, Oregon
Edible Native Plants and Weeds - F. Ritchie

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Edible Native Plants and Weeds - F. Ritchie

Copyright 1999, by Fern J. Ritchie, No reproduction permitted without written permission, except for brief excerpts for review purposes.

Foreword
In times of strife, economic or disaster, the need for food doesn’t diminish, but the usual sources may not be available. You may learn about the food sources that surround us, and they present new possibilities for your eating “pleasure”. Some wild edibles are nutritious to some degree, while others are highly nutritious. If you are really hungry, either way, they will put something in your stomach. A person need not go hungry under these circumstances if there is a willingness to learn before-hand. The American public has so allied itself with instant food, sprayed vegetables, out of season and commercial sources, it no longer knows the pleasure of the simple things of life. Take away instant and out of season foods, and will they know how to take care of themselves and their families? When camping, most people take all the conveniences with them as if the wilderness was another planet. Lost in the woods, the edible things about them have no meaning. It’s time to wake up to the natural possibilities available. Some people of the 60's went back to simple ways of eating. The need is closer than you think. One main purpose for the Incredible Edible Series is that whatever situation you find yourself, there is always food available. How else did the Native Americans survive? It's always good to know what is edible in an emergency, for refreshment on a hike, a camping trip, or just as a new experience. This is the second book in the Incredible Edible Series. In an effort to provide a more useful
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Edible Native Plants and Weeds - F. Ritchie

We assume no responsibility for uses made of the contained information. If you are successful, you have made the best use for the intended purpose of the book. Congratulations.

ISBN: 0-939656-27-2 CD Edition: 0-939656-51-5

Library of Congress Card Number: 99-64725

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

Written, typeset, printed, and bound in Springfield, Oregon

Edible Native Plants and Weeds - F. Ritchie

The Handbook is the part that one would likely want in the field for reference about edible plants. This book names the so-called wild plants or weeds. plant sources. or alternatives are given from which to choose. The plants with the most information are those that frequent the vegetable. The first volume names the edible native. seeds. or decorative garden. as mentioned earlier. escaped. All the information has been gathered from many sources and compared. It contains the references. or that are downright poisonous. The wild and naturalized plants Edible Native Plants and Weeds .book. their environment and available growing information.F. and materials that complete the picture. Not all sources agree. perhaps something the wind or the birds have dropped nearby. The last of the series is on edible herbs. bibliography. etc. Ritchie C7 C8 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .F. A minimum of additional material is provided with it. available. It includes wild edible plants that may grow on your country property or in the wild. but it would not help much in the field. The second volume. Nursery catalogs have been very helpful. and escaped plants that have edible parts. Preface This second book of the Series is a departure from growing edibles in the garden. It also warns about the parts to which the human system reacts unfavorably. credits. and references.. The third book is on fruits. Edible Native Plants and Weeds has been divided into two volumes. Ritchie . It is divided into two volumes for utility. The majority rules in this case. is more necessary for study. or wild plants. naturalized plants. herb. The second volume contains sources of seeds and plants. details on propagation and growing. but not necessarily known to you as food.

maximum. escaped. and left out needed. The published books I found with similar information were written from an entirely different perspective. they have found a suitable place to grow. and from the top of Maine to Hawaii. It was something my husband wanted to do. pertinent information. or native growing locality follows. Naturalized. C10 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .F. In the text. America. Editor’s Note: All I said was that it would be good to have some information on edible wild plants to fill out the Emergency Procedures Series. N. Puerto Rico is not included because no response came from my queries. available at the time of writing. I’m sure that the residents will know of edible uses of plants in the States that are not listed.F. pertinent information concerning propagation is followed by a description of where the variety is found. Since plants know no political borders. useful. There is a wide range of plant habitats in which to grow all of the plants. what circumstances are needed for its survival. I expected two or three dozen plants. Fern does not do things in a small way. I gathered information as I found it. and wild plants usually are not too fussy about where they grow. From Alaska to the tip of the Florida Keys. Some. or mixing poetry with nature. Let me know of them. Under a heading entitled Growing Requirements. as listed. I started writing this book as a complete novice on the subject. The common or local names are listed next. you will find names of plants from many countries. with the proper credits. What is the use of listing a plant if you don’t know what part is edible and how to use it? We have done our best to make this information easy to find.usually have a description of the places where they can be found. Sources for obtaining each plant. Each plant description is concluded with a listing of the edible uses for the plant. Other books were more interested in how to lay out a garden containing edible plants. you may want to cultivate. Don’t be alarmed if your weed takes on a little different color or character. Of course. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . We would be happy to receive copies of new pictures to put in later printings. refers to the contiguous United States and bordering areas. and safe. the first name listed is followed by the botanical name. naturalization. of course. Ritchie C9 . are listed in Volume II. enjoyable.will grow more lush and beautiful if given care. This is a book to use. If you have access to pictures we don’t have. and that was eight years ago. Even people and animals change character with care. The survival books list few edible plants. the plants. This will give the reader a hint as to the best way to find the plant. The origin. The information was inconsistently presented. Like much of the population. or if propagating it. Other topics include Indoor and Outdoor Sowing and Transplanting. paste (tip) them in. They are like the Starlings ( birds ) that finally made it across the desert even to Oregon.

no effect.However. we cannot assume responsibility or liability for any effect which may result from using this information.F. that’s great. The next day the cat died. DEDICATED TO If this book triggers some academic study. so he ate them and died.F. Ritchie C11 C12 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Along with many other sources. Ritchie . we advise first trying small amounts of any plant new to you. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . And don’t be like the man who fed wild mushrooms to his cat. Ralph: A gift for 50 happy years.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . Compost Pile Addition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Growth Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Starting Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miscellaneous Seed Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Climate Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 When to Plant Seeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fertilizer . . . . . . . . 5 Botanical Names. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Table of Contents For The Printed Edition Foreword Preface Dedication Volume 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 pH Range . . . . . . . . . . 45 Bibliography. . . . . . 1 Warnings . . . . 59 Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wall-O-Water (R). 10 Containers for Starting Seeds . . .F. . . . . Ritchie Fertilizer Sources and Mineral Availability Fertilizer Sources. . 14 Growing Temperature . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Sources Listed by Plant Names . . . . . . . . . . . . .Previous Preparation for Transplanting Outdoors . . . . . . . . Ritchie C13 . . . . . . Extending the Growing Season: Cloches. . . Mineral and Trace Mineral Proportions Epsom Salts and Dolomite Mineral Availability Compost Pile Additions Keeping the Bugs Down . . . . . . . 18 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Watering: Growth and Damping Off Inhibitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A1 Volume 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Light . . . . . . . . 3 Key To Plant Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Second Transplanting . 1 Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 21 22 22 24 26 27 28 30 32 35 Seed and Plant Catalog Sources. 19 Transplanting Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wood Ash. . . Remay (R). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soil Sterilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Temperature to Germinate: Bottom Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Transplanting . 71 C14 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . . 5 Edible Plants Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Key To Plant Information . . . . . . . . . . 69 Disclaimer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Seed Life. . . . . . . . . 8 Seed Depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Time to Plant . . . .F. . . . . . 7 Collecting Seeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plant Protection. . . . . . . . . . . Other Means of Propagating . . . . . 12 Germination Time . . . . . . . . . . Viability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zone Map . . . . . . . . . . . . .

the seeds were left to sprout in the earth. the birds and animals have spread plants and seeds by intention or escape throughout this country. or ‘Early Uses of California Plants’ listed in the Bibliography. Many more nurseries are including natives and naturalized plants since this book was started. or Hottentot figs were edible. etc. I was told “No. Native plants and escaped plants have been unattended for so long only the botanists can sort them out. “Cornucopia” is available in a new edition with an improved index system. and the trees were left to propagate themselves.” Whatever was wild was considered non-edible. been kept to those plants that don’t take too much preparation to make them palatable. but not wild or escaped. As an adult. or in an emergency. the wind. but not the “ wild plants”. herbs. Wild plants do not always adapt (transplant) C2 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . it is wise to know what you can count on for food when necessary. nuts.Edible Wild Plants and Weeds Introduction When I was a child walking through vacant lots in Berkeley. Some included plants are considered weeds. The list has. ‘Skills for Taming The Wilds’ (It has excellent drawings of wild edible plants. Some of the plants listed have warnings in bold if there is a question to their safety. The other question I had was how would you propagate them? You see. California. it is wild. They are not included. We call them wild. I’m a seed collector. In a sense. the wild fennel smelled so good in the heat of the summer sun. they have become native. wagon trains. Ritchie catalogs. I wondered if natal plums. but they need to be planted. This list consists of edible plants that can be found wild.. some of which may be cultivated. such as bean varieties. For some reason it was okay to eat the (wild) blackberries that made their way through the fence. the wave. and found in seed Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Ritchie C1 . who should know what is edible in their locality. There was no one or no book to answer my questions. Agricultural Extension and Botanical Gardens often sponsor plant identification trips in natural settings.F. Years later I realized the wild oats were escaped plants from the farms that had existed before my time. camping. When I asked if it was good to eat. They are included for those who have rural or mountain properties. for the most part. When settlers moved on.F. You will find some only through nurseries while others are out in the countryside. or passion fruit. or naturalized in North America. while others are exotic and found only on the specialty canned goods shelf. Be sure to read Wise's ‘The New Encyclopedia of Cookery’ for more information.). There is a later edition. There are seeds derived from the Conquistadors. They include berries. Settlers. While hiking. seeds. For other lists see ‘Outdoor Survival Skills’. greens.

Since most planting is done in the spring. They must not be slimy or old. 6. Note: Sap or resin from trees is edible. When crushed they must not smell of almonds or peaches. and if all is well. Cook plants when in doubt. are mentioned. plant tiny seed on the surface of the soil in the flat. 8. Leave plenty for nature to propagate. If you are planting wild seed. Do not eat spines or stickers. Do not dig up the plants. or milk-containing plants unless you know them as edible. Do not eat if when raw or cooked it irritates the skin. Those numbers outside the parenthesis indicate the high and low range limits that occur in plant literature. Do not eat seeds that have become black. and it tastes all right chew it. Put some of it on the lips for 5 minutes.F.F. place the container under lights or indirect light. Further explanation of the page layout is found just before the plant listings. Fall is shown in bold face. Warning Some edible plants have unpleasant or poisonous properties. 7. Where plant information. 2. After germination. To select unidentified plants in an emergency: 1. Ritchie C3 C4 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . If the taste continues to be the same. Cover the container with glass or plastic. Most information on the subject comes from military manuals . Edible Native Plants and Weeds . eat a little bit. Water always from the bottom so the seed isn’t disturbed. Survival authorities warn not to eat hairy. Eat small amounts of any unknown plant and wait 5 hours to be sure of its edibility. Grow them from seed. 4. especially the mouth. red berries you don’t recognize are sometimes inedible. dark sap. Avoid eating soapy tasting. White berries are rarely edible. 3. 5. the parenthesis encloses the most favored range. Ritchie . Sap dissolves in water: resin does not. prickly. zones etc. sticker-y.well into the garden.

Ritchie .5. Planting Depth: 1/8". (Light colored) 1/4" (most seed) Germination: 2 days.F. Thin the seedlings to 10-15 inches apart. Ritchie C5 C6 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .. contains a sub letter. Amaranth. if available (Amaranthus hypochondriachus) Mexican. and the soil’s mineral content.F. beans or cucumbers. 8c. Details of growing.Literature warns not to eat of plants that resemble carrots. if appropriate. various zone requirements. New Mexico Plant Name.(Botanical Name) phonetic pronunciation. special feeding. Key To Plant Information Directory reference number of this plant. Soil pH: 6. the dryness or wetness of the air and soil.0-7. broad-cast the seed and rake it. Preliminary preparation for growing or transplanting. The seed may be soaked 12 hours. is shown here. Seed Viability: 4-5 years. Knowing these differences can help determine what plants are edible. The Mexicans use only the light colored seeds as a grain. Author’s comments. Illustration here. including color. low value (consensus range) highest value is the format used to indicate what the experts say about some variable. Soil Temperature: 60*-75*+F. [ ] or italics are used to denote author’s experience. The black Edible Native Plants and Weeds . the amount of wind or heat and when it comes. of a plant may differ from a domesticated one depending on the soil pH and condition. Outdoor Sowing In the spring or if you have summer rains. Southwest native. Note: The character. Growing Requirements This Arizona native is easy to grow in a warm area. Using Amaranth This is a grain amaranth. Tender Annual. parsnips.

F. wild. Botanical Names Botanical names help one to identify or purchase exactly what is wanted. Ritchie . Most catalogs do not give the viability of native.seeds are edible. The seeds may be sprouted up to 1/4" long and used for salads. Ritchie C7 C8 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . By knowing the botanical name of an edible plant. It is ground into flour for baking. It does happen. but it does help to recognize families and to see how much they resemble each other. The best nurseries do have at least one knowledgeable clerk. Young plants are eaten as greens. or escaped plants. Seed kept stored in a quart canning jar or vacuum sealed packet also keep well. This layout is used throughout the Series.F. Wild plants are more and more available in the seed catalogs. Seed Life Seed viability depends upon nature. Park Seed has foil packets. Stokes has very heavy paper. Most of them have a longer life than vegetable seeds. Try mixing amaranth with scrambled eggs. and how the seed is stored. Native or wild and escape plants may be of the same family and one be poisonous while the other has edible parts. Rely more on what the catalogs say than the clerks at most nurseries. Southern Exposure Seed Exchange sells Edible Native Plants and Weeds . it can be tracked down. An abundance of seed makes up for any shortness of life. Without the botanical name you won’t know for sure if you are purchasing the edible variety. Sprouting could take 11 days. Both keep very well. Watch out for incorrect tagging. Check the seed packet or plant tag for the specific name and botanical name to be sure of what you are getting. Most native seed remains in the soil ready to germinate as soon as we turn up the soil. There is not much need for the botanical name for the usual vegetables of the garden. and have about the same needs.

envelopes which my friend in Alaska uses for saving seed.F. a greenhouse. or a raised bed? One year it rains until July. and yet there is seed that is not to be touched after sowing. Some annuals will live unprotected in a six inch blanket of snow and serve the gardener into spring (Western Bittercress. Annual or Biennial. Some plants like it cool. Growth Cycle Some perennials are grown as annuals when no seed is wanted. Some are hardy or tender to cold or frost. but not all of them. Some use the size of the seed as an indication: it's planted the same depth as the diameter of the seed. but only one if you don't have a controlled greenhouse for grow-ing the heat loving ones. and deeper when the soil is warm farther down. the last and first frost. In the Willamette Valley of Oregon the berries are planted in March. The planting depth is listed if the author could find a willing provider. Plants are listed as Perennial. In southern California strawberries are planted in November or December. your locality determines the start of things. Use your best judgement. It is best to study the natural conditions under which the seed starts to germinate. Your Agricultural Extension Service has the frost dates for your locality. or no more than 1/16" deep and pressed firmly. that likes warm conditions. Its always best to test the seed. a cold frame. and the soil doesn't dry out enough to turn it over. it probably will be colder than up higher. well lit bench. It is not just the temperature that harms. I have found it best to pre-germinate seed that rots in cold wet soil. or hard frost dates is helpful in this determination. If the family self-seeds. The cold runs down the slope. Ritchie C9 . if your garden is in a low location. Ritchie Most packets give this information. frost on the leaves can burn them. is there a sunny window. the length of the rainy season. The seed-lings come up sooner. Notice the depth is higher early in the season. but the depth is not given. That is a C10 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . for six weeks. Remember. Most seeds are said to have a 3-4 year life when they are kept cool and dry in the refrigerator. Knowing the last and Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Knowing what botanical family the seed belongs. I have found the shorter depth works well indoors. There are two opportunities for growing the cool ones. while others wait until spring or early summer to germinate. Seed Planting Depth When to Plant Seeds The time to start seeds varies with one's locality. and the length of warm sunny days. the seed would be pressed into the soil surface. you can be quite sure that your seed will be planted at the same depth as the rest of the family. Seed starting also depends on physical location. Dandelion). or needs a long growing season.F. first frost. Listening to the weather predictions helps. The next year the last frost is two months early and the temperature is 85*F. Good soil contact is always neces-sary. others like it hot. bottom heat.

This rule and even the specific depth listed in the planting chart must be used with judgement. bottom soak it.") rocks. Wild seeds need to start getting used to life's possibilities. and alkaline. Plants that grow on slopes don’t like their roots wet. forested locations have acidic soils. In Growing Organic Vegetables West of the Cascades. but doesn’t sterilize the soil. It’s 4. Mix as: 2 parts by volume garden soil (ours is well-manured.F. and put it in a plastic bag if the situation warrants it. Maybe this is part of why my seedlings need so little time to acclimate to each change later on. Varying the water mixed in. silty clay) 1 part by volume sphagnum moss Add to each cubic foot of mix: 1 cup agricultural lime or dolomite 1/2-1 cup cottonseed meal or other seed meal or fish meal 1 pint soft rock phosphate or 1 cup steamed bone meal 1 cup kelp meal C12 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Volcanic. It depends upon the location. When determining the depth. (In All about Vegetables "The old rule of thumb is plant at a depth equal to 4 x's (times) the diameter of the seed. heavy. I get a very good germination percentage.5-5. Ritchie STARTING MIX There are many recipes for the mix in which the seeds are started. Mother Nature has cleaning methods. arid soils are usually sandy with fine Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Remember. sandy and dry weather is expected. the range given must be thoughtfully consid-ered for the seed to be planted at the best depth. makes it suitable for the seeds that like it a little on the dry side.5 in the forest. With vegetables. Wild plant seed is very hardy. rainy.plus. they usually all germinate. and for my set-up the best combination is two parts ground peat to one part vermiculite. plant shallow. If the seed requires more. The mix should have just enough water in it to pack. plant deeper. Water needs to run through quickly as it does in nature. If soils are light. Steve Solomon gives the UC (University of California) Mix as: 75% coarse sand 25% sphagnum peat moss Then add to each cubic Yard of mix: 7 1/2 lbs dolomite lime 2 1/2 lbs superphosphate 12 lbs 5-10-5 fertilizer Cornell University's "Peat-Lite" Mix as: 11 bushels sphagnum peat moss 11 bushels horticultural grade vermiculite (#2 or #4) or perlite 5 lbs dolomite lime 1 lb superphosphate 12 lbs 5-10-5 fertilizer Territorial's Seed Co. I don't sterilize the ingredients. Ritchie C11 . Keep this in mind when watering seeds or seedlings. Wild plant seed should do as well.F. In wet weather or in heavy soils. I use plastic pots. Those that grow in meadows probably don’t mind. If the seeds like a very moist condition to germinate or the mix seems a little on the dry side I place them in a pan of light fertilizer liquid mix.

