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SPRING FORWARD
2 A.M. SUNDAY
WALL STREET
ENDS MIXED
BUSINESS PAGE 10
MODERN TWIST
ON OLD CLASSIC
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 17
SET CLOCKS AHEAD FOR DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The man convicted of helping a
childhood friend and former lover
murder his 15-year-old Daly City
classmate in 2001 and keeping a
photo of his co-defendant hovering
over the body was sentenced Friday
to 25 years to life in prison.
Reynaldo Maldonado, 35, was
found guilty of the first-degree mur-
der of Quetzlcoatl Alba on May 21,
2001, in a storage unit turned teen
hangout at the
W e s t l a k e
Ap a r t me n t s .
Jurors rejected a
special circum-
stance of lying
in wait which
would have made
Maldonado inel-
igible for
parole.
Defense attor-
Teen killer
to prison25
years to life
Conviction may be appealed
for 2001 Daly City murder case
By David Wong
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Homemade banana bread and a
pot of black tea is a welcome sight
as spreads go, especially if you’re
sitting next to Diana Noriega
Weng, Miss Redwood City-San
Mateo County.
Weng and her mother, Mary, are
more accommodating than people
could expect to be at 8:30 a.m., on
a day when the
sky’s perpetual-
ly overcast and
the ground is
damp.
Their Foster
City home is
intimate and the
definition of
cozy, complete
Miss Redwood City-San Mateo
County aims high with interests
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo County voters have a
full ballot for the June primary elec-
tion with a few new faces stepping
up to challenge the incumbents.
Not counting the state and federal
positions representing San Mateo
County, voters will weigh in on 16
positions located here. Of those, it
appears that six have more than one
contender, according to the roster
of qualified candidates as of the end
of the filing period 5 p.m. Friday.
The primary June 3 marks the
first time county supervisors will
be elected by residents in their indi-
vidual districts rather than by vot-
ers countywide. The charter change
was made in part to encourage diver-
sity and lower the high financial bar
for potential candidates but this ini-
tial outing has failed to drum up new
blood.
Supervisor Carole Groom is run-
ning against challenger Mark de
Paula to maintain her District Two
office. Groom said she wants anoth-
er term for several reasons many
which include continuing work
with parks, childhood reading and
implementing the Affordable
Health Care act and mental health
programs. She also enjoys the vari-
ety of the work.
“I’ve done a lot of things but the
primary ones are kids, health care
and parks,” she said. “We have a
great county in which to live, work
and raise a family. I want to contin-
ue to keep San Mateo County
healthy and safe.”
De Paula, 58, is retired from
telecommunications and industrial
coatings and said if elected he
promises to only serve one term.
“Then I’ll let somebody else
come on in so we don’t get into
these little fiefdoms or kingdoms,”
De Paula said.
He wants to address the thousands
of uninsured residents, bring undoc-
umented workers into the system
by teaching them how to write con-
tracts and improve veterans’ servic-
es. He also suggests more trans-
parency through quarterly or even
bi-yearly audits of supervisorial
decisions.
Supervisor Don Horsley is also
running for re-election in District
Three and is opposed by Michael G.
Stogner, a victim’s advocate who
has moved within the county sever-
al times in the past to accommodate
his previous challenges to supervi-
sors in different districts.
Candidate filing period closes, local June ballot set
San Mateo County voters will weigh in on 16 positions;six have more than one contender
Diana Weng
See WENG, Page 8
See MALDONADO, Page 20
By Samson So
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
One look in the eyes of Ernest
Williams shows a lifetime of per-
severance, honor and integrity.
Settled in his cushioned arm-
chair comfortably, Williams on
this day isn’t one for too many
words. Actually, he barely notices
others in the room.
He calmly scans the array of
family photos on the opposite
wall, as if reliving earlier times.
His quiet demeanor now only
hides his true story.
Afew weeks ago, Williams, 91,
was paid a special visit by a veter-
ans’ community liaison from the
VITAS Innovative Hospice Care,
who delivered two Bronze Star
medals, along with other medals
and ribbons, for his service in
World War II. The Bronze Star is
the fourth-highest individual mili-
tary honor awarded for acts of
heroism, acts of merit or meritori-
ous service in a combat zone.
Williams enlisted in the U.S.
Army at 21. A look at his photo
album shows pictures of his time
in Manila, Philippines. He had
driven General Douglas MacArthur
in his vehicle during his time
there.
However, Williams’ family
emphasized how he had never
stayed in one place for too long
during the war.
Williams’ photo album details
stays on several other islands in a
span of four years as well. He
fought in the Battle of Iwo Jima
where he witnessed the raising of
the American flag. He was
involved with campaigns in the
Solomon Islands and Australia to
name a few. He also took part in
the eventual liberation of
Honolulu after the war.
After he was honorably dis-
charged with the rank of sergeant,
Long-lost medals home again
World War II veteran has two Bronze Stars, other medals returned
Menlo Park’s Ernest Williams recently had several medals and ribbons delivered to him decades after his service
during World War II.
See ELECTION, Page 20
See MEDALS, Page 8
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 174
Reynaldo
Maldonado
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor James Van
Der Beek is 37.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1979
Technology firm Philips demonstrat-
ed a prototype compact disc player
during a press conference in
Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
“In every person, even in such
as appear most reckless, there is
an inherent desire to attain balance.”
— Jakob Wassermann, German author (1873-1934)
Actor Freddie
Prinze Jr. is 38.
Actress Jessica
Collins is 31.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Ukraine’s Alina Fodorova competes in the long jump event during the women’s pentathlon at the world indoor athletics
championships at the ERGO Arena in Sopot, Poland.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the lower
60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows
in the lower 50s. North winds 5 to 10
mph...Becoming east 10 to 15 mph after
midnight.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the mid
60s. Northeast winds around 5 mph in the
morning...Becoming light.
Local Weather Forecast
The column “Local impact of supermajority loss” by Jon
Mays in the March 7 edition of the Daily Journal had an
error. The water bond proposed for the November ballot is
$11.1 billion.
Correction
I n 1702, England’s Queen Anne acceded to the throne upon
the death of King William III.
I n 1854, U.S. Commodore Matthew C. Perry made his sec-
ond landing in Japan; within a month, he concluded a treaty
with the Japanese.
I n 1862, during the Civil War, the ironclad CSS Virginia
rammed and sank the USS Cumberland and heavily damaged
the USS Congress, both frigates, off Newport News, Va.
I n 1874, the 13th president of the United States, Millard
Fillmore, died in Buffalo, N.Y., at age 74.
I n 1917, Russia’s “February Revolution” (referring to the
Old Style calendar) began in Petrograd; the result was the
abdication of the Russian monarchy in favor of a provi-
sional government. The U.S. Senate voted to limit fil i-
busters by adopting the cloture rule.
I n 1930, the 27th president of the United States, William
Howard Taft, died in Washington at age 72.
I n 1944, two days after an initial strike, U.S. heavy
bombers resumed raiding Berlin during World War II.
I n 1965, the United States landed its first combat troops in
South Vietnam as 3,500 Marines were brought in to defend
the U.S. air base at Da Nang.
