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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 166
Ma’s Auto Repair
—Yelp!
Tires º Service º Smogcheck
980 S Claremont Street, San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Drive, San Mateo
650.558.8530
650. 588. 0388
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA 94066
Mon.-Sat. 10am-7pm
Sun. Noon t o 6pm
CONTROVERSIAL BILL
NATION PAGE 7
COLTS LOSE IN A
HEARTBREAKER
SPORTS PAGE 11
SAVE SPACE WITH
A MURPHY BED
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17
ARIZONA GOVERNOR VETOES RELIGIOUS FREEDOM LEGISLATION
University sued for
underage drinking
Lawsuit: Lacrosse recruit hospitalized
while visiting Notre Dame de Namur
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A young man who claims he suffered from alcohol poi-
soning after playing beer pong on a supervised recruiting
trip to Notre Dame de Namur University is suing the school
for damages he claims resulted from the school negligently
allowing underage drinking on its campus.
According to a lawsuit filed by Christian Ballow, he was
18 years old when pressured into drinking during a recruit-
ing trip that led to his hospitalization after two students
found him covered in feces and urine in a NDNU dorm rest-
room.
Ballow, a San Diego County resident, visited the Belmont
campus in 2011 because he was recruited by Steve Dini, the
school’s lacrosse coach at the time, and was offered an ath-
letic scholarship, according to the suit filed Tuesday.
Ballow and his attorneys couldn’t be immediately reached
for comment but, according to the lawsuit, the school
should have known underage drinking was a problem on the
Former sheriff’s deputy to
stand trial in assault case
By Aimee Lewis Strain
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
A former San Mateo County sheriff’s
deputy who allegedly beat up his ex-girl-
friend’s past boyfriend in an apparent
jealous rage was ordered Tuesday to stand
trial on charges that could put him
behind bars for up to a decade, prosecu-
tors said.
Colin Troy Smith, 42, of San Carlos,
was held to answer on the charges after a preliminary hear-
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The developers of an eight-story
apartment building proposed for down-
town San Mateo were offered a litany
of ideas to make their project better by
the San Mateo Planning Commission
this week — more parking, more
retail, a better pedestrian experience
and an architectural design to comple-
ment Central Park.
“Central Park is really a jewel, so the
building that sits across from that park
really needs to make a statement. It has
to be something San Mateo is going to
be proud of,” said Planning
Commissioner Charlie Drechsler.
The Planning Commission met for a
study session Tuesday night to review
the pre-application for the proposed
75-foot Essex at Central Park that
would cover the surface parking lot on
the corner of Fifth Avenue and San
Mateo Drive. While the need for hous-
ing was a consensus, there were con-
cerns about the location and size of
this proposal.
Voter-approved Measure P, an exten-
sion of Measure H, requires develop-
ments taller than 55 feet to provide an
affordable housing component of 10
percent below-market rate units per
development and a public benefit.
Defining that public benefit is another
challenge.
Whether it’s making financial con-
tributions to Central Park, improving
parts of Fifth Avenue or donating to a
parking structure, Planning
Commissioner Rick Bonilla said the
public benefit will need to be signifi-
cant.
“We are looking at a big change,
what’s next to probably one of the
most beloved parks on the Peninsula,”
Ideas abound for Essex plan
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Compass High School, a Redwood
City school for students with mild to
moderate learning differences launched
in August 2013 is opening a new, big-
ger facility in San Mateo during the
2014-15 school year.
The private school, currently located
at Twin Dolphins Drive in Redwood
Shores and has nine students, entered
into a lease agreement on a 7,100-
square-foot building at 2040 Pioneer
Court near City Hall and the move-in
date is set for June. The goal is to offer
a supportive environment to students
with challenges from traditional learn-
ing disabilities to those who have
high-functioning autism. The curricu-
lum offered includes a college prepara-
tory program and also integrated serv-
ices such as speech therapy and sup-
port for students as well as their fami-
lies. Currently, there are two 10th-
Learning differences school to expand
Compass High School moving to larger San Mateo location
San Mateo Planning Commission weighs in on eight-story downtown apartment proposal
Rendering of downtown San Mateo’s Essex development.
Colin Smith
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Students at Compass High School work with a teacher, while another student writes on his iPad.
See SMITH, Page 20
See NDNU, Page 20
See ESSEX, Page 16
See SCHOOL, Page 16
Huge Marilyn Monroe
statue to leave California
PALM SPRINGS — Amassive statue
of Marilyn Monroe that has turned
heads for two years in Palm Springs is
headed east.
The Riverside Press-Enterprise says
the 26-foot-tall, 34,000-pound statue
will be transported in April from
California to Hamilton, N.J., where it
will be part of an exhibit honoring its
designer, Seward Johnson.
A going away party, open to the
public, is planned for March 27.
The statue of the “Some Like it Hot”
star arrived in the desert resort city in
2012.
The sculpture depicts Monroe trying
to push down her billowing skirt in
her memorable scene in the “Seven
Year Itch.”
The “Forever Marilyn” statue, on
loan from The Sculpture Foundation,
was previously in Chicago.
Palm Springs officials say they
hope to eventually lure Marilyn back.
Irwindale holds meeting
over hot sauce factory
IRWINDALE — There could be fiery
words Wednesday night as a Southern
California city considers whether a
hot sauce factory is a public nuisance
because of its spicy emissions.
The Irwindale City Council has
scheduled a public hearing about the
Sriracha factory. The council could find
that the plant is a public nuisance — a
step that at some point could lead to a
shutdown order.
Last month, a judge ordered the
plant to stop producing the smells
until air-quality experts can determine
how to mitigate them.
But the Los Angeles suburb says res-
idents have continued to complain
about eye-stinging fumes.
Plant owner Huy Fong Foods says
it’s proposed ways to deal with the
problem and it’s urging supporters to
attend the meeting.
Behaviorists: Dogs feel
no shame despite the look
LOS ANGELES — The next time you
start shaking your finger and shouting
“Shame on you!” because your dog
chewed up your favorite fuzzy slip-
pers, just remember that no matter
how guilty your dog looks, it doesn’t
know what your rant is about.
Behaviorists insist dogs lack
shame. The guilty look — head cow-
ered, ears back, eyes droopy — is a
reaction to the tantrum you are throw-
ing now over the damage they did
hours earlier.
“Just get over it and remind yourself
not to put temptation in the way next
time,” said Dr. Bonnie Beaver, a pro-
fessor at Texas A&M University’s
College of Veterinary Medicine and
executive director of the American
College of Veterinary Behaviorists.
But scientific findings haven’t put a
dent in the popularity of online dog
shaming sites like dogshaming.com
and shameyourpet.com or videos like
those posted on youtube.com/crack-
rockcandy. In the photos and videos,
dogs wear humorous written “confes-
sions” and often are surrounded by the
remnants of their misdeeds. There is
no question that in some photos, they
look guilty of eating, drinking, chew-
ing, licking or destroying something
they shouldn’t have.
Dogshaming.com was the first and
is among the most popular sites.
Since Pascale Lemire started it in
August 2012, it has received more
than 58 million page views and more
than 65,000 submissions. A submis-
sion has to come with a photo show-
ing the dog’s guilty look.
Lemire, who lives in Vancouver,
British Columbia, also published a
book called “Dog Shaming,” which
hit the New York Times best-seller list
in January.
“I don’t think dogs actually feel
shame,” Lemire said. “I think they
know how to placate us with this sad
puppy-dog look that makes us think
they’re ashamed of what they’ve done.
My guess is that their thinking is: ‘Oh
man, my owner is super mad about
something, but I don’t know what, but
he seems to calm down when I give
him the sad face, so let’s try that
again.”’
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor Adam
Baldwin is 52.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1814
Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony
No. 8 in F major, Op. 93, was first
performed in Vienna. (Also on the
program was Beethoven’s Symphony
No. 7 in AMajor, Op. 92, which had
premiered in Dec. 1813.)
“There is no inevitability
in history except as men make it.”
— Felix Frankfurter, U.S. Supreme Court Justice (1882-1965)
Consumer
advocate Ralph
Nader is 80.
Chelsea Clinton is
34.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Visitors take a rest inside a bubble at the terrace at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona,Spain.
Thursday: Showers likely and a slight
chance of thunderstorms in the morn-
ing...Then a chance of showers in the
afternoon. Highs in the upper 50s. South
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Rain likely. Lows in
the upper 40s. Southeast winds 5 to 10
mph increasing to east 15 to 20 mph after
midnight.
Friday: Showers in the morning. Aslight chance of thun-
derstorms. Highs in the mid 50s. Southeast winds 10 to 20
mph.
Friday night: Showers likely. Lows in the upper 40s. East
winds 10 to 20 mph. Chance of showers 70 percent.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Achance of showers. Highs in
the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1801, the District of Columbia was placed under the
jurisdiction of Congress.
In 1911, inventor Charles F. Kettering demonstrated his
electric automobile starter in Detroit by starting a Cadillac’s
motor with just the press of a switch, instead of hand-crank-
i ng.
I n 1922, the Supreme Court, in Leser v. Garnett, unani-
mously upheld the 19th Amendment to the Constitution,
which guaranteed the right of women to vote.
In 1933, Germany’s parliament building, the Reichstag,
was gutted by fire. Chancellor Adolf Hitler, blaming the
Communists, used the fire as justification for suspending
civil liberties.
I n 1939, the Supreme Court, in National Labor Relations
Board v. Fansteel Metallurgical Corp., effectively outlawed
sit-down strikes. Britain and France recognized the regime
of Francisco Franco of Spain.
I n 1943, during World War II, Norwegian commandos
launched a raid to sabotage a German-operated heavy water
plant in Norway. The U.S. government began circulating
one-cent coins made of steel plated with zinc (the steel pen-
nies proved very unpopular, since they were easily mistak-
en for dimes).
I n 1951, the 22nd Amendment to the Constitution, limit-
ing a president to two terms of office, was ratified.
I n 1960, the U.S. Olympic hockey team defeated the
Soviets, 3-2, at the Winter Games in Squaw Valley, Calif.
(The U.S. team went on to win the gold medal.)
I n 1968, at the conclusion of a CBS News special report on
the Vietnam War, Walter Cronkite delivered a commentary in
which he said the conflict appeared “mired in stalemate.”
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
SPELL TOXIN ENCORE GLANCE
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The judge’s closing remark was a —
LONG SENTENCE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GERVE
HANTK
LOBWEL
SHELIG
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
Actress Joanne Woodward is 84.Opera singer Mirella Freni
is 79. Actress Barbara Babcock is 77. Actor Howard Hesseman
is 74. Actress Debra Monk is 65. Rock singer-musician Neal
Schon (Journey) is 60. Rock musician Adrian Smith (Iron
Maiden) is 57. Actor Timothy Spall is 57. Rock musician Paul
Humphreys (Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark) is 54.
Country singer Johnny Van Zant (Van Zant) is 54. Rock musi-
cian Leon Mobley (Ben Harper and the Innocent Criminals) is
53. Basketball Hall-of-Famer James Worthy is 53. Actor
Grant Show is 52. Rock musician Mike Cross (Sponge) is 49.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No. 12, in first place; Hot Shot, No. 3, in second
place; and Solid Gold No. 10, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:41.12.
9 7 5
12 18 25 35 66 15
Mega number
Feb. 25 Mega Millions
11 12 17 38 42 2
Powerball
Feb. 26 Powerball
15 19 24 35 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 8 2 7
Daily Four
1 0 6
Daily three evening
5 7 17 20 23 23
Mega number
Feb. 26 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Fraud. A woman was told her grandson
was arrested and was scammed out of
$1,950 on Tipperary Avenue before 2:46
p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13.
Burglary . A purse was taken from a blue
Cadillac Escalade after its window was
smashed on Amaryllis Court before 7:52
a.m. Thursday, Feb. 13.
Burglary . A briefcase was taken from a
silver Chevrolet Suburban at the Marriott
Hotel on Veterans Boulevard before 7:57
a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12.
Fraud. A person reported seeing an
employee steal cash that was supposed to
go to the bank on Spruce Avenue before
3:39 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 .
Acci dent. A black Mercedes hit a parked
vehicle and a stop sign at South Maple
Avenue and Victory Avenue before 3:34
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 .
SAN BRUNO
Burglary . A bag with a laptop, camera
and luggage was taken from a gray Honda
Pilot through a smashed rear window on
the 800 block of El Camino Real before
10:32 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23.
Pet t y t hef t . Ablack iPhone 5 was taken
after being left unattended on the 1200
block of El Camino Real before 5:42 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 23.
Pet t y t hef t . Acheetah-print wallet con-
taining a driver’s license and Social
Security card was taken from a business on
the 1200 block of El Camino Real before
4:20 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23.
PRINCETON
Arre s t . A juvenile man and woman told
officers who stopped them that they
ingested three mollies while at a night
club and were arrested and transported to
San Mateo Medical Center before 4:37
a.m. Thursday, Feb. 13.
Sandra J. Canavan
Sandra J. Canavan, born Nov. 6, 1936,
died Feb. 15, 2014, in Millbrae after a series
of illnesses.
She is survived by her husband of 53
years, Don, AKALefty, her daughters Marci
and Cathy, her son Mike and daughter-in-
law Katie. Also survived by her brother,
Eldred and his wife June and sister-in-law
Grace Reed. Grandmother of Keith,
Veronica, Summer, Holden and Tommy.
“She was loved by all.” Sandy enjoyed
traveling and loved her Thursday night
bowling league.
Family services will be in the near future.
Condolences may be sent to the Chapel of
the Highlands at 194 Millwood Drive in
Millbrae.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200
words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the family’s choosing. To submit
obituaries, email information along with a
jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar. If you would like to
have an obituary printed more than once,
longer than 200 words or without editing,
please submit an inquiry to our advertising
department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Police reports
Not in my city!
A woman was waving a sign that said
“smile” at the intersection of Ralston
Avenue and El Camino Real in Belmont
before 2:46 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19.
STATE
GOVERNMENT
• Assembl yman
Rich Gordon, D-
Menlo Park, intro-
duced As s embl y
Bi l l 2516 to estab-
lish the Pl anni ng
for Sea Level Rise Database to be a
centrally located source of information on
how California is preparing for, and adapt-
ing to, sea level rise.
Over the past year, Gordon chaired four
select committee hearings that focused on
the impact of sea level rise on coastal agri-
culture, the fishing industry, tourism, ports
and infrastructure, as well as examined the
existing authority granted to state agen-
cies. Gordon co-hosted a conference with
U. S. Rep. Jacki e Spei er, D- San
Mat eo, and San Mateo County
Supervisor Dave Pine on the issue in
December.
The Planning for Sea Level Ri se
Database will be overseen by the
Natural Resources Agency, who will
be charged with posting the database on its
website. State agencies, as well as speci-
fied private and public entities will submit
information for the database, including:
studies, modeling, mapping, cost-benefit
analyses, vulnerability assessments and
adaptation assessments, according to
Gordon’s office.
The bill will be heard in committee this
spring.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Bel mont Ci ty Counci l will
appoint a new councilmember instead of
holding a special election to fill the seat
recently vacated by Chri sti ne Wozni ak.
The council voted Tuesday to begin an
application process and allow residents to
submit an up to 400-word statement sum-
marizing their interest in the position
along with a resume by March 14. For more
information visit www.belmont.gov.
Obituary
4
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
California storms bring
rain and threat of floods
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Much-needed rain fell on downtown
San Francisco and elsewhere in California on Wednesday at
the outset of what the parched state hopes is the start to a
one-two punch of stormy weather.
The storm was expected to move down the coast, dumping
a half-inch to an inch of rain in southern areas late in the
day, forecasters said.
A potentially stronger storm moving in late Thursday
could bring thunder and dump up to 2 inches of rain in cen-
tral and southern valleys, 2 to 4 inches in the foothills and
up to 6 inches in some mountain spots. State water officials
plan Thursday to survey the anemic mountain snow pack,
and will likely find that California’s precipitation is badly
lagging what’s needed to quench the region’s thirst.
Committees approve $687 million in drought relief
SACRAMENTO — A$687 million drought relief plan is
headed for floor votes in the Legislature after winning quick
approval Wednesday in legislative committees.
Assembly and Senate budget committees passed the bills,
a week after the package was announced by Gov. Jerry
Brown and the Democratic legislative leaders. California is
facing its driest year on record, putting 17 communities at
risk of running out of drinking water while forcing farmers
in the nation’s agricultural heartland to fallow fields and
uproot orchards.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Redwood City’s finances are on
stronger footing than the past but
threats like pension and worker costs
and the departure of auto dealerships
remain concerns, city officials said at a
mid-year budget update Monday night.
“The financial situation has
improved but it’s still shaky,” City
Manager Bob Bell told the City
Council before it received a detailed
breakdown of the money coming in
and out of its coffers.
The City Council will hold a budget
study session June 9 and consider
adopting it at the Monday, June 23
meeting.
At Monday night’s meeting,
Finance Director Brian Ponty
explained that 60 percent of the gener-
al fund is due to property and sales
taxes which are both in stronger posi-
tions because of higher assessed val-
ues and a 24 percent increase in auto
sales tax over fiscal year 2011-12. The
tax — one of the budget’s “bright com-
ponents,” Ponty said — contributed
$23.5 million in general fund revenue.