Larger seed may be erratic in its germination. Ritchie C13 . I start by raising the boxes with one quarter inch stick and then two. compost 1 qt. If a soil temperature is given. heat pad made for this purpose. 1 qt. I have a hard time keeping track of the seedlings outside through our wet winters. This is not true of seeds that need light to germinate. A light bulb under a box would do the same job as it would to start the plants in the first place. Temperature to Germinate: Bottom Heat Few natives. or grow a taproot early. leaf mold 1 qt. while pumpkin or squash-like seed is planted four to a four inch pot. I rely on containers when I can. Corn-types need a deep pot 3 1/2"-4" deep. sand 1 qt. A form of cold frame would be the next in importance. will need a source of heat. 2 qts.Robert Rodale's Starting Mixes 1. a shielded wire. Vista. loamy soil 1 qt. Cucumber-like seed is planted three to a Edible Native Plants and Weeds . the parenthesis indicates the range most authorities agree on. are put in a larger or longer pot than plants that don't mind the transfer. 1 qt. The heat loving plants are later placed on top of the fluorescent for bottom heat. loamy soil 1 qt. perlite or vermiculite Dolomite three or four inch pot. is sprinkled over a 4"x 4" box. California 3. But if they do. grow a delicate root system. Plants that don't like to be transplanted. sand.F. unless they need light to germinate. For some. or sun light coming through a window which heats the soil. Fine seed. Outdoors. a black plastic covering can heat the soil. Ritchie Containers for Starting Seeds Many of the plants included in this book are directly seeded where they are to grow outside. Cole (brassica) and tomato plants do well in a 4"x 4" box and the seed is easy to drop in. this can be supplied by a light bulb. The kind of plant the seed will produce determines what type of pot is used. Large seeds are placed in a heavier medium with a little fertilizer near the bottom in three or four inch pots. compost or well rotted manure Bromeliad Mix from Kent Nursery. vermiculite 1 qt loamy soil 1 qt sphagnum moss 1 qt perlite 2. other than Southern ones.F. but that takes more room and requires much more soil. The seedlings need to move to a cooler condition as soon as they have germinated unless they are heat loving. nor for seeds C14 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . In most cases cover the seed with soil at least as deep as the seed is thick. such as a lettuce type. such as parsley and celeriac. Some gardeners would plant these seeds one to one pot. a "plug" box is ideal.

so she wouldn't waste effort when it was late already. very old corn. Rodale says that those seeds that need light to germinate should be sprinkled on the growing medium. It saves her from replanting when every day counts. but I don't expect to see signs of germination until the third day. It's a good thing we didn't know that. The Verilux Company. Once they have germinated they like it a little cooler. With wild plants. Remember. When I have a new set-up. Kris Wetherbee advises soaking the seed. 3". or we wouldn't have eaten all that good corn. They should be as close as possible without touching the plants. and only allows me a minimum six inch distance from the light. 18 hours of light from them is necessary if they are the only source of light.F. the germination temperature is warmer than the growing temperature. 14 hours (16 doesn't hurt. The second way is for seed that molds easily (corn). I can't get the light 2". Cool White as 68%. Two fluorescent fixtures with two bulbs each are much better than one fixture alone. Ritchie Germination Time If the seed is old it saves time to germinate the seed in a damp paper or cloth towel placed in a plastic bag. and put it in a plastic box until the seed germinates. If the light source is too far away the plants get leggy. advertising "SunLight". but in the north the days are short when the plants need to be started. and lean toward the light. Few catalogs give this information for wild Edible Native Plants and Weeds . A friend does this with most of her seed. A timer switch on the light regulates this for me. Light Sun light has always worked. I fill a three or four inch pot with soil mix. I start checking the second day. She started this after my suggestion of starting some very. I have a box with a mylar covered lid which keeps the moisture in and the bugs out. two ends. or one grows the plant beyond the zone indicated for it. The temperature is regulated by placing a quarter inch stick under one end. put a thermometer in the soil and place it where the seedlings will germinate to determine the temperature. the weeds grow faster than the plant. In writing about starting vegetable seed. and Warm Light as 56%. "SunLight" as 93%. Germination limits are stated for growing outdoors. or leaving it flat on the surface. describes natural sunlight as 100%. or refrigerat-ing it overnight in cool weather.that are scratched into the soil after being cast. or 4" away. wrap the seed in it. plants. but press them in for good contact unless otherwise instructed. The seedlings need a rest too.F. Most garden “experts” tell you to pour water of different temperatures over the seed to spur the germination. and kept in a warm spot. One tube covers a six inch strip under the C16 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . the rainy season is long. Plant seed is germinated indoors where summers are short. They start to be a little leggy. I pour slightly warm water over the seed and let it soak overnight. the light is usually for growing not germination. Ritchie C15 . Some give only two years for corn. or dip a paper towel in warm water. The pots are placed in starting boxes.) is enough light. but even so you can see which plants are on the edge of the full light. It has been determined that regular fluorescent bulbs give the best conditions for growing seeds.

in an undated catalog. Most fruits grow at 6. and cobalt are available at a lower range. Above 7. Calcium and magnesium help to make potassium available. Kris Wetherbee says that especially nitrogen is tied up in very cold soil. Forming flowers does not depend on or respond to the number of day light hours or night hours. If it can't feed. Cultivated soils are usually more acid because the lime that is used leaches out easily. Legumes grow at 7. Tropical plants or warm loving ones grow best at 75*-90*F. nitrogen and sulphur are not absorbed. Otherwise check the instructions on the seed packet. manganese.) This is the basis for determining neutral pH. 8. air temperature. We had flowers form on Chayote squash in the spring and in the fall when the sun was in the same relationship and daylight hours were close to the same length. Ritchie Growing Temperature If the soil temperature range is listed. and east of the high western mountains it is 7. etc.0. Other-wise.5 pH. Ringer Research says. Plants are native or become naturalized when they can take up the minerals they need for food. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Of course. Some seeds need a cold treatment to break their dormancy. Only very poor soils don’t have calcium. though I recently read that in the colonial states the gardens C18 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . It is reported that agricultural land ranges from 4. 4-6 pH.0 pH. It must be above 5.0. Trace elements. Most forest or wood lands are acidic. Some plants grow better with a cooler night temperature. it doesn't matter if the sun burns it or the cold freezes it. You will find ”day length neutral” mentioned in catalogs. iron.0 pH. Ritchie C17 . In the Southwest the land and water source are alkaline.5-7. Rodale says that much of the soil in the USA is acid. H is for Hydrogen.F. for 4-6 weeks or until germination starts.0 to 8.0 pH is the limit for most plants. Each plant has a range within which it can function. Far below 7. that bacteria. The growing temperature is always five to ten degrees cooler than the germination temperature.0 pH iron and magnesium are less available.0 pH.5 pH and the best is between 6 and 7 pH where plant nutrients are available. keep the seeds warm and moist for two weeks followed by 33*-35* F. The Southwest adobe soil is the exception. The seedlings' soil temperature is changed as soon as most of them have come through the soil. it is for indoor germination. quit working or die in a pH below 5. those that grow in the forest or in the northern climates need acidic soil.F. (1) lower pH=acid (14) higher pH=basic or alkaline (The pH of distilled water is 7. Magnesium is in most soils. pH Range Rodale says the p stands for potential. Specific methods are included if the particular seed needs it. zinc.0 pH. It is called cold stratification. The best growing air temperature for cool loving plants is 60*-70*F.tube band.

or hairy leaves which wrap around. a little C20 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . gathering extra soil around the roots. I fill the pot with the rest of the soil and gently press down around the seedling. When transplanting larger seedlings to larger pots. to 1 gal. This includes when they are planted outdoors. The seedlings respond immediately. Plants become better adjusted the more they are trans-planted. Peat moss. and placing the whole in the pot. I don't feel guilty in making as many tests as I do. I have found this to be the most important point in growing plants. pine needles. I have tried an indicator which is supposed to register the pH.F. and exposing the roots while losing too much of the soil.have been used so long. or grab each other. Gently.) in a diluted liquid fertilizer (Miracle Grow. Roger Swain says that seedlings grow better if they are shaken a little. Extension can help with soil testing. Even tomatoes will sit there not growing without the right pH range. Ritchie Transplanting Most authorities say. Like with baby food. After the transplant. The mix I use for the first transplanting consists of steer. It takes the place of a light breeze which makes them stronger. If a very small seedling is being transplanted its best to hold it at the base of the leaves. lock together. As long as the plants are small they are watered this way when they become dry. soil mix left over from old pottings as long as there was no disease. The Second Transplanting Transplanting larger seedlings that are too close to cut apart. The best tool for these conditions is an old short pencil which makes the right sized hole in the soil and assists in pushing the root into the hole. oak leaves and cottonseed meal are all very acid. but it wasn't sensitive enough to see a small change. Since using the B1 there has been no problem of wilting. Each plant is given the right amount of acidity or alkalinity in its soil. and they are accurate enough to grow good plants. have spoon shaped leaves. a first planting mix that didn't produce a seedling. With each transplanting they are placed in a bath which contains liquid fertilizer plus vitamin B1 (according to the instructions). the pH may be very different from what is expected. serrated leaves. By cutting the paper strips in half the price is half. If the plants need to be held beyond the limits of the pot they are transplanted again to a larger size.F. the pot is placed in a pan containing a mix of B1 (1 tbs. Even those plants that wilt a little soon stand straight up. The use of any of these must be limited to "lightly". the bigger the baby the coarser the food. TM). plus some fertilizer (a local product). causing more damage than if they were transplanted earlier. I have found a chemical house that has a test that suits my purpose. soil. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . wood chips. He uses the flat of his hand to brush over the tops of the plants. I lift the root while supporting the stem. Wood ash doesn’t break down as quickly as you may think. and soon didn't seem to work. Ritchie C19 . "Transplant when the seedlings have their first true leaves." Some plants. For these little ones the mix is kept the same until they are transplanted a second time. I test the pH of each batch of mix that's made. While still holding and supporting. at the same time. Wood ashes are very alkaline. like the cole family. I push the roots into the soil with the two fingers holding the root.

CA ) says turnip. and the length of time for maturing. Only the "cool" plants will take the light frost of the late spring. Get your frost dates from Extension. Transplanting Outdoors Plants will just sit still until they get the warmth they need. I remove them. Dolomite is added after the soil is thoroughly mixed and the pH tested. collards. If the delay has to be long a third transplanting may be in order. are listed under "Growing Requirements". These cover crops are broadcast. Natives need such preparation only if they are not growing in their natural zones. 1 peat. and a second Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Charles B. transplanting outdoors may have to be delayed. is the wood products capital. Ritchie C21 . Compost is a natural for native plants. kale and lentil seedlings. if available. Lane. as I mix the soil. It has to be heavy enough for the pot size.F. Whatever comes from the local amendment yard has wood chips of varying size. but those that have a tap root. C22 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Many times a plants stem has been damaged or the earth ball falls away because of some of these chips. Our county. transplanting to a larger size pot has to be done. 1/2 sand. My mix for the second transplanting is by volume: 1 compost. The trick is to transplant before the roots get to the outside of the pot. egg shells. Ledgerwood in 'Reliable Seeds'. Nurseries offer a number of seeds for green manure (Let the plants grow a height they can still turn under to compost in a couple of weeks. Because too much rain or extreme cold stays into spring. or put out lots of root may. Corn Salad is used this way. listing the lightto very heavy feeders. four and five inch pots taking up much more room than a one or two inch pot. The last frost determines when many plants are started or planted in the garden. especially the flat ones. 1 ground bark. so.rock dust or sand and a local growing medium (mostly composted wood chips). No recipe is used. physical requirements. 1983 (Carlsbad. Some plants won't mind. In the Northern parts of the western world the only way you can grow warm weather plants is to grow them indoors and transplant even a third time.F. mustard. the location. For other means see EXTENDING THE GROWING SEASON. Time to Plant Weather conditions dictate when to plant seed outside. Ritchie Fertilizer For: Boron: granite dust. I have found they wend their way toward the stem of the plant or corners of the pot. side dressing. This is true for any that are said to have a taproot. mulching. burned bones. when turned under at 6" are an inexpensive way to improve the soil. It takes a lot of space. Transplanting Outdoors: Previous Preparation The later requirements: zones where they grow best. Big Leaf Maple seeds grew beautifully when they blew onto a compost pile. rutabaga. Calcium: limestone.

5-7. Root development can be seen through the plastic. 1:400=1/2 pint to 25 gals. With earth layering. of the current season. other than with seed. Low Nitrogen 3% Low Phosphorus 16% Low Potassium 8-12% Rock phosphate is calcium phosphate-1 lb to 10 sq ft 3-5 years Granite dust 1 lb-20 sq ft every 3-5 yrs Lime 1 lb-20 sq. Do not let the moss dry out. 3-4 years 5. The rooted stem is then cut off and planted. Hot Bed 1 1/2-2Ft. granite dust. The branch may need some support to hold the tip up.0-8.0 pH Iron-4. Spray tomatoes. is bent down to the ground where roots develop.0-7. to 1 gal of water Wood ashes 5-10 lbs per 100 sq. Keep it below 90*F. 1/2"-1" of bark is removed.0-9. outdoors a cold frame can be opened 6". It is usually done in early spring. of water. Mildew: 8 tbsp. outdoors a cold frame can be wide open until mid-afternoon and then closed. Or. it needs to be pinned whether on the ground or partially in the ground.6-6. takes care of potash and phosphorus deficiencies. The moss is covered with a piece of plastic. Several cuttings can be taken this way.0 pH (9.0 is the greatest) Phosphates-4. Some plants use this process naturally. the stem is cut on the diagonal about 2/3 of the way through.5 pH Calcium-4. The slit or girdle is covered with damp sphagnum moss.F. Ritchie C23 .5-8.5 pH Magnesium-4. ft. it holds itself up. Wait until the temperature drops to 85*F. In 3-6 days it will heat up.0 pH Nitrates-5. Air layering is used in the spring on wood of the previous season’s growth. The stem is girdled 12" or so from the tip.. cucumbers just before bloom. Usually.Potassium: wood ash. Week to 10 days before planting.8 pH Manganese-4. Magnesium: Dolomite limestone. are mentioned in the text. Spread 6" fine soil on top. Other Means of Propagating Several means of propagating.3 pH Kelp or Seaweed 1: 400-Pre-soak seed.5-9. deep. A rooting compound can be applied to hurry the process. Note: 40*F. Root cuttings are made by cutting through part of the growth and roots.0-7. Watering seed beds 1 tbsp to 1 qt water or 1/2 pint to 7 1/2 gals water. and the ends of the plastic are tied tightly around the stem. green sand. Hose down. beans. a portion of wood. pack horse or chicken manure up to 6" from soil level.F. A small sliver (toothpick) is slipped into the slit to keep it open. 60*F.6 pH best for most vegetables. C24 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . it is cut either when the plant is in the ground. before using it.5. Depending on the situation. include strawberries For best availability of : Potassium. ft. In the case of juniper. or after it has been dug. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds .

ft. Put in a blender 1 small onion.5 pH. Clean pots: 1 part bleach/9 parts water.. arrowhead. It should cover 100 sq. ft. usually keep well. Cover seed 3 x its size. yd.. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Frost-tender plants must mature at least 2 weeks before frost. 7. Seaweed. Sterilization Rodale: Pour boiling water slowly through soil. ft. reed grass.0 being neutral. Sawdust: Cedar sawdust won't harm vegetables.For a fuller explanation. Ritchie C25 . Researchers have had good results according to Gardens Alive. night 70-75*F.F. day Try spraying powdery mildew with baking soda and oil in water as soon as it appears. of boiling water is sufficient for a standard sized flat. OR. ft or about 46 lbs. Miscellaneous Seed Notes Sprouting: To speed sprouting: Soak hard-coat seeds in warm water for 24-48 hours in a small. Compost Pile Additions Bone meal 2# per 100 sq. One bushel basket equals 1 1/2 cu. papyrus. will increase the pH by one unit. white and yellow lily. cattails. 1 cup of 5% white vinegar C26 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . It should cover 4 1/2 sq. Warm soil is 65*-80*F. pondweed. Moisture kills more seed than higher heat. Most crops prefer 68*-84*F. per year in garden. Organic Gardening ad pamphlet. widemouthed thermos. It will keep one week in the refrigerator. to germinate. Compost has about a 6. check in a propagation manual. Root crops 1/4-1/2" deep. I scatter the ash that has the burnt bones where I'm going to plant the brassica. 1 Qt water. Add burnt bones to compost. Drying seeds: Seeds kept at home 32*-41*F. pickerelweed. One gal. 1 cu. water hyacinth are all good to add to the compost pile. 3" deep. of compost equals 1000 # or 21 1/2 bushels. Let steep and add 1 tbsp liquid soap (not detergent). Soil Temperatures: Cool soil is 50*-60*F. Night temperatures 5-10* lower than day 55-65*F. General Rule: 30 lbs of limestone to 1000 sq. 1 garlic bulb. 1 tbsp cayenne pepper. of compost.F. 3" deep. Walnut sawdust needs one year to break down the juglone which is harmful. ft. Aphid Spray.

Sterilize soil 180* 1 hour. Nevertheless. sweet clover. Alabama & N. off though it is not as good as the 1st method. it was left on for 6-14 weeks (Near the coast it is foggy and tends to be cool after July 4th and then it starts to warm up. compost. huckleberry-Sow indoors in pots Apr 1st 1/4" deep 10 daysG.) in Humboldt County. Florida Canada. Ritchie C27 . Blackberry. SeptemberDecember. The sheeting was applied in early August at Davis and in mid-June in Humboldt County. To sterilize peat moss steep it in boiling water overnight.British Columbia.pH 5-6. pine needles. oak leaves. cantaloupe leaves. Before applying the sheeting. Florida to Maine & west to Michigan. oak saw dust & oak bark. Care was taken to assure good seal at the edges of the sheeting.F. Rabbiteye Native to river valleys & edge of the woods in S. (Granite dust 1 lb to 10 sq ft every 3-5 yrs) (To treat with Borax 1 1/2 tsp borax to 15 gal water per 100 sq ft. Ritchie weather. Blueberry Maine & Adirondacks. At Davis the sheeting was left on for 6-9 weeks. Dryland Native from Georgia & Alabama to Maine west to Michigan & Oklahoma. It has also been used in some locations to control annual weed seeds. peat moss. but not necessarily in that order. To lower pH if above 8 add compost. Plant January-March. and the sheeting was stretched tightly so as to make close contact with the soil surface.6. "Soil solarization (solar heating of wet soil under clear plastic sheeting) has been shown to be highly effective for controlling many air born pests & diseases. "A single layer of clear polyethylene sheeting worked as well as two layers.7-6. then vetch. (It's hot in Davis in August. Blueberry-Saw dust 2oz or handful of Muriate of C28 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .) Bermuda grass rhizomes were killed and Johnson grass rhizomes and seedlings were controlled to eight inches deep. Alpine s. Blueberry. Georgia. Let rest for twenty four hours. Blueberry: Low bush Native in northeastern US & parts of Canada." The Stay Organic Newsletter. Mountain Native to Cascade Mts. raspberry-4-6 pH 5.4 pH best Strawberry seed "Rugen Improved" (Blueberry & cranberry-Best pH 4. high bush Native wild from N. Evergreen Native along Pacific Coast from Central California . September has the hottest Edible Native Plants and Weeds . University of California researchers have successfully used solarization to control two perennial weeds.6-5. But perennial weeds are tougher targets <with spray also> for solarization. 8-10 weeks before last frost Cold treat (air tight bag or jar in freezer 2-4 weeksdefrost without opening container). because of their massive underground food-storage organs. 140*-180* F. Strawberries should be above 5. at 70*.F. cotton seed meal. Loosely place 1/2" of vermiculite over this.to one quart of water & pour this slowly through the soil will help control damping. Cranberry. Spring trials would do the gardener the most good.4)fruit from June through Oct (see Strawberries above). Boron deficiency: The best is granite dust.pH Best pH 5. for 30 minutes kills fungus knats. plots were mowed or rototilled and watered. Bermuda grass and Johnson grass. Watering the soil and covering it with clear plastic and having continuous sunlit days for two weeks will sterilize deep enough.

With the advent of plastic we create zones. so that.F. The other is the red.) grown in American gardens. Climate Zones Zones are not just those indications of lowest temperatures on a map of the United States or those more detailed for the Western States in Sunset Western Garden Book. Ritchie C29 C30 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Alaska can grow corn and I can grow eggplant. USDA Hardiness Zones Zone Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Average Annual Minimum Temperature below -50* F.potash no lime. black. One is the dried fruit of small grapes (Vitis vinifera) exported from the Mediterranean region. okra and artichokes in Mohawk Valley. or white berry (Ribes sp. The topography of the land gives us different zones. -50* to -40* -40* to -30* -30* to -20* -20* to -10* -10* to 0* 0* to 10* 10* to 20* 20* to 30* 30* to 40* above 40* Edible Native Plants and Weeds .F. Currants: There are two kinds. so does the placement of the chimney or the outside heating unit. Ritchie .

It's the only constant they have. Magnesium enriched18-18-21. potassium. onions are so large and good that the gophers will eat all of the underside. Plant Food for crops: 15-30-15.0 and is high in potassium and calcium (Pacific Northwest and the Southeast).per plant. Potato: 15-15-15. Rabbit Manure: The three values usually given for rabbit droppings are probably for just the droppings. This combination begins to sour. Fish Fertilizer: 5-2-2. The use of both assures the plant uptake of magnesium as well as calcium and potassium. water combination and leave worm castings which are more perfect for feeding vegetables. collards grow large and tender and avocados grow to two pounds (Nabal and Anaheim) and couldn't be better.F. When you raise rabbits they are fed alfalfa and rabbit food. sooner or later. salts to 1 gal of water).Fertilizer These are recommended fertilizer strengths for various plants and fertilizer ingredients. it is generally low in magnesium. Tomato: 5-6-5. becomes available more quickly than dolomite. Ritchie C31 . The combination of droppings plus alfalfa plus the dropped food is perfect for vegetables. Dolomite is dug in for a long time solution. Bone Meal: 3-7-0. strawberries are the best. Strawberry: 10-52-17. Blood Meal: 6-0-0. the result is that cabbages are huge. Anaheim chilies are big. as a spray (1 Tbsp. and they drop much of it. It can also be used directly on the soil around the base of a plant at the rate of 1 Tbsp . you have them when they are needed the most. Epsom Salts Magnesium is critical for the production of chlorophyll in fruit and nut trees. feed.F. Corn: 23-34-11. The worms move into the rabbitry during the winter and out of it during the summer. but it is only part of the story. so. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . 8-24-8. Asparagus: 17-16-28. I have always included it as part of the calcium. Ritchie Red worms are added. 3-5-6. Epsom Salts in water when lower leaves of the tomato start to show yellow from Magnesium deficiency. When the soil pH is above 7. They eat the dropping. Epsom Salts. phosphorus and magnesium fertilizer in my Pacific Northwest vegetable garden C32 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Raspberries: 20-21-20. It improves the uptake of potassium and phosphorus in any plant. and better growth. Wood Ash Hard woods produce the most ash and nutrients. The watering system for any animals leaks. Grown in worm castings.