I n 1971, Joe Frazier defeated Muhammad Ali by decision in
what was billed as “The Fight of the Century” at Madison
Square Garden in New York. Silent film comedian Harold
Lloyd died in Beverly Hills, Calif., at age 77.
I n 1974, Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport in France began
service.
I n 1983, in a speech to the National Association of
Evangelicals convention in Orlando, Fla., President Ronald
Reagan referred to the Soviet Union as an “evil empire.”
I n 1999, New York Yankees baseball star Joe DiMaggio
died in Hollywood, Fla., at age 84.
A
colonial drummer boy is pic-
tured on the reverse side of the
1976 bicentennial quarter.
Chicago artist Jack Ahr designed the
drummer boy, inspired by Archibald
Williard’s (1836-1918) painting
“Spirit of 76.”
***
The first time the image of George
Washington was put on quarters was in
1932. The quarters were issued as a
commemorative coin to celebrate
America’s 200th birthday. The design
was popular with the public, so it
became permanent.
***
Environmental activist and naturalist
John Muir (1838-1914) is pictured on
the California state quarter, issued in
January of this year.
***
John Muir founded the Sierra Club in
1892. The purpose of the Sierra Club
is to “explore, enjoy and protect the
wild places of the earth.”
***
Sierra Nevada means “snowy range” in
Spanish.
***
The Sierra Nevada mountain range in
Andalucia, Spain is home to the coun-
try’s largest national park, Sierra
Nevada National Park (Parque Nacional
Sierra Nevada).
***
Sixty years ago, the population of
mountain goats in the region of
Andalucia, Spain was almost totally
wiped out due to hunting. Ongoing
breeding programs by the regional
government have increased the moun-
tain goat population in nature reserves
and in the wild.
***
Amale mountain goat is called a billy
goat Afemale is called a nanny goat.
***
The Brothers Grimm tale “Three Billy
Goats Gruff,” set in the mountains of
Norway, is a story about three goats
that pass over a bridge with a menac-
ing troll living beneath it .
***
Trolls, dwarves and giants were popu-
lar creatures in Norse mythology; the
mythology of Scandinavia before the
establishment of Christianity.
Folklore was passed orally to many
generations.
***
Do you know how many countries
make up Scandinavia? Can you name
them? See answer at end.
***
Pippi Longstocking is from Sweden.
Created by Swedish children’s book
author Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002),
Pippi is a 9-year-old girl with red
braids that stick out sideways. She
lives on a farm with a monkey and a
horse.
***
Popular around the world, Pippi
Longstocking stories have been trans-
lated into more than 60 languages.
She is known as Pippi Langstrumpf in
Germany, Pippi Si Kaus Kaki Panjang
in Indonesia and Pippi Calzelunghe in
Italy.
***
Author Astrid Lindgren attended secre-
tarial school. When she started writ-
ing children’s stories about Pippi
Longstocking in 1944, she wrote
them in shorthand and continued to do
so throughout her writing career.
***
Shorthand is most commonly known
as stenography. The word comes from
the Greek words stenos, meaning nar-
row or close, and graphy, meaning
writing.
***
Court stenographers are usually notary
publics that are legally empowered to
administer oaths and witness signa-
tures.
***
Answer: Scandinavia is the countries
of Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland
and Iceland.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers Monday)
COUCH BURLY ALLEGE BISECT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Their breakfast by the water included —
BAY GULLS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TUCEA
SKPYE
ADEZMA
PPORRE
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A: A
Actress Sue Ane (correct) Langdon is 78. College Football
Hall of Famer Pete Dawkins is 76. Baseball player-turned-
author Jim Bouton is 75. Songwriter Carole Bayer Sager is 70.
Actor-director Micky Dolenz (The Monkees) is 69. Singer-
musician Randy Meisner is 68. Pop singer Peggy March is
66. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Jim Rice is 61. Singer Gary
Numan is 56. NBC News anchor Lester Holt is 55. Actor Aidan
Quinn is 55. Country musician Jimmy Dormire is 54. Actress
Camryn Manheim is 53. Actor Leon (no last name) is 51.
Rock singer Shawn Mullins (The Thorns) is 46. Actress
Andrea Parker is 44. Actor Boris Kodjoe is 41.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Win, No.
6, in first place; Winning Spirit, No. 9, in second
place;and Gorgeous George,No.8,in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:42.77.
7 1 9
11 13 51 57 69 1
Mega number
March 7 Mega Millions
3 7 9 26 54 19
Powerball
March 5 Powerball
12 16 20 31 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 8 0 5
Daily Four
0 6 0
Daily three evening
6 32 33 43 44 16
Mega number
March 5 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The former church usher accused of inap-
propriately touching two young girls on
separate occasions will stand trial on some
but not all of the molestation counts with
which he was originally charged.
Judge Donald Ayoob held Julian Lopez,
69, to answer on four counts but dismissed
two others plus a count of using threats to
dissuade a witness. Even with the two
charges, Lopez faces life in prison if con-
victed of abusing multiple victims.
He will enter a Superior Court plea March
21 and possibly set a trial date.
In 2008, Lopez served
at Ministerio Mundial in
Daly City when a teen
says that when she was
10, he approached her
upstairs where she was
doing homework and
both kissed and fondled
her. The girl said Lopez
threatened to harm her
parents if she told but she
informed her mother who contacted the
church pastor. The pastor called a church
meeting at which Lopez reportedly con-
fessed and asked forgiveness from some
members of the congregation, according to
prosecutors.
Lopez was removed as an usher but not the
church.
The alleged victim brought the accusa-
tions to police now after having trouble
attending the same church as her alleged
abuser, according to the District Attorney’s
Office.
After the teen came forward, further police
investigation led to another reported victim
who said around the same time in 2008 when
she was 13 Lopez also grabbed her twice and
touched her inappropriately.
Lopez is being held without bail.
Former Daly City church
usher faces molestation trial
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The official opening of the Devil’s Slide
trail is being delayed by the recent rainy
weather and the absence of specialized
handrails around the north overlook.
“It’s very minor things. We’re down to the
wire and we’ll get it done but there’s too
many variables right now to set an opening
on March 21,” said county Parks Director
Marlene Finley.
Finely hopes a new date can be announced
Monday and that the delay will only be
between a few days and a week. While the
new date is uncertain, Finley said it won’t be
that far off.
The 1.3-mile public trail is the site of the
former Devil’s Slide section of Highway 1
which closed when the Tom Lantos Tunnels
opened. In its new use, the trail will be open
to bikers, walkers and those on horseback.
One lingering issue is the handrails that
have been ordered but have yet to arrive.
Fencing has gone up around a good portion
of the site but some spots require the
handrails. Finley said her department is cur-
rently working with the manufacturer to see
if delivery can be sped up.
Another issue contributing to the open-
ing delay is the surfacing on the trail which
needs to be done within a certain tempera-
ture. With the rain and unpredictable weath-
er, Finley said it is uncertain the work will
be done by the original March 21 target.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Devil’s Slide trail opening delayed by weather
SAN BRUNO
Pet t y t hef t . Aman left his cellphone on a
counter on the 600 block of West San Bruno
Avenue before 7:47 p.m. Sunday, March 2.