However, the dealers are always com-
plaining about the lack of land, Ponty
said.
Councilwoman Diane Howard sug-
gested the council’s economic sub-
committee take a look at the danger of
losing the dealerships and Mayor Jeff
Gee agreed, noting that the businesses
are “very land intensive” and in com-
petition with other uses for limited
space.
“Given the economic pressures and
our vision we have to find a way to rec-
oncile that,” Gee said.
Other possible threats to the city’s
finances include property tax inflation
factors, public safety overtime,
changes in future employee contribu-
tions to the retirement system and
decreases in the extra property tax
returned from the state.
The funds, known as Educational
Revenue Augmentation Funds, are pro-
jected at $4.6 million in 2013-14 but
drop to an estimated $2.5 million in
2015-16.
The development related revenue —
planning checks and fees among them
— are estimated to increase 4.7 per-
cent in 2013-14 but drop 14 percent in
2014-16.
The bottom line is an estimated
operating surplus of $4.3 million
which will continue out about five
years until Public Employee
Retirement System rates are expected
to go up, Ponty said.
The City Council took no action
Monday on Ponty’s and Bell’s presen-
tation but Ponty is recommending it
transfer at least $2.5 million from the
general fund to the workers compensa-
tion budget to reach the minimum rec-
ommended funding level of 70 percent.
Ponty recommended holding all other
fund balances as protection against the
“other economic and financial threats
that are out there.”
Looking to the future, Bell said one
challenge for the city will be continu-
ing to provide an expected level of
service with a growing population and
a staff whose turnover means a loss of
institutional knowledge and new
employee learning curve. In 2012, the
city’s population was 79,000 and full-
time positions were 520. The project-
ed ratio in 2015 has the same number
of workers but a population grown to
84,400.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Officials: Redwood City budget strong
Concerns linger about worker costs, auto dealer departures
Comment on
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www.smdailyjournal.com
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Redwood City Port Commission
approved a three-year lease with Boxer
Industries, Inc. for a facility producing
carbon black, a material used in manu-
facturing nearly all black rubber and
plastic products.
The commission Wednesday
approved the lease with the Silicon
Valley-based company for the facility
at the port on Hinman Road adjacent to
Sims Metal Management.
The 5,000-square-foot pilot plant
will be built on approximately .6 acres
near the Kaiser Cement silos and
include an office trailer and parking.
The plan will be partially assembled
prior to delivery and installation and
stand about 30 feet high. The plan will
produced roughly 180 metric tons of
carbon black annually and operating
hours will typically be 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Any future explanation from
pilot plan to full production will
require a separate environmental
review.
Carbon black is used in rubber and
plastic products and as a pigmenting,
UV stabilizing and conductive agents
for toners, printing ink and coating.
In November, the Port Commission
adopted a mitigated negative declara-
tion and mitigation monitoring plan.
The mitigated negative declaration
concluded that the proposed project
will have less than significant envi-
ronmental impacts and that effects on
air quality during the two- to four-week
construction period can be mitigated.
Air emissions from the proposed plant
itself are far below standards set by the
Bay Area Air quality Management
District, the regional body monitoring
air pollution.
Carbon black facility lease approved
REUTERS
A woman’s umbrella flips inside out during a rain storm in
San Francisco.
Around the state
6
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Thank you thank
you thank you.
This is what I hear
over and over, year
after year, from
families that we
serve. Either
verbally or in hand-written cards or letters
families say thank you: Thank for your
help; Thank you for all you have done to
make this process easier; Thank you for
making this final tribute to my mother one
which will be fondly remembered; Thank
you for your advice; Thank you for being
there for us at a time we needed you most;
Thank you for making it all easy for us;
Thank you for being a friend, etc. To hear
“Thank you” time and time again is a
confirmation for me that our Chapel of the
Highlands crew is doing their best to serve
families who’ve been through a death, in an
appropriate and professional manner, and
that we are doing the right thing in caring
for families during a difficult situation, in
turn making it more of a comfort for them.
Normally saying “You’re welcome” is
the correct response. You’re welcome, or
“You are welcome”, can be taken a number
of different ways. Generally it means you
are always a welcome guest. It can also be
taken as a blessing meaning you wish
wellness on the person who thanked you.
Wishing wellness or health to anyone is a
nice gesture. In recent years though we all
have witnessed the term “You’re welcome”
being substituted with “Thank you” back at
the person who is doing the thanking. This
is “OK”, but saying “You’re welcome” first
is taken as a hospitable and warm gesture.
Now that “Thank you” and “You’re
welcome” have been established, I would
like to say thank you back to the families we
serve: Thank you for supporting the Chapel
of the Highlands. Thank you for your
faithful patronage. Because of you we have
been able to continue with our high
standards and excellent level of service for
many years, since 1952. Thank you to those
families who we’ve helped so many times in
the past. Thank you to the new families
who’ve discovered that we offer them
respect and provide the dignified care that
their loved one deserves.
Your support, and the continued interest
from the community in our service, is what
keeps us going strong and available when
we are needed. Our costs have always been
considered fair, and the funds taken in for
our services are also very much appreciated.
Those Chapel of the Highlands funds along
with our support sifts back to the community
in different ways. Donations to local causes,
along with the donation of time through
membership in service organizations such as
Lions, I.C.F., Historical Society, Chamber
of Commerce, etc. is natural for us. Giving
back as a volunteer via these groups helps in
binding us with our neighbors, together
creating a better community for the future.
All in all there are many ways to say
“Thank you”. Doing so in a variety of ways
can create a circle of gratitude, in turn
making our community a better place.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Creating A Circle Of Gratitude
By Saying Thank You
Advertisement
‘PetSmart burglars’
linked to more crimes
San Mateo police detectives have
linked the “PetSmart Burglars,” 25-
year-old San Jose residents Ashley
Kirk and Juan Ortega-Ramos, to
three San Mateo residential burgla-
ries committed last summer.
In January 2014, the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office announced
the arrest of these suspects for their
connection to several residential
burglaries. Through their investi-
gation, the Sheriff’s Office
Investigations Bureau learned the
suspects were associated with
PetSmart in San Carlos, and that
the suspects had targeted residences
where the families were on vacation
and had boarded their pets at
PetSmart. During continued follow-
up, San Mateo police detectives
became aware that these suspects
may have also been involved in
residential burglary activity in San
Mateo.
Kirk and Ortega-Ramos were
identified as suspects responsible
for three separate residential bur-
glaries in August of 2013 that
occurred on the 700 block of
Sequoia Avenue, 900 block of
South Norfolk Street and the 1600
block of South Norfolk Street,
according to police.
Home burglarized
in San Carlos
Residents in San Carlos should
be on alert after a home was bur-
glarized on Monday morning in the
city’s White Oaks neighborhood,
according to the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office.
Some time between 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. Monday, a home was
burglarized in the 200 block of
Oakview Drive. Sheriff’s officials
believe entry into the home was
made through a rear door.
The case remains under investi-
gation.
Sheriff’s officials are asking resi-
dents to be vigilant in their efforts
to protect their city. Residents
should be on the lookout for unusu-
al activity in their neighborhoods
and report anything suspicious by
calling 911.
Person hit by car on El
Camino Real in Redwood CIty
A patient was transported to
Stanford Hospital after being hit by
a car in Redwood City Wednesday
afternoon, a fire battalion chief
said.
The collision on El Camino Real
near Oakwood Drive was reported at
3:37 p.m., Battalion Chief
Geoffrey Balton+ said.
A person was hit by a car and
taken to the hospital with injuries
not considered life-threatening,
Balton said.
Northbound El Camino Real was
briefly closed while police and the
California Highway Patrol investi-
gated the collision, Balton said.
Local briefs
Ashley
Kirk
Juan
Ortega-Ramos
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Burlingame education startup
EdSurge announced Tuesday it just
wrapped up a $1.5 million ven-
ture-backed financing round,
which will allow it to expand the
news and analysis edtech online
community, along with hosting
more summits.
EdSurge’s expansion plans for
2014 are focused in four core
areas: organizing events across
the United States; producing cus-
tomized research reports for
schools, edtech companies and
investors on how specific tech-
nologies are playing out in class-
rooms; developing a nationwide
hiring site to serve the rapidly
evolving job market for edtech
experts; and continuing to grow
EdSurge’s mass-audience newslet-
ters, which currently serve more
than 45,000 active subscribers a
week.
“Our goal is to provide really
great information for people to
make smart decisions,” CEO
Elizabeth Corcoran, who started
the company in 2011. “I’m most
proud we have built an amazing
team of people. I could not have
imagined three years ago that we
would have found people of this
caliber, passionate people.”
Institutional investors in
EdSurge’s $1.5 million Series A
round are led by GSV Capital and
include NewSchools Venture Fund
and LearnCapital. Angel
investors are Nancy Peretsman,
Judy Estrin, Gillian Munson,
Kelly Pope and David Bulfer, Joe
Gleberman, George Anders, Bud
Colligan, Jennifer Fonstad and
Martha Ehmann Conte, Imagine
K12, John Katzman, Alan Louie,
Tim Ranzetta and Lynda
Weinman.
“In a remarkably short time,
EdSurge has become a vital center
of the edtech industry,” Michael
Moe, CEO of GSV Capital, said in
a statement. “It’s earned the trust
of key constituents — educators,
entrepreneurs and investors. We
are excited about helping Betsy
and the EdSurge team continue to
frame critical issues and develop
innovative events, technology
and services in this dynamic,
fast-growing space.”
The Burlingame company cur-
rently has 11 full-time workers
and a couple people who work
part time.
“We love being in
Burlingame,” said Corcoran, who
is a trustee for the Burlingame
Public Library, advisor for the
new San Mateo Union High
School District charter school
Design Tech High and has two
kids at Burlingame High School.
“I’m really committed to public
education, literacy and educa-
tion,” said Corcoran who previ-
ously was executive editor for
technology at Forbes Media and a
staff writer for The Washington
Post.
Meanwhile, teachers and other
funders have good things to say
about EdSurge.
“I read every edition of
EdSurge,” Esther Wojcicki, who
teaches journalism at the Palo
Alto High School, serves as vice
chair of the Creative Commons
board of directors and advises
EdSurge, said in a statement.
“Without EdSurge, I wouldn’t
know what is happening in the
education space. Not kidding, not
exaggerating. It is an important
resource for all teachers, adminis-
trators, anyone interested in edu-
cation and especially for people
in education.”
EdSurge is a voice of clarity in
edtech, where accurate informa-
tion is at a huge premium, said
Jennifer Carolan, who runs the
Seed Fund at NewSchools Venture
Fund.
The startup kicked off its 2014
summit season in Baltimore Feb.
22. More than 650 educators and
34 companies participated. It will
host its next in Nashville in
April.
EdSurge’s newsletters can be
found at edsurge.com/signup. For
more on the company visit
edsurge.com.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
New funding for edtech startup
Burlingame-based EdSurge runs online resource community
NATION 7
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer looks up as Barack Obama addresses the National Governors
Association in the State Dining Room of the White House .
By Bob Christie
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Gov. Jan Brewer on
Wednesday vetoed a Republican bill that set
off a national debate over gay rights, reli-
gion and discrimination and subjected
Arizona to blistering criticism from major
corporations and political leaders from both
parties.
Loud cheers erupted outside the Capitol
building immediately after Brewer made her
announcement.
“My agenda is to sign into law legislation
that advances Arizona,” Brewer said at a
news conference. “I call them like I seem
them despite the tears or the boos from the
crowd. After weighing all the arguments, I
have vetoed Senate Bill 1062 moments
ago.”
The governor said she gave the legisla-
tion careful deliberation in talking to her
lawyers, citizens and lawmakers on both
sides of the debate.
But Brewer said the bill “could divide
Arizona in ways we could not even imagine
and no one would ever want.” The bill was
broadly worded and could result in unintend-
ed negative consequences, she added.
The bill backed by Republicans in the
Legislature was designed to give added pro-
tection from lawsuits to people who assert
their religious beliefs in refusing service to
gays. But opponents called it an open attack
on gays that invited discrimination.
The bill thrust Arizona into the national
spotlight last week after both chambers of
the state legislature approved it. As the days
passed, more and more groups, politicians
and average citizens weighed in against
Senate Bill 1062. Many took to social
media to criticize the bill, calling it an
attack on gay and lesbian rights.
Prominent Phoenix business groups said
it would be another black eye for the state
that saw a national backlash over its 2010
immigration-crackdown law, SB1070, and
warned that businesses looking to expand
into the state may not do so if bill became
law.
Companies such as Apple Inc. and
American Airlines and politicians including
GOP Sen. John McCain and former
Republican presidential nominee were
among those who urged Brewer to veto the
legislation.
Obama seeking $300
billion for roads, railways
ST. PAUL, Minn. — President Barack
Obama said Wednesday he will ask Congress
for $300 billion to update aging roads and
railways, arguing that the taxpayer invest-
ment is a worthy one that will pay dividends
by attracting businesses and helping put
people to work.
Obama announced his plan at the Union
Depot rail and bus station after touring a
light rail maintenance facility. Funding
for surface transportation programs
expires later this year, and the White
House says 700,000 jobs could be at risk
unless Congress renews them.
Texas gay marriage
ban latest to be struck down
AUSTIN, Texas — Afederal judge declared
a same-sex marriage ban in deeply conser-
vative Texas unconstitutional on
Wednesday, but will allow the nation’s sec-
ond-most populous state to enforce the law
pending an appeal that will likely go to the
U.S. Supreme Court.
Judge Orlando Garcia issued the prelimi-
nary injunction after two gay couples chal-
lenged a state constitutional amendment and
a longstanding law. His ruling is the latest
in a tangled web of lawsuits across the coun-
try expected to end up in the Supreme Court
next year.
Arizona governor vetoes religious freedom bill
Around the nation
WORLD 8
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Karl Ritter
and Vladimir Isachenkov
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KIEV, Ukraine — Russia ordered
150,000 troops to test their combat readi-
ness Wednesday in a show of force that
prompted a blunt warning from the United
States that any military intervention in
Ukraine would be a “grave mistake.”
Vladimir Putin’s announcement of huge
new war games came as Ukraine’s protest
leaders named a millionaire former banker
to head a new government after the pro-
Russian president went into hiding.
The new government, which is expected
to be formally approved by parliament
Thursday, will face the hugely complicated
task of restoring stability in a country
that is not only deeply divided politically
but on the verge of financial collapse. Its
fugitive president, Viktor Yanukovych,
fled the capital last week.
In Kiev’s Independence Square, the heart
of the protest movement against
Yanukovych, the interim leaders who
seized control after he disappeared pro-
posed Arseniy Yatsenyuk as the country’s
new prime minister. The 39-year-old
served as economy minister, foreign min-
ister and parliamentary speaker before
Yanukovych took office in 2010, and is
widely viewed as a technocratic reformer
who enjoys the support of the U.S.
Across Ukraine, the divided allegiances
between Russia and the West were on full
display as fistfights broke out between
pro- and anti-Russia protesters in the
strategic Crimea peninsula.
Amid the tensions, Putin put the mili-
tary on alert for massive exercises involv-
ing most of the military units in western
Russia, and announced measures to tighten
security at the headquarters of Russia’s
Black Sea Fleet on Ukraine’s Crimea
peninsula.
The maneuvers will involve some
150,000 troops, 880 tanks, 90 aircraft
and 80 navy ships, and are intended to
“check the troops’ readiness for action in
crisis situations that threaten the nation’s
military security,” Defense Minister
Sergei Shoigu said in remarks carried by
Russian news agencies.
The move prompted a sharp rebuke from
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, who
warned Russia against any military inter-
vention in Ukraine.
Russia war games over Ukraineprompt U.S. warning
REUTERS
Ukrainian men help pull one another out of a stampede as a flag of Crimea is seen during
clashes at rallies held by ethnic Russians and Crimean Tatars near the Crimean parliament
building in Simferopol.
By Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGRAM AIR FIELD, Afghanistan —
Depicting a grim future for Afghanistan
without U.S. help, the top U.S. military
officer said Wednesday that Afghanistan’s
refusal to sign a security agreement with
the United States may make the fight more
difficult this year, embolden the enemy and
prompt some Afghan security forces to
cooperate with the Taliban to “hedge their
bets.”
Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, spent the day
with his commanders and troops in
Afghanistan working to manage the after-
effects of President Barack Obama’s order
Tuesday to begin actively planning for a
total withdrawal of U.S. troops by the end
of the year. In back-to-back meetings, he
urged them to focus on the considerable
military work they have to do and not
worry about next year.
Dempsey told the Associated Press in an
interview that the possible exit of all U.S.
troops was making Afghan military leaders
anxious and eating away
at their troops’ confi-
dence. He said he spoke
with some Afghan lead-
ers after the Tuesday
announcement, and they
asked him to stay com-
mitted to an enduring
U.S. presence, and told
him they were doing all
they could to get the
agreement signed.
Frustrated with Afghan counterpart
Hamid Karzai, Obama ordered the Pentagon
to accelerate planning for a full U.S. troop
withdrawal from Afghanistan by the end of
this year. But Obama is also holding out
hope that Afghanistan’s next president, to
be elected this spring, may eventually sign
a stalled security agreement that could pre-
vent the U.S. from having to take that
step.