With our wind conditions they have to be anchored with a somewhat heavy wire. Peppers like the heat early. a bench to put a heating device on. with or without timer or a box large enough for a number of trays that the plants stay in (I find I need four large trays. a non-woven fabric. The box has two fluorescent lights over it. Wall o' Water (R) covers are very helpful. part of it was destroyed. The most important item is a sunny spot by a large window. and a height-adjustable light source. It also keeps out the bugs. but after the first success we had two years of very bad wind in early spring.(see Fruit: Grapes). C33 C34 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . It keeps the plants warmer in the cool months. The fruit invariably ends up in a puddle. and one week after putting it up. but once summer heat comes the black needs to be covered around the plants with grass clippings or straw to keep the roots cooler. but believe I like it better without as the seedlings get more light. The sand is kept moist to facilitate the heating. of ash per 1000 sq. you see all the inviting adds for materials and gadgets that will extend your growing season. this seems to be a new pattern.F. one to hold them up and the other to pour the water in. opening the end away from the usual wind source when the day is too warm. Black pliable black plastic tubing arches over the bed. It must be partially open when the plants start to blossom. fits over the box to keep the moisture in. My husband made them with heavy plastic sacks (2) and the kitchen bag sealer. After we have planted we fasten clear plastic over the hoops leaving it closed as long as it is needed. I have used the starting trays with plastic lids. For acid soils. Ft. Some of these you can build for yourself. and keeps the hot sun off the "cool" plants in late summer. Ritchie punched through the plastic about every four feet on both sides and opposite each other. and is shoved over the aluminum pipes for anchor. Placing it under melons or cucumbers out in the open leads to problems when it rains. They were held up with three pieces of cane after filling. Reemay (R).F. With some protection two anchors on the wind side will do. Extending The Growing Season If you receive garden magazines. It took two of us to set them up. We use black plastic to heat the soil for heat loving plants. We have 3' x 3' and 3' x 4' cloches for melons.). We first made these big enough to cover two crops and high enough to walk under the middle. Depending on the thickness it will last two or three years. otherwise four are needed. ½ to 1 lb. is a ball park figure. is Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Aluminum tubing. and protects the wire. is a wonderful invention. while others are expensive enough to shop through the catalogs and your local garden shops to find the best buy. A lid. which is far better than one. about 20" long. covered with mylar (Sheet plastic won't last as long and usually sags a bit. Ritchie . There is quite a range of prices for the same item. Homemade ones are very satisfactory.). It lasts 2-3-7 years in our garden. The torn pieces can be draped over lettuce to allow planting the fall crop earlier. The box has sand at the bottom burying the heating cable.

In Oregon 50% shade screen is used. Growing Vegetables From Seed. Garlic Water. There are two reasons why plants grow lush in the tropics. Kool Ray. We intend to put a tank in the line that is heated by the sun. If you need to keep plants there are all kinds of props. 4". none less than two feet long and some 6"-8" long holding it down.Successfully. I haven't tried infrared Transmitting Mulch. One morning we went out to find the wind had removed all but 6' of it which was held down on a snagged 2"x 6"x 6'. That will boost the temperature where the plants have no Edible Native Plants and Weeds .F. stops damping off Maple Leaves (Roger Swain said that these inhibit the Cole Family growth.) Eucalyptus Eighty five degrees F. The 44' ended somewhere up the valley. and 6" wide construction lumber of varying lengths. The first time we tried Reemay we had 2". Ritchie .or shade screen over hoops. for the greenhouse plastic roof .We use plastic pipe on each side fastening it with clips and pin it down with the wire that has already been mentioned. I haven't tried foil under plants to reflect more light. it is reported. and keep the moisture in. Watering A drip system under black plastic is ideal in that it warms the water. Water will go through it. Ritchie C35 C36 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . and that is a little cool for many plants. 80% keeps the warmth in so plants grow like mad. Of coarse mulching the "old fashion way" will help keep the plants warmer at night. Our water comes out of the well at 50*F. our whole sculpture display garden in N. Let it be a lesson to you. To give you a reference.. rain and warmed water.) More detailed information about propagation can be found in Book 1 of this Series.F. Growth Inhibitors Beach leaves exposed in winter (None in fresh. San Diego County was under 80% screen. I can't speak about it. There was 50' of cloth. but I believe it would have the rain puddle problem. Is the limit for seeds to germinate. though you have to be sure that it doesn't just run down the sides. so. It wraps easily around a bush. If it is needed in a big way there is a "sun screen" paint. "mulch".

soil pH. what has this to do with an article from "Weedpatch". USA. Ritchie . I tried growing bachelor buttons the first year we were in Oregon. the plants getting at least to three feet. It needs the shade under the larger plants to keep it cool and plenty of water. I have brought together every bit of information needed to grow edible plants successfully. hardiness zone. In Southern California one probably would have to resort to an ice pack every day.Warnings Don't count on a clerk or the computer printer to write on your bill exactly what you have purchased. I want to know why it doesn't work and do something to insure success. Ritchie get the lilac to bloom. If you find a discrepancy between the information you have and this book. that seems to have all the answers for you? If you don't have the same conditions. but that is under these conditions. you start looking for the why.F. how can you judge properly? My friend tries something. The seed packet was of no help. In Oregon it re-seeds itself several times a year. That's how this book got started. It needed the cold at least once a year. In Southern California coriander didn't get more than a spindly eight inches tall before it bolted and went to seed. Bachelor buttons grow wild here. Nothing on the seed packet told me why. and if it doesn't work she doesn't try it again. When a native doesn't grow under your conditions. The few that came up grew to about six inches and put out one flower. One plant may need to be cut all the way to the ground in the fall while another variety may need to be cut part way down. I emptied all the ice from freezer and refrigerator and put it under the lilac. so. To Edible Native Plants and Weeds .F. C37 C38 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . and I can have cilantro (the leaf part) all year round. So. ask the following questions before deciding which you wish to follow: Check the writer's altitude. water pH. it may not have all the right answers for you. Very few articles and books have this information.

Bantam Books. NY 10016.. OR 97213. **** Pam North. Hortus Third. Garden Way Publishing. 5345 N.. **** Ann Reilly and Editors. Portland. 387 Park Ave. Harcourt Brace Javanovich. 1976. Ritchie C39 C40 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Bee Beyer. William G. J.. Revised Edition. University of California Press. Berkeley. Director. New York.Barbara Joe Hoshizaki. 1990. Balls.O. 1980.F. 1990. Diagram Visual Information Ltd. Early Uses of California Plants. 9110 Sunset Blvd. L. Inc. 1976. 1978. Summerland.. 1964. Inc.P. Clan of the Cave Bear.H. A Guide To Field Identification. Inc. Jack Kramer. Los Angeles. Kampong Publications. Paradise Farms. Academic Book Center. New Jersey. Princeton. New York. Artist: Rebecca Merrilees. Bailey. Inc. Tarcher. Van Nostrand Company. Cornell University.. Abrams. 1963. **** Claire Shaver Houghton.. Sandy Blvd. 1977. England or Canada. Stephen Facciola. Herb Identifier and Handbook.F. Inc. Trees of North America. Inc. Macmillan. Box 436. CA 92084. Adelma G. P. Box 972. 120 Alexander St. Inc. Golden Press. Sampson Low. 1983. N. 1978. D. Ingrid Gabriel. Ritchie . 1976. Frank Brockman. Food Drying at Home The Natural Way. NY 10103. ***** Edward K. California Tree Finder. New York City. Herb Gardening in Five Seasons. Fern Growers Manual. Herbs.. Tom Watts. Simmons..Y. Inc. CA 90069. Doubleday Book & Music Clubs. Sterling Publishing Co. 666 5th Avenue.. California. Green Immigrants. ***** Listed only by botanical names. 1870 Sunrise Dr. U.. Vista. Atlas of Oregon 2nd Edition. Loy. Nature Study Guild. South. Herb Growing a Visual Guide. Inc. Cacti and Other Succulents. CA 93067. New York. Bibliography Books: C... 1962. of Oregon. Alfred A. Horitorium. Harry N. Guide for Cooking with Flowers. Cornucopia a Source Book of Edible Plants. E. Jean Auel. California. Knopf. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Third Printing 1970 Berkeley & Los Angeles. 1986. New York..

The New Seed-Starters Handbook. 1993. How To Guide for Gardeners.. New York.. Ritchie Bradford Angier. Leona Woodring Smith. Inc.O. Exeter Books.. 1984. NY 10016. Saving Seed. P O Box. Emmaus. Constant. 1953.. Making the Best of Basics. Pa. Glasgow G4 ONB. (Collins Gem) Harper Collins Publishers. 112 Madison Avenue. The Readers Digest Assoc. 1967. Stebbins and Michael MacCaskey. Storey Communications.James Talmage Stevens. Eleventh Edition McGraw-Hill Book Co.S. Utah 84111. Pleasantville. Krieger. _____Edited by E. New York.. Rodale Press. Brady and Henry R. Stackpole Books. Seymour. Menninger. N. Great Neck. Louis C. Michalak. 1988.. Utah 84601. The Complete Book of Fruit.. 1946. Inc. H. Emmaus. Lesley Bremnus & Dorling Kindersley Text Copyright. G.. HP Books.. Dick Pijpers. Kees Jansen. P. 1990. 1986.A. Salt Lake City. P. RD Home Handbook. Crown Publishers Incorporated. **** Lesley Bremness.. The Sea-Beach At EbbC42 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .. New York City. Rodale Press. New York.. The New Garden Encyclopedia Wm. SAS Survival Guide. PA 18049.F. Wise & Co. AZ 85703. NY 10020. John Wiseman. Inc. Contributing Editor. Pruning. Herbs. Third Edition. a trade mark of Simon & Schuster Inc.. H. Marc Rogers. **** Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Jac. B. NY 11021. _____Outdoor Survival Skills. Seaside Plants of The World. 1974.. 1978.D. London. Patricia S. ***** _____The World Atlas of Food. Wm..L.O. Edwin A.. Robert L. Inc. Skills for Taming the Wilds. 1990. ***** George S. Pa..C.. Inc. Rodale Press. 1221 Avenue of the Americas. Clauser. Gallery Books. Tucson. 1983. Dorling Kindersley Limited. Gordon Rowley. Nancy Bubel. Inc. Materials Handbook. Pelican Publishing. Harrisburg.Y.. One Park Avenue. Brigham Young University Press. 1977. 180 Varick St. Peton Corp. 1993. New York. Ritchie C41 . New York. New York City. 1967. Dover Publications. Rodale's Successful Organic Gardening Herbs.. The Forgotten Art of Flower Cookery. Emmaus. PA 18049. 445 Northern Blvd. New York. Box 5367.F. ***** _____The Wise Encyclopedia of Cookery. NY 10014. Provo. NY 10016. Small-Scale Grain Raising. Hearthside Press Inc. 1970. Wise & Co. New York City. Augusta Foote Arnold. New York City. Box 11925. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Succulents. Cameron & Kelker Streets. 17105. Gene Logsdon.. The Mushroom Handbook. Inc. Inc. 1964. Inc. 1977.

Boise.. 1957. 180 Varick St. Year-round Vegetable” by Walter Chandoha. Dover Publications. Kalamazoo. Golden Press. 1992. Aug/Sep 1995. Inc. Oct. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . May 1996. 1976. Trees of The Eastern and Central United States and Canada. Jun/Jul 1992. Merchants Publishing Co. 1976. J. May 1997. Swengel.1976. 1976. 260 Madison Ave. First Aid Procedures & Lifesaving Techniques.. New York. 1990. NY 10014. 1968. 1996.. 774 South Placentia. Placentia.. Trees of North America. Frank Brockman. Food Drying At Home The Natural Way.P. “Well-mannered Crabs” by Thomas Christopher. “Clove Currant” by Jo Ann Gardner. 1996... Hinkley. Inc. “Bird Pepper” (author unknown) Dec. 1901. William Harlow. The Magazine of American Gardening. Microtek Publications.. NY-Western Publishing Co. Inc. Aug/Sep 1997. Inc. Hawthorn Books.. 1997. 1989. “Rugged Rugosas” by Suzanne Verrier.Tide. _____Luffa. Inc.. Bee Beyer. 9110 Sunset Blvd. Nurserymen’s Exchange. Rombough.. New York. 1994. “Step-By-Step Primulas from Seed” by Thomas Fischer. Magazines: American Survival Guide. “Step-By-Step Planting a Waterlily” by Terry Dunn. “Stalking Wild Seeds” by Ann B. “ Raising a Tree from Seed” by Janet H. Dover Publications.. Inc. Horticulture. Questians & Answers by Bob Polomski. Idaho 83704. Apr. Jan. CA 90069. Family Circle 2/24/81 “ Jerusalem Artichokes: The Little-known. Wildflower Perennials for Your Garden. Wisconsin. Dec. Questions & Answers (answer) by Patrick Nutt on Lotus. Oct. Bebe Mieles. ?Nov. Horticulture. NY 10016. Racine. MA 02114-1913 C44 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . “Pecans” by Brenda Olcott-Reid. 1994. “Blue-Ribbon Catmints” by Daniel J. McMullen & Yee Publishing. C. CA 94103... New York City 14. Ritchie Booklets: Cacti & Succulents for Modern Living. San Francisco. 98 North Washington Street. NY.F. “Winterberry” by Wayne Winterrowd. Aug/Sep 1980. 475 6th St. California 92670. Los Angeles. 180 Varick St. Sanchez..F. “Fruits for the Kitchen” by Lon J. 1986. Ritchie C43 . Boston. Tarcher. Michigan 49001. The Century Company. Inc.

Organic Magazine. National Gardening Magazine: Jul/Aug 1991. Burnett. Oct/Nov 1993. Dan Sullivan. 1995. What’s News Section. 23st St. Maine 04910-9731. “Mint Condition” by Holly H. 1996. Box 488. Emmaus. NY 10010. August 1995. Johnny's Selected Seeds. Sep/Oct 1994. C45 C46 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . “Hardy Fennel” by James Jankowiak.. Currants Jan/Feb 1997. IA 51602. “Found at Last-Real Oregano” by Dorothy Patent. “Survival Miracle Plants” by Chris Janowsky. Sanchez. “A Passion for Garlic” by Vicky Congdon.” Mother Earth News. 1983.) National Gardening Magazine. Yankton. Inc. 1 Foss Hill Rd. Nursery Growing Guides: Burpee Gardens. Ferry-Morse Seeds. Vermont 05401. Fulton. Nov/Dec 1996. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . 180 Flynn Ave. P. “Spring's Chicories by Janet H. W. Doherty Sept. Ritchie .. Sept.F. Gurney Seed & Nursery Co.. 1995. “ Seaweed or Pondweed?” by Katherine M. Henry Fields’s Planting Guide. Ritchie Organic Gardening.. 1996. Shimizu. “Precious Persimmons” by Charlie Nardozzi. “Dear Mother. SD 57079. “Get Crackin’!” (nuts) by Joan HuyserHonig. KY 42041-0488. Shimizu. “Brilliant Bee Balms by Holly H. Gough. Grow-It Guide. PA 18974.. 415 N.. Sussex Publishers. “Saffron-A Fall Phenomenon” by Sarah Price. Mar/Apr 1997. Inc. NY. 1993. Calling All Pits. Shenandoah. Atlee Burpee & Co. 19931999. Minor St. **** Miller Nurseries Planting Guide & Catalog.O. 1980. PA 18049. “The Mighty Lingonberry” by Robert E.Mother Earth News. July 1996. 24 E. 33 E.. Mar/Apr 1994..F. Albion. Burlington. Gurney's Seed & Nursery Co.. Nov/Dec 1993. Rodale Press. “Tea from the Garden” by Evelyn Gaspar. “Powerful Purslane” by Joan HuyerHonig. “Rediscovering our Roots” by Lucy Beckstead. Oregon State University (% content of minerals in wood ash. Henry Field's Seed & Nursery Co. Warminster. Questions and Answers.

A Tasty. Editor.. Emmaus. Canby. (Information comes with seeds. Rodale Press.1981. Spring/Winter 1995-1999 Catalog.) On The Horizon by Greg and Pat Williams. Box 535. Agr. 1996. Pinetree Garden Seeds. Springfield. Springfield. One Norway Street. NY 14424. Newspapers: Fertile Ground by Dennis Lueck. Connecticut 06790-6627. 27635 S. Stokes Seed Inc. Albany. Native Seeds/SEARCH.) Territorial Seed. The Cook's Garden Spring/Summer 1995 Catalog. The Springfield News.O. 1993. (Excellent catalog. ME 04260. Inc. Lawrenceburg. Walk on the Wild Side by Annie Capestany.O. Pamphlet/Leaflet/Newsletter/Etc. Oregon 97477. 1190 North Pacific Hwy. Growers Guide. New Gloucester. Davis. P. W. OR 97013.O. Vermont 05148. Instructions. 1997. Prickly Pear Delight by Howard LaFranchi September 7.5060 West Lake Road. Box 300.. OR 97477. 30 Irene St. NY 14240-0548. 1999 Seed listing. 20 Palmer Ave. 1 Parkton Rd. OR 97424. 1999 Catalog. PA 18098. AZ 85705.1999.F. 1995-1999. P. Harrington. Springfield. Gardens Alive. Londonderry. The Seed Catalogue. Ritchie . 1987. Ortho Garden Guide. Ritchie C47 C48 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . OR 97477. 1993. California. Box 139.. Box 1308. NJ 08527-0308. Greenwood. Oglesby Rd. Shepherd's Garden Seeds.. 1995. Nichols Garden Nursery. 5100 Schenley Place. 1996. Fall '93. University of California. The Christian Science Monitor. MA 02115. Davis. Geo. Jackson. 26..C.F. Box 548 Buffalo. 526 N. Laura Street. Park Seed Co. Extension by J. 1995. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . P. Tucson. Northwoods Nursery. The Springfield News.. U. 1999. The Christian Science Publishing Society.O. Dept. Boston.. Box 139.F. Make Way For Nopal.. SC 29647-0001. 4th Ave. IN 47025. Dec. Cottage Grove. 1995. Canandaigue.. The Great Garden Guide.. of Vegetable Crops. P. Park Seed Flowers and Vegetables. The Stay Organic Newsletter. 1995. Torrington. Stay Organic Newsletter. Organic Offerings by Kris Wetherbee July 2. Thompson & Morgan Inc. 1993 The Springfield News. Chevron Chemical Co. 1998. Bruce Woods. OR 97321-4598.

Acknowledgments For almost fifty years I have been learning from The New Garden Encyclopedia. Oregon. Arizona. were based on the drawings of Rebecca Merrilees. or other edible parts. for her photographs.S. in Amador. with the help of Sara Huey. Decorah. in fields. The American Southwest. Chris Janowsky for his generous offer. who allowed us complete freedom to photograph.. Wise & Company. Oregon. Thanks to the U. or even in someone’s yard with a telephoto lens. SAS Survival Guide. Yale Dawson. Mary Lou Spencer. in Eugene. and the Turk’s Cap Lily in Mellinger’s 1999 catalog. I thank Ralph Ritchie for the many photographs he has taken. Just as we would have gathered the leaves or seeds. Ritchie C49 C50 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . E. Without that experience I couldn’t have started on this book. The drawings. Arch & Miriam Hurford. Norman Arlott. we harvested edibles with a camera along roadsides. and Gray’s Nursery. Ritchie . A Guide to Field Identification Trees of North America.F. Decker Nursery.Organizations Seed Savers International List. Ann Gee of Wickenburg. Winn Rd.F. Department of Agriculture for the Zone Map of the United States. those of the author. Iowa 52101. catalog (free) 3076 N. We fulfilled the basic premise of the book by gathering what was around us. Seashore Plants of Southern California. c/o Seed Saver Exchange. reminiscent of the artist who painted a still life before Edible Native Plants and Weeds . It took Stephan Facciola’s Cornucopia to verify some of the information and complete the book. Several of the edibles were photographed in our own yard before we gathered and ate them.

you should have no problem with the edible plants or plant parts. weeded look so commonly seen in the urban-suburban culture. Fortunately. Study. Well. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Ritchie . If you are in a situation where you need food. Do your homework ahead of time. particularly.F. mowed. Ritchie C51 C52 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . A Word of Caution If you have read the book thoroughly and made certain of your plant identification. study the plant and see if anything else has been eating it. In the wilds. but its situation may not be. yourself and your family. what stage of plant maturity is safe. our yard does not have the tailored. Know what plants are safe. On the other hand. Any plants that have been washed by flood waters or even rain runoff may be contaminated. Take heed of what plant parts may be eaten. but that doesn’t mean it cannot be eaten in an urgent necessity.eating it. Realize also that a perfectly edible plant may have a taste that is repulsive to your pallette.besides insects. That’s a good indicator. and where the plant is situated. In either case your better judgement would be to eat sparingly of any plant until you know its effect on humans. a plant may be safe to eat. your purpose is different than when you may be casually interested in eating from the garden for the novelty of it.F. that’s our excuse.

It is your choice. Our sole purpose was to heighten your awareness and perhaps also give you another handle on disaster survival. Likewise. We cannot assume responsibility for the information contained in this book. Ritchie C53 C54 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . You must be responsible for your own actions! Edible Native Plants and Weeds . would only show up again under dire circumstances. The situation is no different than having read a camping manual. leave it out. no matter what the book said. When in doubt. and you suffer the consequences.F. Ritchie . We have done our best to verify the book’s accuracy and we have tested most of the plants available to us. while they were edible. but our best advice is to study and sample the plants around you before you really need them.F. you fail to recognize poison oak from the pictures. or didn’t say. Other plants.Rule number one is. Some plants have become favorites and show up regularly on our table. collect a nice bouquet. you are responsible for trying to pet that nice little black kitty with the white stripe.