Pet t y t hef t . Acellphone was taken from a
purse on the 1100 block of El Camino Real
before 7:56 p.m. Saturday, March 1.
Petty theft. Acellphone was taken after it
was left in a stroller on the 1100 block of El
Camino Real before 4:17 p.m. Saturday,
March 1.
Vandal i sm. A maroon Pontiac Aztek was
keyed in a parking lot on the 1100 block of
El Camino Real before 3:18 p.m. Saturday,
March 1.
Pet t y t hef t . A license plate was taken
from a silver Toyota Camry on the 1100
block of National Avenue before 2:15 p.m.
Saturday, March 1.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Burglary. Aperson reported a laptop and a
camera stolen from his 2006 Kia Sorrento
on Grand Avenue before 8:34 a.m. Monday,
March 3.
Speci al servi ce. Aperson reported seeing
a mattress with blood on it on Ridgeview
Court before 10:59 p.m. Sunday, March 3.
Assaul t. Aman reported he was punched in
the face at the Beijing Buffet on South
Airport Boulevard before 3:30 p.m. Sunday,
March 2.
Police reports
What, pray tell, is your problem?
Aperson requested to speak with an offi-
cer regarding excessive noise at a
church on the 1100 block of Trousdale
Drive in Burlingame before 12:58 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 23.
Julian Lopez
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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5an Matea
Bay Area unemployment
increases slightly in January
Unemployment rates in the Bay Area increased slightly
from December to January despite jobless numbers
decreasing elsewhere in California and nationwide,
according to data released Friday by the state’s
Employment Development Department.
While the state’s unemployment rate fell from 8.3 per-
cent to 8.1 percent and the national rate dropped from 6.7
to 6.6, each county in the Bay Area saw an increase in its
unemployment rate.
The lowest unemployment rate in the region remained
in Marin County, which was at 4.7 percent in January, up
from 4.2 percent in December.
San Francisco had an unemployment rate of 5.3 percent
in January and San Mateo counties had a rate of 4.9 per-
cent.
Marin, San Mateo and San Francisco counties are the
three counties with the lowest unemployment rates in the
state.
The largest jump in unemployment between December
and January was recorded in Solano County, which went
from 7.3 percent to 8.1 percent, according to the state
report.
Solano County has the highest unemployment rate in
the Bay Area.
Local brief
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Apermanent city manager will likely
be appointed next week by the South
San Francisco City Council after a con-
tentious last minute choice and months
of having an interim fill the role.
Mike Futrell, an attorney who has
executive experience in local, state and
federal government, is set to be
appointed to the role at the council’s
Wednesday, March 12 meeting. He was
the chief administrative officer for the
city of Baton Rouge; served on staff in
the U.S. Senate; was an elected member
of the Louisiana House of
Representatives and the Baton Rouge
City Council.
“We were very excited,” said
Councilman Mark Addiego. “The nice
thing is we all agreed. We started off
with 38 people and whittled that down
to eight. We’re excited to have someone
with that kind of a background to lead
our town. I think it’s a bold move and
I’m glad we landed on him.”
The whole search began when former
city manager Barry M. Nagel announced
he would retire in November and the city
vetted former city manager Jesús Armas
for the job. The council decided not to go
with Armas after all. The original pool
was small and weak, said Addiego.
Addiego previously said he found Armas
to be a star in his work in Hayward and
said it would be hard to find a candidate of
that caliber. Addiego was disappointed
with the focus on alleged past “sex
escapades,” rather than Armas’ qualifica-
tions. Since, City Attorney Steve
Mattas has been filling the role in an
interim capacity. The city hired a firm to
launch a fresh search following its deci-
sion to not go with Armas. Futrell
brings a fresh perspective and has a good
idea about how he wants to do things,
said Vice Mayor Richard Garbarino.
“It was a sort of long search,” he said.
“There were several excellent appli-
cants. We were impressed with pretty
much all of the applicants. Mike exuded
a confidence I didn’t see in the others. He
strikes me as a take charge, self-assured
individual. I’m looking forward to
working with him.”
Mayor Karyl Matsumoto is in agree-
ment with the other councilmembers.
“We are very pleased at the prospect of
having Mike as the next city manager
for the city of South San Francisco,” she
said in a press
release. “Mike was
our unanimous
choice and his
experience and
leadership will be
a valuable asset in
moving the city forward into a new era.”
More recently, Futrell worked as the
executive vice president of a public util-
ity company. He also served as a Navy
reservist, rising to the rank of captain.
He received his law degree from
Louisiana State University Paul M.
Herbert Law Center, holds a master’s in
business administration from
University of Massachusetts and a bach-
elor’s in business and public administra-
tion from Louisiana State University.
“I am very excited about joining the
South San Francisco team of city pro-
fessionals and working with the coun-
cil, staff and residents to continue build-
ing a strong, safe and attractive city,” he
said in the release. “My wife Susan and
our son James and I look forward to
making new friends and neighbors and
becoming active members of the South
City community.”
The council will vote on approving
his appointment 7 p.m. Wednesday,
March 12 at Council Chambers, 33
Arroyo Drive in South San Francisco.
South City to name city manager
6
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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U.S. approves state’s
new K-12 testing plan
By Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Federal education officials on Friday
approved California’s plan to roll out new computer-based
standardized tests this spring, ending a months-long dis-
pute that put the state at risk of sacrificing $1.5 billion in
federal school funding.
The U.S. Department of Education said the state’s plan for
an experimental trial run of the new Smarter Balanced lan-
guage and math tests makes sense because they more accu-
rately mirror the lessons teachers have been giving this
year. The Smarter Balanced tests will replace the
Standardized Testing and Reporting tests, or STAR tests,
that the state’s public school students have taken in read-
ing, math and social science since 1999, but no results will
be made available from this year’s debut.
The new tests, which take six or seven hours to complete
but are administered over several days, were designed with
23 other states to follow a set of national curriculum stan-
dards known as the Common Core. Most of the participat-
ing states plan to have 20 percent of their students take
either the math or language portion this year. But in
California, both parts will be given to all students in grades
3-8 and 11, as well as small sample of ninth- and 10th-
graders, sometime between March 18 and June 6.
“Approval of this waiver could not have come at a better
time. In little more than a week, some 3 million students
will begin the largest field test of these new assessments of
any state in the nation,” state Superintendent of Public
Instruction Tom Torlakson said in a statement.
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan initially threatened
to withhold funding the federal government provides to
schools with large numbers of low-income children if the
state abandoned the old tests while the new ones were still
under development. Duncan said in the fall that he was con-
cerned the public would be deprived of essential information
about how well students and teachers are performing because
no individual or school wide scores will be generated or
reported from this spring’s testing.
S
an Mateo Middle College
Hi gh School, a program for
juniors and seniors in the San
Mateo Uni on Hi gh School
Di stri ct, is accepting applications
for fall 2014. The deadline is March
25.
For more information contact
Principal Greg Qui gl ey at 574-
6101 or middlecollege@smuhsd.org
or visit collegeofsanmateo.edu/mid-
dlecollege.
