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Properties and uses of materials Lesson Plans: 1 - 5 Lesson 1 introduce topic Timing: 45 mins Topic: properties and uses

s of materials Learning Areas: Science, English Year level: 4 Class size: 30

Curriculum outcomes

ACSSU074 - Natural and processed materials have a range of physical properties; these properties can influence their use. - describing a range of common materials, such as metals or plastics, and their uses. ACSHE062 - Science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions.

Learning objectives Preparation

- Students consider where particular materials come from - Begin to make meaning of properties of a material - Link ideas between the use of a material and its properties - Organise different materials to discuss with children (rubber, plastic, metal, fabric, glass etc). - Bring the Topmarks activity up on the IWB http://www.topmarks.co.uk/Flash.aspx?b=science/characteristic_material Assessment will occur through observation and teacher notes throughout this lesson, based on student input and showing evidence of gaining some understanding from the lesson. Students are introduced to properties and uses of common materials in the first lesson. The teacher has a variety of everyday materials on hand to use as discussion starters. Begin with the word properties and ask students if they can name some properties of a particular item. If they have some ideas then work with them, but if not then discuss the meaning of properties in relation to materials. What might this term mean? and challenge students to question and put forward ideas about the uses of materials with certain properties. Use the link http://www.topmarks.co.uk/Flash.aspx?b=science/characteristic_material to give students the opportunity to test properties of materials via the interactive whiteboard (IWB). Moving towards the end of the lesson give student 2 sticky notes each and ask then to write one thing they learnt in this lesson and one thing they would like to find out about. These should be collated on a big piece of butcher paper and stuck up on a wall to refer to throughout the unit.

Assessment

Body of lesson

Lesson 2 make meaning Timing: 45 mins Topic: properties and uses of materials

Learning Areas: Science, English Year level: 4 Class size: 30

Curriculum outcomes

Natural and processed materials have a range of physical properties; These properties can influence their use (ACSSU074) - describe a range of common materials, such as metals or plastics, and their uses - investigate a particular property across a range of materials - select materials for uses based on their properties Science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions (ACSHE062) Making notes about a task, asking questions to clarify or follow up information, and seeking assistance if required ( ACELY1687) Navigate, read and view learning area texts (ACSSU074) - explain the properties waterproof, flexible, strong and transparent in relation to certain materials - explain how objects and materials can be used - explain why the properties of a material determine what the use of the material might be Teacher should organise materials and work stations (metal, wood, glass, paper, rubber, fabric, wool) prior to lesson and suitable amount of worksheets (see below). - Involvement throughout duration of unit e.g. contribution to discussion, collaboration with peers during group work, involvement in group sharing work and work samples. Revisit the term properties from the last lesson. Ask children to recap what they learnt it means when we discuss the properties of materials. Give a few examples to jog memories, such as a plastic bag and ask children what the properties of this item are and why its use is a carry bag. Organise students into groups of 5. Each group is given an iPad to open the app LivePaper and take in turns using the app. The aim will be for groups to rotate around the classroom spending time at each of the 5 stations (prepared earlier by the teacher) inspecting the properties and uses of the common materials on each table (such as items made of wood, rubber, fabric, glass, plastic, paper etc). The LivePaper app will act as the scientists notebook as they can type, draw, photograph and voice record their findings at each table station and save them accordingly. Time the minutes spent at each station and point out to students when its time to rotate stations and the person using the Ipad. Stress that just because one group member is controlling the iPad that does not mean that other members do not contribute to the discussion at each station. When groups later return to their tables (group all sits at same table) they can bring up their recorded notes to assist them to fill out a properties and uses worksheet. Groups will report back to the class with their findings through a class discussion where students should be encouraged to put their ideas forward and justify their reasoning.

Learning objectives

Preparation Assessment Body of lesson

Properties and uses of materials

Name:

Mark which properties are true of each material:


waterproof, flexible, strong, transparent

Write the names of some other things made by this material.

Where does this material come from?