GODELIGHTS@AOL. Anaheim. 18991-0008. Bulk seed. 1999. 1999.clyderobin.. (GM)=Gourmet Mushrooms. FL 33325. $1.O. Some plants come from tubers or rooted cuttings. Box 328. above address. otherwise. WA 98368. 300 Park Avenue. Box 488.com faban@enter. Box 37328. (GD)=Garden of Delights 1997. Fax: (502) 459-9054. Oriental Vegetable Seed Packets. etc. Box 17538..com (C)=The Cook's Garden (some botanical names) Has pgs of Mesclun.O. but are not offering it to the public either for lack of enough seed or interest from the public the past year. it will say plants. P. If there is no special indication the company reference is for seed. Babylon. many catalogs come through their mailing lists without asking. bulk. The following companies sell packets of seed. (B)=Burgess Plant & Seed Co.O. Easton. 1999. 1999. Williams.. Return To Directory (A)=Abundant Life Seed Foundation. Large supply of palms. www.F. w/recipes Pkts. 1995-96. Ritchie . Order Dept. (E)=Evergreen Y. Box 83. PA 18042. Fort Calhoun. IL 61704. (GrD)=GreenDealer 1999. (FS)=Four Seasons Nursery. IL 61701.. The following names indicate any specialty they offer.O.. Att. (BP)=W.O. The garden magazines have offers for free nursery catalogs for the asking. Warminster. Atlee Burpee & Co. P. Lousiville. P. 14560 S. 415 North Burnett. (A) is the code for that particular company. Burpee Heirloom Seed Catalog.. (FP)=The Fragrant Path. Davie.O. Port Townsend. Ritchie (Bo)=Van Bourgondien Bros. CA 95444. Nebraska 68023. If a listing in the future does not show up in the next catalog. Enterprises 1995/1996. 245 Route 109. the company may still have the seed. Wild flowers. sprouts. Box 1000. P. Addresses change frequently.. KY 42041-0488. W.COME-MAIL (GC)=Goodwin Creek Gardens. 1999.. P. 715 Northampton St. P. Castro Valley. Fulton.O. Rare and Old-Fashioned Plants. 1998. Each year more wild plants are added to garden catalogs as the public interest in them increases. 11702-9004. Any listings without dates are from 1995 catalog listings. Bloomington. (FM)=Ferry-Morse Seeds/Advance Seed Company. 14th St. Inc. $1. N. Has some unusual fruit. P.F. The names of the companies are listed in alphabetical order. (CR)=Clyde Robin Seed Co. C2 C1 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . 1998.Y. (F)=Henry Fields Seed & Nursery Co. Seeds for Fragrant. To order: 1-800-622-9959. 1996. CA 94546-0366. Box 515T6. Spanish listings.net Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Not everything produces reliable seed. If one subscribes to magazines. 1999. Box 2366. (BT)=The Banana Tree. The first line following the plant name indicates that the company carries the usual varieties. Bloomington. roots.O. Box 772. CA 92817. 905 Four Seasons Road. 1706 Morrissey Dr.H. Iowa 51602.Catalog Sources The following list of wild or escaped edible plants are keyed to the names listed below.. Bulk. Bulk refers to the alternative offering. Shenandoah. O. PA 18991-0001. P. Write to the company and ask for it. P. KY 40233-7328. Bulk. OR 97544. Has some unusual fruit. http: //www.banana-tree. Their codes are not. **** Pkt. This is a most interesting list of rare fruiting plants and trees. Very select number of each vegetable (many heirloom). Graton.

(IN)=Ison’s Nursery and Vineyards. Concentration seems to be more on herbs & flowers. P. NW. 1996 Cokesbury Road. Fax 1-716-396-2154. S-99M. Box 245.. CA 92274. Lists planting depth for vegetables. Bloomington. Box 190. Ritchie .30 Large Pkt 1.F.. PA 150882. Maine 04910-9731. Eugene. Canby. P.**** 1-800-321-74444.. Box 10. 27635 S. (MF) is not listed in this Source.O. 1999 seeds. 1996. Fax: 724-465-9893.O.. St. Pomona.W. (GG)=Greer Gardens. 1999.F. 800-836-9630. (H)=J.O.O.O. 1280 Goodpasture Island Rd. $5.S. Randolph. They have Dwarf trees. SD 57079. CA 91766. Fax: 330-549-3716.O.. Fax 1-520-622-5591. 1996. Albion. Bushes: 10. 5060 West Lake Rd. 502 Haskell Hill Rd... Santa Fe.. 2310 W. 1999. 1996 (O)=Owen Nursery. C4 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Range Rd. P.. (Lp)=Lilypons Water Gardens.. Few botanical names. Franklin Ave. $1. http://www. (ML)=Mellinger's Inc. 1999.. Box 75. 110 Capital St. Box 1130. P. 724-4655685. spacing & when to plant. P. Jung Seed Co. (R)=Raintree Nursery. 1997. (NN)=Northwoods Nursery. 50. Canandaigua.. Buckeystown. Thermal. Foss Hill Road. TX 77423. C3 (M)=Miller Nurseries 1999. 1999.com Trees. 25. CA 94020. 1999 Division of Plantron. O. Yankton. Brookshire. Catalog has too many good things to list more. Star Route 2.. Morton. Inc. (HS)=Heirloom Seeds. (Pa)=G. E. GA 30205. Unusual list of unique fruits (plants). E-mail: mellgarden@aol. Inc. P. SC 29647-0001 New trend: Space Savers.. WI 53957-0001. Info@musserforests. Box 2209 Grass Valley. P. Penn..Tucson. 15701-0340.4th Ave. WA 98584. 301 E. 335 S.. 526 N. 1999. Shelton. OR 94401. 2902 Rufina St. Ohio 44452-9731.. If you’re looking for a tree listed in the text check their catalog first.. (NS)=Native Seeds/SEARCH. 1999-2000. OR 97013 Fax 503-266-5431. 410 8th Ave. Dept. San Jose. 1999 Richard Owen Nursery. Oglesby Rd. 3133. AZ 85705.heirloomseeds. 1998.html (GN)=Greenlee Nursery. New Gloucester.. 2300 E. Only alfalfa is listed in bulk. IL 61701 Has some unusual fruit. Has quite a variety in their catalog. Box 188. Faribault.. 1999. MD 21717.. NM 87505-2929.com (MF)=Musser Forests. CA 95126 (L)=Le Jardin du Gourmet. 1996 plants. Pkts & Bulk.greendealer. NY 14424. High St. Box 3337.com (HC)=High Country Gardens. 1996.00+ Imported seeds from France Few botanical names. Box 300. (J)=Johnny's Selected Seeds. (N)=Nichols Garden Nursery. P.com (Ju)=J. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (G)=Gurney's Seed & Nursery Co. Special attention to Greater Southwest Native American farmers.. Inexpensive pkts. Indiana. Organic. W. RR 1 Box 2580. Greenwood. Park Seed Co. Bulk.com/seeds/TropicalGreen house. Pkts & Some bulk listed w/seed. La Honda. Separate list for growers Goodly number of oriental vegetables Recipes.O. 1111 Chapman St.johnnyseeds. So. North Lima. L. Lincoln St. Johnsbury Ctr. 800-437-4290 U. (HH)=Heaths and Heathers. (PVF)=Peaceful Valley Farm Supply. Inc. 405 Butts Rd. ME 04260 Botanical names only w/herbs. West Elizabeth..http://www. (Pn)=Pinetree Garden Seeds. Brooks. Dept. CA 95945 $2. MN 55021 (Kz)=Kitazawa Seed Co. WA 98356. 100 per variety. Box 340. Hudson. 1999. Mesclun recipe. (K)=Kelly Nurseries. VT 05863 Sample Pkt . Spring and Fall catalogs. Seed growing instructions are in the catalog and the bill comes with some information. www.

com Specialty Companies Amish types-Berlin Seeds. Hodges. MD 21802. Albany.. A show of flowers. Leicester Mushrooms-Fungi Perfecti. Montauk Hwy. 1997. (see Natives) Herbs-The Thyme Garden. 1999.P. Inc. Okanogan. Box 535. Millersburg. Torrington. C5 Apples-Bear Creek Nursery. 05146 59th St. NGM Hwy. Salterpath. 1999. Sandy Mush Herb Nursery. P. C6 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . 3622 Weedin Ct. (W)=Wildseed Farms.. 30 Irene Street. Cottage Grove. N.O.. Stokes Tropicals $4. 1998.. 526 N. (SS)=Select Seeds.Tucson.. 180 Stickney Hill Rd. Box 3000. Bulk seed.. (St)=Stokes Seeds Inc. DeGrandchamp's Blueberry Farm Inc. P. NY 11702-9004. Box 7634. Grand Junction.F.O. GA 30540. Landis Valley Heirloom Seed Project. Union.com (Sh)=Springhill Nurseries. 1999. 1-800-396-9238. Box 2538. 180 Stickney Rd.F. Londonderry. 109. Nichols Garden Nursery. SC 29695-0001. Garlic-Filaree Farm.. OH 45371.. Recipes. Delaplane.. Fruits-Northwoods Nursery. San Jose. CT 06076-4617.O. Inc.O. Natives of the Greater Southwest and Mexico -Native Seeds/SEARCH.. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Blueberries-Barwacz Farm. Fredericksburg TX 78624-3000. 1 Garden La. 5371 County Road 77. Ellijay. OH 44654-9104. 425 Wildflower Hills. Oglesby Rd. 2451 Kissel Hill Rd. NBG6. 27635 S. Graton... PA 17601.wildseedfarms. Chicories-The Cook's Garden ($1. Select Seeds. P. PO Box 157.4th Ave. Spring Valley Nursery. Rt. Dept. Box 418. refundable). NY 11940.shepherdseeds. Johnson Nursery. Box 548. Box 411-NG. OR 97321. 12 pgs of Herbs. Dept. P. Gourmet Mushrooms. NM 87506-5700. 11096 Spring Valley Ln. Fax (830) 990-8090. $4. NY 14240-0548. CA 95132. 316 Surrett Cove Rd.. Instructive information is very good. 1999. Lancaster. Adequate vegetable list with large list of giant vegetables. OR 97324. 245 Farmingdale Road. Drawer NG. N. Box 1308.. P. Berries-Brittingham Plant Farms. Salem. Box 29-J. Box 5700. Ritchie . (Vn)=Van Bourgondien Bros. 182 Conconully Hwy. Canby. Olympia. WA 99157. CA 95444.. Morel.. 2816. Ornamental plants.. Pacific Hwy. 16 Railroad Ave. Buffalo. 110 W. Union. 1190 N. NC 28557. (S)=Shepherd's Garden Seeds. Ornamental plants. Box 515T6. Rt.. Elm St.. South Haven.O.(RG)=Russell Graham Purveyor of Plants.00. Tipp City. WA 98840. Box 1000. P. Box 666-G. W. Seeds of Change. VA 22025. (WG)=Wayside Gardens. Dwarf-Henry Leuthardt Nurseries. Has sowing information for indoors as well as direct seeding. Inc. 1-800-845-1124. Babylon. Conn 06790-6658 European seeds Large selection of Chilis. 1993.-NGA... 1-800-848-0078... www. Has more info.O..O. Ornamental Edibles.O. Heirloom-Bentley Seeds. MI 49090 . (T)=Territorial Seed Company. 15575 77th St. Jackson. 1996. WA 98507. Santa Fe. Salisbury. **** www. P. 1999. (TM)=Thompson & Morgan Inc.Y. 1997. Or 97013.. Beach-Carolina Seacoast Beach Plants. Northport. Cambridge. for growing west of the Cascades Pkts & Bulk. 20546-N Alsea Hwy. 5. 52 E. MI 49056. NJ 08527-0308. VT 05148. CT 06076.O. OR 97424-0061 Winter Cat. OR 97304. P. East Moriches. & most variety in each category than any other listed here Mostly Americas' seed.. 1998. Alsea. 4030 Eagle Crest Rd.

The companies listed first have seed unless otherwise indicated (Plant. 4290 Rice Valley Rd. Ritchie C7 C8 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . 1162 Cherry Rd. OR 97321. Box 2209. Tubers. Grass Valley. Newsletters Organic Offerings by Kris Wetherbee. 3076 N. P. SD 57079 . NM 87505-2929. Territorial Seed Company. Shadblow. Northwest-Nichols Garden Nursery. Ritchie ..F. FL 33307.O. Toll-free Order (888) 784-1722. Sources Listed By Plant Name The letters following the plant name is keyed to the companies ( ) above. Box 2237. SC 29634-9952. ID 83845. Saskatoon. 2902 Rufina St. Mamey Plant (GD) Arikara (see Squash) Artemisia. P.AZ 85705. Vegetable (Calaloo) (Hinn choy) (Tampala) (J) (ML) (N) Amelanchier (see Serviceberry. 1190 North Pacific Hwy. 18001 Shafer Ranch Rd. Pkts & Bulk. Native Trees & Bushes (see Musser Forests.95/Yr. Clemson. The first row or so indicates these companies have the usual varieties.. Albany.O..O. Special attention to Greater Southwest Native American farmers. Box 157. www. Cottage Grove. Bulb). Yankton. Peppers-The Pepper Gal. Western Plants-High Country Gardens. Oakland. OR 97424. Those following indicate varieties by the name or description for which you may be looking. Winn Rd. Clemson University. 110 Capitol St. Box 23006. Wild (ludoviciana) (GrD) Plant (GC) (WG) (Pn) (JU) Big Sage (see Sage) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Moyie Springs. Roots...F. $14. Fort Meyers. Inc. Decorah. OR 97462. Juneberry) Angelica (T) (N) (L) (TM) (V) (FP) (J) Plant (L) (GC) Purpurea Plant (GC) Anise (N) (L) (Pa) (G) (St) (B) (FM) (V) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (J) (W) (Hr) (see Licorice) Anise Hyssop (Pn) (BP) (GC) Blue & White (T) Blue (N) (J) (S) (FP) Plant (ML) (GC) Apple. P. Organic Seeds-Bountiful Gardens.O. 95.. Tomatoes-Tomato Growers Supply Co.. Lauderdale.com Seed Associations Seed Savers International List c/o Seed Savers Exchange. Ft. Return To Directory Achillea (G) (Ju) (GC) (W) (J) (St) (Pn) (A) Plant (F) Agastache (cana) Plant (GC) (HC) Texas Hummingbird Mint (HC) Agrimony (V) (GC) (J) Alexanders Plant (GC) Alfalfa (Pa) (ML) (J) (GrD) Sprouts (TM) (V) (T) (Ju) (ML) (PVF) (J) (Pn) Amaranth. CA 95945.. CA 95490. Willits. Fax 1-520-622-5591. FL 33902. South Carolina Foundation Seed Association. P..highcountrygardens. Potatoes-Ronniger's Seed Potatoes. Star Rt. Wild (Ju) Edible Greens (S) (NS) Grain (J) (NS) New Mexico (GC) Popping (NS) Hopi (NS) Durango (NS) Amaranth. above) Northern-Gurney's Seed & Nursery Co. Santa Fe. Peaceful Valley Farm Supply. Iowa 52101.

Wild (R) ‘Brunswick‘ (wild Nova Scotian lowbush) (NN) (R) Rabbiteye (BT) R. Bergamot (V) (N) (GC) (L) (K) (G) (J) (St) (RG) Plant (Ju) Orange (S) (Ju) Lemon (GC) Beech Plants (ML) Purple (K) Tri-color (K) Bergamot. Ritchie C9 . Blue (N) Barley (PVF) & Bulk Basil Heirloom (NS) Mrs. Lemon (Pn) (T) (N) (L) (G) (S) (St) (B) (TM) (J) (F) (BP) (Pa) (V) (Ju) (ML) (GC) (J) Plant (ML) (GC) Variegated (FP) Plant (L) (BP) (Bee Balm. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Laurel (GG) Bayberry Pacific (A) Eastern Plant (F) (GG) American (WG) Beans. German (Pn) (T) (N) (L) (G) (S) (J) (NN) (F) (FM) (BP) (V) (Pa) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (GC) (Hr) Cherry. Black (ML) (FP) Sand (ML) Purple Leaf (K) (O) (FS) Chervil (Pn) (T) (L) (S) (St) (TM) (FM) (L) (FP) (ML) (GC) (W) (C) (J) (Hr) Curled (Pa) (BR) (V) (L) Chestnut American (R) Chestnut. Lesser (TM) Nepeta (GC) Camas Blue (A) Canola (see Rapeseed) Carob (BT) Carolina Allspice Plant (F) (ML) (K) (FP) (WG) (R) (O) (FS) Catmint (S) (V) (Pa) (FP) (GC) Plant (Ju) Catnip (Pn) (T) (N) (L) (G) (S) (St) (J) (FM) (BP) (V) (Pa) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (GC) (F) (L) (BP) (Pa) (W) (Hr) Lemon (GC) Grandiflora (GC) Cattail (A) Ceanothus Smaller Red-root (GrD) New Jersey Tea (GrD) (see local nursery) Centaurea (see Bachelor Button) Century Plant (TM) Plant (HC) Chamomile. see Bergamot) Golden Plant (GC) Balsam. type (Sk) Thinleaved (A) (see Huckleberry) Borage (Pn) (C) (T) (N) (L) (St) (TM) (J) (FM) (BP) (S) (V) (Pa) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (GC) (W) (Hr) Buckwheat (ML) (PVF) & Bulk (Pn) (J) & Bulk Sprouts (Pn) Buffalo Berry Plant (HC) (ML) Buffalo Grass (see Grass) Bull Bay Plant (GG) (ML) (BT) Bunchberry (A) (C) Plant (GG) (R) Bush Cinquefoil (Potentilla) (GC) (WG) Butterfly-weed (see Milkweed) Butternut Plant (GG) (M) (B) (R) Cactus. Prickly Pear (GC) (GrD) Hedgehog (HC) Opuntia humifusa (TGS) Calamint.Arugula (Rocketor.F.F. Wild (FP) (GC) (W) (J) (SS) Betony (GC) Bilberry Dwarf (A) Birch Sweet (FP) Plants Gray (WG) Paper or Canoe (A) (GG) (O) (WG) (ML) (K) (FS) Red or River Plants (K) (WG) Blackberry Trailing (A) Black Haw (GC) Plant (WG) Blueberry. Earth (N) C10 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Alpine (GC) Grandiflora (GC) Calamintha. Roquette-French (T) (L) Recipe (C) (Pa) (S) (St) (L) Sprouts (Pn) Ash American (TM) Cascade Mtn. Burn’s Famous Lemon (NS) Bay Seed (TM) (V) (FP) Plant (L) (N) (NN) (Pa) Sweet (GG) Calif. Plant (G) European Mtn. Manzanita (A) Plant (GC) (WG) Beautyberry Plant (NN) (WG) (GG) Bee Balm. Wild (NS) Southwest Natives (NS) Tepary (NS) Lima (NS) Scarlet Runner (NS) Fava Heirloom (NS) Garbanzos Heirlooms (NS) Lentils (NS) (see Peas) Bearberry. (ML) Aspen Quaking (G) Avens (GrD) Plant (GC) (A) (see Purple) Bachelor’s Button (J) (N) (W) (A) (St) (FP) (CR)/(PVF) (HS) & Bulk (Pn) (see Mountain Bluet) Balm. Garden Rocket-English) (N) (Pn) (TM) (J) (V) (FM) (BP) (T) (G) (L) (Pa) (Ju) A. (A) Mtn.