The administration would like to leave up
to 10,000 troops in Afghanistan after com-
bat operations end on Dec. 31 to continue
training Afghan forces and conduct coun-
terterrorism missions.
Syrian state media say
army killed 175 rebels
DAMASCUS, Syria — Syrian army troops
on Wednesday killed 175 rebels, many of
them al-Qaida-linked fighters, in an ambush
described as one of the deadliest attacks by
government forces against fighters near
Damascus, according to state media.
An opposition group said the dawn
ambush — part of a government effort to
secure the capital — was carried out by the
Lebanese Hezbollah group, which has been
instrumental in helping President Bashar
Assad’s regime push back rebels entrenched
in the suburbs of the capital city.
Syrian state news agency SANA quoted a
field commander in the eastern Ghouta area
as saying most of the rebels killed in the
assault near Oteibah lake southeast of
Damascus belonged to the al-Qaida-linked
Nusra Front rebel group. The report said sev-
eral of those killed were foreign fighters
who came to Syria from Saudi Arabia,
Chechnya and Qatar.
SANA said the operation dealt “a smash-
ing blow to terrorists,” a term Syrian state
media uses for rebels.
Israel takes risk
with airstrike on Hezbollah
JERUSALEM — Israel has opened a new
front in its attempts to halt weapons smug-
gling to Hezbollah, striking one of the
group’s positions inside Lebanon for the
first time since the sides fought a war eight
years ago.
This week’s airstrike, meant to prevent
the Islamic militant group from obtaining
sophisticated missiles, is part of a risky
policy that could easily backfire by trigger-
ing retaliation. But at a time when the
Syrian opposition says Hezbollah has been
striking major blows for President Bashar
Assad’s government in neighboring Syria
by ambushing al-Qaida-linked fighters
there, it shows the strategic importance for
Israel of trying to break the Syria-
Hezbollah axis.
While Israeli experts agree that Israel
would never want to help al-Qaida, in this
case Israel and the al-Qaida-linked fighters
have as a common goal opposing Hezbollah
and its alliance with the Syrian government.
U.S. general: Grim Afghan
future if no security pact
Around the world
Martin
Dempsey
OPINION 9
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
The Fresno Bee
N
o one reasonably expects to get
money, and the influence of
those who have it, out of poli-
tics.
But it is possible to slow the flow in
the pipeline between campaign contribu-
tions, fundraising parties and legislation
in California.
Afundraising blackout during the final,
critical days of the legislative session
would help.
Ablackout is proposed as part of a
package of four bills introduced last week
by state Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Los
Angeles, who is running for secretary of
state.
Senate Bill 1101 would ban fundraising
by legislators in the final 100 days of the
legislative session and for seven days
after the session ends. This is when much
of the political pressure is applied on
critical legislation such as the state budg-
et and the high-stakes bills that generally
appear in the last days of each session.
This time limit may be crucial to
attracting support in the Senate or
Assembly.
One of the main criticisms when
fundraising blackouts were proposed in
the past was that they would make it diffi-
cult for less affluent legislators to raise
money for campaigns against wealthy
challengers.
While that discounts the pricelessness
of the incumbent’s advantage, it does
deflate the argument because much of the
year is open to soliciting funds.
The other three bills in the package
would require that contributions of more
than $100 be reported electronically
within 24 hours of receipt if fewer than
90 days before an election, and within
five days at any other time; would man-
date the electronic reporting of campaign-
funded communications within 24 hours;
and would limit candidates from raising
money for more than one seat at a time.
These are all good-government ideas,
but the fundraising blackout offers the
best potential to stop the proliferation of
legalized corruption in the Capitol.
The case of lobbyist Kevin Sloat offers
a good example of why.
Sloat was hit with a record fine —
$133,500 — by the Fair Political
Practices Commission this month for
holding lavish fundraising parties at his
house with fine cigars and finer wine that
far exceeded the $500 limit for such
events.
In announcing the bill package, Padilla
said this would “reduce the likelihood of
an unseemly overlap of public policy and
campaign contributions.”
Presumably, he should know. He was
one of 37 state lawmakers who received
FPPC warning letters for holding politi-
cal fundraisers at Sloat’s home — in
Padilla’s case, during the legislative ses-
si on.
Padilla’s proposal faces an uphill battle
to get support. We wish him luck.
Response to John
McDowell’s column
Editor,
The Sequoia Healthcare District is mak-
ing a wise, strategic investment to help
provide its residents with the highest
quality care and services, now and in the
future, by supporting the nurse education
partnership operated at Cañada College
with San Francisco State University. SF
State is honored to partner with communi-
ties in the region to provide an excellent,
accessible public education (in response
to “Special district dysfunctions” column
by John McDowell in the Feb. 22 edition
of the Daily Journal).
The Sequoia Partnership provides
opportunities for district residents as
well. At least 50 percent of the students
in this selective program are from the dis-
trict and many are the first generation in
their families to attend college. Inspired
by this opportunity, and a highly sup-
portive learning environment, our stu-
dents achieve an exceptional 90 percent
graduation rate and 90 percent pass rate
on the very challenging licensing exam.
University graduation rates for at risk stu-
dents are usually less than 50 percent.
About half of the partnership’s gradu-
ates work in the region, at nearly every
hospital in the area, as well as the school
systems, senior centers and medical
offices. We anticipate a return very soon
to pre-recession employment of nearly
100 percent of our graduates employed in
the district.
Another nursing shortage is predicted
in California, driven by pending retire-
ments and the impact of the Affordable
Care Act. It would be short-sighted to cut
back now on educating new nurses.
My colleagues and I, and the students
we serve, offer our heartfelt thanks to the
people of Sequoia Healthcare District, and
the community’s leaders, for their vision-
ary support of such a productive, essen-
tial and lifesaving enterprise.
Mary Ann van Dam, RN, PhD, PNP
Director, School of Nursing
San Francisco State University
Nursing program
Editor,
Sequoia Healthcare District CEO, Lee
Michelson, in response to an article
addressing the dysfunctions of “special
districts” by John McDowell, speaks of
“the responsibility to provide well-
researched and accurate information.”
Regarding the nursing program, the issue
is not whether “500 outstanding nurses”
(I’d settle for “competent”) are needed,
but who should pay for their training?
Thanks to the nursing union, salaries are
attractive. Why don’t the unions play a
major roll in funding nurses training?
Then it wouldn’t matter where nurses were
employed, the unions could always get a
return on their investment in the dues-
paying process. For accurate information
see: “$10,000,000 Sequoia Healthcare
District Nursing Education Program”
(http://www.almanacnews.com/square/ind
ex.php?i=3&d=1&t=7914).
The Sequoia Healthcare District is on a
philanthropic spending spree to ward off
predator government agencies eyeing
their assets and tax revenue. San Mateo
County has grabbed $1.35 million/year
since 2003 for the Children’s Health
Initiative. Millions are being spent each
year on schools in the district. Subsidies
to Sequoia Hospital which they no longer
own, continue.
Why do we need a special district with a
$192,800 year CEO to dole out our prop-
erty taxes? Dissolution of the district
would allow its tax revenue and assets to
go directly to these other agencies.
McDowell puts his finger on a problem
which needs solving. LAFCo, charged
with facilitating the dissolution of redun-
dant districts, is underfunded.
Jack Hickey
Emerald Hills
Fundraising timeout would be good for California
Other voices
Six Californias?
F
ile this one under “why not?”
Venture capitalist Tim Draper, now
known in these parts for his bur-
geoning “University of Heroes” in down-
town San Mateo, has said he actually is
serious about his plan to divide California
into six states. His initiative has entered
circulation and he needs more than 800,000
signatures by the middle of July to qualify
for the November bal-
lot.
For those who
haven’t heard,
Draper’s plan would
separate the state into
the new state of
Jefferson to the very
north (and a couple of
counties have already
expressed interest),
North California,
South California,
Central California,
West California (including Los Angeles)
and our neck of the woods — Silicon
Valley.
The arguments have been made in the past
that the interests of the state are already
divided. The Central Valley with its flat
lands, farms and tract homes already seems
like another country for some. People from
Los Angeles tend to like the Lakers and the
Dodgers — but not including L.A. in South
California seems ripe for confusion. And
then there’s the fact that North California is
not the northernmost state in this new con-
figuration. That one would be Jefferson.
And who is that named for? Thomas
Jefferson? I know he dispatched Lewis and
Clark, but is that enough reason to name
the new state after him? The names, of
course, I’m guessing will be up for debate.
As they should. The idea of naming our
state Silicon Valley is borderline offensive
(I mean, not really, so don’t get all up in
arms about that adjective). I know the tech
industry is a very big deal, but I would sug-
gest it does not define the Bay Area, known
for its diversity of people, businesses and
interests. Naming a state after a nickname
for an industry center is akin to the Golden
State Warriors — doesn’t make a lot of
sense if you think about it. How about
something Spanish and cool? I might sug-
gest Yerba Buena, the original name of San
Francisco. It has an old vibe to it, which
could also make it trendy since old things
tend to always come back (home canning
anyone? Mustache wax?) And it’s an alter-
native phrase for the Spanish Hierba Buena,
meaning “Good Herb.” Which might make
some sense since that’s what detractors to
Draper’s idea may be saying he was smok-
ing when he thought of it.
And what’s with the detractors? I’m fairly
certain I would not sign the initiative or
vote for this idea if it made it on the ballot,
but what’s wrong with a little out-of-the-
box thinking? Draper is notorious for such
activity and a magnet for new ideas big and
small. The underlying commentary could be
that there is something wrong with our cur-
rent system and it needs to be fixed. You’d
be hard-pressed to find any rational person
to say otherwise. Is this the solution?
Probably not. Think of the infrastructure,
the water delivery systems, the economies
of scale provided by a large state govern-
ment, the stationary!
Besides, Draper is simply exercising his
right in our citizen initiative system of pro-
posing something, gathering signatures
and seeing if enough people like the idea.
So far, the Secretary of State’s Office has a
wide range of initiatives in circulation from
limiting hospital administrator compensa-
tion, re-establishing redevelopment agen-
cies, stopping high-speed rail, raising the
wages for in-home health care workers and
limiting the terms for county assessors,
district attorneys and sheriffs. Some will
make it on the ballot, some won’t. Some
will be approved by voters, some won’t.
But you have to hand it to Draper, Six
Californias is definitely getting some atten-
tion.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily
Journal. He can be reached at jon@smdai-
lyjournal.com. Follow Jon on Twitter @jon-
mays.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,198.41 +18.75 10-Yr Bond 2.67 -0.03
Nasdaq 4,292.06 +4.48 Oil (per barrel) 102.55
S&P 500 1,845.16 +0.04 Gold 1,329.70
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market is
struggling to take it to the next level.
For a third straight day the Standard
& Poor’s 500 index traded above its
record close but fell back to end below
it. An early move higher Wednesday
was led by retailers and home builders,
but the gains mostly petered out in the
afternoon. By the closing bell the
index was up just a fraction of a point.
After rebounding from losses early
in the year, when investors were con-
cerned about the outlook for growth in
emerging markets and the U.S., the
stock market now appears to be at a
crossroads.
While investors seem comfortable
attributing the recent weakness in eco-
nomic reports to the unusually cold
weather, they also appear reluctant to
push stocks higher before they see
more evidence of growth.
“This is a market that has been try-
ing to decipher how much of the nega-
tive news is weather-based, against
concerns that we have moved into a
soft patch,” said Quincy Krosby, a
market strategist at Prudential
Financial.
The S&P 500 edged up four-hun-
dredths of a point to close at 1,845.16,
three points short of its record high
close of 1,848.38 set Jan. 15. The
index climbed as high as 1,852.65.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 18.75, or 0.1 percent, to
16, 198. 41. The Nasdaq composite
rose 4.48 points, or 0.1 percent, to
4,292.06.
Home builder stocks rose sharply
after the government reported that
U.S. sales of new homes jumped in
January at the fastest pace in more than
five years. That’s a hopeful sign after a
slowdown in the housing market last
year caused by higher interest rates.
PulteGroup rose 57 cents, or 2.8 per-
cent, to $21.25 and Lennar rose
$1.52, or 3.6 percent, to $43.78.
Retailers rose after several encourag-
ing earnings reports.
Lowe’s climbed $2.61, or 5.4 per-
cent, to $50.72. The company’s net
income rose 6 percent in the most
recent quarter as the home-improve-
ment retailer continued to benefit from
a recovery in the housing market. The
company also announced a new $5 bil-
lion stock repurchase program.
Abercrombie & Fitch jumped $4.05,
or 11.3 percent, to $40.04 after post-
ing earnings that exceeded the expec-
tations of Wall Street analysts. The
retailer also initiated a $150 million
accelerated share buyback program.
“We’ve dialed estimates down in that
space, simply because of worries about
the effects of the weather,” said Darrell
Cronk, regional chief investment offi-
cer for Wells Fargo Private Bank. “A
lot of people were walking in today
expecting some of those retail compa-
nies to have much softer results.”
Investor may get a catalyst to push
stocks higher on Thursday when Janet
Yellen, the new head of the Federal
Reserve, testifies in front of the
Senate’s Banking Committee. Stocks
jumped Feb. 11 when Yellen spoke to
Congress, and said that she would con-
tinue the central bank’s market-friend-
l y, low-interest rate policies.
The comments were her first in pub-
lic since taking over for Ben Bernanke
at the Fed. Her appearance in the
Senate was delayed because of a winter
storm.
Bond prices rose. The yield on the
10-year Treasury note fell to 2.66 per-
cent from 2.70 percent.
Stocks edge higher, S&P ends shy of record
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Target Corp., up $3.98 to $60.49
Still reeling from the theft of customer credit card data, the retailer
managed to top Wall Street expectations for the quarter.
Abercrombie & Fitch Co., up $4.05 to $40.04
The teen retailer’s adjusted profit for the fourth quarter was better than
expected and it announced a $150 million stock buyback.
Chesapeake Energy Corp., down $1.33 to $25.61
The cost of trimming its workforce and getting out of land leases weighed
on the energy company’s fourth quarter profit.
Sturm, Ruger & Co. Inc., down $5.38 to $62.99
The nation’s biggest gunmaker reported a rare miss in the fourth quarter
as fear of a crackdown under the Obama administration fade.
Nasdaq
First Solar Inc., down $5.29 to $52.74
The solar company posted weaker fourth-quarter profit and revenue
and gave a sheepish outlook for the current quarter, sending investors
fleeing.
EBay Inc., up $1.19 to $57.34
Carl Icahn ramped up his attacks on the e-commerce site with another
open letter. The company says the activist investor’s claims are “not
factually accurate.”
SodaStream International Ltd., up 9 cents to $39.17
The Israeli carbonated beverage machine company did better than most
had expected in the fourth quarter despite slimmer margins.
JAKKS Pacific Inc., up $1.37 to $7.27
The chief executive of the children’s and pet toy company predicted
more international growth this year with more products.
Big movers
“We’ve dialed estimates down in that space, simply
because of worries about the effects of the weather.
... A lot of people were walking in today expecting some
of those retail companies to have much softer results.”
— Darrell Cronk, regional chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank
By Anne D’Innocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Looks like Target Corp.
will be feeling the financial pain for a while
from the theft of credit card numbers and
other information from millions of its cus-
tomers.
The nation’s second largest discounter
said Wednesday that its profit in the fourth
quarter fell 46 percent on a revenue decline
of 5.3 percent as the breach scared off cus-
tomers worried about the security of their
private data.
While Target said sales have been recov-
ering since the breach was disclosed in mid-
December, the company expects business
to be muted for some time: It issued a profit
outlook for the current quarter and full year
that was below Wall Street estimates.
The results come more than two months
after Target disclosed that personal credit
card data from millions of Target customers
was stolen by hackers who targeted credit
card terminals in its stores.
During a conference call with investors
on Wednesday, Target CEO Gregg
Steinhafel said the retailer has been updat-
ing shoppers early and often on the facts of
its ongoing investigation, offering free
credit card monitoring to any customer
shopping at a Target store and working on
equipping its locations with more secure
technology.
“We are committed to making things
right,” he said.
Target’s business has been affected by the
breach in a number of ways. During the
quarter, the number of transactions fell 5.5
percent, in part because of shoppers leery
of buying at Target following the breach.
The company also has faced costs related
to the breach. Target said it can’t yet esti-
mate how much the data breach will cost it
in total.
But in the fourth quarter, it said the
breach resulted in $17 million of net
expenses, with $61 million of total
expenses partially offset by the recogni-
tion of a $44 million insurance receivable.
Target said expenses may include pay-
ments to card networks to cover losses and
expenses for reissuing cards, lawsuits,
government investigations and enforce-
ment proceedings. The costs could hurt the
company’s first-quarter and full-year earn-
ings, it said.
Target, which based in Minneapolis,
earned $520 million, or 81 cents per share,
for the three months that ended on Feb. 1.
That compares with a profit of $961 mil-
lion, or $1.47 per share, a year earlier.
Revenue fell to $21.5 billion from $22.7
billion. Revenue at stores open at least a
year, an important retail measurement, fell
2.5 percent.