***
The 14t h Annual Skyl i ne
Col l ege Presi dent’s Breakfast
will be held 7 a.m.-8:30 a.m.
Thursday, March 27 at the South San
Francisco Conference Center,
255 South Airport Blvd. The breakfast
is hosted by Skyl i ne Presi dent
Regina Stanback Stroud and is
free to attend. The event provides the
opportunity to learn about Skyline
College and how the Presi dent’s
Innovation Fund awards faculty and
staff with seed money for creative
programs and services.
If you are interested in making a
donation to the President’s
Innovation Fund and/or you would
like to attend the breakfast call 738-
4325. RSVPs for the breakfast are
requested by Monday, March 10.
***
ParenTeen Quest and the San
Mateo Uni on Hi gh School
Di stri ct will host “Teens
Resi l i ence and
Anxi ety/ Depressi on Parent i ng
for the ‘Epidemic’ with Dr.
Mike Bradley” 7 p.m. March 11 at
the San Mateo Performing Art s
Center, 900 N. Delaware St. in San
Mateo.
It’s $10 per person in advance and
$20 at the door. Tickets can be pur-
chased online at parenteenquest-
bradley.bpt.me.
***
Woodsi de Hi gh School will put
on a play version of “Beauty and
the Beast” from March 14-23.
Purchase tickets at whsdramaboost-
ers.com or call the box office at 367-
9750 ext. 43706 to reserve seats.
Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for
staff/students, and $15 for those over
65. Performances are 8 p.m. on Friday
and Saturday (March 14, 15, 21 and
22), with a 2 p.m. matinee on Sunday
(March 16 and 23).
***
The North Peninsula Jewish
Teen Foundation members recently
spent time volunteering with the sen-
ior residents of Moldaw
Resi dences in Palo Alto, including
Sophi e Tal cove-Berko, a student
of Hi l l sdal e Hi gh School.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at angela@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
LOCAL/NATION 7
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Michael Allan Thompson
Michael Allan Thompson, 57, died in the
early morning hours of Feb. 5, 2014, after
courageously battling a
short illness.
Born at Sequoia
Hospital Oct. 17, 1956,
to Betty Griffith and Jack
Thompson, Michael was
raised in the Fair Oaks
neighborhood of Menlo
Park, graduating from
Menlo Atherton High
School in 1974.
“His enduring ties to the neighborhood
and those friends he grew up with remain
strong and intact up until this very day; a
testimony to Michael’s loyal nature.
Michael possessed a true zest for life which
led him to travel around the world and to live
in such places as Thailand and Amsterdam.
His drumming talent was unparalleled
among his peers and he shared his passion
by teaching the drums to others.”
Over these last few years, Michael had
been the proud owner/operator of his own
gear shop in Redwood City.
He is survived by his wife Katie, sisters
Susan Moore and Patty Emert, and numerous
cousins, aunts and uncles. He was preceded
in death by his sister Peggy Cobb in 2002.
A private gathering was held earlier in
Pescadero to share memories and thoughts
about Michael.
“His presence will be missed beyond
measure.”
Louis Frank Musso
Louis Frank Musso of Burlingame died at
his home on March 5, 2014.
He was 95.
He was the husband of 70 years to the late
Yolanda Musso. He is survived by his daugh-
ters, Lynn Ward of San Jose and Nanette
Chapman of Arlington, Texas (her husband
Tom); six grandchildren and three great-
grandsons. His son-in-law Paul Ward preced-
ed him in death in 2013 as well as his par-
ents Louis Musso Sr. and Estelle Musso.
He was a native of San Francisco and grad-
uated from Galileo High
School. His entire work-
ing career of 42 years was
spent with Wells Fargo
Bank; retiring in 1981 as
vice president of Human
Resources.
Family and friends are
invited to attend the
funeral mass 1 p.m.
Tuesday, March 11 at Our Lady of Angels
Church, 1721 Hillside Drive, Burlingame.
Private inurnment will be at Alta Mesa
Memorial Park, Palo Alto. Memorial contri-
butions in his memory can be made to the
ALS Association, 1275 K St. NW, Suite
250, Washington, D.C. 20005 or your
favorite charity.
Linda Lou Sondy
Linda Lou Sondy, of San Carlos, born Jan.
3, 1946, died Dec. 24, 2013, after a battle
with cancer.
She was preceded in
death by her father Elton
Black and her two broth-
ers Randy Black and Gary
Black.
She is survived by her
husband Kevin Sondy, her
mother Evelyn “Betty”
McConnell, her sister
Judy West, her two daughters Jamie Dichoso
and Gretchen Taylor, her son Kevin Sondy
Jr., her three grandsons Bryan Arroyo,
Joshua Kirchner and Logan Taylor and her
granddaughter Kiley Arroyo.
Amemorial service will be held to honor
the life of Linda at Casa De Flores, 737
Walnut St., San Carlos, CA 94070 from 1
p.m.-4 p.m. March 15.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200
words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the family’s choosing. To submit
obituaries, email information along with a
jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituaries
By Jesse J. Holland
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Most of
America’s young adults are single,
don’t go to church and while half
say they have no loyalty to a
political party, when pushed they
tend to swing further left political-
ly than those before them.
Anew Pew Research Center sur-
vey out Friday showed that half of
America’s young adults, ages 18
to 33, consider themselves politi-
cal independents, identifying with
neither party. But asked which
way they lean politically, half of
the so-called millennials say they
lean toward the Democratic Party,
the highest share for any age
group over the last decade.
In addition, young adults seem
to be turning away from their pred-
ecessors’ proclivity for religion
and marriage. Almost two-thirds
don’t classify themselves as “a
religious person.” And when it
comes to tying the knot: Only
about 1 in 4 millennials is mar-
ried. Almost half of baby boomers
were married at that age.
The new survey shows how the
millennial adults are “forging a
distinctive path into adulthood,”
said Paul Taylor, Pew’s executive
vice president and co-author of the
report. This can especially be
seen when it comes to politics.
Only 27 percent said they consid-
er themselves Democrats and 17
percent said Republicans. The half
of millennials who say they are
independent is an increase from 38
percent back in 2004.
“It’s not that they don’t have
strong opinions, political opin-
ions, they do,” Taylor said. “It’s
simply that they choose not to
identify themselves with either
political party. ”
The number of self-described
independents is lower among their
predecessors. Only 39 percent of
those in Generation X said they
were independents, along with 37
percent of the boomers and 32 per-
cent of the Silent Generation.
Pew describes Gen Xers as those
from age 34-49, boomers as 50-68
and the Silent Generation as
those 69-86.
When the self-identified
Democratic millennials are com-
bined with the self-described
independents who lean
Democratic, half — 50 percent —
of the millennials are Democrats
or Democratic-leaning while 34
percent are Republicans or
Republican-leaning.
“They don’t choose to identi-
fy, but they have strong views
and their views are views that
most people conventionally
associate with the Democratic
Party,” Taylor said.