F. Cinnamon Plant (G) (Bo) (F) (Sh) (ML) (FS) (GG) (O) Feverfew (F) (GC) (J) (FP) Filbert (see Hazelnut) Fir Plant Douglas (FS) Fireweed (A) Flax. Feldsalat (see Lamb's Lettuce) Fennel (T) (N) (G) (L) (S) (St) (TM) (J) (BP) (V) (Pa) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (F) (W) (GrD) (Hr) Florence (F) (T) (Ju) Giant (FP) Green (GC) Heirloom (S) Italian (Pn) (C) (N) (S) (St) (J) Smokey (Bronze) (TM) (C) (Pn) (N) (S) (Pa) (GC) Wild (A) Fennel Flower (FP) (GC) Fern . Desert (NS) Native (NS) (A) Health Food Store Chickweed (A) Chicory (N) (C) (L) (Pa) (St) (TM) (V) (FM) (T) (FP) (W) (GrD) Asparagus (FM) (T) (N) French (Chicorees Frisees) Escarole and Endive (V) (L) Mitado (N) Italian (Pn) (N) (St) (V) (T) (L) Root (coffee) (ML) Wild (L). (A) (C) has the largest selection. canadensis) Plant (ML) English Daisy (N) Plant (ML) Epazote (Pn) (N) (Pa) (S) (J) (T) (L) Erythrina Check with Los Angeles City or County. Golden Plant (GG) Custard Apple (BT) (GrD) Plant (GD) Dame’s Rocket (see Rocket) Dandelion (N) (St) (J) (A) (GrD) French (C) (S) (L) (St) (Pn) Italian (J) Dasylirion (BT) Plant (HC) Daylily Native Seed (F) (K) Plant (F) (B) (K) (FS) Seed (Pa) (Bo) (ML) (Ju) (G) Plant (GG) Dwarf (Ju) Devil’s Claw (FP) (TM) Southwest Native (NS) Dittany (Stone Mint) (GC) Dock (A) (Pn)-Sorrel Earth Chestnut (N) Elderberry. Chiles. Heirloom (NS) Cinnamon-vine (FP) Clary Sage (see Sage) Claytonia (C) (J) (A) (RG) Cleavers (A) Clover. American High Bush Plant (WG) (ML) Wild (R) Cress. Ritchie Currant. (GrD) & Bulk. Red (T) (ML) (J) (A) (PVF).Chia. Blue (St) (Pn) (ML) (CR) (GrD) (FM) Wild (FP) Prairie (FP) Fuchsia Hardy (GC) (Local nursery) Gamagrass (GrD)-Bulk (see Grass) Garlic Cloves (Pn) (C) (T) (N) (L) (Pa) (G) (S) (St) (TM) (J) (V) (BP) (Ju) (ML) California White (F) (V) (Pa) (Ju) Chinese Red & White (V) German Red (Ju) C12 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (GD) may have them. Garden (Pn) (C) (N) (G) (L) (St) (TM) (J) (FM) (A) (BP) (T) (Ju) (FP) Curled or Curly (A) (Pa) (S) (St) (T) (ML) Broadleaf (A) (S) (J) Mega Sprouts (TM) Water (Pa) (S) (L) (St) (J) (FM) (T) (V) (FP) (GC) (E) (A) (ML) (GC) Upland (J) (BP) (V) (A) Crocus (see Saffron) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (PVF) also Bulk. Wild Blue (A) Plant (F) Red (A) (S. Sprouts (V) (T) (Ju) Alsike (Pn) Crimson (ML) (J) (PVF) (FP) (W) (GrD) Rose (PVF) Sweet (PVF) (J) (ML) Sprouts (Pn) (Ju) (T) (V) Coco Plum Plant (GD) Coltsfoot (GC) Comfrey Roots (N) (ML) (GC) (A) Russian Seed (Pa) for edibility (GrD) Coralvine (FP) Corn. Clove (GG) Currant. Sweet (L) Anise (GrD) Cilantro. Wild (NS) Native & Heirloom (NS) Cotton Thistle (TM) Cottonwood (G) Cowslip (SS) Plant (GC) Crabapple Western (A) Cranberry. Wild (NS) Native Heirlooms (NS) Chinquapin Bush (A) Chokeberry Black ((Ju) (ML) (GrD) Red (Ju) Chokecherry (A) Plant Red (GG) Black (GG) Plant (F) Cicely. Ritchie C11 .F.

Native (NS) Ground Cherry (N) (B) (ML) (Ju) (T) (H) (B) (FS) Guarijio Conivari (NS) Guava. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (Ju) (GC) (ML) (WG) ‘Silver Carpet’ (BP) Lamb’s Quarters (A) Leek (GrD) Lemon Balm (see Balm. Pacific (A) Plant (GG) Magnolia. Rose. Spanish (T) Romanian Red (T) Garlic. Wild Edible (NS) Grains (J) Grape. Creeping Plant (GG) Fendler’s Plant (HC) Mallow. (FP) (Blue Giant) (FP) Mexican Giant (SS) Dwarf (GC) Impatiens (Pa) (FP)check Jerusalem Artichokes Tuber (F) (N) (G) (L) (TM) (B) (J) (BP) (ML) Native Amer. Roots (N) (G) (F) (ML) (GC) (R) Horehound (N) (L) (B) (V) (Pa) (FP) (ML) (GC) (J) (GrD) (Hr) Horseradish Roots (N) (G) (F) (Pa) (B) (J) (Ju) (ML) (GC) Huckleberry Red (A) Plant (R) Evergreen (A) (GG) (R) Tall Mountain & Low Growing Mtn. Southern (see Bull Bay) Mahonia. Orange. of scented Germander Plant (ML) Geum (see Avens) Ginger Plant (G) (ML)-Wild Chinese (ML) European (WG) American Wild (ML) Ginkgo (ML) (GC) (J) Male Plant (ML) Goldenrod (GC) Gooseberry Coast Black (A) Goosefoot (NS) Gourds. American Plant (ML) Male & female (G) Honeysuckle Plant (ML) (GG) (WG) Japanese (WG) Hop Seed (L). Garden (B) Hyssop (Pn) (C) (N) (L) (BP) (V) (Pa) (ML) (J) (GC) (Hr) (GrD) Anise H. Perfume. Scented Plant (ML) Fruit. E. (R) Huckleberry. (sylvestris) (GC) (S) Plant (Ju) (see Malva) C14 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Panic (NS) Buffalo (G) Greens. Peach. Elephant (T) (N) (F) (G) (FS) (B) (J) (V) (BP) (Ju) (ML) French Giant (Pa) Geranium. Muscadine (IN) Plant (GD) (Sk) Vitis vinifera (GD) (GG) Bunch Plant (GD) Grass. Ritchie C13 . Pineapple (G) Strawberry (G) Gum. Ginger. Wild) Lemon Mint (Monarda) (N) (FP) (W) Licorice (L) (N) (NN) (R) Wild (GrD) Lily Trout Plant (ML) Turk’s Cap (ML) (GrD) (FP) Linden (G) Linden Flowers Plant (ML) Lingonberry. New York White (J) Rocambole (FP) Rocambole. Strawberry (S) Wild (GrD) Plant?(Ju) Goodwin Creek has 31 varieties. Lemon) Lemon Bergamot (see Bergamot.(J) (N) (V) (T) German White (BP) (GC) Gilroy (S) (L) Grolau (indoor) (N) Korean Red (T) Italian Heirloom (S) Italian (T) (S).F. Dwarf (R) Lovage (Pn) (N) (L) (Pa) (J) (BP) (V) (FP) (BP) (L) (GC) (F) (A) Lovage. LemonRose. Shagbark Plant (GG) Holly. Black (N) Lotus (Lp) Yellow (FP) Madrone. Black (see Tupelo) Plant (F) Hackberry Plant (G) Southern (GrD) Spiny (GrD) Sugarberry (GrD) Western (GrD) Hawthorn Plant (ML) Black (A) Hazelnut California (A) Dwarf American Plant (B) Heath Plant (ML) (HH) (O) (K) Heather Plant (ML) (GG) (HH) Hemlock (K) Hickory. (Pn) (Ju) Jewelweed (GrD) Yellow Jewelweed (GrD) Jujube (Chinese date) Plant (FP) Juneberry (Serviceberry) Plant (K) Dwarf (O) (FS) Juniper (A) Plant (ML) (G) (GG) Trailing (GC) ‘Compressa’ (GG) Kinnikinnick (R) Kudzu (BT) Lamb’s Ears (St) Plant (TM) L.F.

Himalayan (GC) Mint. Corsican Mint (L) (GC). Curley-Seed (BP) Egyptian (GC) Ginger (GC) Grapefruit (GC) Lemon (L) (FP) Seed-(Pa) Lime (GC) Mountain Seed-(Pa) (GrD) Mizuna Oriental (N) (Pn) (C) (S) (St) (V) (T) (E) (Tokyo Beau) (Brassica japonica) Kyona (T) Persian-(S) Pineapple (S) (L) (ML) (GC) Scotch (GC) Silver (GC) Silver. Sea (J) & Bulk *Woodland Plant (BP) Onions (N) (G) (C) (T) (F) (Pa) (G) (S) (L) (St) (TM) (J) (V) (FM) (BP) (B) (Ju) (ML) (Kz) Heirloom (S) Nodding Multiplier (NS) (GrD) Prairie (GrD) Orach. Oyster (R) (Ju) Pearl Oyster (T) Portabella (G) (T) (Ju) Royal Tan (Ju) King Stropharia (Outdoor) (NN) (T) Shitake (NN) (ML) (GM) (L) (Pa) (R) (Ju) (T) (O) White Button (ML) (T) (Ju) Musk Mallow (Ju) (GC) (BT) (S) Mustard or M. African (TM) Gem (T) (Ju) (GC) (FP) Lemmon. Mamey) Mangrove Seed (BT) Maple Sugar (A) Plant (ML) (F) (R) (GG) (K) (G) Silver (tip) (G) (ML) Big leaf (A) (R) Vine (GG) (A) (R) Red (ML) (O) (FS) Striped (GG) Marigold. Common (Pn) (TM) (J) (E) Some have mint flavor (oriental) Mix s (F) Plant Apple. “Maitake” (Outdoor) (T) Morel (GM) Giant Morel. Greens.(F) (S) (G) (L) (BP) (ML) (GC) Blue Balsam (GC) (see Balsam) Orange (L) (ML) (GC) Mint Bush (GC) Chocolate (Pa) (S) (L) (BP) (ML) (GC).F. Blue Oyster. Native & Heirloom (NS) Mexican Turnip (FP) Milkweed. Wild (NS) Black (V) Brown (S) Red Heirloom (NS) Southern Giant (Ju) Sprouts (V) Stem (St) Myrrh (TM) (see Sweet Cicely) Myrtle (M. communis) (TM) (FP) (GC) Nannyberry (FP) Nasturtiums (N) (Pa) (G) (S) (V) (FM) (BR) (T) (FP) (ML) (Ju) (Pn) (SS) (BP) (HS) Peruvian (GC) Navajo Tea (GC) Nettle (GC) (J) (T) (A) New Jersey Tea (see Ceanothus) Nightshade (BT) Oak Plant (G) (ML) (F) (Ju) Oats (T) (J) & Bulk (PVF) & Bulk (Pn) Hulless (J) Wild (NE) (GC) *N.s (HC) (see Tagetes) Marjoram (C) (N) (L) (Pa) (S) (St) (B) (J) (FM) (V) (FP) (F) (ML) (Kz) (GC) (Ju) (W) (Hr) Golden (GC) Wild (GC) Marshmallow (N) (NN) (GC) (J) (SS) (A) Maypop (GG) Plant (Ju) Meadowsweet (GC) (A) Melilot (A) Melons. Common (GC) (A) (GrD) Swamp (GrD) (FP) (T) (H) (B) (FS) Showy (GrD) Butterfly-weed (GrD) (FP) Millet (ML) Finger (FP) Miner's Lettuce (see Claytonia) Mint.F. Ritchie Mormon Tea (GC) (A) Mountain Bluet (J) Mugwort (L) (GC) (J) (A) (GrD) Western (GC) Mushroom Kits (G) (Pn) (F) (Pa) (Ju) (ML) (L) had dry Cepes & dry Morels in the 1995 catalog. Wild Mountain Hairy (GC) Virginia (GC) Monarda (GC) Plant (WG) (Lemon Mint) (V) (FP) (W) Monarda Mixed (Sh) ‘Cambridge Scarlet’ (Sh) (GC) Plant (N) ‘Marshall’s Delight’ Plant (N) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Pleurotus (Sonoma Brown. Wild (NS) Domestic (Pn) Red-(C) (N) (J) (FP) Golden (FP) Orange (FP) Oregano Wild (A) Common (Pn) (N) (L) (Pa) (G) (St) (B) (TM) (J) (BR) (S) (V) (FP) (ML) (Kz) (F) (J) (GC) (Ju) (W) (A) (Hr) C16 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Ritchie C15 . Hericum (Pom Pom Blanc) (GM). Golden Oyster) (GM). but was closing them out for lack of interest.Malva verticillata (Malva crispa) (N) (A) (FP) ‘Primley Blue’ (Ju) ‘Zebrina’ Plant (Ju) Mamey Apple (see Apple.

Flanders (CR) (FP) (W) (GrD) Mix (CR) The following may be naturalized. Big (BT) Salal (see Wintergreen) Salmonberry (A) Salsify (oyster) (N) (G) (Pn) (F) (St) (TM) (J) (V) (ML) Russian (L) Salsify. Dame’s. Summer (N) (L) (Pa) (S) (St) (B) (TM) (J) (FM) (BP) (FP) (ML) (GC) (Ju) (W) (Hr) Savory. Edible (Yu Choy) (E) Rapeseed/Rape/Canola (L) (J) (PVF) Sprouts (J) Raspberry Black Cap (A) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (Bread) (S) (J) (L) (FP) (Bo) (J) (A) Oriental (T) (Pn) Pot Marigold (T) (see Calendula) Potentilla (see Bush cinquefoil) Prairie Sage (see Mugwort) Primrose. Beach Plant (K) (M) Native (ML) (R) (G) Pokeweed (GC) Pond Apple (BT) Plant (GD) Poppy Seed Shirley (FP) (W) (Pn) (SS) (PVF) & Bulk. Giant Wild Plant (WG) Cow (GrD) Passionflower (see Maypop) Paw Paw Seed (ML) Plant (ML) (Ju) (M) (FS) Peas. Wild (TM) (RG) Evening (A) (W) (TM) (J) (T) (ML) English (T) (RG) Purple Avens (GC) Purslane (T) Continental (Pn) (C) (N) French (S) (L) Golden (J) (L) Queen Ann’s Lace (SS) (CR) Quince.F. Sabal Palmetto (GrD) Pansy (G) (Ju) (ML) (HS) Parsley Wild (TM) Barestem Desert (A) Parsnip. Ritchie Redbud (FS) Eastern Plant (WG) (G) (GG) (ML) (K) (O) Rocket (N) (FP) (see Arugula) Rocket. Black-Eyed Native Southwest (NS) Pennyroyal (T) (N) (L) (Pa) (J) (BP) (ML) (GC) (A) (GrD) (Hr) Persimmon (BT) (Ju) (ML) Photinia (ML) Pigeon Plum Plant (GD) Pine. Sweet Rocket (T) (FP) (W) (GrD) Rose. Winter (Pn) (N) (L) (Pa) (BP) (V) (ML) (GC) (J) Creeping (GC) Scorzonera (Scorsoneres) (Black Salsify) (N) (J) (L) Sea Buckthorn Plant (R) Sea-grape Plant (GD) Seakale. Texas (ML) Rape. Rosa rugosa (A) (GrD) Plant (G) (O) (R) (FS) White (R) (GrD) Apple Rose (GC) Arkansas (FP) Nootka Seed (A) Rosemary (L) (Pa) (G) (S) (St) (V) (ML) (F) (Ju) (Pn) (C) (N) (L) (BP) (S) (TM) (J) (Pa) (FP) (GrD) (GC) (W) (Hr) Plant (ML) Rosemary 'Arp’ (N) Bog (GG) Trailing (Pa) Rose of Sharon Plant (G) (F) (ML) (Sh) (K) (G) Rye (PVF) & Bulk Winter (J) & Bulk (ML) (Pn) Safflower (N) (L) (V) (FP) (TM) (GC) Sage (Pn) (C) (T) (N) (L) (Pa) (G) (S) (B) (St) (TM) (J) (BP) (V) (FP) (ML) (GC) (F) (W) (J) (Hr) Dwarf (GC) Blue (GC) Big Sage Plant (HC) Broad Leaf (FM) (Kz) (L) (Ju) Clary (S) (V) (GC) (J) Golden (N) (L) (ML) (GC) Greek (GC) Holt’s Mammoth (GC) Honey Melon (GC)-Pineapple (L) (GC) Purple (ML) (GC) Russian (Pa) (TM) (ML) (Ju) (G) (GC) Scarlet/Crimson (GC) (W) (GrD) Tricolor (L) (GC) Tuberous (FP) Sagebrush. Black (see Scorzonera) Samphire (N) (ML)-mint (GC) Sancoya (BT) Saskatoon Serviceberry (A) Plant (F) (see Juneberry) Sassafras Plant (NN) (ML) (G) (GG) Savory. Ritchie C17 . Sea-kale (TM) Giant Seakale (FP) C18 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .Oregon Grape Tall (A) Cascade (A) Creeping (A) Plant (WG) Palm Cabbage. Pinyon (A) (ML) Plant (FP) (ML) Sugar (A) Singlleafed Pinyon (GG) American Red (Norway) (ML) Ponderosa (G) White (ML) Pineapple-weed (FP) (TM) Pink (Dianthus) (GC) (HS) Maiden Seed (FP) Clove (A) Plantain (GC) (J) (A) Plum. Field.F.

F. Sweet White (ML) Dog’s Tooth Violet (Ju) Horned seed (FP) Walnut. Grey Hill (GC) Lemon (N) (S) (BP) (L) (ML) (GC). Green (J) (V) (L) (E) (ML) (Kz) (see Perilla) Shi-sho. Ritchie Tarragon Mexican. Seed (St) (V) (J) (S) (Pa) (FP) (L) (BP) (F). Wild (NS) Punta Banda (NS) Triticale (T) Triticum (T) Tupelo. Canada. (BP) Sweet Cicely (N) (L) (GC) (A) (GrD) European (GrD) Sweet Flag (GrD) Sweetleaf Sweet Rocket (see Rocket. Mastic (GC) Mother of Thyme (A) (GC) Orange Balsam (GC) Oregano (N) (L) Passion Pink (GC) Pink Ripple (GC) Silver Lemon (GC) Variegated (ML) Winter (Ju) (A) Thyme Leaved Savory (GC) Tiger Lily (A) Plant (G) (FM) (F) (Ju) (O) Bulb (BP) Tomatillo Zuni (NS) Domestic (F) (N) (B) (S) (L) (J) (V) (FM) (BP) (Ju) (ML) (BP) Latin Amer.Seaside (ML) (GC) (GN) At the beach. Black Plant (ML) (M) (R) (FS) (G) Walnut. English Plant (O) (GG) (FS) Grafted (R) Waterlily Seed (FP) Watermelon Hopi Red (NS) Hopi Yellow (NS) Heirloom C20 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Red (Pn) (J) (V) (S) (L) (E) (Kz) Plant (ML) Silybum (N) Skirret (N) Sorghum Heirloom (NS) Sorrel (Pn-Continental) (St) (TM) (J) (V) (BP) (T) (L) (FP) (GC) Soursop (BT) (GrD) Plant (GD) Mountain (GD) Southernwood (GC) Spice Bush Plant (ML) Spotted Touch-me-not (GrD) Spruce (ML) Plants (K) (ML) (FS) Blue (G) Squash Calabaza (NS) SW Heirlooms (NS) Magdalena Big Cheese (NS) Pumpkin (NS) Arikara Try Heirloom. Ritchie C19 . Inc. Elephant Ear (Vn) (Pa) (Bo) (F) (G) (Latin or Asian Thimbleberry (A) Thistle Milk (L) (J) Thyme. Black Plant (GG) (ML) Turk’s Cap Lily (GrD) (ML) Valerian.F.. Dame’s) Sweet Shrub (see Carolina Allspice) Sweet William (G) (FP) (ML) (W) (SS) (GrD) Plant (F) (K) Tagetes (T) Lucida (N) (NS) (Signata Pumila) (TM) (see Marigold) Lemmonii (GC) Tamarind (Asian. (GG) Viola. Serviceberry Shadblow (K) (see Saskatoon. Russian (Pn) (Pa) (G) (V) Mexican (GC) Taro. Latin Markets) (Ex) (H) Tansy (FP) (ML) (GC) (A) Tapioca Plant (GD) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Stone Mint (see Dittany) Strawberry (Seed) (N) (Pn) (L) (St) (TM) (V) (B) (Pa) (Pa) (G) (NN) (BP) (O) (Vn) (ML) Alpine Seed (J) (BP) (GC) Northwest Wild (R) White & Red (S) Sugar Apple (BT) Plant (GD) Sunflower (N) (G) (Pa) (F) (C) (S) (St) (J) (FM) (ML) (T) (GC) Havasupai Striped (NS) Hopi Black (NS) White (GC) Heirloom (NS) Edible seeds listed separately. Creeping Lemon (GC) English (N) (S) (TM) (V) (Hr) (GC) English Variegated (GC) French Summer (C) N) (L) (S) (Kz) (L) German or Winter (T) (L) (B) (J) (G) (L) Golden Lemon (N) (BP). Red (HF) Verbena. Birdsfoot. Creeping T. Johnny-Jump-Up (FM) (T) (G) (GC) (W) (A) (Pn) (ML) (S) Plant (ML) Violet (V) (GC) Violet. Seeds of Change. Juneberry) Shadblow (see Serviceberry) Shepherd’s Purse (A) Shi-sho. Common (Pn) (N) (Pa) (St) (TM) (FM) (BP) (FP) (ML) (F) (W) (A) (GrD) Britannicus (GC) Caraway (N) (L) (GC). Lemon (L) (S) (GC) Vervain (J) Blue (GC) (J) (A) Viburnum Possum Haw Plant (GG) Tea V. (Pn) (C) (N) Tomato.