In addition to the breach, Target’s results
were hurt by stumbles in its expansion into
Canada, its first foray outside the U.S.
Analysts had expected a profit of 80 cents
on revenue of 21.5 billion, according to
FactSet estimates.
Investors sent shares of Target up more
than 7 percent, or $3.98 to $60.49 on
Wednesday as the earnings beat Wall Street
estimates by a penny and met analysts’
sales estimates. The increase comes as
Target’s stock had fallen 11 percent since
the company disclosed the breach in mid-
December. The stock is now down 5 percent
since the theft was disclosed.
Still, Target has much work to do to bring
back customers who are still scared to shop
there.
Target disclosed on Dec. 19 data breach
compromised 40 million credit and debit
card accounts between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15.
Then on Jan. 10 it said hackers also stole
personal information — including names,
phone numbers as well as email and mail-
ing addresses — from as many as 70 mil-
lion customers.
Data-breach costs take toll on Target profit
YouTube ordered to
take down anti-Muslim film
SAN FRANCISCO — AU.S. appeals court
ordered YouTube on Wednesday to take down
an anti-Muslim film that sparked violent
riots in parts of the Middle East and death
threats to the actors.
The decision by a divided three-judge panel
of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San
Francisco reinstated a lawsuit filed against
YouTube by an actress who appeared briefly in
the 2012 video that led to rioting and deaths
because of its negative portrayal of the
Prophet Muhammad. YouTube resisted calls by
President Barack Obama and other world lead-
ers to take down the video, arguing that to do
so amounted to unwarranted government cen-
sorship and would violate the Google-owned
company’s free speech protections.
Sony to close two-thirds of U.S. stores
LOS ANGELES — Sony Corp. says it is
closing about two-thirds of its U.S. Sony
Stores is part of a wide-ranging company
restructuring it announced earlier this month.
It also said that 1,000 of the previously
announced 5,000 job cuts would come from
its Sony Electronics unit, mainly in the U.S.
and Mexico.
By Michael Felberbaum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RICHMOND, Va. — Several U.S. senators
on Wednesday introduced a bill that would
curb electronic cigarette marketing while
the fast-growing industry awaits regulation
by the Food and Drug Administration.
The bill is co-sponsored by California
Sen. Barbara Boxer, Iowa Sen. Tom
Harkin, both Democrats, and others. It
would ban marketing to children based on
standards set by the Federal Trade
Commission and allow the agency to work
with state attorneys general to enforce the
ban on advertising. The battery-powered
devices heat a liquid nicotine solution and
create vapor that’s inhaled.
Companies vying for a stake in the elec-
tronic cigarette business are reviving the
decades-old marketing tactics the tobacco
industry used to hook generations of
Americans on regular smokes. Those tac-
tics, such as running TV commercials and
sponsoring race cars and other events, are
raising worries that e-cigarette makers could
tempt young people to take up something
that could prove addictive.
While the FDAplans to set marketing and
product regulations for electronic cigarettes
in the near future, for now, almost anything
goes.
And Harkin said e-cigarette makers are
attempting to create “a new generation of
nicotine addicts.”
“When it comes to the marketing of e-cig-
arettes to children and teens, it’s ‘Joe
Camel’ all over again,” Harkin said in a
statement.
A 2009 law gave the FDA the power to
regulate a number of aspects of tobacco mar-
keting and manufacturing, though it cannot
ban nicotine or cigarettes outright.
The agency first said it planned to assert
authority over e-cigarettes in 2011 but has-
n’t yet. The proposed FDA regulation was
submitted to the Office of Management and
Budget for review in October.
While FDA regulation of these products
remains critical, Harkin said the legislation
would complement the agency’s oversight.
Senators look for e-cigarette marketing limits
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PALO ALTO — Electric car maker Tesla
Motors is considering sites in Nevada,
Arizona, New Mexico and Texas for a mas-
sive battery factory that would employ
around 6,500 people.
Tesla plans to start construction this year
and complete the factory in 2017.
The Palo Alto-based company expects the
factory to supply enough batteries for the
500,000 cars it hopes to make by 2020.
Tesla and partners including battery maker
Panasonic will invest between $4 billion
and $5 billion to build the factory, which
would supply battery packs to Tesla’s
Fremont, Calif., assembly plant.
Tesla also announced Wednesday it would
raise $1.6 billion in a debt offering. The
proceeds would help finance the new factory
and a lower-cost vehicle expected to go on
sale at the end of 2016.
Tesla plans new battery factory; will employ 6,500
Business briefs
<<< Page 13, Giants fall to A’s
in Spring Training opener
LOCAL SCORES: PLAYOFF ACTION HEATS UP >> PAGE 12 AND PAGE 15
Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
El Camino’s SamOrtiz slides in to knock the ball away from an Overfelt player during the Colts’heartbreaking 3-2 loss to the Royals in the first
round of a CCS Division II playoff game.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The El Camino boys’ soccer team went
from elation to heartbreak in the matter of
about a minute.
After the ninth-seeded Colts tied the score
at 2 against No. 8 Overfelt late in regulation
of a first-round Central Coast Section
Division II playoff game Wednesday, the
Royals scored the winner on a counterattack
with only stoppage time left to play, turn-
ing El Camino’s first CCS appearance since
1986 into a short one.
“I love the way we battled back,” said El
Camino coach Ken Anderson.
“Unfortunately, we made a mistake (at the
very end).”
El Camino (11-6-4) gave up a pair of first-
half goals to trail at halftime and, despite
dominating most of the second half, just
could not finish in the final third of the field.
With about 15 minutes to play, however,
the Colts found some magic. Christian
Marquez, a frosh-soph callup who started
the game and was one of the more dangerous
players throughout the game for the Colts,
was brought down in the Overfelt penalty
box, drawing a penalty kick. Leonardo
Silva stepped up and placed the spot kick
into the upper left corner to close the Colts’
deficit to one.
Then, in the 78th minute, the Colts found
the equalizer, this time off a free kick 30
yards from the Royals’ goal.
Season ends in heartbreak
O
ther than a few squads, San
Mateo County in general, and
the Peninsula Athletic League
specifically, has never really been known
as a hotbed for basketball.
Opinions may change, at least for this
season. On Tuesday, the bulk of the
Central Coast Section playoffs started
and the PAL had a banner night as the
league went 12-1 in both boys’ and girls’
brackets Tuesday
night.
The only loss was
the Oceana boys
falling to Gonzales.
Overall, the PAL i s
12-2, with the
Oceana girls’ losing
in a game Monday.
Sequoia (Division
I), Westmoor (DII),
Terra Nova (DII),
South City (DIII),
San Mateo (DIII) and
El Camino (DIII) all
won on the boys’ side, while Aragon
(DII), Capuchino (DIII), Hillsdale (DIII),
Burlingame (DIII), Mills (DIII) and Half
Moon Bay (DIV) were all victorious on
the girls’ side.
PAL commissioner Terry Stogner cred-
its PAL representatives Herb Yaptinchay,
Westmoor boys’ coach, and Paul Carion,
South City girls’ coach, for knowing the
PAL’s strengths against the rest of the
leagues in CCS.
As opposed to football and soccer, for
example, CCS basketball seeds are not
based on power points. So that means
league representatives have to lobby for
their teams and their leagues.
“I think they (Yaptinchay and Carion)
do a great job of representing [the league
at the CCS seeding meeting],” Stogner
PAL makes
statement
See LOUNGE, Page 14 See SOCCER, Page 14
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Half Moon Bay wrestling team may
have captured the Peninsula Athletic League
Bay Division regular-season, team title
with an undefeated record, but the Cougars
have not cornered the market on PAL
wrestling talent.
At the PAL championships at El Camino
last weekend, South City was the big win-
ner, capturing five individual titles.
Kevin Perez (128), Rubeen Salem (140),
Will Nicholls (147) and Dupra Goodman
(172) all claimed crowns for the Warriors
and, in arguably the biggest upset of the
tournament, Luke Cruz captured the 287-
pound title for the Warriors by beating Half
Moon Bay’s Jose Ayon in the semifinals on
his way to the championship. Ayon is seed-
ed fifth in this weekend’s Central Coast
Section championships at Independence
High School in San Jose.
Goodman also secured a top seed at 170 in
the CCS tournament, earning the No. 4 slot
this weekend.
Half Moon Bay did come away with a pair
of titles, with Raul Hernandez taking the
184-pound division and Marcos Sarabia
capturing the 222-pound title. Sarabia is the
No. 4 seed at that weight at CCS.
Menlo-Atherton, which was co-champion
of the Ocean Division, had three individual
winners. Leading the way was Anthony
Andrighetto, who won the 122-pound
crown, upsetting Terra Nova’s Patrick
Palomata in the finals. Palomata is seeded
No. 6 in the CCS tournament. Austin
Wilson won at 134 and is an alternate in
this weekend’s CCS tournament. James
Smith was the other Bear to win a PAL title,
winning the 162-pound class.
Burlingame, El Camino, Sequoia and Terra
Nova each had one PAL champion. Kevin
PAL individual wrestling champions crowned
See WRESTLE, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Girls’ lacrosse
Sacred Heart Prep 14,
Foothill-Pleasanton 8
The Gators opened their 2014 season with
a victory over the Falcons in Pleasanton
Tuesday night.
SHP(1-0) was led by a pair of sophomores
with Libby Muir scoring six goals and Ally
Mayle adding five goals and an assist.
Kiana Cacchione and Drew Learner each
added a goal for the Gators.
Baseball
Menlo 7, Gunn 5
The Knights opened their 2014 campaign
with a win over Titans Tuesday.
Designated hitter Macklan Badger drove
in three runs for Menlo (1-0), which stole
nine bases in the game.
Wyatt Driscoll picked up the win on the
mound.
Carlmont 5, St. Francis Christian 0
The Scots opened the Milpitas tourna-
ment with a shutout win over St. Francis.
Evan McClain went six innings in pick-
ing up the win, scattering just three hits,
while striking out nine and walking none.
Matt Seubert drove in a pair of runs for
Carlmont (1-0-1), while Kyle Barret added
two hits.
Softball
Hillsdale 3, Notre Dame-Belmont 2
The Knights scratched out a win over the
Tigers in the season opener for both
Tuesday afternoon.
Notre Dame (0-1) took a 1-0 lead with a
run in the third, but Hillsdale (1-0) respond-
ed with a three-run fifth. The Tigers got a run
back in the bottom of the frame, but could
not complete the comeback.
Kelly Miller went 1 for 4 with an RBI and
a run scored for Hillsdale, while Eryn
McCoy earned the win in the pitcher’s cir-
cle.
Freshman Marina Sylvestri led the Tigers’
offense, going 2 for 3, with a triple and run
scored. Danica Kazakoff was 1 for 3 with an
RBI.
Girls’ tennis
Crystal Springs 7, Mills 0
In a non-league matchup, the Gryphons
blanked the Vikings.
Crystal Springs won five of the seven
matches in straight sets.
College baseball
Skyline 10, Cosumnes River 9
The Trojans scored a huge upset and
picked up their first road win of the season
in knocking off Cosumnes River, the top-
ranked team in the state.
After watching Cosumnes River rally
from a six-run deficit to the game at 9 in the
sixth, Skyline (4-8) scratched out the win-
ning run in the top of the ninth when Lance
Montano came through with a one-out, run-
scoring single. It was Montano’s second
RBI of the game.
Shawn Scott picked up the win with a 1-2-
3 bottom of the ninth. Scott pitched three
innings of no-hit relief.
Nick McHugh, Michael Franco,
Montano, Lucci Molina, Armando Fajardo
and Phil Caulfield all had a pair of hits for
Skyline. In addition to Montano, Molina
and Caulfield also drove in two runs apiece.
College of San Mateo 17, DeAnza 2
The Bulldogs opened Coast Conference
Pacific Division play by trouncing the Dons
Tuesday afternoon.
CSM (1-0, 6-6) scored all its runs in the
first five innings, leading 13-0 after three
innings as the Bulldogs banged out 19 hits
for the game.
Steven Pastora (El Camino), Matt Glomb
and Allen Smoot each had three hits to pace
the the CSM attack. Dylan Isquirdo drove in
four runs, while Vande Gutche, Glomb, Tyler
Carson and Pastore drove in two runs
apiece.
CSM used seven pitcher to record the
shutout.
College softball
College of San Mateo 19, Mission 0
The Lady Bulldogs improved to 3-0 in
Coast Conference play with a five-inning
whitewash of the Saints Tuesday.
Ashlynne Neil and Lacie Crawford com-
bined for a no-hitter for CSM (3-0 Coast
Conference, 19-1 overall), and were one
Crawford walk away from a perfect game.
Talisa Fiame (Terra Nova) had a huge game
offensively for the Bulldogs, going 2 for 4
with a pair of home runs, seven RBIs and
two runs scored. Natalie Saucedo
(Burlingame) had a double and was 3 for 4
with five runs driven in.
Local Sports Briefs
SPORTS 13
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FEET, LEGS, HANDS
Prickling orTingling of Feet/Hands
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Josh
Reddick made two highlight-reel
catches to take away homers from
Michael Morse, Brandon Moss and
Stephen Vogt each drove in two runs
during a six-run fourth inning against
San Francisco closer Sergio Romo,
and the Oakland Athletics opened
Cactus League play with a 10-5 victo-
ry over the Giants on Wednesday.
“We were getting challenged right
away,” said Reddick, who also drove
in a run. “That first one got my heart
pumping a little bit.”
Morse hit the ball hardest of any
Giant starter without anything to
show for it. In his first two at-bats, in
the second and the fourth, he hit
drives that were headed over the fence
in right field but Reddick reached over
the wall to catch both.
Yoenis Cespedes also drove in two
runs as the A’s won their first spring
opener in three years and their second
in 10 years. Alberto Callapso, John
Jaso and Michael Taylor also drove in
runs. Sam Fuld and Nick Punto each
added two hits.
Pablo Sandoval drove in a run for
the Giants. Yusmeiro Petit took the
loss, allowing four runs - three earned
— on five hits in one inning.
STARTING TIME
Athletics: Jesse Chavez allowed a
hit and struck out a batter in two
innings. Chavez was 2-4 with 3.92
ERAin 35 games, all in relief, for the
A’s last year. A’s manager Bob Melvin
loves his versatility out of the
bullpen and thinks he could start a
game or two.
Giants: Petit, 4-1 with a 3.56 ERA
in eight games — seven starts — last
year, threw strikes but just got too
much of the plate.
TRAINER’S ROOM
Athletics: A’s OF Craig Gentry will
miss at least 10 more days to help him
recover from a lower back strain. Jaso
caught in a game for the first time
since sustaining a concussion last
July. He singled and was hit by a pitch
and left after the top of the third.
“It hit just above the right elbow, ”
Jaso said. “I thought I would get four
or five innings bit after that hap-
pened, Melvin made the call.”
Giants: LHP David Huff was
scratched when he reported shoulder
problems. RHP Sandy Rosario has an
undiagnosed leg problem that has
bothered him for a few days.
THE CATCHES
Reddick made two sensational
catches, each time robbing Morse of
home runs. Reddick said the first one,
in which he climbed the 10-foot fence
in right field to snag a ball that was
clearly over the fence, was the best
he’s ever made.
“I don’t know how I did it,” Reddick
said. “When I got to the fence and
climbed it, I looked back and the ball
was already two feet over my head. I
was lucky enough to get my glove on
it.”
After the second one, which was
similar, Morse raised his arms in dis-
belief: “I was like, ‘I thought we were
friends.’ I know Reddick and he takes
his defense so seriously,” Morse said.
Fuld, who made his own running,
over-the-shoulder catch in center field,
was also impressed.
“I’m pretty sure that’s the best play
I’ve ever seen live and then it just got
wacky with the second one. You’ll
never see that again.”
PABLO TALK
Giants president and CEO Larry Baer
said the team is open-minded to talk-
ing long-term contract with infielder
Pablo Sandoval.
“On opening day, if Pablo doesn’t
have a long-term deal it doesn’t mean
he’s not going to be a Giant. There
have been no discussions yet. We
want to let Pablo get acclimated and
then the evaluation starts. We’ve got
the month of March. We’ll see.”
Reddick makes 2 highlight-reel catches in win
A’S 10, GIANTS 5
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. (AP)
— The PGA Tour season began five
months ago. The new year is two
months old. And yet there’s some-
thing about the Honda Classic that
makes Tiger Woods and a collection of
stars feel as though it’s all about to get
underway.
“I think once we get to Florida, I
think we’re all thinking about our way
to Augusta,” Woods said.
Six tournaments remaining before
the Masters, the first major of the
year, and this is now serious business.
It shows in the strength of the field at
PGA National, with seven of the top
10 players from the world ranking.
The last time Woods, Phil
Mickelson, Rory McIlroy and Adam
Scott competed in the same tourna-
ment was the BMW Championship
near Chicago last summer.
That’s how it was a generation ago,
when some of golf’s top players either
rested or played overseas early in the
season, and then showed up in tropical
conditions at Doral to start the official
road to Augusta National.