Half of millennials more likely to lean Democratic
Ukraine doesn’t keep
Obama from Florida vacation
KEY LARGO, Fla. — The crisis
in Crimea won’t keep President
Barack Obama from forging ahead
with a weekend getaway with his
wife and daughters in the Florida
Keys.
But it’s more than the Oval
Office that will be dark as Russia’s
incursion into Ukraine reaches its
one week mark. Vice President Joe
Biden and his wife are vacationing
in the Virgin Islands. And national
security adviser Susan Rice is trav-
eling in the Middle East for meet-
ings with her counterparts.
White House spokesman Josh
Earnest said “there’s always a
chance” Obama could cut a trip
short and return to Washington,
but this weekend’s vacation
appeared solid.
By Steve Peoples Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OXON HILL, Md . — Some of
the GOP’s most prominent conser-
vatives insisted Friday that
Republicans should emphasize
hot-button social issues like abor-
tion and gay marriage in this
year’s midterm elections, expos-
ing an ideological divide within a
party trying to capture the Senate
and then the White House.
Former Arkansas Gov. Mike
Huckabee, a Southern Baptist pas-
tor, set the tone early in the sec-
ond day of the Conservative
Political Action Conference.
“If this nation forgets our God,
then God will have every right to
forget us,” Huckabee said to
cheers. “It’s time for government
to scale back, not for people of
faith to scale back.”
The day also featured Texas Gov.
Rick Perry and former
Pennsylvania Sen. Rick
Santorum, who, like Huckabee,
have run presidential campaigns
fueled in part by support from reli-
gious voters.
But Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul,
one of the final speakers of the
day, represents a new generation
of libertarian-minded Republicans
less likely to oppose gay marriage
or embrace laws allowing the gov-
ernment to affect people’s private
lives.
“There’s a great battle going on.
It’s for the heart and soul of
America,” Paul told a swelling
crowd, focusing on civil liberties
instead of social issues.
GOP pushes social issues at conservative showcase
By Michael R. Blood
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Even in an
election year that appears favor-
able for national Republicans,
California Democrats are confi-
dent they will retain their iron
grip on state leadership and pos-
sibly enrich their share of House
seats in Washington.
But for all the political saber-
rattling, a gathering of party dele-
gates in Los Angeles this weekend
could be significant for what goes
unsaid.
The party has plenty to cele-
brate, with Democrats controlling
every statewide office and both
chambers of the Legislature,
along with a commanding 2.6
million voter edge in registra-
tions. Gov. Jerry Brown appears
headed for an unprecedented fourth
term, after taming California’s
seemingly perpetual budget
deficits with the help of a tax
increase and a gradually improv-
ing economy.
But Democrats in the state
Senate count among their ranks a
newly convicted felon, Sen.
Roderick D. Wright, and Sen. Ron
Calderon, who is facing federal
bribery charges.
Campaigns present mixed prospects for Democrats
Around the nation
“It’s not that they [millennials] don’t have
strong opinions, political opinions, they do. ... It’s simply that
they choose not to identify themselves with either political party.”
— Paul Taylor, Pew’s executive vice president
LOCAL/WORLD 8
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
with a four-foot tall stuffed animal taking up
half a couch.
Weng, the 2012 Miss Sing Tao pageant
winner (run by the eponymous Chinese lan-
guage newspaper based in San Francisco),
was recently crowned Miss Redwood
City/San Mateo County.
“[Miss Sing Tao] was my very first title and
it was very special to me because Sing Tao is
a multimedia company, its global actually
and ... I connected with the staff and the other
contestants, my court — it was a very special
experience and it was my favorite pageant,
actually, and I loved all the people there,”
Weng said.
The scholarship program that organizes
the pageant is an official preliminary to enter
the Miss America Pageant, where she will first
compete in the Miss California pageant in
Fresno in June.
“The competition is going to be very diffi-
cult, but I’m also very confident in my abili-
ties to be successful, it doesn’t mean to win,
because it’s very difficult to win, but just to be
successful and content with my results and my
performance there,” Weng said.
The pageant will have contestants repre-
senting all 58 of the state’s counties, judged
upon criteria such as: swimsuit, evening
gown, questions and answers, judges’ private
interviews with contestants and talent pres-
entation. The latter two categories are the
most heavily weighted.
“[To prepare for the interview portion], I
had to catch up on my current events and read
up on politics, the government and what is
happening around the world with health and
different types of industries, so it was a tough
process,” Weng said.
Pageant prep
She is preparing for the pageant by honing
her approach to interviews, swimsuit portion
(which is used as a barometer to physical fit-
ness) and talent presentation.
“I’m preparing by eating healthy, working
out very often, which is part of my personal
platform, which is ‘Healthy and Active
Lifestyles.’ I’m also in the midst of choosing
my evening gown, which is the best part of it
all, because it’s the gown you could possibly
be crowned in, you have to choose the right
style the way it fits on you, the right color,
but it should always be true to yourself and
who you are.” Weng said. “I’m also working
on my talent. That’s the difficult part — it has
to be technical, yet eye-catching and enter-
taining for the judges to score high on [your
presentation].”
Spanish study
Currently a student at San Francisco State
University, Weng has a scholarship to Notre
Dame de Namur University in Belmont, where
she will major in Spanish and minor in dance.
Weng admits, like other students, paying
tuition is one of her major challenges, along
with graduating in four years.
Studying Spanish for two hours a day,
Weng is working on her certification for
translation and interpretation, after translat-
ing two published books already.
Aside from written works, she sees a practi-
cal application for her language skills.
“I would love to work for Redwood City or
the county and use my translation and inter-
pretation skills,” she said.
Love of dance
Using her knowledge of dance, Weng is an
instructor in after-school programs for ele-
mentary to high school age students. Two
teams made up of high school dancers she
teaches are Hyperactivez and High Voltage,
with performances at community events such
as the San Mateo County Fair.
“I’ve been teaching dance for what seems
like five to six years already, and I’ve had var-
ious teams over the years, I’ve actually been
asked to coach and train the Miss Teen
Chinatown Girls, along with dancers from the
VYDC (Vietnamese Youth Development
Center),” Weng said.
Community-focused
Besides working for the county and youth
dancers, Weng has aspirations to help her
community on a wider scale.
“I would love to one day set up my own
[recreation] center ... it’s going to be open to
young adults, because they need the most
guidance, especially at that vulnerable age,
that’s the time to guide them and implement
good values and morals in to them, dance
classes are on offer, we could have Sunday
school, we could have language classes ... I
would love for teens to have some place to go
to,” Weng said.
Role models
When Weng looks for her own role models,
she doesn’t have far to go, as her mother and
sister inspire her work ethic and dedication to
education.
“My mother is fluent in seven languages
and is a language teacher and she teaches all
over the Peninsula. ... My sister is a ballerina
and she has studied ballet for over 10 years,
even though she has scoliosis, she fights
through the pain and she’s a beautiful balleri-
na,” Weng said.
Living in Mexico with Chinese and
Mexican ancestry for the first 12 years of her
life strengthened her and her family’s resolve
to succeed.