William G. of Oregon. OR 97213.F. Knopf. Loy. Balls. 1976. Box 972. California. 1870 Sunrise Dr. Abrams. New York. NY 10103. Plant (WG) (ML) (HC) Yerba Buena (GW) (GC) Yucca (BT) (TM) Plant (FP) (ML) (Ju) (G) (FS) (WG) (GG) (B) (Sh) (K) Bibliography Books: C. 1977. Return To Directory Bee Beyer.. Ritchie C21 C22 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Berkeley. Atlas of Oregon 2nd Edition. Jack Kramer. Nature Study Guild. Los Angeles. P. Harry N. Jean Auel. ***** Edward K. 1963. Fern Growers Manual. 9110 Sunset Blvd. California Tree Finder. 1962.. Inc. New York. Ritchie . Cornucopia a Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications.. Cacti and Other Succulents.Y. Inc. Golden Press.. 1986.(NS) Wheat (T) Summer-Spring (J) & Bulk Winter (J) (Pn) & Bulk (PVF) & Bulk (T) Black Beard (GC) Willow. Third Printing 1970 Berkeley & Los Angeles. New York. Frank Brockman. Director. N. Tom Watts. 5345 N. J. Tarcher. Trees of North America. Early Uses of California Plants. University of California Press. **** Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Revised Edition. Food Drying at Home The Natural Way. Sweet (V) (FP) (L) (BP) (ML)(GC) Plant (Ju) (K) Yarrow (see achillea) (HC) (GrD) White (PVF) (Hr) (GrD) & Bulk. California. Artist: Rebecca Merrilees. 1983. A Guide To Field Identification. 1976. Weeping Plant (ML) (O) (K) (FS) (Ju) (M) (B) (G) Wintergreen Plant (NN) (ML) (GG) (Ju) (GC) (R) (TGS) Salal (GG) (A) (R) Plant (R) Creeping (WG) Wisteria Plant (G) (HF) (GG) (Ju) Chinese (FP) White Chinese (FP) Woodruff. Clan of the Cave Bear. 1990.F.O. Inc. Stephen Facciola... Portland. CA 92084. Sandy Blvd. 1980. E.P. CA 90069. Alfred A. Vista. Bantam Books. U. Inc. Inc. Academic Book Center. 666 5th Avenue... Barbara Joe Hoshizaki.

H. Marc Rogers. 1978. Patricia S. Sampson Low. 1993. Seaside Plants of The World. Adelma G. Harrisburg. Princeton. Saving Seed.. Krieger... Emmaus. 1976. 1964. Great Neck.. Utah 84601. New York City. PA 18049. Salt Lake City. Rodale Press. Kees Jansen. NY 10016. The Readers Digest Assoc. 1986. Box 11925. 120 Alexander St. Small-Scale Grain Raising. Inc. Robert L. Inc. Cornell University. New York. The New Seed-Starters Handbook. D. 1964.. Peton Corp. 112 Madison Avenue. Gene Logsdon. Dorling Kindersley Limited. P. New York. 445 Northern Blvd. Inc. Herb Identifier and Handbook. Inc. Emmaus. **** Lesley Bremness. 1990. Stackpole Books. Inc. 1993. New Jersey. Herbs. Brady and Henry R.. Pruning. Making the Best of Basics. Storey Communications. New York. The Forgotten Art of Flower Cookery. Macmillan.O. Green Immigrants... P O Box. 1977. Hearthside Press Inc.. Lesley Bremnus & Dorling Kindersley Text Copyright. London. Edwin A. Pa.. Inc.. Louis C. Pa. Bailey. Diagram Visual Information Ltd.. Van Nostrand Company. Guide for Cooking with Flowers. Glasgow G4 ONB.. RD Home C23 Handbook.O. Herbs. Horitorium. **** Bradford Angier. Provo. How To Guide for Gardeners. G. CA 93067. Sterling Publishing Co. Rodale Press. Pleasantville. NY 10020. **** Pam North. **** Ann Reilly and Editors. Leona Woodring Smith. Herb Gardening in Five Seasons. Materials Handbook. ***** Listed only by botanical names. 1967. SAS Survival Guide. Paradise Farms. Box 5367. Gallery Books. 1983. Dick Pijpers. Third Edition. The Complete Book of Fruit. 1990. Doubleday Book & Music Clubs. P.. James Talmage Stevens. Tucson. New York City. Pelican Publishing. Eleventh Edition McGraw-Hill Book Co. 180 Varick St. Contributing Editor... 1977. Cameron & Kelker Streets.F. Dover Publications. Emmaus. NY 11021.. 1978. Summerland.Claire Shaver Houghton. Ingrid Gabriel. Nancy Bubel. 1988. AZ 85703. Brigham Young University Press. Constant. Inc..C. 387 Park Ave. 1990. The Mushroom Handbook. Clauser. Ritchie . Harcourt Brace Javanovich. 1967. Stebbins and Michael MacCaskey. HP Books. Jac. Herb Growing a Visual Guide. Hortus Third. L. Rodale's Successful Organic Gardening Herbs. South. Utah 84111. Simmons. Inc. 17105. 1970. Inc. Box 436. Menninger. Skills for Taming the Wilds. NY 10014. (Collins Gem) Harper Collins Publishers. NY 10016. ***** George S. Rodale Press. New York City. Inc. 1221 Avenue of the Americas. Michalak. 1974. PA 18049. _____Outdoor Survival Skills. New York. C24 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . John Wiseman. Garden Way Publishing.F. Inc. England or Canada. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds .

Wm. Aug/Sep 1980.... 1994. Kalamazoo. 1994. Inc.. Jan.P.. The Sea-Beach At Ebb-Tide. Swengel. Nurserymen’s Exchange.Y. NY 10014. Questians & Answers by Bob Polomski. Aug/Sep 1995. Ritchie C25 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .. 1976. California 92670.. Boise.. Year-round Vegetable” by Walter Chandoha. 774 South Placentia. N. Ritchie . Wise & Co. Inc. Golden Press. Trees of The Eastern and Central United States and Canada. 1968. San Francisco. “Bird Pepper” (author unknown) Dec.. 1984. 1997.F.L.. B. Inc. “Step-By-Step Primulas from Seed” by Thomas Fischer. 1957. New York City. ***** _____The Wise Encyclopedia of Cookery. Inc. Dover Publications. Microtek Publications. One Park Avenue. May 1996. NY 10016. “Pecans” by Brenda Olcott-Reid. May 1997. 1986.S. McMullen & Yee Publishing. Inc. Oct. H.1976.. 1953. “Stalking Wild Seeds” by Ann B. “Winterberry” by Wayne Winterrowd. Wise & Co. 1978. 1901. Wildflower Perennials for Your Garden. 1946. “Rugged Rugosas” by Suzanne Verrier. CA 90069. The Magazine of American Gardening. New York. Rombough. 1989. Sanchez. New York City. New York. Trees of North America. Racine.F. Exeter Books. Idaho 83704.. The Century Company. 1976. Inc. Aug/Sep 1997. Crown Publishers Incorporated. C. Family Circle 2/24/81 “ Jerusalem Artichokes: The Littleknown. Magazines: American Survival Guide.. a trade mark of Simon & Schuster Inc. 180 Varick St. 260 Madison Ave. 1990. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Succulents. Dec.. Food Drying At Home The Natural Way. 475 6th St... NY-Western Publishing Co. ***** _____The World Atlas of Food. 1996. ?Nov. “Well-mannered Crabs” by Thomas Christopher. Augusta Foote Arnold. H. Apr.D. Bee Beyer. New York City 14. “Blue-Ribbon Catmints” by Daniel J. “Clove Currant” by Jo Ann Gardner.. First Aid Procedures & Lifesaving Techniques. 9110 Sunset Blvd._____Edited by E. Gordon Rowley. Wisconsin. “Fruits for the Kitchen” by Lon J. New York. “ Raising a Tree from Seed” by Janet H. Frank Brockman.. Questions & Answers (answer) by C26 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Jun/Jul 1992. Horticulture. CA 94103. Placentia. New York. The New Garden Encyclopedia Wm. _____Luffa. New York. Los Angeles. 1976. 180 Varick St. NY 10016. Bebe Mieles. Hawthorn Books. Inc.A. Tarcher. 1992. Merchants Publishing Co. Oct.. Michigan 49001. William Harlow.. 1996. “Step-By-Step Planting a Waterlily” by Terry Dunn. J. NY. Hinkley. Inc. Dover Publications. Seymour.. Booklets: Cacti & Succulents for Modern Living.

Patrick Nutt on Lotus. Horticulture, Inc., 98 North Washington Street, Boston, MA 02114-1913 Mother Earth News, July 1996, Oct/Nov 1993, “Dear Mother, Calling All Pits.” Mother Earth News, Sussex Publishers, Inc., 24 E. 23st St., NY, NY 10010. National Gardening Magazine: Jul/Aug 1991, “Mint Condition” by Holly H. Shimizu. Nov/Dec 1993, “Get Crackin’!” (nuts) by Joan HuyserHonig. Mar/Apr 1994, “Spring's Chicories by Janet H. Sanchez. “The Mighty Lingonberry” by Robert E. Gough. “Tea from the Garden” by Evelyn Gaspar. “Powerful Purslane” by Joan HuyerHonig. Sep/Oct 1994, “Rediscovering our Roots” by Lucy Beckstead. “A Passion for Garlic” by Vicky Congdon. “Precious Persimmons” by Charlie Nardozzi. Nov/Dec 1996, Questions and Answers, Currants Jan/Feb 1997, “Brilliant Bee Balms by Holly H. Shimizu. Mar/Apr 1997, What’s News Section, Dan Sullivan, Oregon State University (% content of minerals in wood ash.) National Gardening Magazine, 180 Flynn Ave., Burlington, Vermont 05401. C27

Organic Gardening, Sept. 1980, “Hardy Fennel” by James Jankowiak. “ Seaweed or Pondweed?” by Katherine M. Doherty Sept. 1983, “Saffron-A Fall Phenomenon” by Sarah Price. “Found at Last-Real Oregano” by Dorothy Patent. August 1995, “Survival Miracle Plants” by Chris Janowsky. Organic Magazine, Rodale Press, Inc., 33 E. Minor St., Emmaus, PA 18049. Nursery Growing Guides: Burpee Gardens, 1996, W. Atlee Burpee & Co., Warminster, PA 18974. Ferry-Morse Seeds, 1996, P.O. Box 488, Fulton, KY 42041-0488. Gurney's Seed & Nursery Co. Grow-It Guide, 19931999, Gurney Seed & Nursery Co., Yankton, SD 57079. Henry Fields’s Planting Guide, 1995, Henry Field's Seed & Nursery Co., 415 N. Burnett, Shenandoah, IA 51602. Johnny's Selected Seeds, 1995, 1 Foss Hill Rd., Albion, Maine 04910-9731. **** Miller Nurseries Planting Guide & Catalog, 1993, 5060 West Lake Road, Canandaigue, NY 14424. Native Seeds/SEARCH, 1999 Seed listing, 526 N. 4th Ave., Tucson, AZ 85705. Nichols Garden Nursery, 1996, 1190 North Pacific Hwy, Albany, OR 97321-4598. Instructions. C28

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Edible Native Plants and Weeds - F. Ritchie

Northwoods Nursery, 1996, 27635 S. Oglesby Rd., Canby, OR 97013. Ortho Garden Guide, Chevron Chemical Co.,1981.

University of California, Agr. Extension by J.F. Harrington, Dept. of Vegetable Crops, U.C. Davis, Davis, California. Newspapers:

Park Seed Flowers and Vegetables, 1995-1999, Geo. W. Park Seed Co., Inc., 1 Parkton Rd., Greenwood, SC 29647-0001. Pinetree Garden Seeds, 1995, 1999, Box 300, New Gloucester, ME 04260. Shepherd's Garden Seeds, 1995, 1999 Catalog, 30 Irene St., Torrington, Connecticut 06790-6627. Growers Guide, 1995,1999, Stokes Seed Inc., Box 548 Buffalo, NY 14240-0548. (Excellent catalog.) Territorial Seed, Spring/Winter 1995-1999 Catalog, 20 Palmer Ave., Cottage Grove, OR 97424. The Cook's Garden Spring/Summer 1995 Catalog, P.O. Box 535, Londonderry, Vermont 05148. The Seed Catalogue, 1993, Thompson & Morgan Inc., P.O. Box 1308, Jackson, NJ 08527-0308. (Information comes with seeds.) Pamphlet/Leaflet/Newsletter/Etc. On The Horizon by Greg and Pat Williams, Fall '93, Stay Organic Newsletter, Gardens Alive, 5100 Schenley Place, Lawrenceburg, IN 47025. The Great Garden Guide, 1987, Rodale Press, Emmaus, PA 18098. The Stay Organic Newsletter, Bruce Woods, Editor, 1993. C29

Fertile Ground by Dennis Lueck, Dec. 26, 1998, The Springfield News, P.O. Box 139, Springfield, OR 97477. Make Way For Nopal, A Tasty, Prickly Pear Delight by Howard LaFranchi September 7, 1995, The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Publishing Society, One Norway Street, Boston, MA 02115. Organic Offerings by Kris Wetherbee July 2, 1997, The Springfield News, P.O. Box 139, Springfield, OR 97477. Walk on the Wild Side by Annie Capestany, 1993 The Springfield News, Laura Street, Springfield, Oregon 97477. Organizations Seed Savers International List, c/o Seed Saver Exchange, catalog (free) 3076 N. Winn Rd., Decorah, Iowa 52101.

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Acknowledgments
For almost fifty years I have been learning from The New Garden Encyclopedia, Wise & Company. Without that experience I couldn’t have started on this book. It took Stephan Facciola’s Cornucopia to verify some of the information and complete the book. I thank Ralph Ritchie for the many photographs he has taken; Chris Janowsky for his generous offer; Ann Gee of Wickenburg, Arizona, for her photographs; Mary Lou Spencer; Decker Nursery, in Amador, Oregon, with the help of Sara Huey; and Gray’s Nursery, in Eugene, Oregon, who allowed us complete freedom to photograph. The drawings, those of the author, were based on the drawings of Rebecca Merrilees, A Guide to Field Identification Trees of North America; Arch & Miriam Hurford, The American Southwest; E. Yale Dawson, Seashore Plants of Southern California; Norman Arlott, SAS Survival Guide; and the Turk’s Cap Lily in Mellinger’s 1999 catalog. Thanks to the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the Zone Map of the United States. We fulfilled the basic premise of the book by gathering what was around us. Just as we would have gathered the leaves or seeds, or other edible parts, we harvested edibles with a camera along roadsides, in fields, or even in someone’s yard with a telephoto lens. Several of the edibles were photographed in our own yard before we gathered and ate them, reminiscent of the artist who painted a still life before eating it. Fortunately, our yard does not have the tailored, mowed, weeded look so commonly seen in the urban-suburban culture. Well, that’s our excuse.

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If you are in a situation where you need food. Rule number one is. Know what plants are safe.besides insects. study the plant and see if anything else has been eating it. The situation is no different than having read a camping manual. On the other hand. leave it out. what stage of plant maturity is safe.F. your purpose is different than when you may be casually interested in eating from the garden for the novelty of it.A Word of Caution If you have read the book thoroughly and made certain of your plant identification. Ritchie . Take heed of what plant parts may be eaten.F. and where the plant is situated. Realize also that a perfectly edible plant may have a taste that is repulsive to your pallette. but that doesn’t mean it cannot be eaten in an urgent necessity. but its situation may not be. Any plants that have been washed by flood waters or even rain runoff may be contaminated. you should have no problem with the edible plants or plant parts. Ritchie C33 C34 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . When in doubt. That’s a good indicator. a plant may be safe to eat. you fail to recognize poison oak from Edible Native Plants and Weeds . yourself and your family. Study. particularly. In either case your better judgement would be to eat sparingly of any plant until you know its effect on humans. In the wilds. Do your homework ahead of time.

Inc. Bulk refers to the alternative offerings. It is your choice. B. The following lines name any specialty they offer. Some plants come from tubers or rooted cuttings. no matter what the book said. Some plants have become favorites and show up regularly on our table. If there is no special indication. Addresses change frequently. P. many catalogs come through their mailing lists without the asking. Ritchie . Other plants. We have done our best to verify the book’s accuracy and we have tested most of the plants available to us. 1998. bulk.F. etc. The garden magazines have offers for free nursery catalogs for the asking. Ritchie C35 C36 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .F. otherwise. but are not offering it to the public either for lack of enough seed or interest from the public the past year. collect a nice bouquet. The first line following the plant name indicates that the company carries the usual varieties. or didn’t say. WA 98368. Write to the company and ask for it. roots. Each year more wild plants are added to garden catalogs as the public interest in them increases. while they were edible. etc. (BT)=The Banana Tree. (A. Port Townsend. If a listing in the future does not show up in the next catalog. the company reference is for seed. 715 Northampton Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (A)=Abundant Life Seed Foundation.the pictures... it will say plants. sprouts. O. The names of the companies are listed in alphabetical order. The following companies sell packets of seed.) is the code for a particular company. Our sole purpose was to heighten your awareness and perhaps also give you another handle on disaster survival. You must be responsible for your own actions! Catalog Sources The following list of wild or escaped edible plants are keyed to the names listed below.. but our best advice is to study and sample the plants around you before you really need them. We cannot assume responsibility for the information contained in this book. C. 1998. the company may still have the seed. Likewise. If one subscribes. **** Pkt. Box 772. Their codes are not. E-mail and Website addresses are given when known. you are responsible for trying to pet that nice little black kitty with the white stripe. Many companies have on-line catalogs. Any listings without dates are from 1995 catalog listings. would only show up again under dire circumstances. Not everything produces reliable seed. and you suffer the consequences.

1999. http://www. Seeds for Fragrant. Bulk. Box 1000. Santa Fe. (FS)=Four Seasons Nursery. 1-800-824-6400. Foss Hill Road. O..O. Williams. Iowa 51602-0001. above address. www. Jung Seed Co. High St. 14th St. 335 S. Shelton. To order: 1-800-622-9959. $5.. Babylon.H. VT 05863 Sample Pkt . L. 1999 Division of Plantron. Inc. 2001. Shenandoah. Box 3337. Box 37328. Oriental Vegetable Seed Packets. Anaheim.O. spacing & when to plant. Atlee Burpee & Co. $1. NM 87505-2929.. (G)=Gurney's Seed & Nursery Co. 1-800-235-0845 Fax: 1-800-357-4149 (FM)=Ferry-Morse Seeds/Advance Seed Company. West Elizabeth.mySEASONS. Www. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . W. 1999. CA 91766.Y. Fax: 1-877-616-7871. Eugene. IL 61701. 1996. (E)=Evergreen Y. (FP)=The Fragrant Path. 1996 plants. E.F. Bulk seed.com/seeds/tropicalgreenhouse (GN)=Greenlee Nursery. Brooks. 1280 Goodpasture Island Rd. Davie. KY 42041-0488.S.O. Has some unusual fruit. GA 30205. WA 98584. Nebraska 68023. 1706 Morrissey Dr. Pomona. Bulk. CA 95126 (L)=Le Jardin du Gourmet. MN 55021 (Kz)=Kitazawa Seed Co. 14560 S. (GD)=Garden of Delights 1997. 1999 seeds. 300 Park Avenue. SD 57079. Hudson. 1999. P. 1995-96.O. Rare and Old-Fashioned Plants. Bloomington. (GrD)=GreenDealer 1999. 1999. OR 97544. godelights@aol. Burpee Heirloom Seed Catalog. 1996. http: //www.. NW. Fulton.O.O. Box 328. Has some unusual fruit. (K)=Kelly Nurseries. P. (HS)=Heirloom Seeds... N. 800-437-4290 U. 2001. CA 94546-0366. (CR)=Clyde Robin Seed Co. P. This is a most interesting list of rare fruiting plants and trees. Box 488. Lists planting depth for vegetables. 1111 Chapman St. www. IL 61704. Franklin Ave. St..com (Ju)=J. P. 415 North Burnett.. (F)=Henry Fields Seed & Nursery Co. (J)=Johnny's Selected Seeds. $1. Enterprises 1995/1996. OR 94401. WI 53957-0001. w/recipes Pkts. CA 92817.O. C37 (GM)=Gourmet Mushrooms.00+ Imported seeds C38 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (BP)=W.. 502 Haskell Hill Rd. 301 E.banana-tree. P. P. Albion.com faban@enter.johnnyseeds... Faribault. P. P.greendealer.net (Bo)=Van Bourgondien Bros. Att. Star Route 2.com Has quite a variety in their catalog.com (C)=The Cook's Garden (some botanical names) Has pages of Mesclun. 2902 Rufina St. 1999. PA 150882. Castro Valley. Randolph. www. 1999. Ritchie . 11702-9004. Easton. Yankton..heirloomseeds. KY 40233-7328. Spanish listings. 905 Four Seasons Road. (IN)=Ison’s Nursery and Vineyards.O. Box 190.30 Large Pkt 1. FL 33325. Box 2366.. RR 1 Box 2580. 245 Route 109. CA 94020. 1999. Large supply of palms.F. Box 515T6. Box 83. $1. 410 8th Ave. Lousiville. Graton. Box 75.... Bloomington.St.. (H)=J.. Fort Calhoun. Johnsbury Ctr.O. (HH)=Heaths and Heathers. Order Dept. (GG)=Greer Gardens. (B)=Burgess Plant & Seed Co.W. Wild flowers. Box 245. P. Box 17538. PA 18042. Bulk. La Honda. 1999.. Fax: (502) 459-9054. Maine 04910-9731. San Jose. PA 18991-0001.O.come-mail (GC)=Goodwin Creek Gardens. CA 95444. 18991-0008. 1998.com (HC)=High Country Gardens. 110 Capital St.clyderobin. Very select number of each vegetable (many heirloom). Warminster. P. P.

