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Oregon Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan

Oregon Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan

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Published by: dahl on Oct 13, 2009
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10/20/2011

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The OTP directs ODOT and the cities and
counties to integrate all modes of transporta-
tion and encourages use of the mode that is the
most appropriate for each type of travel. The
people of Oregon who participated in the
process emphasized that all modes of trans-
portation should be accommodated and that
over-reliance on the use of the automobile
should be reduced. See Appendix D for the
OTP Goals, Policies and Actions related to
bicycling and walking.

16

2. STATE & FEDERAL LAWS RELATING TO BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES

1995 OREGON BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PLAN

Walking is an important element
of Oregon’s transportation policy

layout part 1 03_98 3/27/98 2:13 PM Page 16 (Black plate)

1995 OREGON BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PLAN

INTRODUCTION

Walking is practical for short trips, or trips
with many stops; bicycles provide similar flexi-
bility, but for longer distances, through town or
to neighboring towns. Roadways designed
primarily to facilitate high-speed trips by
automobile can be obstacles to walking and
bicycling. Yet most people will feel comfortable
walking and bicycling along a roadway if well-
designed facilities are provided.

For people who do not have access to an
automobile, walking or bicycling are their only
transportation choices. They will walk or ride on
busy urban thoroughfares with no sidewalks or
bikeways, since most destination points, such as
stores and offices, are located along these roads.
Transit users require proper walkways to walk
to and from their transit stops.

Traffic counts taken in urban locations
throughout the state indicate that well-
designed thoroughfares with appropriate
bicycle and pedestrian facilities are used more
by pedestrians and bicyclists than roads
without facilities.

Sidewalks and bikeways along a road are only
part of the solution; many busy streets and
intersections are difficult to cross and can be
barriers to walking and bicycling.

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