“[It] was not the easiest of situations, we
dealt with discrimination, my sister and I
dealt with bullying and it was difficult grow-
ing up there, but [my mother and sister] were
very strong,” Weng said. “And even though
my sister is younger than I am, I look up to
her because she’s a role model for anyone her
age.”
Report: Vietnam detects
signals from missing plane
BEIJING — Vietnamese media reported
that authorities have detected signals from a
missing Malaysia Airlines flight off the
southwestern coast of Vietnam on Saturday,
hours after the flight went missing during a
flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.
Russia in patriotic fervor over Crimea
MOSCOW — Russia was swept up in patri-
otic fervor Friday in anticipation of bringing
Crimea back into its territory, with tens of
thousands of people thronging Red Square
chanting “Crimea is Russia!” as a parliamen-
tary leader declared the peninsula would be
welcomed as an “equal subject” of Russia.
Ignoring sanctions threats and warnings
from the U.S., leaders of both houses of par-
liament said they would support a vote by
Crimeans to split with Ukraine and join
Russia — signaling for the first time that the
Kremlin was prepared to annex the strategic
region.
Tensions in Crimea were heightened late
Friday when pro-Russian forces tried to seize
a Ukrainian military base in the port city of
Sevastopol, the Ukrainian branch of the
Interfax news agency reported.
Continued from page 1
WENG
Williams ended up in Kansas City, where he
met his wife Virginia and eventually moved to
Menlo Park to start a family.
Williams never kept in touch with the U.S.
Department of Veterans Affairs, in charge of
his service records. His constant transferring
from place to place resulted in him losing his
medals. Williams’ military records were rela-
tively forgotten because his parents were not
the best at safekeeping his belongings.
Understandably, Williams rarely delved
into the specific hardships and terrors of war
with his family, which is why his medals were
never redelivered.
A short time ago, Williams’ daughter
Angela, had contacted the VITAS Care pro-
gram about his discharge papers, which
included his information regarding his enlist-
ment, duty assignments, training and medical
records along with his awards and medals.
VITAS was able to retrieve his lost dis-
charge information and found that Williams
had several medals that the family had not
known about.
John Forrett, the veterans community liai-
son at VITAS who personally delivered the
medals, was able to connect with Williams
due to their military backgrounds.
With his family around him, a misty-eyed
Williams graciously accepted his awards.
Williams’ daughters, Angela and Vicki
helped assemble a shadow box with his pres-
tigious awards enshrined inside.
While the awards are a prominent symbol
of his duty to his country, for Williams, fam-
ily always comes first.
Whether it was working two jobs as a
machinist and a yard worker or just taking his
children out for a movie or picnic and helping
them with their homework, Williams always
put his heart and soul into providing for his
family. Only recently did Williams decide to
share certain accounts of his stay on the
islands. “There was this one story about how
his time in the Philippines where he was a
military policeman and he had to go out in the
dumps with others,” said Vicki Williams.
“Oftentimes they encountered Komodo drag-
ons that would chase the soldiers off.”
Stories like these are relatively on the
lighter side, compared to the tragedies of
WWII. “No one else should have to go
through war and see the things I had to see,”
said Williams.
Continued from page 1
MEDALS
Around the world
OPINION 9
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Steve Zimmerman
T
he phone rings one evening
and the voice on the line
enthusiastically proclaims
that you that you have won the lot-
tery! To claim your $30 million prize,
all you have to do is send a check for
$1,500 to the following address. If
this sounds too good to be true, that’s
because it is. Unfortunately each year
in California tens of thousands of
innocent victims fall prey to this and
countless other scams designed to
extort financial assets from unsus-
pecting people. Not surprisingly,
many of the people victimized are
seniors. The prospect of winning
large sums of money, with relatively
little investment, is very tempting.
Couple this with the fact that seniors
by nature are very trusting, making
them extremely vulnerable to these
types of scams.
Once the caller has the interest of
the victim they continue to extract as
much personal information from that
person as possible. Mrs. Jones you
live at 123 Apple Orchard Lane in San
Mateo, is that correct? When you
answer; “no I live at 456 Watermelon
Ave.” you have just unknowingly
given the caller your correct address.
Once you mail a check to the caller
you have provided them with your
bank account number. Things tend to
snowball very rapidly from here until
the caller has access to enough infor-
mation to literally change your phone
number, order new credit cards and
access funds in your bank account.
The good news is
that there are
things you can do
to avoid being
drawn into one of
these telephone
scams.
Recognize the
signs of telemar-
keting fraud:
• Be suspicious of the caller if you
don’t know them;
• The caller announces that you
have won a prize;
• The prize is from another country;
• The caller claims to be a govern-
ment official; and
• The caller asks you to keep the
prize a secret.
Secondly, never give out personal
information to a caller you do not
know. Request their name and phone
number and call the person back.
Never wire or mail money to someone
that you don’t know. If the caller tells
you not to tell anyone else about their
request for money, chances are that
this is a scam. If the caller identifies
themselves as a police officer, an FBI
agent or even the IRS, be aware that
these people do not call you on the
phone. If they have business with you
they will always come to your house
in person.
Finally, if you have a caregiver
helping you in your home, always use
a reputable agency that hires employ-
ees, rather than independent contrac-
tors. This will ensure that the caregiv-
er has gone through a rigorous hiring
process that includes the following:
• Reference checks;
• Criminal background and DMV
screening;
• Liability Insurance and bonding;
• Workers’ Compensation
Insurance; and
• Supervised by a professional
office staff.
Acaregiver provided by an agency
using this type of process will have
your best interests in mind. The care-
giver will be trained to be on the
lookout for unusual or suspicious
activity by people who intend to
abuse seniors. Remember, if it sounds
too good to be true, it probably is.
Don’t be afraid to say no and hang up
on the caller.
If you believe that you are the vic-
tim of senior financial abuse ask for
help. The following agencies can
help:
• San Mateo County Adult
Protective Services — (800) 675-
8437.
• California State Attorney General
(24 hour hotline) — (800) 952-5225.
• San Mateo (or your local) Police
Department — (650) 522-7700.
Steve Zimmerman is the owner of
Senior Helpers of San Mateo, part of a
national franchise providing in-
home, non-medical care for seniors.
His email is
szimmerman@seniorhelpers.com.
Seniors beware
Corrections system
in need of reform
T
he inside of a county jail or state prison is not
something most people see. Nor do most people
know anyone who has served time for committing
crime, other than perhaps for drunken driving. Unlike most
people, I’ve had the opportunity to experience both.
My godson is locked up, awaiting trial on charges of
threatening other family members. Unfortunately, he’s a
regular there. Several of my friends have been incarcerated
as well. Moreover, I’ve been in and out of the Washington,
D.C., jail many times — not as
an inmate but as a member of an
oversight commission.
Democratic Mayor Anthony
Williams appointed me to the
Corrections Information
Council, a commission charged
with representing citizen and
offender interests by inspecting
the jail, halfway houses and pris-
ons holding D.C. inmates.
I’ve learned two important les-
sons through these experiences.
First, other than the worst of the
worst, every offender comes
home. Second, a corrections
department is just like any other government agency.
They’re no more efficient than the DMV, and no better at
outcomes than struggling public schools.