Salem. (Pn)=Pinetree Garden Seeds. Ritchie . W. 2001. Jackson.. 1999. www. Box 10.. for growing west of the Cascades Pkts & Bulk. Buffalo. (NN)=Northwoods Nursery. A show of flowers.O. Torrington. 28696 S. Buckeystown. Mesclun recipe. 4030 Eagle Crest Rd. 2310 W. Union. PO Box 157. 526 N. 3133. 1999. Fax 1-520-622-5591. Oglesby Rd. Box 2209 Grass Valley. Fall & Spring Catalogs.. 724-4655685. Box 1130. (NS)=Native Seeds/SEARCH.com (Pa)=G. 1998. Dept. check their catalog first..Tucson. Fax: 800-275-9941. Canby. 2300 E. 15701-0340. Conn 06790-6658 European seeds Large selection of Chilis. Molalla. E-mail: nichols@gardennursery. (St)=Stokes Seeds Inc. 1996 (O)=Owen Nursery. Elm St. 1-800-396-9238.com. 2001. Box 340. P. 2001. CA 92274. Inexpensive pkts.. Range Rd.**** 1-800-321-74444. 25. Box 1308. NE... Inc. Concentration seems to be more on herbs & flowers. 2001. Lincoln St. 1999.com Trees.F. Thermal. 110 W. Bloomington. Special attention to Greater Southwest Native American farmers. Info@musserforests. (N)=Nichols Garden Nursery. 1999-2000. 30 Irene Street. P. 180 Stickney Hill Rd.territorial-seed. Penn. Seed growing instructions are in the catalog and the bill comes with some information.parkseed. 1999 Richard Owen Nursery. 1999. 1993. 1996. Has more info. C39 OGW=One Green World. 1 Parkton Road. Brookshire. Space Savers. TX 77423. NY 14424. OR 97013 Fax 503-266-5431. Separate list for growers Goodly number of oriental vegetables Recipes. Has sowing information for indoors as well as direct C40 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . P.onegreenworld. Spring and Fall catalogs. ME 04260 Botanical names only w/herbs. Cramer Rd. E-mail: mellgarden@aol.O. Ohio 44452-9731. Pkts & Bulk. & most variety in each category than any other listed here Mostly Americas' seed. (S)=Shepherd's Garden Seeds. Box 188. Fax: 330-549-3716. MD 21717. 1-541-942-9547 Fax: 1-888-657-31-31 www. (SS)=Select Seeds. Greenwood. Box 300. OR 97424-0061 Winter Cat. Unusual list of unique fruits (plants). 1999.O.com www.. (T)=Territorial Seed Company. 2001. CA 95945 $2. OR 97321-4580. AZ 85705. Cottage Grove. P.com Pkts & Some bulk listed w/seed. Dept. 800-845-3369.shepherdseeds. P. (541) 928-9280 Fax: (800) 231-5306. (ML)=Mellinger's Inc.. (PVF)=Peaceful Valley Farm Supply.nicholsgardennursery. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Indiana. (TM)=Thompson & Morgan Inc. W. WA 98356.com (RG)=Russell Graham Purveyor of Plants. 800-836-9630. Organic. Inc.O. 50. Morton.com (MF)=Musser Forests. (R)=Raintree Nursery. Box 548.com (Sh)=Springhill Nurseries. Fax: 724-465-9893. Www. N.. CT 06076-4617.4th Ave. New Gloucester. Park Seed Co. Fax 1-716-396-2154. Recipes.. Canandaigua. Fax: 1-800-418-9983. They have Dwarf trees... (MF) is not listed in this Source. Few botanical names.from France Few botanical names. 1190 Old Salem Rd.O. 1996. P. 1-877-353-4028. North Lima.. If you’re looking for a tree listed in the text. OH 45371. 1997. 12 pgs of Herbs. Stokes Tropicals $4. Tipp City. NY 14240-0548. 27635 S. (M)=Miller Nurseries 1999. 1999. So.O. Only alfalfa is listed in bulk. Bushes: 10. 405 Butts Rd. 100 per variety. S-99M. Albany.F. Catalog has too many good things to list more. 5060 West Lake Rd.. SC 29647-0001.. OR 97038-8576. OR 97304. NJ 08527-0308. Bulk seed. IL 61701 Has some unusual fruit. **** www. (Lp)=Lilypons Water Gardens.

P. Territorial Seed Company. Inc. Box 515T6. 11096 Spring Valley Ln. OR 97321. P. Babylon. 526 N. Dept. Union.P. Inc. Salisbury.Tucson.O. Box 3000. P. 05146 59th St.. Fax 1-520-622-5591. Okanogan. OH 44654-9104... AZ 85705. NM 87506-5700. 110 Capitol St. 109. (W)=Wildseed Farms. Salterpath.O. Fredericksburg TX 78624-3000. Box 666-G. 2451 Kissel Hill Rd. Johnson Nursery. 95. Box 411-NG.com Specialty Companies Amish types-Berlin Seeds. PA 17601. Heirloom-Bentley Seeds. OR 97324.. Inc. (Vn)=Van Bourgondien Bros. WA 98840.00. Chicories-The Cook's Garden ($1. Moyie Springs.-NGA. 1996. Toll-free Order (888) 784-1722. Seeds of Change. Pacific Hwy. Box 2538. P. South Haven.. MD 21802.. P. CA 95132. Northport. Box 2209.F. 316 Surrett Cove Rd. Albany. Yankton. Box 418..O. Delaplane. NC 28557. Adequate vegetable list with large list of giant vegetables.. Cottage Grove. Ornamental plants. P. Ornamental Edibles. Box 7634. Morel. 1998. CT 06076.. Beach-Carolina Seacoast Beach Plants. ID 83845.O. 425 Wildflower Hills. 1 Garden La. Garlic-Filaree Farm. Instructive information is very good. Lauderdale. 5. Montauk Hwy. Blueberries-Barwacz Farm. Albany. OR 97424..O. Pkts & Bulk..O. Spring Valley Nursery. Graton. Hodges. Star Rt. P. Fruits-Northwoods Nursery. P. WA 99157. 16 Railroad Ave.wildseedfarms. 1999. NY 11940. East Moriches. Sandy Mush Herb Nursery. 52 E. Potatoes-Ronniger's Seed Potatoes. Native Trees & Bushes (see Musser Forests.. P..O. Grand Junction.seeding. N.Y. www. Millersburg.. Organic Seeds-Bountiful Gardens. P.O. Special attention to Greater Southwest Native American farmers. Drawer NG. refundable).. Olympia. Box 29-J. Ellijay. Alsea.O. 5371 County Road 77. Ornamental plants. 1190 North Pacific Hwy. CA 95444. $4. 182 Conconully Hwy. 1190 N. Peaceful Valley Farm Supply. Inc. (WG)=Wayside Gardens. Dept. Northwest-Nichols Garden Nursery. 15575 77th St. Rt. C42 Edible Native Plants and Weeds ..4th Ave. Ft. 245 Farmingdale Road. Fax (830) 990-8090. 1-800848-0078. DeGrandchamp's Blueberry Farm Inc.O. Cambridge.. OR 97321. 27635 S.. Dwarf-Henry Leuthardt Nurseries.. NY 11702-9004. Box 535. WA 98507. above) Northern-Gurney's Seed & Nursery Co.. (see Natives) Herbs-The Thyme Garden. 1999.O. Box 23006. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Londonderry. MI 49090 . SC 29695-0001. Box 1000. Canby. Gourmet Mushrooms. Oglesby Rd. MI 49056. Leicester Mushrooms-Fungi Perfecti.. VA 22025. Ritchie . Apples-Bear Creek Nursery. NBG6. Natives of the Greater Southwest and Mexico -Native Seeds/SEARCH. VT 05148. NGM Hwy. Rt. Berries-Brittingham Plant Farms. Santa Fe. 20546-N Alsea Hwy. FL 33307. Select Seeds. GA C41 30540. 1-800-845-1124. SD 57079 . Lancaster. 180 Stickney Rd. Landis Valley Heirloom Seed Project.. Or 97013. San Jose... Box 5700. 2816. CA 95945. CA 95490. Box 157. Peppers-The Pepper Gal. 18001 Shafer Ranch Rd. Willits.. Grass Valley. 3622 Weedin Ct. Nichols Garden Nursery.F.

Tomatoes-Tomato Growers Supply Co. P. Shadblow. Box 2237. Return To Main Index Sources Listed By Plant Name The letters following the plant name are keyed to the companies ( ) above. Roquette-French (T) (L) Recipe (C) (Pa) (S) (St) (L) Sprouts (Pn) C44 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . 1162 Cherry Rd. Juneberry) Angelica (T) (N) (L) (TM) (V) (FP) (J) Plant (L) (GC) (N) Purpurea Plant (GC) Anise (N) (L) (Pa) (G) (St) (B) (FM) (V) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (J) (W) (Hr) (see Licorice) Anise Hyssop (Pn) (BP) (GC) Blue & White (T) Blue (N) (J) (S) (FP) Plant (ML) (GC) Apple.. Santa Fe.F. Achillea (G) (Ju) (GC) (W) (J) (St) (Pn) (A) Plant (F) Agastache (cana) Plant (GC) (HC) Texas Hummingbird Mint (HC) Agrimony (V) (GC) (J) (N) Alexanders Plant (GC) Alfalfa (Pa) (ML) (J) (GrD) Sprouts (TM) (V) (T) (Ju) (ML) (PVF) (J) (Pn) (Pa) Bulk (N) Amaranth. Saskatoon. Iowa 52101. NM 87505-2929. 2902 Rufina St. The companies listed first have seed unless otherwise indicated (Plant. FL 33902. OR 97462. Decorah... Mamey Plant (GD) Arikara (see Squash) Artemisia. Clemson University. Those following indicate varieties by the name or description for which you may be looking.O. Wild (ludoviciana) (GrD) Plant (GC) (WG) (N) (Pn) (JU) Big Sage (see Sage) Arugula (Rocketor.F. The first rows indicate these companies have the usual varieties. 3076 N. Winn Rd. Ritchie C43 . Roots. Clemson.95/Yr. $14. SC 29634-9952. Ritchie Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Western Plants-High Country Gardens. South Carolina Foundation Seed Association. Vegetable (Calaloo) (Hinn choy) (Tampala) (J) (ML) (N) Amelanchier (see Serviceberry..highcountrygardens. Newsletters Organic Offerings by Kris Wetherbee.com Seed Associations Seed Savers International List c/o Seed Savers Exchange. Bulb). Oakland. 4290 Rice Valley Rd. Garden Rocket-English) (N) (Pn) (TM) (J) (V) (FM) (BP) (T) (G) (L) (Pa) (Ju) A. Fort Meyers. www. Tubers.. Wild (Ju) Edible Greens (S) (NS) Grain (J) (NS) New Mexico (GC) Popping (NS) Hopi (NS) Durango (NS) Amaranth.

Blue (N) Barley (PVF) & Bulk Basil Heirloom (NS) Mrs. Burn’s Famous Lemon (NS) Bay Seed (TM) (V) (FP) Plant (L) (N) (NN) (Pa) Sweet (GG) Plant (N) (Pa) Calif. Bergamot (V) (N) (GC) (L) (K) (G) (J) (St) (Pa) (RG) Plant (Ju) (F) Orange (S) (Ju) Lemon (GC) Beech Plants (ML) Purple (K) (R)Tri-color (K) Bergamot. (ML) Aspen Quaking (G) (F) Avens (GrD) Plant (GC) (A) (see Purple) Bachelor’s Button (J) (N) (W) (A) (St) (FP) (CR)/(PVF) (T) (G) (HS) & Bulk (Pn) (see Mountain Bluet) Plant (F) Balm. Ritchie type (Sk) Thin-leaved (A) (see Huckleberry) Borage (Pn) (C) (T) (N) (L) (St) (TM) (J) (FM) (BP) (S) (V) (Pa) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (GC) (W) (Hr) Buckwheat (ML) (PVF) & Bulk (Pn) (J) & Bulk Sprouts (Pn) Buffalo Berry Plant (HC) (ML) Buffalo Grass (see Grass) Bull Bay Plant (GG) (ML) (BT) Bunchberry (A) (C) Plant (GG) (R) Bush Cinquefoil (Potentilla) (GC) (WG) (Pa) (G) Butterfly-weed (see Milkweed) Butternut Plant (GG) (M) (B) (R) (G) Cactus. Laurel (GG) Plant (R) Golden Plant (N) Bayberry Pacific (A) Eastern Plant (F) (GG) American (WG) Northern (G) Beans. German (Pn) (T) (N) (L) (G) (S) (J) (NN) (F) (FM) (BP) (V) (Pa) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (GC) (Hr) Roman (Pa) Plant (N) Cherry Plants Black (ML) (FP) Sand (ML) Purple Leaf (K) (O) (F) (FS) Chervil (Pn) (T) (L) (S) (St) (TM) (FM) (L) (FP) (ML) (GC) (W) (C) (J) (Hr) (N) Curled (Pa) (BR) (V) (L) Chestnut American (R) C46 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (A) Mtn.F.F. Wild (FP) (GC) (W) (J) (SS) (N) Plant (N) Betony (GC) Bilberry Dwarf (A) Birch Sweet (FP) Plants Gray (WG) Paper or Canoe (A) (GG) (O) (WG) (ML) (K) (FS) Red or River Plants (K) (WG) Blackberry Trailing (A) Plant (R) Native (R) Black Haw (GC) Plant (WG) Blueberry. Ritchie C45 . Alpine (GC) Grandiflora (GC) Calamintha. Plant (G) (R) (OGW) European Mtn. Lemon (Pn) (T) (N) (L) (G) (S) (St) (B) (TM) (J) (F) (BP) (Pa) (V) (Ju) (ML) (GC) (J) Plant (ML) (GC) (N) Variegated (FP) Plant (L) (BP) (Bee Balm. see Bergamot) Golden Plant (GC) Balsam. Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Lesser (TM) Nepeta (GC) Camas Blue (A) Bulb (N) Canola (see Rapeseed) Carob (BT) Carolina Allspice Plant (F) (ML) (K) (FP) (WG) (R) (O) (FS) Catmint (S) (V) (Pa) (FP) (N) (GC) Plant (Ju) (N) (F) (G) Catnip (Pn) (T) (N) (L) (G) (S) (St) (J) (FM) (BP) (V) (Pa) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (GC) (F) (L) (BP) (Pa) (W) (Hr) Plant (N) Lemon (GC) Grandiflora (GC) Cattail (A) Ceanothus Smaller Red-root (GrD) New Jersey Tea (GrD) (see local nursery) Centaurea (see Bachelor Button) Century Plant (TM) Plant (HC) Chamomile.Ash American (TM) (F) Cascade Mtn. Prickly Pear (GC) (GrD) Hedgehog (HC) Opuntia humifusa (TGS) Calamint. Manzanita (A) Plant (GC) (WG) Beautyberry Plant (NN) (WG) (GG) Bee Balm. Wild (R) ‘Brunswick‘ (wild Nova Scotian lowbush) (NN) (R) (OGW) Rabbiteye (BT) R. Wild (NS) Southwest Natives (NS) Tepary (NS) Lima (NS) Scarlet Runner (NS) (Pa) Fava Heirloom (NS) Garbanzos Heirlooms (NS) Lentils (NS) (see Peas) Bearberry.

canadensis) Plant (ML) (R) (OGW) English Daisy (N) Plant (ML) Epazote (Pn) (N) (Pa) (S) (J) (T) (L) Erythrina Check with Los Angeles City or County. Desert (NS) Native (NS) (A) Health Food Store Chickweed (A) Chicory (N) (C) (L) (Pa) (St) (TM) (V) (FM) (T) (FP) (W) (GrD) Asparagus (FM) (T) (N) French (Chicorees Frisees) Escarole and Endive (V) (L) Mitado (N) Italian (Pn) (N) (St) (V) (T) (L) Root (coffee) (ML) Wild (L). (GrD) & Bulk. Garden (Pn) (C) (N) (G) (L) (St) (TM) (J) (FM) (A) (BP) (T) (Ju) (FP) Broadleaf (A) (S) (J) Crinkled (T) Curled or Curly (A) (Pa) (S) (St) (T) (ML) Edible Native Plants and Weeds .Chestnut. Clove (GG) Currant (R) Golden Plant (GG) Red Lake (F) (G) Red.F. Ritchie Mega Sprouts (TM) Upland (J) (BP) (V) (A) (N) Water (Pa) (S) (L) (St) (J) (FM) (T) (V) (FP) (GC) (E) (A) (ML) (GC) (N) Crocus (see Saffron) Currant. Sprouts (V) (T) (Ju) Alsike (Pn) Crimson (ML) (J) (PVF) (FP) (W) (GrD) Rose (PVF) Sweet (PVF) (J) (ML) Sprouts (Pn) (Ju) (T) (V) Coco Plum Plant (GD) Coltsfoot (GC) Comfrey Roots (N) (ML) (GC) (A) Plant (N) Russian Seed (Pa) for edibility (GrD) Coralvine (FP) Corn.F. (GD) may have them. Feldsalat (see Lamb's Lettuce) Fennel (T) (N) (G) (L) (S) (St) (TM) (J) (BP) (V) (Pa) (Ju) (FP) (ML) (F) (W) (GrD) (Hr) Florence (F) (T) (Ju) (N) Giant (FP) Green (GC) Heirloom (S) Italian (Pn) (C) (N) (S) (St) (J) Smokey (Bronze) (TM) (C) (Pn) (N) (S) (Pa) (GC) Plant (N) Wild (A) Fennel Flower (FP) (GC) Fern . American High Bush Plant (WG) (ML) (F) (G) (OGW) Wild (R) Vine (F) (G) (Pa) Cress. Wild (NS) Native Heirlooms (NS) Chinquapin Bush (A) Chokeberry Plants Black (OGW) (Ju) (ML) (GrD) (R) Red (Ju) Chokecherry (A) Plant Red (GG) (G) Black (GG) Plant (F) Cicely. Black & White (OGW) Custard Apple (BT) (GrD) Plant (GD) Dame’s Rocket (see Rocket) Dandelion (N) (St) (J) (A) (GrD) French (C) (S) (L) (St) (Pn) Italian (J) Dasylirion (BT) Plant (HC) Daylily Native Seed (F) (K) Plant (F) (B) (K) (FS) Seed (Pa) (Bo) (ML) (Ju) (G) Plant (GG) (F) Dwarf (Ju) Devil’s Claw (FP) (TM) Southwest Native (NS) Dittany (Stone Mint) (GC) Dock (A) (Pn)-Sorrel Earth Chestnut (N) Elderberry (G) Wild (F) Blue (A) (OGW) Plant (F) (R) Red (A) (OGW) (S. Blue (St) (Pn) (ML) (CR) (GrD) (FM) (T) (Pa) Wild (FP) Prairie (FP) Omega (tan) (T) C48 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . (PVF) also Bulk. Ritchie C47 . Chiles. Sweet (L) Anise (GrD) Cilantro. Wild (NS) Native & Heirloom (NS) Cotton Thistle (TM) Cottonwood (G) Cowslip (SS) Plant (GC) Crabapple Western (A) Prairie (G) Cranberry. (A) (C) has the largest selection. Heirloom (NS) Cinnamon-vine Plant (FP) (R) Clary Sage (see Sage) Claytonia (C) (J) (A) (RG) Cleavers (A) Clover. Cinnamon Plant (G) (Bo) (F) (Sh) (ML) (FS) (GG) (O) Feverfew (F) (GC) (J) (FP) (N) (T) Plant (N) Filbert (see Hazelnut) Fir Plant Douglas (FS) Fireweed (A) Flax. Red (T) (ML) (J) (A) (PVF). Earth (N) Chia.