Woods has plenty of work to do
based on his early performance — a
missed 54-hole cut at Torrey Pines in
his lone PGATour start this year, fol-
lowed by a dismal performance by his
standards at the Dubai Desert Classic,
where he tied for 41st.
He conceded that he spent most of
his winter break working on his body
instead of his golf. Since returning
from overseas earlier this month,
Woods said he has spent most of his
time working on his short game.
Woods begins his road to the Masters
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — Taj Gibson scored 21 points, Carlos Boozer
added 15 points and 13 rebounds, and the Chicago Bulls
used a big third-quarter run to win for the seventh time in
eight games, pounding the Golden State Warriors 103-83
Wednesday night.
Jimmy Butler scored 16 points after missing two games
with bruised ribs, Mike Dunleavy Jr. added 15, and Joakim
Noah grabbed 17 rebounds for the Bulls.
They also dominated on the glass 56-41, forced 16
turnovers and held All-Star Stephen Curry in check while
bringing Golden State’s four-game win streak to an emphat-
ic end.
Jordan Crawford scored 16 points, but it was a rough night
for the Warriors even though David Lee returned to the rota-
tion.
He came off the bench to score 11 points in 20 minutes
after being hospitalized with a stomach flu and missing two
games. But Curry tied a season low with five points on 2-of-
10 shooting and the Warriors never found a rhythm.
They trailed by 11 at the half and were within eight in the
third quarter when things got out of hand.
Dunleavy blocked Andre Iguodala’s layup with 7:33 left,
and in a flash, the Bulls were on their way. Kirk Hinrich con-
verted a three-point play, igniting a 14-2 run that sealed
this one for Chicago.
Butler deflected a pass by Lee, leading to a layup for
Boozer, and scored on a putback that made it 66-51 with
5:52 remaining. After Dunleavy hit a free throw, Boozer
capped the run with three straight baskets — a 15-footer, a
short jumper and a 13-foot bank shot — that bumped
Chicago’s lead to 73-53 with 3:20 to go in the quarter.
Butler was active early, scoring 13 points to help the
Bulls build a 56-45 halftime lead.
Dunleavy was on target again with 11 points in the half
after scoring 22 in Tuesday’s win at Atlanta. He hit two 3-
pointers, the second bouncing straight up off the rim and
into the net with 27 seconds left in the second quarter to
make it 54-45.
Gibson leads Bulls to
103-83 win over Dubs
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
said. “It’s based on knowledge. We have
some people who can tell you on the third
game of the year how San Benito played
(for example).”
Yaptinchay and Carion must know what
they’re talking about because certainly
there were some raised eyebrows when the
likes of the San Mateo (8-15 overall) or El
Camino (9-15) boys’ teams earning 12th
and ninth seeds, respectively, or the
Aragon girls’ (10-15) making the field as
the No. 10 seed in their respective divi-
sions.
Until you look at the results. Aragon
crushed Lincoln-SJ 45-29, San Mateo
blasted North Monterey County, 85-57 and
El Camino thumped Gilroy, 80-55.
“There’s an example of a selection com-
mittee that knows what they’re doing,”
Stogner said. “I think the level of basket-
ball (in the PAL), as compared to the rest of
CCS, is climbing.”
***
Gladiator Gym in Redwood City sent
seven fighters to the Northern California
Golden Gloves competition in Vacaville
last weekend and came home with six gold
medals and a silver.
“I’ve taken kids to local tournaments,
but never to the Golden Gloves,” said
Gladiator trainer/coach Antonio Renteria,
who trains five of the seven fighters.
Eden Leznik, a 16-year-old Aragon stu-
dent, captured the 123-pound title in the
novice division. Elias Bac-Felix won the
152-pound crown, going undefeated in his
amateur boxing debut.
“He doesn’t have any fights and he went
2-0,” Renteria said.
Jose Martinez won the 165-pound novice
title, while Casey Jackson won the 165-
pound open title, which qualifies him for
the regional tournament.
“His chances of advancing (out of
regionals to the state and national tourna-
ments) are pretty high,” Renteria said.
Casey Jackson is coached by his father,
Eugene “The Wolf” Jackson, who is one of
the godfathers of mixed martial arts and
founder of Gladiator Gym.
Paul Yapp took the 178-pound champi-
onship.
The 141-pound title bout was an all-
Gladiator affair, with Edgar Mayorga edg-
ing Anthony Lawrence, who is also trained
by Eugene Jackson.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by phone: 344-5200
ext. 117 or by email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com.
You follow him on Twitter@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Again it was Silva supplying the magic
for El Camino, as the senior captain sent a
shot to the upper left corner again. The
Overfelt goalkeeper managed to get his
hands on the ball but, with the slick, wet
conditions, the ball slipped through his
hands and into the net for the equalizer.
“We’ve been a second-half team all sea-
son,” Anderson said.
As El Camino and its fans started think-
ing overtime, Overfelt (9-4-8) had other
ideas. The Royals quickly went on the
attack and a pass found Jose Nunez
unmarked on the left side. He carried the ball
to the top of the El Camino penalty box
and, with Colts’ goalkeeper Anthony
Graham off his line trying to cut off the
angle, Nunez slipped a low, hard shot under-
neath him and into the net for the game win-
ner.
As dominant as the Colts were in the sec-
ond half, it was Overfelt that dominated the
first 40 minutes as El Camino struggled to
string passes together and the Royals con-
trolled possession for most of the first peri-
od.
“(I think our problem was we were) being
too cautious,” Anderson said. “We were
telling [our team] … we had to play with
energy and play physical and attempt to
fight for every 50-50 ball. To not make it
easy on them.”
The Royals did not have too many quality
chances, but Juan Carlos Bugarin turned
nothing into something for Overfelt —
twice. In the 13th minute, a long pass was
sent into the Colts’ penalty box. Bugarin
held off an El Camino and with Graham con-
verging on the play, Bugarin managed to
poke the ball past both Colts and into the
empty net for a 1-0 lead.
Ten minutes later, Bugarin used a brilliant
individual effort to put his team up 2-0.
After receiving a pass near the endline,
Bugarin beat a handful of El Camino defend-
ers off the dribble and then tucked a shot just
inside the near left post for his second goal
of the half.
As well as Bugarin played in the first half,
however, he all but disappeared over the
final 40 minutes of the game.
“The only quality chances they had were
what [Bugarin] made,” Anderson said. “I
don’t know where he went in the second
half. I think they started to wear down. I
think our fitness was a lot better. ”
Despite being outplayed in the first half,
El Camino had it chances. The Colts were in
line for a prime opportunity minutes into
the game when Daniel Ramos sent a perfect
through ball to a streaking Silva.
But just as Silva was about to take the ball
and break in on goal, the ball nearly came to
a stop as it hit a puddle on El Camino’s arti-
ficial-turf field.
“Can you imagine a puddle on our field?”
Anderson asked.
In the 29th minute, the Colts had a 2-on-
1 break with Silva and Marquez. Silva decid-
ed to keep the ball and took a shot that was
blocked by the Overfelt goalkeeper. He
gave up a rebound, but Marquez could not
corral it and another chance went by the
board for the Colts.
In the end, the game boiled down to tak-
ing advantage of opportunities. The Royals
capitalized on theirs.
“We had some good chances,” Anderson
said.
Continued from page 11
SOCCER
Nash will represent the Panthers at CCS
after winning the 108-pound crown and
earning the No. 6 seed at the section tourna-
ment. El Camino’s Christian Diokno won
the 115-pound title and got the No. 4 seed at
the CCS tournament. Brady Green was seed-
ed No. 3 at CCS in the 154-pound class after
capturing the PAL title in that weight class.
David Melton earned Terra Nova’s lone PAL
championship, winning at 197.
Not only PAL champions qualify for CCS,
however. Those who finished in second
place — or third-place finishers who had a
wrestle-off with runners-up to determine the
league’s second representative — also
earned spots, which include: Will Fullerton
(Half Moon Bay, 108), Justin Persino (Terra
Nova, 115), Palomata (Terra Nova, 122),
Josue Gazo (Oceana, 128), David Ortega
(Capuchino, 134), Chase Edgington (Terra
Nova, 140), Roman Reich (El Camino,
147), Alec Goff (El Camino, 154), Dominic
Pintarelli (Half Moon Bay, 162), Patrick
Mullens (Mills, 172), Alfredo Chavez
(Sequoia, 184), Bilguun Khishigbat (El
Camino, 197), Matt Lentz (Aragon, 222)
and Ayon (Half Moon Bay, heavyweight).
Continued from page 11
WRESTLE
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Anne Peterson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND — Deron Williams took
a moment to snap a few photos of
Brooklyn teammate Jason Collins at
their shootaround in Portland.
He couldn’t help it: The NBA’s first
openly gay player was surrounded by a
throng of cameras and microphones,
and at least for the next week or so,
Collins will be the face of the Nets
wherever they go.
The 7-footer was signed to a 10-day
contract on Sunday. He played in a
108-102 victory over the Lakers that
night, with two rebounds, five fouls
and a steal in just under 11 minutes.
Before Wednesday night’s game
against the Trail Blazers, Collins said
accepted the both the interest and
scrutiny that has come with his return
to the league.
“I’m back playing basketball, so of
course I’m enjoying this,” he said.
After Portland, the Nets visit
Denver, where the attention will
become even more intense. The family
of slain Wyoming college student
Matthew Shepard is expected to make
the drive for the game Thursday night
against the Nuggets.
Shepard was tortured and murdered in
1998 because he was gay. Collins
wears his No. 98 jersey in Shepard’s
honor. He wants to keep the details of
any meeting with Judy Shepard to him-
self.
“Obviously, it’s extremely special
and I’m very much looking forward to
meeting them,” he said.
Collins wore the No. 98 with both
the Boston Celtics and the
Washington Wizards for Shepard even
before coming out. The jersey wasn’t
yet ready for the game against the
Lakers (he wore a spare jersey with his
name hastily added), but he was set to
wear No. 98 again against the Blazers.
“We were very touched,” Judy
Shepard told the New York Daily News
about the jersey. “For him to make
that tribute to Matt was meaningful to
us.”
Collins, Nets dealing with bright spotlight
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 32 25 .561 —
Brooklyn 26 29 .473 5
New York 21 36 .368 11
Boston 20 39 .339 13
Philadelphia 15 43 .259 17 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 40 14 .741 —
Washington 29 28 .509 12 1/2
Charlotte 27 30 .474 14 1/2
Atlanta 26 31 .456 15 1/2
Orlando 18 42 .300 25
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 43 13 .768 —
Chicago 31 26 .544 12 1/2
Detroit 23 35 .397 21
Cleveland 23 36 .390 21 1/2
Milwaukee 11 45 .196 32
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 41 16 .719 —
Houston 39 18 .684 2
Dallas 36 23 .610 6
Memphis 32 24 .571 8 1/2
New Orleans 23 34 .404 18
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 43 15 .741 —
Portland 40 18 .690 3
Minnesota 28 29 .491 14 1/2
Denver 25 31 .446 17
Utah 21 36 .368 21 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 39 20 .661 —
Golden State 35 23 .603 3 1/2
Phoenix 33 24 .579 5
Sacramento 20 37 .351 18
L.A. Lakers 19 39 .328 19 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Wednesday’s Games
Orlando 101, Philadelphia 90
Boston 115, Atlanta 104
Chicago 103, Golden State 83
Dallas 108, New Orleans 89
Cleveland 114, Oklahoma City 104
Memphis 108, L.A. Lakers 103
San Antonio 120, Detroit 110
NBA GLANCE
Boys’ basketball
Wednesday
DivisionV
No. 9 Summit Prep (11-9) at No. 8 Crystal Springs
(6-17), 7 p.m.
Thursday
Division II
No.11 Westmoor (10-14) at No.6 Santa Clara (18-6),
7 p.m.
DivisionIII
El Camino (9-15) at No. 8 Hillsdale (12-12), 7 p.m.
No.12 SanMateo (8-15) at No.5 Valley Christian (6-
19), 7 p.m.
No. 10 SouthCity (12-11) at No. 7 Gunderson (16-
11), 7:30 p.m.
No.11 Terra Nova (12-12) at No.6 Monterey (14-10),
7 p.m.
DivisionIV
No. 12 Gonzales (13-12) at No. 5 Menlo School (11-
13), 7 p.m.
Friday
OpenDivision
No. 6 Leigh (23-2) vs. No. 3 Serra (19-7), 7:30 p.m. at
Santa Clara High
No.7Riordan(16-9) vs.No.2Burlingame(23-3),5:30
p.m. at Santa Clara High
No. 5 Sacred Heart Cathedral (17-10) vs. No. 4 Half
Moon Bay (23-3), 5:30 p.m. at Piedmont High
Saturday
DivisionI
TBD vs. No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (16-8), at Piedmont
Hills High,TBA
DivisionIII
TBD vs.No.3 Aragon (17-9),at Foothill College,TBA
TBD vs. No. 1 Mills (21-6), at Foothill College,TBA
DivisionIV
Pacific Grove/King’s Academy winner vs. No. 1 Sa-
cred Heart Prep (17-7), at Kaiser Arena, Santa Cruz,
TBA
DivisionV
TBD at No. 4 Alma Heights (20-6),TBA
Girls’ basketball
Tuesday
DivisionII
Lincoln (12-11) at No. 10 Aragon (9-15), 7 p.m.
DivisionIII
Live Oak (15-9) at No. 11 Capuchino (16-8), 7 p.m.
Soledad (16-8) at No. 10 Hillsdale (16-8), 7 p.m.
Gilroy (16-8) at No. 12 Burlingame (9-15), 7 p.m.
James Lick (9-11) at No. 9 Mills (16-9), 7 p.m.
DivisionIV
Santa Catalina (11-8) at No. 10 Half Moon Bay (11-
14), 7 p.m.
Thursday
DivisionI
No. 10 Silver Creek (20-6) at No. 7 Menlo-Atherton
(16-9), 7 p.m.
No.12Independence(12-12) at No.5Carlmont (23-
3), 7 p.m.
DivisionII
No. 10 Aragon (10-15) at No. 7 Pioneer (10-12), 7
p.m.
DivisionIII
No. 11 Capuchino (17-8) at No. 6 Santa Cruz (14-
12), 7 p.m.
No. 10 Hillsdale (17-8) at No. 7 Gunderson (13-11),
5:30 p.m.
No. 12 Burlingame (10-15) at No. 5 Notre Dame-SJ
(12-13), 7 p.m.
No. Mills (18-9) at No. 8 Terra Nova (10-16), 7 p.m.
DivisionIV
No. 10 Half MoonBay (12-14) at No. 7 Monte Vista
Christian (17-6), 7 p.m.
Harker (11-14) vs. No. 8 Mercy-Burlingame (9-13),
7 p.m. at College of San Mateo
Saturday
DivisionII
TBD vs.No.3 Westmoor (21-6),at Christopher High,
TBA
DivisionIII
TBD vs. No. 4 South City (17-9), at Mills,TBA
DivisionIV
TBD vs. No. 3 Sacred Heart Prep (13-12), at Notre
Dame-Belmont,TBA
TBD vs.No.2 Menlo School (15-11),at Notre Dame-
Belmont,TBA
TBD at No. 1 Notre Dame-Belmont (9-16),TBA
DivisionV
No. 5 Summit Prep (12-5) vs. No. 4 Alma Heights
Christian (14-10), at Santa Teresa High,TBA
CCS BASKETBALL PAIRINGS
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Tied at 0-0 after 90 minutes of
soccer, the Carlmont girls’ soccer
team used five penalty kicks to
come away with a victory in the
opening round game against
Salinas.
The Scots came away with a 5-4.
Carlmont’s Peninsula Athletic
League sisters, Menlo-Atherton,
fell in their opening game to Santa
Teresa by a goal, 3-2.
PAL Bay Division champion
Woodside showed absolutely no
mercy in its opening round bout.
The Wildcats took it to Overfelt
High School and did not let up, fin-
ishing with a 9-0 win.
Woodside led 5-0 at half time.
Over in boys’ soccer, Sequoia
fell to Homestead 1-1, 5-3 in
penalty kicks.
Nathan Rosental was the hero
for Carlmont in its opening round
game against San Benito.
After 103 minutes of soccer,
Rosental scored the game-winning
and the Scots eliminated San
Benito 2-1 in double overtime.
South San Francisco was
blanked in its opening round game
against Willow Glen.
South City lost 2-0.
Gilroy High School also elimi-
nated a PAL team. The Wildcats
were eliminated 2-1 in double
overtime.
Dramatic PK win
for Carlmont in CCS
Cal loses 87-59 in
rematch against Arizona
TUCSON, Ariz. — California
knew Arizona would be angry after
what the Bears did to the Wildcats
in Berkeley.
They were and once the third-
ranked Wildcats got rolling, Cal
had no way of stopping them.
Arizona took control with a big
first-half run and never gave Cal a
chance for a last-second victory in
the rematch, sending the Bears to
an 87-59 loss Wednesday night.
“They were solid and a little
angry having lost to us,” Cal
coach Mike Montgomery said.
“They’re making shots now and at
our place they weren’t making all
their shots. They’re playing really
well right now. ”
Cal won the first meeting 60-58
on a last-second jumper by Justin
Cobbs that sent the students pour-
ing onto the court.