Inmates leave our jails and prisons daily. They need some-
where to go, somewhere to live and somewhere to make a
living. Eventually, most end up back in the neighborhoods
from where they came. Many have family and friends there.
Others, particularly those in for a long time, may not have
either but the old haunts are all they know.
These women and men are now on their own. They have to
make daily decisions about their lives. For someone locked
up a long time, this is difficult after years of having every
decision made for them. Moreover, with a thin or non-exis-
tent resume, the stigma of prison time and a long gap in
employment, finding an employer willing to take a chance
on them is difficult, especially in slow economic times.
Without resources, without a support network and without
a job, it’s easy for ex-offenders to fall back on the one thing
they know well — crime. That crime creates more victims,
causes more families hurt and pain and results in another
incarceration on the endless carousel of crime and punish-
ment.
The outcomes of the California Department of Corrections
and Rehabilitation speak for themselves. Almost two-thirds
of prisoners who have done their time end up back in prison
three years after their release. According to the CDCR’s own
figures, nearly a third of ex-offenders end up back in jail in
only six months. Every one of these recidivist crimes
means one or more new victims.
Something is clearly broken in our corrections system.
Too little attention is paid to how what happens (or doesn’t
happen) in prison impacts what happens in our cities,
towns and neighborhoods.
Conservative policy wonks and elected officials have
begun to address this issue, both here in California and
across the nation. Led by the Texas Public Policy
Foundation, Prison Fellowship and the American
Legislative Exchange Council’s Right on Crime coalition
has emerged that disrupts the link between politicians,
unionized prison guards, the prison construction industry
and associated campaign contributions.
Signatories to the Right on Crime Statement of Principles
include such conservative Californians and former
Californians as Ed Meese, Ward Connerly, Michael Reagan,
Pat Nolan and Chuck DeVore.
The principles they endorse aim at reducing recidivism,
restoring victims and their families, lowering crime rates,
reducing spiraling costs and freeing up space for dangerous
offenders and career criminals.
Texas has eagerly adopted many of the reforms suggested
by these conservative principles. There, conservative
Republicans joined with Democrats to reform the correc-
tions system, including providing incentive funding to
improve probation outcomes, expanding drug courts (focus-
ing on treatment rather than time) and using community cor-
rections for mentally ill and petty criminals.
These reforms have saved Texas taxpayers almost $2 bil-
lion over five years. Moreover, instead of a forecast increase
in crime and subsequent prison building, Texas has already
closed one prison due to a lack of prisoners and is on track
to close two more.
I’ve had the chance to see a corrections system up close
and personal. I’ve seen how can fail victims and their fami-
lies, as well as failing neighborhoods, cities and towns.
Real change and real reform will come when we acknowledge
that the system is broken and that if our governments con-
tinue their current practices, we will reap will more spend-
ing, more victims and more crime.
John McDowell is a longtime county resident having first
moved to San Carlos in 1963. In the intervening years, he has
worked as a political volunteer and staff member in local, state
and federal government, including time spent as a press secre-
tary on Capitol Hill and in the George W. Bush administra-
tion.
John McDowell
Guest
perspective
By Adrienne J. Tissier
T
his Sunday we turn forward our
clocks one hour for daylight
savings, or “spring forward.”
Fire departments use this twice-a-year
occurrence as a reminder to check the
batteries in our smoke detectors. We
should also use this opportunity to
make sure our families are prepared
with an emergency preparedness kit
and that the kit is replenished and
updated at this time twice a year.
If you need some direction putting
together a kit, please visit the San
Mateo County Office of Emergency
Services website at www.smcready.org
and join us for the 10th Annual San
Mateo County Disaster Preparedness
Day which is held on the opening day
of the San Mateo County Fair —
Saturday, June 7 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
at the San Mateo County Event Center
— 1346 Saratoga Ave., San Mateo. In
addition to learning about disaster
preparedness kits, residents can
receive free Friends and Families CPR
Training and meet
with representa-
tives from your area
to learn about its
disaster contin-
gency plan.
Families that arrive
before 11 a.m. will
receive free parking
and free admission
to the San Mateo County Fair.
You and your family should put
together a disaster plan and ask your-
self the question — what would my
family need if there was no electricity
or gas and all local businesses were
closed for a week. Agood emergency
preparedness kit would include a
weeks supply of water, food, cash,
current medications, batteries, an
extra set of eye glasses and more.
Many of these items have a shelf life
and so residents are encouraged during
daylight savings time to check the
expiration dates on perishable items,
switch out the water supply and test
your batteries.
In 2005, following the aftermath
of Hurricane Katrina, the costliest and
one of the most deadliest natural dis-
asters in the history of the United
States, many federal, state and local
agencies put themselves on high
alert. Since then attention to disaster
preparedness has diminished. In light
of this, I encourage residents to
remain prepared and join us in cele-
brating the 10th Anniversary of San
Mateo County’s Disaster Preparedness
Day on Saturday, June 7, 2014.
Adrienne J. Tissier is a member of the
San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors and chair of the San Mateo
County Emergency Services Council.
Keeping up with your kit
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,452.72 +30.83 10-Yr Bond 2.79 +0.05
Nasdaq 4,336.22 -15.90 Oil (per barrel) 102.54
S&P 500 1,878.04 +1.01 Gold 1,340.80
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Big Lots Inc., up $6.72 to $35.97
The losses associated with the closeout retailer’s exit from Canada were
not as bad as most industry watchers had expected.
Alpha Natural Resources Inc., down 68 cents to $4.80
The miner was downgraded to “sell” from “neutral” at Goldman Sachs,
which sees more tough times ahead in the coal industry.
Foot Locker Inc., up $3.76 to $46.49
Fourth-quarter sales at stores open at least a year jumped more than 5
percent and the shoe and apparel store topped profit expectations.
Cliffs Natural Resources Inc., down 45 cents to $18.65
The mining company said activist investor Casablanca Capital turned
down its offer of board seats, which was made in an attempt to settle a
proxy fight.
Nasdaq
Skullcandy Inc., up $1.80 to $9.23
The headphones maker’s fourth-quarter net income blew away Wall
Street expectations and so did the company’s revenue.
FuelCell Energy Inc., up 54 cents to $3.53
The U.S.Department of Energy issued a continuation award that is worth
nearly $3 million to the fuel cell power plant company.
Peregrine Pharmaceuticals Inc., down 21 cents to $2.40
The drugmaker posted a wider loss for its fiscal third quarter and a
revenue decline of 45 percent was worse the expected.
GT Advanced Technologies Inc., up 52 cents to $17.50
The technology company is getting financing for a facility in Arizona
from Apple, and it caught an upgrade from Credit Suisse.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — One positive report on
the economy was not enough to make
investors more confident.
The stock market ended mixed Friday
after a day of muddled trading. Among
the three main U.S. stock indexes, one
edged higher, one closed little changed
and the other closed lower.
Investors focused on the tensions in
Ukraine, where the region of Crimea
was preparing for a referendum on
whether to split away and become part
of Russia. It was enough of a reason to
sell into the weekend and to offset opti-
mism over a pickup in hiring by U.S.
employers last month.