Ritchie C49 . Pineapple (T) Rose (S) (T) Strawberry (S) (T) Wild (GrD) Plant?(Ju) Goodwin Creek has 31 varieties. Ginger. (Pn) (Ju) Jewelweed (GrD) Yellow Jewelweed (GrD) Jujube (Chinese date) Plant (FP) (R) (OGW) Juneberry (Serviceberry) Plant (K) Dwarf (O) (FS) Juniper (A) Plant (ML) (G) (GG) (F) Trailing (GC) ‘Compressa’ (GG) Kinnickinnick (R) Kudzu (BT) Lamb’s Ears (St) (N) Plant (TM) L. Perfume.F. E. (Ju) (GC) (ML) (F) (WG) ‘Silver Carpet’ (BP) Lamb’s Quarters (A) Leek (GrD) Lemon Balm (see Balm. Panic (NS) Buffalo (G) Bulk (F) Greens. Native (NS) Ground Cherry (N) (B) (ML) (Ju) (T) (H) (B) (FS) Guarijio Conivari (NS) Guava. Lemon) Lemon Bergamot (see Bergamot. American Plant (ML) Male & female (G) Honeysuckle Plant (ML) (GG) (WG) Japanese (WG) Hop Seed (L).Fuchsia Hardy (GC) (Local nursery) Gamagrass (GrD)-Bulk (see Grass) Garlic Cloves (Pn) (C) (T) (N) (L) (Pa) (G) (S) (St) (TM) (J) (V) (BP) (Ju) (ML) California White (F) (V) (Pa) (Ju) Chinese Red & White (V) German Red (Ju) (J) (N) (V) (T) German White (BP) (GC) Gilroy (S) (L) Grolau (indoor) (N) Korean Red (T) Italian Heirloom (S) Italian (T) (S). Garden (B) Hyssop (Pn) (C) (N) (L) (BP) (V) (Pa) (ML) (J) (GC) (Hr) (GrD) (T) Plant (N) Anise H. Wild Edible (NS) Grains (J) Grape. Elephant (T) (N) (F) (G) (FS) (B) (J) (V) (BP) (Ju) (ML) French Giant (Pa) Geranium. Lemon-Rose. Wild) Lemon Mint (Monarda) (N) (FP) (W) Licorice (L) (N) (NN) (R) (T) Wild (GrD) Lily Trout Plant (ML) Turk’s Cap (ML) (GrD) (FP) Linden (G) Linden Flowers Plant (ML) C50 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Spanish (T) Romanian Red (T) Garlic. Scented Plant (ML) Chocolate (T) Fruit. Mix (T) (Pa) Germander (Pa) Plant (ML) (N) Geum (see Avens) Ginger Plant (G) (ML)-Wild Chinese (ML) European (WG) American Wild (ML) (N) Ginkgo (ML) (GC) (J) (OGW) Male Plant (ML) (OGW) Goldenrod (GC) Gooseberry Plants (G) (OGW) Native (F) Coast Black (A) English (R) Goosefoot (NS) Gourds. Ritchie Heath Plant (ML) (HH) (O) (K) Heather (Pa) Plant (ML) (GG) (HH) Hemlock (K) Hickory. Pineapple (G) Strawberry (G) Gum.F. Muscadine (IN) Plant (GD) (Sk) (Pa) Vitis vinifera (GD) (GG) Bunch Plant (GD) Grass. (R) Huckleberry. Roots (N) (G) (F) (ML) (GC) (R) Horehound (N) (L) (B) (V) (Pa) (FP) (ML) (GC) (J) (GrD) (Hr) (T) Horseradish Roots (N) (G) (F) (Pa) (B) (J) (Ju) (ML) (GC) Huckleberry Red (A) Plant (R) (OGW) Evergreen (A) (GG) (R) (T) (OGW) Tall Mountain & Low Growing Mtn. (FP) (N) (Pa) Plant (N) (Blue Giant) (FP) Mexican Giant (SS) Dwarf (GC) Impatiens (Pa) (FP)check Jerusalem Artichokes Tuber (F) (N) (G) (L) (TM) (B) (J) (BP) (ML) Native Amer. Orange. New York White (J) Rocambole (FP) Rocambole. Shagbark Plant (GG) Shellbark (F) (G) Holly. Peach. Black (see Tupelo) Plant (F) Hackberry Plant (G) Southern (GrD) Spiny (GrD) Sugarberry (GrD) Western (GrD) Hawthorn Plant (ML) Black (A) Hazelnut (F) (OGW) California (A) Dwarf American Plant (B) (G) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . of scented G.

Creeping Plant (GG) Fendler’s Plant (HC) Mallow. Eau de Cologne) Plant (N) Banana Plant (N) Mint Bush (GC) Chewing Gum Plant (N) (T) Chocolate (Pa) (S) (L) (BP) (ML) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Wild Mountain Hairy (GC) Virginia (GC) Monarda (GC) Plant (WG) (Lemon Mint) (V) (FP) (W) Monarda Mixed (Sh) ‘Cambridge Scarlet’ (Sh) (GC) Plant (N) ‘Marshall’s Delight’ Plant (N) Mormon Tea (GC) (A) Mountain Bluet (J) (Pa) Mugwort (L) (GC) (J) (A) (GrD) (N) (Pa) Western (GC) Mulberry (G) (OGW) Illinois Plants (R) Black (R) (F) Mushroom Kits (G) (Pn) (F) (Pa) (Ju) (ML) (L) had dry Cepes & dry Morels in the 1995 catalog. Common (Pn) (TM) (J) (E) Some have mint flavor (oriental) Mix s (F) Plant Apple. Oyster (R) (Ju) Pearl Oyster (T) Portabella (G) (T) (Ju) (G) (F) Royal Tan (Ju) (F) King Stropharia (Outdoor) (NN) (T) Shitake (NN) (ML) (GM) (L) (OGW) (Pa) (R) (Ju) (T) (O) (F) (G) White Button (ML) (T) (Ju) (F) (G) Musk Mallow (Ju) (GC) (BT) (S) Mustard or M. Himalayan (GC) Swiss Ricola Plant (N) Mint. Ritchie (GC) Plant (N) Corsican Mint (L) (GC) Plant (N) Curley-Seed (BP) Egyptian (GC) Ginger (GC) Grapefruit (GC) Lavender Plant (N) Lemon (L) (T) (FP) Seed-(Pa) Lime (GC) Mountain Seed-(Pa) (GrD) Mizuna Oriental (N) (Pn) (C) (S) (St) (V) (T) (E) (Tokyo Beau) (Brassica japonica) Kyona (T) Persian-(S) Pineapple (S) (L) (ML) (GC) Plant (N) Scotch (T) (GC) Silver (GC) Silver.F. “Maitake” (Outdoor) (T) Morel (GM) Giant Morel. Blue Oyster.F. Greens. Ritchie C51 . but was closing them out for lack of interest. African (TM) Gem (T) (Ju) (GC) (FP) Lemmon. Pleurotus (Sonoma Brown. Southern (see Bull Bay) Mahonia. Black (N) Lotus (Lp) Yellow (FP) Madrone.Lingonberry (OGW) (Pa) Dwarf (R) Swedish (R) Lovage (Pn) (N) (L) (Pa) (J) (BP) (V) (FP) (BP) (T) (GC) (F) (A) Plant (N) Lovage. (sylvestris) (GC) (S) (Pa) Plant (Ju) (see Malva) Malva verticillata (Malva crispa) (N) (A) (FP) ‘Primley Blue’ (Ju) ‘Zebrina’ Plant (Ju) Mamey Apple (see Apple. Native & Heirloom (NS) Mexican Turnip (FP) Milkweed. Wild (NS) Black (V) Brown (S) Red Heirloom (NS) Southern Giant (Ju) Sprouts (V) Stem (St) Myrrh (TM) (see Sweet Cicely) Myrtle (M. Mamey) Mangrove Seed (BT) Maple Sugar (A) Plant (ML) (F) (R) (GG) (K) (G) Silver (tip) (G) (ML) Big leaf (A) (R) Vine (GG) (A) (R) Red (ML) (O) (FS) (F) Striped (GG) Marigold. Hericum (Pom Pom Blanc) (GM). Golden Oyster) (GM).(F) (S) (G) (L) (BP) (ML) (GC) Blue Balsam (GC) Plant (N) (see Balsam) Orange (L) (ML) (GC) (Bergamot.s (HC) (see Tagetes) Marjoram (C) (N) (L) (Pa) (S) (St) (B) (J) (FM) (V) (FP) (F) (ML) (Kz) (GC) (Ju) (W) (Hr) (T) Golden (GC) Wild (GC) Marshmallow (N) (NN) (GC) (J) (SS) (A) (T) Marsh Marigold (G) Maypop (GG) Plant (Ju) (OGW) Meadowsweet (GC) (A) (Pa) Plant (F) Melilot (A) Melons. Pacific (A) Plant (GG) Magnolia. Common (GC) (A) (GrD) (N) Swamp (GrD) (FP) (T) (H) (B) (FS) Showy (GrD) (N) Butterfly-weed (GrD) (FP) Millet (ML) (G) Finger (FP) Miner's Lettuce (see Claytonia) Mint. communis) (TM) (FP) (GC) Nannyberry (FP) Nasturtiums (N) (Pa) (G) (S) (V) (FM) (BR) (T) (FP) (ML) (Ju) (Pn) (SS) (BP) (HS) Peruvian (GC) Navajo Tea (GC) Nettle (GC) (J) (T) (A) New Jersey Tea (see Ceanothus) C52 Edible Native Plants and Weeds .

Wild (NS) Domestic (Pn) Red-(C) (N) (J) (FP) Golden (FP) Purple (T) Orange (FP) Oregano Wild (A) Common (Pn) (N) (L) (Pa) (G) (St) (B) (TM) (J) (BR) (S) (V) (FP) (ML) (Kz) (F) (J) (GC) (Ju) (W) (A) (Hr) (T) Sicilian Plant (N) Oregon Grape Tall (A) Cascade (A) Creeping (A) Plant (WG) Palm Cabbage. (Bread) (S) (J) (L) (FP) (Bo) (J) (A) Oriental (T) (Pn) Pot Marigold (T) (see Calendula) Potentilla (see Bush cinquefoil) Prairie Sage (see Mugwort) Primrose. Dame’s.Nightshade (BT) Oak Plant (G) (ML) (F) (Ju) Oats (T) (J) & Bulk (PVF) & Bulk (Pn) Hulless (J) Wild (NE) (GC) *N. Black-Eyed Native Southwest (NS) Pennyroyal (T) (N) (L) (Pa) (J) (BP) (ML) (GC) (A) (GrD) (Hr) Perilla (see Shi-sho Persimmon Plants (BT) (Ju) (ML) (R) (OGW) Photinia (ML) Pigeon Plum Plant (GD) Pine. Sabal Palmetto (GrD) Pansy (G) (Ju) (ML) (HS) Plant (F) Parsley Wild (TM) Barestem Desert (A) Parsnip.F. Field. Sea (J) & Bulk *Woodland Plant (BP) Onions (N) (G) (C) (T) (F) (Pa) (G) (S) (L) (St) (TM) (J) (V) (FM) (BP) (B) (Ju) (ML) (Kz) Heirloom (S) Nodding Multiplier (NS) (GrD) Prairie (GrD) Orach. Ritchie C53 . Sweet Rocket (T) (FP) (W) (GrD) (N) Rose. Rose of Sharon Plant (G) (F) (ML) (Sh) (K) (G) Rye (PVF) & Bulk Winter (J) & Bulk (ML) (Pn) Safflower (N) (L) (V) (FP) (TM) (GC) (Pa) Sage (Pn) (C) (T) (N) (L) (Pa) (G) (S) (B) (St) (TM) (J) (BP) (V) (FP) (ML) (GC) (F) (W) (J) (Hr) Dwarf (GC) Blue (GC) Big Sage Plant (HC) Broad Leaf (FM) (Kz) (L) (Ju) Clary (S) (V) (GC) (J) (N) Golden (N) (L) (ML) (GC) Plant (N) Greek (GC) Holt’s Mammoth (GC) Plant (N) (T) (R) Honey C54 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Pinyon (A) (ML) Plant (FP) (ML) Sugar (A) Singlleafed Pinyon (GG) American Red (Norway) (ML) Ponderosa (G) White (ML) Pineapple-weed (FP) (TM) Pink (Dianthus) (GC) (HS) (Pa) Maiden Seed (FP) (Pa) Clove (A) Plantain (GC) (J) (A) Plum. Wild (TM) (RG) Evening (A) (W) (TM) (J) (T) (ML) English (T) (RG) Purple Avens (GC) Purslane (T) Continental (Pn) (C) (N) French (S) (L) Golden (J) (L) (T) Queen Ann’s Lace (SS) (CR) Quince. Giant Wild Plant (WG) Cow (GrD) Passionflower (see Maypop) Paw Paw Seed (ML) Plant (ML) (Ju) (M) (FS) (R) (F) (G) (OGW) (Pa) Peanut Virginia (F) (G) (Pa) Peas.F. Ritchie (OGW) Jersey (R) Pokeweed (GC) Pond Apple (BT) Plant (GD) Poppy Seed Shirley (FP) (W) (Pn) (SS) (N) (PVF) & Bulk. Rosa rugosa (A) (GrD) Plant (G) (O) (R) (FS) (F) (OGW) White (R) (GrD) Apple Rose (GC) Arkansas (FP) Nootka Seed (A) Rosemary (L) (Pa) (G) (S) (St) (V) (ML) (F) (Ju) (Pn) (C) (N) (L) (BP) (S) (TM) (J) (Pa) (FP) (GrD) (GC) (W) (Hr) (T) Plant (ML) Rosemary 'Arp’ (N) (T) (R) Bog (GG) Trailing (Pa) (N) has many plant varieties. Beach Plants (K) (M) Native (ML) (R) (G) (F) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Flanders (CR) (FP) (W) (GrD) Mix (CR) The following may be naturalized. Texas (ML) Rape. Edible (Yu Choy) (E) Rapeseed/Rape/Canola (L) (J) (PVF) Sprouts (J) Raspberry Black Cap (A) Redbud (FS) Eastern Plant (WG) (G) (GG) (ML) (K) (O) Rocket (N) (FP) (see Arugula) Rocket.

Stone Mint (see Dittany) Strawberry (Seed) (N) (Pn) (L) (St) (TM) (V) (B) (Pa) (Pa) (G) (NN) (BP) (O) (Vn) (ML) Alpine Seed (J) (BP) (GC) Plant (R) (OGW) Northwest Wild (R) White & Red (S) Sugar Apple (BT) Plant (GD) Sunflower (N) (G) (Pa) (F) (C) (S) (St) (J) (FM) (ML) (T) (GC) Havasupai Striped (NS) Hopi Black (NS) White (GC) Heirloom (NS) Edible seeds listed separately. Red Perilla (Pn) (J) (V) (S) (L) (E) (Kz) (N) Plant (ML) Silybum (N) Skirret (N) Sorghum Heirloom (NS) Sorrel (Pn-Continental) (St) (TM) (J) (V) (BP) (T) (L) (FP) (GC) (N) Plant (N) Blood Veined (N) French (T) Silver Buckler (French) (N) Soursop (BT) (GrD) Plant (GD) Mountain (GD) Southernwood (GC) Plant (N) Spice Bush Plant (ML) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Sea-kale (TM) Giant Seakale (FP) Seaside (ML) (GC) (GN) At the beach. Green Perilla (J) (V) (L) (E) (ML) (Kz) (N) Shi-sho. Russian (Pn) (Pa) (G) (V) Mexican (GC) Taro.. Common (Pn) (N) (Pa) (St) (TM) (FM) (BP) (FP) (ML) (F) (W) (A) (GrD) Britannicus (GC) Caraway (N) (L) (GC) Plant (N) Creeping T. Winter (Pn) (N) (L) (Pa) (BP) (V) (ML) (GC) (J) Plant (N) Creeping (GC) Scorzonera (Scorsoneres) (Black Salsify) (N) (J) (L) Sea Buckthorn Plant (R) Sea-grape Plant (GD) Seakale. Dame’s) Sweet Shrub (see Carolina Allspice) Sweet William (G) (FP) (ML) (W) (SS) (GrD) (Pa) Plant (F) (K) Wild (N) Tagetes (T) Lucida (N) (NS) Plant (N) (Signata Pumila) (TM) (see Marigold) Lemmonii (GC) Tamarind (Asian. Summer (N) (L) (Pa) (S) (St) (B) (TM) (J) (FM) (BP) (FP) (ML) (GC) (Ju) (W) (Hr) (T) Savory. Juneberry) Shadblow (see Serviceberry) Shepherd’s Purse (A) Shi-sho. Seeds of Change.F. Ritchie C55 . Serviceberry Plants (R) Shadblow (K) (see Saskatoon. Ritchie Spotted Touch-me-not (GrD) Spruce (ML) Plants (K) (ML) (FS) Blue (G) Seed (F) Squash Calabaza (NS) SW Heirlooms (NS) Magdalena Big Cheese (NS) Pumpkin (NS) Arikara Try Heirloom. Big (BT) Salal (see Wintergreen) Salmonberry (A) Salsify (oyster) (N) (G) (Pn) (F) (St) (TM) (J) (V) (ML) Russian (L) Salsify.Melon (GC) Pineapple (L) (GC) Plant (N) (T) Purple (ML) (GC) Plant (N) Russian (Pa) (TM) (ML) (Ju) (G) (GC) Plant (T) Scarlet/Crimson (GC) (W) (GrD) Tricolor (L) (GC) (N) Tuberous (FP) Sagebrush. Creeping Lemon (GC) Creeping Lime/C. Elephant Ear (Vn) (Pa) (Bo) (F) (G) (Latin or Asian Thimbleberry (A) (OGW) Thistle Milk (L) (J) Thyme. Plant (N) English (N) (S) (TM) (V) (Hr) (GC) Plant (N) English Variegated (GC) French C56 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Latin Markets) (Ex) (H) Tansy (FP) (ML) (GC) (A) (Pa) Plant (N) Tapioca Plant (GD) Tarragon Mexican. Black (see Scorzonera) Samphire (N) (ML)-mint (GC) Sancoya (BT) Saskatoon Serviceberry (A) Plant (F) (see Juneberry) Sassafras Plant (NN) (ML) (G) (GG) Savory.F. Seed (St) (V) (J) (S) (Pa) (FP) (L) (T) (BP) (F) (N). Inc. (BP) Sprouts (T) Sweet Cicely (N) (L) (GC) (A) (GrD) Plant (N) European (GrD) Sweet Flag (GrD) Sweetleaf Sweet Rocket (see Rocket.

Return To Main Index C57 C58 Edible Native Plants and Weeds . Wild (NS) Punta Banda (NS) Triticale (T) Triticum (T) Tupelo. Canada. Black Plant (ML) (M) (R) (FS) (G) (OGW) Walnut. English Plant (O) (GG) (FS) Grafted (R) Waterlily Seed (FP) Watermelon Hopi Red (NS) Hopi Yellow (NS) Heirloom (NS) Wheat (T) Sprouts (T) Summer-Spring (J) (T) & Bulk Winter (J) (Pn) & Bulk (PVF) & Bulk (T) Black Beard (GC) Semi-dwarf (T) Willow. Ritchie Wisteria Plant (G) (HF) (GG) (Ju) Chinese (FP) White Chinese (FP) Woodruff.F. Sweet White (ML) Dog’s Tooth Violet (Ju) Horned seed (FP) Walnut. Johnny-Jump-Up (FM) (T) (G) (GC) (W) (A) (Pn) (ML) (S) Plant (ML) Violet (V) (GC) (N) Birdsfoot.Summer (C) N) (L) (S) (Kz) (L) Plant (N) German or Winter (T) (L) (B) (J) (G) (L) Golden Lemon (N) (BP) Plant (N) Grey Hill (GC) Lemon (N) (S) (BP) (L) (ML) (GC) Plant (N) Lime Sc. Black Plant (GG) (ML) Turk’s Cap Lily (GrD) (ML) Valerian (N) Red (HF) Verbena. Ritchie . Lemon (L) (S) (GC) Vervain (J) Blue (GC) (J) (A) (N) Viburnum Possum Haw Plant (GG) Tea V. Sweet (V) (FP) (L) (BP) (ML) (GC) (Pa) Plant (Ju) (K) Yarrow (see achillea) (HC) (GrD) White (PVF) (Hr) (N) (GrD) & Bulk. (GG) Viola.F. Plant (N) Mastic (GC) Mother of Thyme (A) (GC) (Pa) Orange Balsam (GC) Oregano (N) (L) Plant (N) Passion Pink (GC) Pink Ripple (GC) Plant (N) Silver Lemon (GC) Spicy Orange (R) Variegated (ML) Winter (Ju) (A) Woolly Plant (R) Thyme Leaved Savory (GC) Tiger Lily (A) Plant (G) (FM) (F) (Ju) (O) Bulb (BP) Tomatillo (N) (T) Zuni (NS) Domestic (F) (N) (B) (S) (L) (J) (V) (FM) (BP) (Ju) (ML) (BP) Latin Amer. (Pn) (C) (N) Mexican (T) Tomato. Weeping Plant (ML) (O) (K) (FS) (Ju) (M) (B) (G) (F) Wintergreen Plant (NN) (ML) (GG) (Ju) (GC) (R) (TGS) (OGW) Salal (GG) (A) (R) (OGW) Plant (R) Creeping (WG) (Pa) Edible Native Plants and Weeds . it is not listed herein. Plant (WG) (ML) (HC) (N) Yerba Buena (GW) (GC) Yucca (BT) (TM) Plant (FP) (ML) (Ju) (G) (FS) (WG) (GG) (B) (Sh) (K) When the Nursery has not listed the Botanical name and the listing is not clear as to it’s origin.

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