Sports Brief
16
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Bonilla said. “We need to see some kind of
public benefit that’s lasting and sustaining
and that’s going to do something positive
for our park and do something positive for
downtown.”
Planning Commission Chair Christopher
Massey supports the concept of a residen-
tial development on the site, if done right.
“It would provide housing in an ideal
location for housing. It fits into the city’s
plans and projections for a more transit-ori-
ented future,” Massey said. “I’m very skep-
tical of the 75 foot height … the issue of the
additional 20 feet in height is within the
discretion of the city. We’re going to be
very focused on that issue as we go forward
and we’re going to need studies to help us
make that decision.”
Since submitting its pre-application sev-
eral months ago, Essex has already begun to
make revisions in response to feedback,
John Eudy, executive vice president of
development for Essex Property Trust, said
Wednesday. However, it could only show
the original design so as to remain consis-
tent during the study sessions and communi-
ty meetings. It will be able to introduce its
new plans as the formal application process
begins, Eudy said.
Now that the pre-application hearing
process is complete, Eudy said Essex will
begin to work with city staff and brainstorm
how to address concerns before drafting a
formal application. The final application
will undergo multiple studies and be chan-
neled back through the Parks and Recreation
and Planning commissions before reaching
the City Council.
“We’re just assembling data so we can
respond accordingly to make sure we address
the concerns everyone has. And obviously
any time you’re developing anything, you
are affecting the neighborhood and it’s our
job to mitigate their concerns,” Eudy said.
Parking
The current proposal is to turn the 1.2-
acre site into 117 one- and two-bedroom
luxury apartments with market based rates
expected to range from $2,000 to $3,000
per month and 3,500 square feet of retail
space. Approximately half of the site would
be turned into a 260-space parking lot, 95
of which would be publicly accessible,
spread between three levels with one under-
ground.
Based on the proposal’s rough draft, after
replacing the public parking spaces, there
would only be 165 spaces for residents and
their visitors. Ideally, new residents would
be amenable to public transportation,
Massey said, but he doubts 260 parking
spaces would be sufficient for a building of
this size.
“Clearly the amount of parking that’s
being provided here is thin. You’re talking
about slightly more than one parking space
per unit,” Massey said.
Some of the ideas from the commission
included real-time parking signs to indicate
available space, moving the proposed
entrance from Fifth Avenue near El Camino
Real to San Mateo Drive to relieve conges-
tion, increasing the width of the sidewalk
and creating safer street crossings — includ-
ing a more inviting one from Fourth Avenue
and improvements from the site to Central
Park.
Neighbors of the project, including the
Gramercy on the Park Homeowners
Association, have already expressed con-
cerns — specifically when it comes to park-
ing, traffic and the impact on Central Park.
About a dozen members of the public
spoke Tuesday and primarily acknowledged
the need for more housing but questioned
the appropriateness of the development’s
proposed size and the potential increase in
traffic and loss of parking.
Housing need
The county is in need of housing for all
income levels, said Rhovy Lyn Antonio,
spokeswoman for the California Apartment
Association.
But community members question if the
10 percent required by Measure P is enough
and what the affordable units will actually
cost. Bertha Sanchez, co-president of the
Home Association of North Central San
Mateo, worries the units won’t be reason-
ably priced
“We do have the need for more housing,
that’s true. But I’m not sure if it’s going to
be for a moderate income,” Sanchez said.
Essex will contribute 12 affordable hous-
ing units to the very low-income category,
Eudy said.
He said he appreciates some of the pub-
lic’s suggestions for satisfying Measure P
requirements but, the City Council will
make the ultimate determination, Eudy said,
adding he would like a council study session
on the public benefit aspect of the project.
Science academies
explain global warming reality
WASHINGTON — Man-made global
warming is worsening and will disrupt both
the natural world and human society, warns a
joint report of two of the world’s leading
scientific organizations.
The U.S. National Academy of Sciences
and the Royal Society, which is the nation-
al scientific academy of the United
Kingdom, are releasing an unusual plain
language report on climate change that
addressed 20 issues in a question-and-
answer format.
“People do have persistent questions all
about climate change,” said study author
Ben Santer of the Lawrence Livermore
National Lab in California. “This is a one-
stop shop for many of those questions.”
The report, released on Thursday, address-
es new issues such as the recent slowing in
the increase of world temperatures and how
heat-trapping gases are connected to
extreme weather. Increases in extreme
weather, melting glaciers, rising seas and
oceans getting more acidic are already hap-
pening, the 36-page report said.
And those changes “are expected to
increase greater warming and will threaten
food production, freshwater supplies,
coastal infrastructure and especially the
welfare of the huge population currently liv-
ing in low-lying areas,” the report said.
Continued from page 1
ESSEX
graders, the rest are ninth-graders and there
are two full-time teachers.
“We planned to be here for a year and
there’s been a big effort to find a suitable
space for the school, so we can grow,” said
Executive Director Rachel Wylde.
Wylde has been a school principal for 20
years and spent a year and a half on research
and development of the school. She added
the new space provides the right amount of
space and light to provide a warm and wel-
coming home for our students. The new
building will be used to house classrooms,
as well as rooms for special programs, such
as the six classes in the Compass Essential
Skills Program taught by specialists. The
school has a few offices it will be subletting
to education professionals since there will
be extra space in the building.
Wylde is no stranger to working at
schools focused on catering to students with
learning differences — this is her fourth.
She is modeling Compass after Oakland’s
Bay Hill High School, which she founded in
2007. That school now has 80 students.
While in the initial startup phase — which
will be completed in the next three years —
Compass wants to grow to 40 students.
After that, staff would like to have between
50 and 100 students, depending on the need
for its services.
“We focus on the most essential content,”
Wylde said. “Students can go at their own
pace. People who chose this school want a
more balanced life. We focus on social
skills, organization and deconstructing the
one-size-fits-all model.”
Students are on a block schedule, taking
three 90-minute classes a day. Wylde said
the new building will allow the school to
add science labs and art classes for the stu-
dents. The Elks Club, located next to the
new San Mateo location, may be used for
physical education classes. Students at the
school currently do yoga, fencing, dancing,
outdoor cardio, trampoline jumping and
other exercises as part of the physical edu-
cation program.
“We have seen a huge amount of interest
in Compass since we opened the doors in
August 2013,” Kim Garlinghouse, chair of
the school’s Board of Trustees, said in a
statement. “We view leasing this building
as just one more way to better serve our
community and prepare our students for col-
lege or vocational programs. Our new facil-
ity is centrally located on the Peninsula and
close to public transportation so it can ben-
efit students from San Jose to San
Francisco.”
Funding is something the administration
is working on and as a nonprofit that means
it can’t receive venture capital funding.
Wylde’s dream is to find an angel donator.
The school does have several grants and has
raised about $500,000. With tuition at
$32,000 per year, the administration is
applying to get certified as a nonpublic
school by the California Department of
Education so students can get placed at the
school. Tuition would be paid for the stu-
dents by the public school. Some students
do currently receive financial aid.
“All the schools I’ve worked with in the
past have had this,” Wylde said.
What’s the most rewarding thing for
Wylde about her job?
“The students,” she said. “Each of them
has these hidden strengths and talents. I
like the planning/startup too; it’s creative
work to run a startup/school.”
Students who are a good fit for the school
are often eager to learn and innocent in
some way, Wylde said.
“We want to continue that really positive
culture,” she said.
The school is doing year-round enroll-
ment and the school welcomes those inter-
ested in the Compass to contact the admin-
istration. For more information on
Compass High School go to com-
passhigh.org.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
Around the nation
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The clients came to interior
designer Laura Casey with a space
dilemma: They did not want to
give up the guest room in their
suburban home, yet they needed a
place for their child to play.
Casey came up with a solution
often used in small urban apart-
ments: a Murphy bed. It takes up
less space than a sofa sleeper or
futon and — unlike many of those
— uses a standard mattress, so
guests, including elderly grand-
parents, have a more comfortable
stay.
“They did not want to compro-
mise the quality of the mattress,”
said Casey, owner of Laura Casey
Interiors in Charlotte, N.C.
The Murphy bed — which tucks
into cabinetry when not in use —
is enjoying new popularity as a
stylish space-saver in many kinds
of homes, not just studio apart-
ments.
“It’s an interesting trend,” said
Chris Fahy, vice president of The
Bedder Way Co. in Indianapolis,
which makes Murphy beds and has
seen sales rise in recent years. He
says many customers are Baby
Boomers, empty nesters, and
other homeowners who want to
turn a bedroom into a hobby room
or exercise room but still need a
place for grown children, grand-
children or other guests to sleep.
Fahy’s Murphy beds range in
price from $1,300 to $3,100.
California Closets, which also
makes custom wall beds, has seen
the same upward trend, said Ginny
Snook Scott, vice president for
sales and marketing. Customers
still buy Murphy beds for studio
apartments and vacation homes,
she said, but many others are
looking to get more use out of an
extra room.
The company designs vertical
and horizontal Murphy beds,
often incorporating them into
cabinetry units for home offices or
craft rooms. Prices range from
$3,000 for a simple wall bed and
desk to $20,000 for a custom proj-
ect with extensive cabinetry.
Support pieces vary by manufac-
turer, but generally the mattress is
encased in a frame that pulls out
from a cabinet adhered to the wall.
Today’s improved mechanism for
lowering and raising the bed
makes the process an easy job for
one person, Fahy said.
The bed Casey designed for her
client does not include a piston or
spring mechanism, which most
manufacturers use to lower the bed
onto the floor.
“It just slowly drops down,” she
said.
Her design, which she had a car-
penter build, does not look like
cabinetry. The bed is incased in a
faux wall. When not in use, the
bed looks like a couch with a shelf
over it. In order to reveal the bed,
the homeowner removes the couch
cushions and pulls on the shelf,
which causes the faux wall to drop
to the floor. The wall is really a
platform for the queen-size mat-
tress. The shelf becomes the sup-
port for the foot of the bed.
It was the first time Casey ever
recommended a Murphy bed to a
client. She wrote about the project
on her design blog, at www.laura-
Murphy beds make a multipurpose room a guest room
A Murphy bed takes up less space than a sofa sleeper or futon and — unlike many of those — uses a standard
mattress, so guests, including elderly grandparents, have a more comfortable stay.
See MURPHY Page 18
18
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
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caseyinteriors.com , and the post drew
inquiries from around the country, she
said. She’s not the only one to think of a
new twist on the Murphy bed. Some manu-
facturers also have designed beds that, like
hers, are hidden in a faux wall rather than a
traditional cabinet. Resource Furniture in
New York sells a wall bed that flips down
over the top of a couch attached to a fake
wall, said interior designer Nicole
Sassman of Century City, Calif.
“The whole bed comes down over the
couch, and it’s a proper bed,” she said. “It’s
pretty amazing.”
Sassman recently designed a room that
she and the client nicknamed the “jack-
knife room” because it served so many
purposes, including guest room, meeting
room and home office.
It included a Murphy bed; they’re just
more versatile and comfortable than sofa
beds, she said.
“People are far more design-savvy, and
they need multipurpose rooms,” Sassman
said. “There are so many reasons why the
Murphy bed works in so many places.”
Continued from page 17
MURPHY
By Carrie Antlfinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MADISON, Wis. — While tiny houses
have been attractive for those wanting to
downsize or simplify their lives for financial
or environmental reasons, there’s another
population benefiting from the small-
dwelling movement: the homeless.
There’s a growing effort across the nation
from advocates and religious groups to build
these compact buildings because they are
cheaper than a traditional large-scale shelter,
help the recipients socially because they are
built in communal settings and are environ-
mentally friendly due to their size.
“You’re out of the elements, you’ve got
your own bed, you’ve got your own place to
call your own,” said Harold “Hap” Morgan,
who is without a permanent home in
Madison. “It gives you a little bit of self-
pride: This is my own house.”
He’s in line for a 99-square-foot house
built through the nonprofit Occupy Madison
Build, or OM Build, run by former organizers
with the Occupy movement. The group
hopes to create a cluster of tiny houses like
those in Olympia, Wash., and Eugene and
Portland, Ore.
Many have been built with donated materi-
als and volunteer labor, sometimes from the
people who will live in them. Most require
residents to behave appropriately, avoid
drugs and alcohol and help maintain the
properties.
Still, sometimes neighbors have not been
receptive. Linda Brown, who can see the pro-
posed site for Madison’s tiny houses from
her living room window, said she worries
about noise and what her neighbors would be
like.
“There have been people who have always
been associated with people who are home-
less that are unsavory types of people,” she
said.
Organizer Brenda Konkel hopes to allay
neighbors’ concerns by the time the City
Council votes in May on the group’s appli-
cation to rezone the site of a former auto
body shop to place the houses there. Plans
include gardens, a chicken coop and possi-
bly bee hives and showers and bathrooms in
the main building.
“I think a lot of them we can work through.
I think there is some ways we can be a real
asset to the neighborhood,” she said.
The group has already built one house
that’s occupied by a couple and parked on the
street. Avolunteer moves it every 24 or 48
hours as required by city ordinances.
The house, which cost about $5,000, fits a
double bed with overhead storage, a small
table and a small room with a compostable
toilet.
Tiny houses help address nation’s homeless problem
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Garden centers, with their vast collec-
tions of plant colors, sizes and shapes, can
be intimidating to inexperienced buyers.
But you can become a discerning purchaser
with a little homework and by quizzing the
sales people as you shop.
“Usually, when shopping, I go early
before the crowds and also before the staff
are worn out,” said Jack McKinnon, a garden
coach from the San Francisco Bay Area. “I
like asking questions like, ‘What are you
getting in next?’ ‘What is new?’ and ‘What
is the most popular now?’ If it is early (in
the season), you may learn a lot that puts
you ahead of the masses in designs and
trends.”
The most important factor in plant shop-
ping, however, is the health of the plant,
McKinnon said.
“As one nurseryman I trust says: ‘Don’t
accept ugly plants.’ And he doesn’t give
refunds.”
How can you tell if a plant is diseased,
pest-ridden or beyond its prime?
“Look for any unusual brown, black or
gray spotting on the foliage,” said
Rizanino Reyes, a landscape designer and
owner of RHR Horticulture in Shoreline,
Wash., a Seattle suburb.
“Any dead sections that are beyond just
grooming to make it look good should be
avoided,” he said. Also avoid plants “that
may be unusually red or sickly yellow look-
ing.”
It’s a good idea to check plant roots at the
nursery. It’s risky to buy plants that are
root-bound, too wet or too dry, although
that may mean removing them from the pot
to examine them.
“If you politely ask a garden center staff
member, any reputable retail center should
stand by their product and allow you to do it,
or they may do it for you,” Reyes said.
Other plant-buying-like-a-pro tips:
• Shop by price and shop the sales. Find out
when new plants are usually delivered and dis-
played. “Try to have a relationship with the
nursery owner or staff,” McKinnon said.
• Bare-root, container grown, or balled and
burlapped? “Bare-root plats have not had a
chance to get root-bound in a pot, and you
can see what you’re buying,” McKinnon
said. “Both are definite advantages.”
• Work from a plan. “I recommend having a
general list so you avoid too many impulse
buys on plants that may not end up getting
planted or worse, get forgotten,” Reyes said.
• Annuals vs. perennials: “Perennials come
back and can look great the year-’round,”
Reyes said. “Annuals provide traffic-stop-
ping impact and remarkable color. You save
and have the most incredible garden by inte-
grating both.”
• Buying tropicals and houseplants: “Take
care in transporting these from the store to
your vehicle as some may be very sensitive
to the cold,” Reyes said. “Plant them right
away or keep them cool but not frozen. Keep
them watered and moist.”
• Choosing bulbs, corms, tubers and rhi-
zomes: “Look for plump, firm bulbs,” Reyes
said. “Usually, the bigger the better. Hardy
bulbs like lilies are ready to plant as soon as
possible. For dahlias and other tender
bulbs, wait until after frost to plant or pot
them up and start indoors.”
Fast route to successful gardening? Buy smart
“Usually, when shopping,
I go early before the crowds and
also before the staff are worn
out. ... I like asking questions like,
‘What are you getting in next?’
‘What is new?’ and ‘What is the
most popular now?’ ”
—Jack McKinnon, a garden
coach from the San Francisco Bay Area
It’s a good idea to check plant roots at the nursery.It’s risky to buy plants that are root-bound,
too wet or too dry, although that may mean removing them from the pot to examine them.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, FEB. 27
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: God
and Gays — An Hour of Civil
Conversation. 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information contact Angelina
Ortiz at angelina@bethany-mp.org
or call 854-5897.
Cardio Kick-Start with Rip, the
San Mateo Firefighters and
Equinox. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Whole
Foods Market, 1010 Park Place, San
Mateo. For more information con-
tact hsu-
lien.rivera@wholefoods.com.
Transportation: The First Mile —
Indicators Launch and Lunch.
Noon to 1:30 p.m. SamTrans
Auditorium, 1250 San Carlos Ave.,
San Carlos. Learn about the latest
trends impacting the county includ-
ing population, job growth, com-
mute patterns and traffic conges-
tion. Free admission and lunch.
Space is limited and participants
must RSVP at
indicators2014.bpt.me.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 per-
cent your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals.