METAL

PAPER

PLASTIC

RUBBER

GLASS

WOOD

FABRIC

Lesson 3 build knowledge Timing: 45 mins Topic: properties and uses of materials

Learning Areas: Science, ICT, English Year level: 4 Class size: 30

Curriculum outcomes

exploring different ways to conduct investigations and connecting these to the types of questions asked with teacher guidance (CSIS065) working in groups, with teacher guidance, to plan ways to investigate questions (CSIS065) Science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions (ACSHE062) Making notes about a task, asking questions to clarify or follow up information, and seeking assistance if required ( ACELY1687) With guidance, identify questions in familiar contexts that can be investigated scientifically and predict what might happen based on prior knowledge (ACSIS064) - Students think of a question to investigate and compare the properties of two materials - Students show understanding of properties of common materials when creating a research question - Students can document their experiment in writing and draw conclusions from results - Suitable number of iPads (1 between 2) - Ensure there are numerous suitable materials in a designated area for students to use in their experiment - applicable number of worksheets to document experiment (see below) - Ability to identify a question to investigate - Understanding of properties of a material through the experiment conducted - Application to the task - Sharing and questioning with peers at the conclusion of the experiment Teacher to explain to students that todays lesson will be about students investigating a question of their own relating to the properties of different materials. Students will identify a question they want to find out (checked by the teacher) for example: Is a wooden pencil or plastic pen stronger? They will then create an experiment to answer their question. Have group brainstorming session to get children thinking about what question they can investigate. They must document their question, predictions, method and results on the sheet provided, to later be used to create an investigation report. Experiments should be relatively straight forward to cement understanding (and as students are thinking the entire process up themselves) and able to complete in the lesson (perhaps a lengthened lesson after lunch). Teacher should help shape students investigation questions (class all work on this step together, then think about method to investigate the question and write the method before experimenting). Methods may change slightly due to results as children realise they may need to do something differently to find their answers. Children should work in pairs to conduct their experiments but take in turns to help their partner out. One member will photograph the experiment with an iPad while the investigator works through the method. Teacher to move around room and direct students towards the intended outcomes if they are not quite on track.

Learning objectives

Preparation

Assessment

Body of lesson

Name:

Scientific Investigation Report

Title: Aim:
Question for investigation

Hypothesis:
Predict what you think may happen and why

Equipment:

Method:
steps to follow

Results:
Describe observations and suggest a reason for your findings

Table:

Diagram:
Demonstrate the investigation

Conclusion:
Did you meet you aim?

Lesson 4/5 interpret data/communicate Timing: 45 mins Topic: properties and uses of materials

Learning Areas: Science, English, Maths Year level: 4 Class size: 30

Curriculum outcomes

Use a range of methods including tables and simple column graphs to represent data and to identify patterns and trends (ACSIS068) Compare results with predictions, suggesting possible reasons for findings (ACSIS216) Represent and communicate ideas and findings in a variety of ways such as diagrams, physical representations and simple reports (ACSIS071) - Students can discuss how well their predictions matched results from an investigation and - Propose reasons for findings - Produce an investigation report detailing a developed experiment - Ensure enough computers for each student - Plan lessons over sufficient time frame or in two separate days - Annotations throughout classroom work on computers - Assessment of culminating activity The PowerPoint Investigation Report Teacher will begin lesson by encouraging students to reflect on their findings from the recent experiment. After a brief class discussion about writing a conclusion, students will have time to construct a conclusion based on their results (if they did not complete this part of the investigation sheet after the experiment). They will illustrate a table and diagram to further demonstrate the investigation. Once the teacher has viewed the completed report, students can begin to produce their investigation reports in PowerPoint on the computer. When students begin to reach the publication stage, the teacher should stop the class and explain how the report should be structured in PowerPoint and give a mini tutorial on how to use the program. Teacher is best to do this via either an IWB or projector/big screen in computer room. Most students will likely be quite capable of using the program once they get the hang of creating slides and realising it is similar to Microsoft Word. Ensure the outline of what is required is written on the board for their constant inspection and that they understand this typing stage is the culmination of all their hard work in the unit and this is where they can show what they have learned. Invite questions before students get to work and ensure they know what is expected of them by asking them random questions to repeat back what the task asks of them. This lesson will probably span over the time duration of two lessons to complete and the opportunity to share work once everyone has completed the task should be encouraged.

Learning objectives

Preparation Assessment Body of lesson