For more information call 342-7755.
Movies for school-age children:
‘Monsters University.’ 3:30 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Rated G. 95 min-
utes. Free. For more information call
522-7838.
Presentation by Dr. Dana Girard:
‘Understanding the Behavior of
Hoarding.’ 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Belmont Hills Memory Care
Community, 1301 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Please RSVP by Feb. 26 to
belmonthills@silveradocare.com or
call 654-9700. Appetizers will be
served from 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. and
the presentation will begin at 6 p.m.
North Star Academy presents
‘Fiddler on the Roof Jr.’ 7 p.m.
McKinley Auditorium, 400 Duane
St., Redwood City. $8 to $14. For tick-
ets go to www.northstartix.com.
‘War Horse.’ 7 p.m. Cinemark, 1901
Junipero Serra Blvd., Daly City; 825
Middlefield Road, Redwood City;
1188 El Camino Real, San Bruno; 320
Second Ave., San Mateo. Pre-record-
ed live from London’s famed West
End. For more information call (303)
792-8763.
FRIDAY, FEB. 28
Spirituality and Veterans. 7:30
a.m. Crystal Springs Golf Course,
6650 Golf Course Drive, Burlingame.
Speaker: Rev. Chaplain Virginia
Jackson, D. Min., BCC. $15 includes
breakfast. For more information and
to RSVP call Jake at 515-5891.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Receive 50 per-
cent your admission. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals.
For more information call 342-7755.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage
Lane, Twin Pines Park, Belmont.
Proceeds benefit the Belmont
Library. For more information call
593-5650.
Kingston Cafe Second
Anniversary Celebration. 5 p.m. to
9 p.m. Kingston Cafe, 19 N. Kingston
St., San Mateo. Live music featuring
local artists Heather Scarlett Rose
and Ronin Rock & Blues. For more
information go to www.kingston-
cafesanmateo.com or call 477-2276.
Billy Manzik and Seconds on End
at Devil’s Canyon. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
935 Washington St., San Carlos.
Admission is free. Doors open at 4
p.m. For more information call 592-
BREW or go to
www.DevilsCanyon.com.
Cheer and Dance Exhibition
Show. 6 p.m. Sequoia High School
Gym No. 1, 1201 Brewster Ave.,
Redwood City. $10 for adults and $7
for students. For more information
call 593-6269.
North Star Academy presents
‘Fiddler on the Roof Jr.’ 7 p.m.
McKinley Auditorium, 400 Duane
St., Redwood City. $8 to $14. For tick-
ets go to www.northstartix.com.
Many Dances. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
$5. For more information call 747-
0264.
‘Little Women.’ 7:30 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University Theatre,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. $25
general, $15 students/seniors. For
more information go to
www.brownpapertickets.com.
Amy Obenski and Artemesia
Black with Kenny Schick. 8 p.m.
Red Rock, 201 Castro St., Mountain
View. This concert will feature
acoustic lyric moody folk-rock. Free
and for all ages. For more informa-
tion call 967-4473 or go to
www.amyobenski.com.
SATURDAY, MARCH 1
HP CodeWars Silicon Valley 2014.
8 a.m. to noon. HP Labs, 1501 Page
Mill Road, Palo Alto. The competition
is open to all high school students,
public or private. Pizza and caffeine
will be provided. For more informa-
tion on HP CodeWars, go to
www.hpcodewars.org. CodeWars
Silicon Valley specific information
will be posted at https://www.face-
book. com/pages/HP-Codewars-
Silicon-Valley/181236968717027.
Mushroom Walk at Filoli. 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. $15 for adult members,
$20 for adult non-members. $5 or
child members, $10 for non-mem-
ber children. For more information
go to www.filoli.org.
Canyon wildflower hike. 10 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. 44 Visitacion Ave., Suite
206, Brisbane. Bring water and a
snack or lunch. Dress for varied
weather. Hike led at a leisurely pace
with time for discussion. For more
information contact
sanbruno@mountainwatch.org.
‘Asian Fusion’ Collection Opening
Day. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Portola Art
Gallery at Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor
Road, Menlo Park. This collection by
Linda Salter runs through March 31.
Portola Art Gallery is open 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday to Saturday. For
more information visit www.porto-
laartgallery.com.
Bountiful Blueberries Class at
Common Ground. 10:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Common Ground Garden
Supply and Education Center, 559
College Ave., Palo Alto. For more
information go to www.common-
groundinpaloalto.org.
Eth-Noh-Tec Kinetic Story
Theater. 11 a.m. Menlo Park City
Council Chambers, 701 Laurel St.,
Menlo Park. Stories from across Asia
come alive through music, dance
and spoken word. For more informa-
tion call 330-2512.
E2 Fitness and Breakfast:
Ultimate Workout with Stella
Sandoval. 11 a.m. Whole Foods
Market, 1010 Park Place, San Mateo.
For more information contact hsu-
lien.rivera@wholefoods.com.
Fault Zone Literary Reading. 2
p.m. Reach and Teach, 144 W. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. Come hear local
authors read their work. Ten authors
will read from the anthology ‘Fault
Zone: Shift,’ the latest in the annual
series published by California
Writers Club, Peninsula Branch. Free
and open to public. For more infor-
mation call 759-3784.
‘The Sound of Music’ by the
Peninsula Youth Theatre. 2 p.m.
Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Tickets are $20. To
purchase tickets call 903-6000 or go
to www.pytnet.org.
The San Bruno Lions Club Crab
Feast and Dance. 5:30 p.m. to mid-
night. San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Dancing to the live music of West
Bay Rhythm. $55 per person. For
more information call 952-4021.
Carl Tilchen and Cryin’ Shame
with Stacey Erdman and Dan
Newitt. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Lutticken’s
Restaurant, 3535 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Menlo Park.
North Star Academy presents
‘Fiddler on the Roof Jr.’ 7 p.m.
McKinley Auditorium, 400 Duane
St., Redwood City. A Tony award win-
ning musical musical set in 1905
Tzarist Russia about a Jewish father
who tries to maintain traditions and
culture amidst political turmoil and
unrest. $8 to $14. For tickets go to
www.northstartix.com.
The Gotham City Black & White
Ball. 7 p.m. San Mateo Masonic
Lodge, 100 N. Ellsworth Ave., San
Mateo. $15. For more information
call (510) 522-1731.
‘The Sound of Music’ by the
Peninsula Youth Theatre. 7:30 p.m.
Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Tickets are $20. To
purchase tickets call 903-6000 or go
to www.pytnet.org.
‘Little Women.’ 7:30 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University Theatre,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. $25
general, $15 students/seniors. For
more information go to
www.brownpapertickets.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
campus and was negligent in hiring
and entrusting Dini and two student
hosts to protect Ballow during his
visit.
NDNU cannot comment on pending
legal matters, however, Dini no
longer works at the university, said
Richard Rossi, spokesman for
NDNU.
After being picked up at the airport
by Dini, Ballow claims he was escort-
ed to the school’s cafeteria where he
met members of the lacrosse team and
was taken on a tour of the campus by
NDNU appointed hosts.
Visitors of NDNU are always escort-
ed while on tours and rarely stay
overnight, Rossi said.
Later in the day, he attended a three-
hour lacrosse practice and then visited
a dorm room where several students
were playing beer pong, according to
the lawsuit.
While at the party, Ballow claims
he was intimidated into playing and
drinking beer with whiskey chasers,
according to the lawsuit. About an
hour later, his two hosts took him to
a larger party at another dorm. At the
behest of his hosts, Ballow said he
drank four or five mixed rum drinks
within half an hour. He was then taken
to a nearby parking lot on the NDNU
campus and was given more alcohol,
according to the lawsuit.
According to the lawsuit, Ballow
doesn’t remember anything else until
he awoke at a hospital the following
morning.
After resting in a dorm room, he met
with Dini and the assistant lacrosse
coach who asked what happened and
profusely apologized for what hap-
pened, according to the lawsuit.
Because of the night, Ballow
alleges he was forced to attend a dif-
ferent school without a scholarship
and has consequentially had to pay for
tuition, books, food, room and board
and the hospital bills he incurred.
Underage drinking is prohibited on
NDNU campus and the school will
retain legal counsel to respond to the
lawsuit, Rossi said.
Continued from page 1
NDNU
ing in San Mateo County Superior
Court that combined two separate
cases that occurred months apart,
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said.
Two prosecutorial witnesses, the ex-
girlfriend and the alleged victim testi-
fied in the hearing in front of Judge
Cliff Cretan.
Prosecutors said that on Aug. 17,
Smith, who was on duty and in uni-
form, drove his patrol car through
Redwood City searching for his ex-
girlfriend at local bars. When he locat-
ed her outside a bar with another former
boyfriend, he allegedly sent her sever-
al texts demanding information about
the relationship between the couple.
When Smith got off duty at 7 a.m.
the following morning, he reportedly
drove straight to the ex-girlfriend’s
home, where the former boyfriend had
stayed the night, and demanded entry
into the home. Prosecutors said he
threatened to kick down the door and
pushed his way through in search of
the victim, who was hiding in a bath-
room.
Smith then severely assaulted the
victim, breaking his eye socket and
nose, prosecutors said.
While out on $50,000 bail in the
assault case, Smith was then arrested
on Dec. 4 for disregarding a no-contact
court order with the ex-girlfriend.
In the December case, Wagstaffe said
Smith knocked on the driver’s side
window of the car the woman was seat-
ed in and allegedly called her names
and threatened her, resulting in a
felony charge of attempting to dis-
suade a witness from testifying.
In the two combined cases, Smith is
facing four felony charges, including
felony residential burglary, felony
assault with a deadly weapon with an
enhancement of great bodily injury,
assault with serious bodily injury and
felony attempting to dissuade a wit-
ness.
Smith will return to court on March
12 for formal arraignment and the two
cases will be consolidated, Wagstaffe
said. Smith remains out of custody on
$150,000 bail.
Continued from page 1
SMITH
By Curt Anderson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Justin Bieber walks
unsteadily and even appears to stumble
while performing a sobriety test short-
ly after his January arrest on driving
under the influence and other charges,
according to police video released
Wednesday.
Only a few moments depict Bieber in
the roughly 10 hours of video released
by Miami-Dade County prosecutors
following public records requests from
the Associated Press and other news
organizations.
The videos were recorded at the
Miami Beach Police Department short-
ly after Bieber and R&B singer Khalil
Amir Sharieff were arrested during what
officers said was an illegal street drag
race in exotic sports cars. They were
not charged with drag racing, however.
In one clip,
Bieber — dressed in
a dark hoodie with
the hood over his
head, dark baggy
shorts and bright red
shoes — wavers as
he tries to walk care-
fully and slowly
heel to toe. He
stumbles slightly as
he turns and appears to have his arms
out for balance. In a second try he
stumbles again, even reaching out to a
wall for support, and has an animated
face-to-face conversation with a police
officer in which both point fingers at
each other.
There are only brief glimpses of
the pop singer’s face and no close-
ups in the medium-quality video,
which also included no time codes
to determine how long he underwent
the sobriety tests.
Other brief clips show Bieber being
walked through various parts of the
police station, and one previously
released video depicted the 19-year-old
singer being patted down by an officer.
None of the videos have any sound.
Bieber and Sharieff are both shown
sitting on the floor of a holding cell,
then getting up one by one, turning
around and being handcuffed behind
their backs. Bieber is again wearing
his dark hoodie, and in another clip as
he is led out of the police station in
handcuffs he ducks down low to avoid
showing his face.
Sharieff is depicted in other seg-
ments, also wearing bright red shoes
while he sits quietly in a chair and
watches Bieber undergo the sobriety
test. At one point the two appear to be
talking and Sharieff raises a clenched
fist .
Justin Bieber jail video
shows unsteady walking
Justin Bieber
COMICS/GAMES
2-27-14
WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Water chute
6 Hobby knife (hyph.)
11 Enthusiastic
12 Wielded power
13 Manually (2 wds.)
15 Bwana’s trek
16 Almost
18 Beat the field
19 Last letter
21 — tai (rum drink)
22 Expresses grief
23 Snapshots, briefly
25 Fasten down a tent
28 Horses’ gaits
30 Bridal notice word
31 Even one
32 Coffee server
33 Merchandise ID
35 Squeegee
37 Tarzan’s son
38 Light in a tube
40 Verne captain
41 Chiang — -shek
42 Give it a go
43 “— Sera, Sera”
46 TV dinner
48 Powerless
50 Polynesian wrap
54 Sunlit courtyards
55 Jeered at
56 Theater sound system
57 Leaves out
DOWN
1 Groundhog mo.
2 Produce an egg
3 Yuck!
4 Stingiest
5 Type of eagle
6 Dental photo (hyph.)
7 — Wiedersehen
8 Dog nail
9 Garr of “Tootsie”
10 Norse deity
14 Clammy
15 Part of a loaf
17 Wet weather wear
19 Masked hero
20 Piano key wood
22 Pencil end
24 Replace a button
25 Gift wrap
26 Adversary
27 Pita sandwich
29 Heat source
34 Black tea
36 Temporary
39 Bites
43 Campus area
44 “Do — others...”
45 James — Jones
46 Stage production
47 Villain in Shakespeare
49 Overalls front
51 Geisha’s tie
52 After deductions
53 Mdse.
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2014
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Don’t let uncertainty
stop you from making necessary changes. Personal
growth requires you to take one step at a time. Once
you consider the pros and cons, you won’t be afraid
to move forward.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You will become
involved in an interesting new relationship. Unusual
rewards will come your way as a result of offering your
services to a worthy cause or deserving individual.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — By concentrating on
love and the fun things in life, you will feel good about
your future. Don’t let negative people drag you down.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Opportunities are
coming your way. Indecisiveness or hesitation will
end up being costly. Relentless pursuit of your goals
and keen concentration will enable you to achieve
the desired results.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You will make
substantial progress if you listen to advice given
to you. With the relevant information, you will
be able to take control of the situation and forge
ahead with confidence.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Money matters will weigh
heavily on your mind. Pay off outstanding debts and
remind others of what they owe you. You will be able
to relax once you have a clean slate.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — By making some
inexpensive and simple changes around the home,
you can reduce your stress and calm your nerves. A
comfortable and relaxing environment is essential to
your health and well-being.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Don’t feel as if life is
passing you by. Find an activity that motivates you to
participate. Being active will renew your energy and
help you rediscover your passion for living.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Someone may be
withholding information. Ask direct questions that will
reveal hidden secrets. Once that is determined, an
answer will be found that will satisfy everyone.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Attend meetings
or social gatherings conducive to learning valuable
information about something you aspire to. An expert
will provide you with a practical plan for advancement.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Positive changes
lie ahead. Discuss your future and your dreams
with your loved ones. Now is an opportune time
to seal contracts, close deals and finish up any
incomplete assignments.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You will be
overwhelmed by the tasks expected of you. Discipline
and courage will help you live up to your obligations.
Be proud of your accomplishments.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 200
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
IN-HOME
CARE Staffng
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
EXPERIENCED
HOUSE SITTER/
DOG SITTER NEEDED
We have inside dogs that need someone to be in
our house full time when we are out of town.
Requires overnight approximately 20 days a year
and day housesitting approximately 30 days a
year. Overnight and daily fees are negotiable but
need someone that does not have significant other
obligations as the timing of need is random ....
could be day, night or overnight for multiple days.
Please leave message
with experience on
(650) 477-2404
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
HOUSEKEEPERS
NEEDED
Full and Part-time;
3+ years Professional in home
experience required.
Duties: cleaning, laundry, errands
and backup childcare.
$25/hr
www.tandcr.com
415-567-0956
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
SAN MATEO COUNTY
The San Mateo County Public Authority seeks qualified organi-
zations interested in providing In-Home Supportive Services for
the period of July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2017.
Proposal packages are available now on the San Mateo Coun-
ty Health System website: www.smhealth.org\AAS
A Proposers’ Workshop will be held Friday, March 14, 2014 at
10:00 a.m., in Room 100 at 225 37th Avenue, San Mateo.
Prospective proposers may raise questions regarding the serv-
ices to be contracted and the proposal procedure.
A mailed hard copy of the proposal packet may also be re-
quested by e-mailing:
AAS_RFP@co.sanmateo.ca.us
Proposals will be due no later 4:00 p.m., March 28, 2014.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
107 Musical Instruction
HAVE YOU ALWAYS
WANTED TO PLAY
THE HARP?
Private lessons in your home or
at San Mateo Studio.
Rentals available.
www.ericamesser.com
(415)786-9143
110 Employment
AUTHENTIC THAI CHEFS WANTED
A new Thai restaurant in Half Moon Bay,
open May 2014, requires 2 authentic
Thai chefs.
Please send resume to
spicemehmb@outlook.com
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff (easy job)
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRIVER WANTED Northern Peninsula,
Your car or mine (650)868-2334
after 7pm
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed per Month. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
RESTAURANTS -
Managers, Servers, Bussers, Bartend-
ers, wanted. New Downtown San Mateo
Restaurant, Call (650)340-7684
110 Employment
HOTEL -
NOW HIRING
Breakfast Attendant
Housekeeper
Apply in person:
Best Western,
2940 S. Norfolk St.,
San Mateo
Or call 650-341-3300
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SOFTWARE - Sr. Software Engr in Mtn
View, CA- Design/Devlp software systm
test envrnmts to test enterprise
scale ntwking gear. Req incl BS+5yrs
exp, incl routing & dep protocols, Layer2
ntwking, Border Gateway protocol,
OSPF.Mail resume to Cumulus Net-
works, Inc. Attn: HR, 185 E. Dana St.,
Mountain View, CA 94041
23 Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
SEQUOIA HEALTHCARE DISTRICT
Notice Invitation to Bid for Project
Sequoia Healthcare District hereby notifies interested parties of a tenant im-
provement project including design built MEP of approximately 800 square
feet of classroom/office space at its building located at 525 Veterans Boule-
vard in Redwood city, California.
Interested parties (General Contractors only) may pick up bidding materials
including instructions and working drawings from the District’s offices on or af-
ter March 5. There will be a mandatory bidder’s conference and walk through
on Wednesday, March 12 at 11:00 AM. Please call Janeene Johnson at (650)
421-2155 x 201 or Lee Michelson (650) 421-2155 x 202 to arrange for an ap-
pointment to pick up materials. All bids must be submitted to the District Office
at 525 Veterans Blvd., Redwood City, CA 94063 to Janeene Johnson no later
than 4:00 PM on Thursday, March 20, 2014.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259283
The following person is doing business
as: The Traveling Dancer, 100 McLellan
Dr., #1077, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Shashonna Chiles, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Shashonna Chiles /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259466
The following person is doing business
as: Davis Associates - TIC, 800 S. Clare-
mont St., Ste 201, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: 1) Helen M. Raiser, Trustee
of JHR Marital Trust, 2256 Hyde St., San
Francisco, CA 94109, 2) Helen M. Rais-
er, Trustee of JHHR Bypass Trust, 2256
Hyde St., San Francisco, CA 94109, 3)
Harvey E. Chapman, Trustee H. Chap-
man Living Trust, 269 St. Andrew Dr.,
Napa, CA 94558, 4) Colleen C. Badell,
Trustee of C. Badell Living Trust, 269 St.
Andrew Dr., Napa, CA 94558. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Joint Venture.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on January 1,
2007.
/s/ Helen M. Raiser /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259513
The following person is doing business
as: Terrificuts, 289 El Camino Real Suite
B, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Lorna
Quiambao, 76 Cielito Dr, San Francisco
CA 94134. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 1/2/01
/s/ Liza Quiambao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/06/14, 02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259484
The following person is doing business
as: Aladdin Bail Bonds, 710 Winslow St.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Two
Jinn Inc., CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Herbert G. Mutter/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14, 03/06/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259478
The following person is doing business
as: Holly Beauty Salon, 160 San Mateo
Rd., Ste. A, HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Cindy Tran, 203 Avalon Dr.,
Pacifica, CA 94044. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/27/2014.
/s/ Cindy Tran/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14, 03/06/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259255
The following person is doing business
as: Beyond Limits Wellness, 1030 Curtis
St., Ste. 203, MENLO PARK, CA 94025
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Beyond Limits Trust, CA. The
business is conducted by a Trust. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Lewis Erwin Connor, Jr. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/16/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/13/14, 02/20/14, 02/27/14, 03/06/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259644
The following person is doing business
as: Storytree Studio, 12 Clarence Ct.,
EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Nicole
Moore, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Nicole Moore /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/14/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/14, 02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259636
The following person is doing business
as: Quality Toner Products, 436 Peninsu-
la, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Charles P. Belnick, 600 N. Claremont
St., #4, San Mateo, CA 94401. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Charles P. Belnick /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/14, 02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259249
The following person is doing business
as: Antiques & More, 1148 El Camino
Real, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Janice Myrick 3409 La Selva St., San
Mateo, CA 94403. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Janice Myrick /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/16/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/14, 02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259559
The following person is doing business
as: France@yours, 2275 Sharon Rd.,
Apt. 203, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Sophie Galtier, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Sophie Galtier /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/14, 02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259351
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Ultra Enterprises, 2) Dj Ajax 3)
Ajax Fitness, 4) Ultra Entertainment, 5)
Unfnbroken 6) War Gear MMA, 1745
Adrian Rd, unit 5, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Ajay Bulchandani, 37 Nusery
Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Ajay Bulchandani /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/14, 02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259777
The following person is doing business
as: Belmont Tattoo, 14855 El Camino
Real Ste. 203, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Karen VareLa, 525 Excelsior, San Frna-
cisco, CA 94112. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Karen VareLa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/25/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259492
The following person is doing business
as: San Francisco Tech, 150 15th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Garib Meh-
diyev, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Garib Mehdiyev /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259769
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pet Treasures, 2)
PetTreasures.com, 409 Park St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Teresa B.
Thompson and William Thompson, same
address. The business is conducted by
a Married Couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on Oct., 2002.
/s/ Teresa B. Thompson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/25/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259402
The following person is doing business
as:Zipotes Restaurant, 828 5th Ave,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063, is hereby
registered by the following owners: Gil-
bert Mestizo, 615 Orange St, Daly City
CA 94014. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Gilbert Mestizo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259427
The following person is doing business
as: Wes Liquors, 16 W. 25th Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403, is hereby registered
by the following owner: Citrin Compa-
nies, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Gilbert Mestizo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259494
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Petking.biz, 2) Pet Food Company
478 San Mateo Ave., San Bruno, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Fred Chang. 64 Barbara Rd.,
Orinda, CA 94563. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Fred Chang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/04/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259533
The following person is doing business
as: DK Construction, 1335 Old County
Rd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Dean
Knopp. 515 Highland Ave. San Mateo,
CA 94401. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Dean Knopp /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259772
The following person is doing business
as: Bitesize Baking, 572 S. Oak Park
Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kimberley Farrar, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Kimberley Farrar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/25/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/14, 03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14).
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-231419
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Ter-
rificuts, 289 El Camino Real Suite B,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. The fictitious
business name was filed on 3/7/09 in
the county of San Mateo. The business
was conducted by: Lorna Quiambao and
Liza Palarca, 76 Cielito Dr, San Francis-
co CA 94134
/s/ Lorna Quiambao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 02/05/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 02/06/2014,
02/13/2014, 02/20/2014, 02/27/2014).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-254722
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Bel-
mont Tattoo Emporium, 14855 El Cami-
no Real Ste. 203, BELMONT, CA 94002.
The fictitious business name was filed
on 03/04/2013 in the county of San Ma-
teo. The business was conducted by: Ka-
ren VareLa, 525 Excelsior Ave., San
Francisco, CA 94112. The business was
conducted by an Individual.
/s/ Karen VareLa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 02/25/2014. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 02/27/2014,
03/06/2014, 03/13/2014, 03/20/2014).
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
Case No.: PRO123812
NOTICE OF SALE OF
REAL PROPERTY
[Prob. Code §§ 10300, 10304]
In re Conservatorship of the Person and
Estate of ROSALIE T. MAYFIELD, Con-
servatee.
Please take notice that
Cheryl Block and Elizabeth Mayfield-
Scerra, as the co-conservators of the es-
tate of Rosalie T. Mayfield, will sell at pri-
vate sale, under the terms and conditions
specified below, real property of the es-
tate situated in the City of Belmont, San
Mateo County, California, and described
as follows:
Address: 2617 Barclay Way,
Belmont, CA 94002
Legal Description:
Lot 7 in Block 81, as shown
on that certain map entitled “Map of Sub-
division No. 9, Belmont Country Club
Properties Belmont, San Mateo County,
203 Public Notices
California” filed in the Office of the Coun-
ty Recorder of San Mateo County, State
of California, on December 24, 1926 in
Book 14 of maps at pages 69, 70, 71 and
72 APN: 043-311-070.
Written offers for this prop-
erty will be received at the office of Jane
E. Bednar, attorney for the co-conserva-
tors, at 310 Monroe St., Monterey, CA
93940 or may be delivered to co-conser-
vators Cheryl Block or Elizabeth May-
field-Scerra personally, on or before
March 3, 2014. Sale will be made on
March 4, 2014 to the person making the
highest and best offer for the property.
The terms and conditions
of sale are: all cash, in lawful money of
the United States of America with 10 per-
cent of the amount offered to accompany
the offer and the balance to be paid on
close of escrow. The sale is subject to
any liens and encumbrances recorded
against the property. The co-conserva-
tors reserve the right to reject any bid
that is less than $1,350,000, which is the
appraised value of the property. For fur-
ther information please contact the attor-
ney for the co-conservators at (831) 375-
6381.
All sales are subject to con-
firmation by the superior court, and no
sale may be consummated and no deed
may be recorded and delivered to a pur-
chaser until the co-conservators have ac-
quired court confirmation.
DATED:__________,2014
________________________________
Elizabeth Mayfield-Scerra,
Co-Conservator
DATED:___________,2014
________________________________
Jane E. Bednar, Attorney for
Co-Conservators
310 Monroe St.
Monterey, CA 93940
(831) 375-6381
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14. Call 650 490-
0921 - Leave message if no answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
24
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
210 Lost & Found
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3 each (650)341-1861
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
295 Art
5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”, signed
Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all. 650-345-
3277
6 CLASSIC landscape art pictures,
28”x38” glass frame. $15 each OBO.
Must see to appreciate. (650)345-5502
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
CRAFTSMAN 9 gal 3.5 HP wet/dry vac-
uum with extra filter. $30. 650-326-2235.
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! SOLD!
HOOD, G.E. Good condition, clean,
white.. $30. (650)348-5169
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
MINI-FRIG NEW used i week paid $150.
Sell $75.00 650 697 7862
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
296 Appliances
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
GIRLS SCHWINN Bike 24” 5 speed in
very good condition $75 SOLD!
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
HO TRAIN parts including engines, box-
cars, tankers, tracks, transformers, etc.
$75 Call 650-571-6295
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
RUSSIAN MEDAL Pins for sale, 68 in
lot, $99 (650)873-4030
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
300 Toys
BARBIE DOLLS- 2002 Collection- Never
removed from box. Holiday Celebration &
Society Girl. $40.650-654-9252
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
VINTAGE 50'S JC Higgins toboggan, 74"
long & 18" wide. $35. 650-326-2235.
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
ATT 2WIRE Router, working condition,
for Ethernet, wireless, DSL, Internet.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
FLUORESCENT LIGHTS, Commercial
grade, 4 tubes $9 650-595-3933
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. SOLD!
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
304 Furniture
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65.
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
SOLD!
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOFA SET of two Casual style, Good
condition 62" long. $85.00 Hardly used..
650 697 7862
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. SOLD.
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE METAL daybed $40. 650-726-
6429
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, (650)345-5502
306 Housewares
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each SOLD!
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/ cover, washable $25.
(650)578-9208
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(2) stainless steel, tem-
perature-resistent handles, 21/2 & 4 gal.
$5 for both. (650) 574-3229.
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MASSAGING SHOWER Head NEW,
screws on, no tool, only $10
650-595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
BLACK & Decker 17" Electric Hedge
Trimmer. Like new. $20. 650-326-2235.
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
308 Tools
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
GREEN CERAMIC flower pot w/ 15
Different succulents, $20.(650)952-4354
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7, SOLD!
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
NALGENE WATER bottle,
$5; new aluminum btl $3 650-595-3933
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 SOLD!
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
25 Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Sunshine State
resort
5 Country in which
Quechua is an
official lang.
8 Transforms, as
for a different
medium
14 “Downton Abbey”
title
15 Tablet maker
16 Osaka-born
violinist
17 *Place for a soak
in Bangkok?
19 Alligator cousin
20 Abase
22 Holy territory
23 *Mumbai baby
food?
27 Musical ability, in
slang
30 As well
31 Mimic
32 Edward Jones
Dome NFL
player
33 Rank below
abbot
35 Oilers’ org.
36 *Low point in
Oran?
40 Shareable PC file
41 Mah-__
42 2011 NBA
retiree
43 Porter, for one
44 Effusive musical
genre
45 Knoxville sch.
47 *Stance in a
Monterrey
studio?
51 Poker haul
52 Green Lantern or
Green Arrow
57 __ license
60 Emergency fund
... or what the
second part of
each answer to a
starred clue ends
with?
61 Mysterious
62 Teacher, at
times
63 Dig for 58-Down
64 “We’re outta
here!”
65 Stop: Abbr.
66 What the nose
knows
DOWN
1 Behrs of “2 Broke
Girls”
2 Vans Triple
Crown of Surfing
locale
3 Stuff
4 Et __
5 Mastermind
6 Pie slices, often
7 “Swing Shift”
Oscar nominee
8 Film buff’s
channel
9 Scattering of an
ethnic
population
10 Continental
farewell
11 Toy dog breed
12 Melodic syllable
13 Preacher’s topic
18 Brief upturn
21 Getting down
24 It may come
before one
25 “I Feel Bad About
My Neck” writer
Nora
26 Long swimmer
27 Carry protectively
28 Anticipate
uncertainly
29 Bit of shocked
text
33 Evergreens with
edible nuts
34 Lurid paper
37 Escaping à la
James Bond,
perhaps
38 Ovoid tomato
39 Microscope slide
additive
40 Non-stick brand
45 Applied to
46 Time between
inaugurations
48 Little bits
49 Inflation causes
50 Bridget Riley
genre
53 __ erectus
54 Oklahoma city
55 Attorney general
after Barr
56 __ and terminer:
criminal court
57 Sidekick
58 See 63-Across
59 Business VIP
By Gareth Bain
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
02/27/14
02/27/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. (650)591-
1500
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WANTED SILVER Dollars
(650)492-1298
315 Wanted to Buy
WANTED: HORSE DRAWN
EQUIPMENT
For restoration.
Condition is not critical.
Email location, photo, &
Telephone number. to:
rosekrans@pacbell.net or
call (650)851-7201
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, $10 (650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
MANS DENIM Jacket, XL HD fabric,
metal buttons only $15 650-595-3933
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
316 Clothes
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
RAY BAN Aviator glasses - brand new in
case. Green lens-gold frames. 63mm.
$99. 650-654-9252
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50. (650)637-
0930
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. SOLD!
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
318 Sports Equipment
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
SUNDAY 3/2
GIANT INDOOR
GARAGE SALE
Foster City
9am-12:15 pm @ Peninsula Sinai
@499 Boothbay Ave & Edgewater;
enter through door on Boothbay.
Bicycles, furn., baby stuff. MORE!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER – Solaris Electric Cord-
less 21” self propelled. Excellent work-
ing condition.$85. SOLD!
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
CIMPLER
REAL ESTATE
Cimpler Real Estate - Reinventing
Home Buying
To Buy Smarter Call Artur Urbanski,
Broker/Owner
(650)401-7278
533 Airport Blvd, 4th Flr, Burlingame
www.cimpler.com
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
RENT
1 bedroom bath & kitchen
close to everything Redwood City $1375.
650-361-1200
452 Condos for Rent
2 BEDROOM 2 Bath Condo San Mateo,
New App, W/D hook-up, Garage, Pool,
Jacuzzi, Quiet $2750, (650)387-5998
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
‘99 DODGE Van, 391 Posi, 200 Hp V-6,
22” Wheels, 2 24’ Ladders, 2015 Tags,
$4500 OBO (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY ‘00 Impala, 58K miles, Very
clean! $6,000. Joe, (650)589-3002
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition SOLD!
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBILE ‘99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. $1,500.
(650)740-6007.
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2000 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
TOYOTA ‘05 TUNDRA, 4WD, Access
Cab, low mileage, $14,000. Call Joe
SOLD!
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
HONDA WHEELS with tires. Good
tread/ 14 in. 3 for $99 SOLD!
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUNNING BOARDS – Dodge Ram fac-
tory chrome running boards. $99 (650)
995-4222
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
1823 El Camino
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & JANITORIAL
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
Spring Cleaning Special! $65
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
REMODELING,
CONCRETE &
MASONRY SERVICES
• Paving • Landscaping
• Demolition
(650)445-844
Mobile (907)570-6555
State Lic. #B990810
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
MARIN CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialists
* custom decks * Framing * remodel-
ing * foundation Rep.*Dry Rot * Ter-
mite Rep * And Much More
Ask about our 20% signing and
senior discounts
(650)486-1298
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels • Framing
• Carpentry Stucco • Siding
• Dryrot • Painting
• Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER’S CLEANING
• Roof and Gutter Repair
• Screening & Seal
• Replace & New Gutters
Free Est. Call Oscar
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
L.C PAINTING
(650)271-3955
Interior & Exterior
Sheetrock/Drywall Repair
Carpentry Repairs
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic. #913461
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
HAMZEH PLUMBING
Faucet Repair, Sewer lines, Un-
clog Drains, Water heater repair
and Repair Sewer inspection
People love me on Yelp!
(415)690-6540
Plumbing
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650)515-7792
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
President's Day Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
$29
ONE HOUR MASSAGE
(650)354-8010
1030 Curtis St #203,
Menlo Park
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax & Massage
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
www.unionspaand salon.com
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP serving your mid-Peninsula
real estate needs since 1976.
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
BRE LIC# 1254368
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
28
Thursday • Feb. 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 3/31/14
WEBUY
$â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

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