The Labor Department said companies
created 175,000 jobs last month, easily
topping economists’ forecasts. While
encouraging, investors didn’t see the
February report as part of a broader
trend. December and January job figures
were mediocre, and the harsh winter
weather has closed factories, cut into
auto sales, and caused existing-home
sales to plummet for the last three
months.
“People are hoping and praying that
the recent slowness was weather-related,
and while this report gave people a little
bit of hope that is the case, it is still too
early to tell,” said Krishna Memani,
chief investment officer of
OppenheimerFunds.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
closed roughly flat, up a point, or 0.05
percent, to 1,878.04. The Dow Jones
rose 30.83 points, or 0.2 percent, to
16,452.72 and the Nasdaq composite
lost 15.90 points, or 0.4 percent, to
4,336.22.
On the whole, the overall tone of the
market was slightly negative. Three
stocks fell for every two that rose on the
New York Stock Exchange. Of the 10
industry sectors in the S&P 500 index,
six fell.
Biotechnology and health care stocks
were among the biggest decliners.
Biogen Idec fell roughly 4 percent and
Amgen fell 2 percent. The Nasdaq com-
posite index is more heavily weighted
to biotechnology and specialty pharma-
ceutical companies, which is part of the
reason the index fell even though the
Dow and S&P 500 rose.
Bond prices fell following the release
of the jobs numbers. The yield on the
10-year U.S. Treasury note rose to 2.79
percent, up from 2.74 percent on
Thursday. Gold fell $13.60, or 1 per-
cent, to $1,338.20.
As they have for much of the week,
investors turned their attention over-
seas.
Lawmakers in Russian-occupied
Crimea unanimously declared they want-
ed to join Russia and would put the deci-
sion to voters in 10 days. President
Barack Obama and several other Western
leaders have condemned the referendum.
Ukraine’s economy is not large
enough to cause serious damage to the
global economy. But the geopolitical
tensions that Russia’s occupation is cre-
ating between Russia, Europe, Ukraine
and the U.S. could potentially be desta-
bilizing for the region, investors say.
In particular, trade between Europe and
Russia could be severely impacted.
Germany’s DAX index fell 2 percent
Friday, and is down nearly 4 percent this
week. The Euro Stoxx 50 index, the
European equivalent of the Dow Jones
industrial average, fell 1.7 percent this
week.
“Europe has a lot more to lose in these
Russia-Ukraine tensions than the U.S.,”
said Andres Garcia-Amaya, a global mar-
kets strategist with J.P. Morgan Assets
Management.
Stocks muddled as Ukraine tensions fester
“People are hoping and praying that the recent slowness
was weather-related, and while this report gave people a
little bit of hope that is the case, it is still too early to tell.”
— Krishna Memani, chief investment officer of OppenheimerFunds
MasterCard, Visa plan group focused on security
NEWYORK — Visa and MasterCard are forming a group
that’s intended to help the retail and banking industries
come together on more-secure credit card payments.
Credit card breaches at Neiman Marcus, Target and other
retailers have put a spotlight on the weak spots in the
security of credit card payments.
Visa and MasterCard, which run the networks that carry
the payments, said Friday the new group will include
banks, retailers, the makers of credit card readers, and oth-
ers with an interest in credit card security.
The group’s initial focus will be on chips embedded in
newer credit cards that make them more secure. Those
chips are optional for U.S. credit card issuers and retailers
now, but changes in liability are going to make them
nearly mandatory for retailers next year. However, some
retailers have resisted the switch because they’ll be forced
to buy newer, more expensive credit card readers.
Hackers stole the information for some 40 million cred-
it cards from Target. While it’s not clear yet whether some
of the new security measures, such as chips, would have
prevented the breach, experts have said the chips make it
harder for thieves to make counterfeit cards using stolen
credit card numbers.
Global ho-hum greets
hubbub over bitcoin’s creator
LOS ANGELES — Who is bitcoin’s real creator? The bit-
coin community is reacting to that burning question with
a collective ho-hum.
Developers and bitcoin enthusiasts from Finland to
Texas are downplaying the media frenzy that occurred
Thursday after Newsweek identified the digital currency’s
creator as a Japanese American living in Southern
California, only to have the man vehemently deny it to
the Associated Press.
The furor, they say, means little to bitcoin’s future and
whether it becomes officially recognized by the govern-
ments and the financial community as a viable form of
money.
The written computer code that underpins bitcoin has
changed dramatically since its inception in 2009, spawn-
ing a generation of entrepreneurs seeking to ride its grow-
ing popularity to newfound wealth.
Samsung introduces free streaming radio service
NEWYORK — Samsung on Friday unveiled a new free
music service for its phones that it touts as a significant
improvement from the apps already on the market.
The South Korean gadget maker’s Milk Music service,
which launched in the U.S. on Friday, includes over 200
stations and 13 million songs. It’s designed to be
extremely fast, easy to use and highly customizable.
But the new service enters an already crowded space.
There are numerous streaming music services, including
Pandora, Spotify and Apple Inc.’s iTunes Radio.
Business briefs
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Brutal winter
weather snarled traffic, canceled flights
and cut power to homes and factories in
February. Yet it didn’t faze U.S.
employers, who added 175,000 jobs,
far more than the two previous
months.
Modest but steady job growth has
become a hallmark of a nearly 5-year-
old economic rebound that remains
sluggish yet strikingly resilient. The
economy has been slowed by political
gridlock, harsh weather and global
crises. But those disruptions have not
derailed growth.
Though the unemployment rate rose
to 6.7 percent from a five-year low of
6.6 percent, it did so for an encourag-
ing reason: More people began seek-
ing work. The unemployment rate
ticked up because most did not immedi-
ately find jobs.
Friday’s report from the Labor
Department suggested that a long-
hoped-for acceleration in growth and
hiring still has not occurred. But that
might not be all bad: Households have
pared debt and avoided the excessive
spending and borrowing that have
undercut explosive economies in the
past.
Total U.S. credit card debt is still 14
percent lower than before the Great
Recession began in December 2007,
according to the Federal Reserve.
And moderate but consistent hiring
still means more people have money
to spend.
“A modest expansion may very well
last longer than one that bursts out
with big increases in spending and
debt,” said David Berson, an econo-
mist at Nationwide Financial.
Some economists also suggested
that having endured harsh weather, the
economy may be poised to pick up
soon.
“If not for poor weather conditions,
job growth would have been stronger, ”
said Michelle Meyer, an economist at
Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “This
suggests we should see solid gains ...
in coming months.”
The figures were a welcome surprise
after recent economic data showed that
severe weather had closed factories,
lowered auto sales and slowed home
purchases. Along with a sharp increase
in wages last month, the jobs report
indicated confidence among some
employers that consumer spending
will increase in the near future.
Blast of winter can’t faze U.S. employers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Shares of
Coupons.com are close to doubling in
their first day of trading on the New
York Stock Exchange.
The stock gained $14.38, or 89.9
percent, to $30.38 in morning trad-
ing.
Coupons.com Inc., which delivers
digital coupons and coupon codes to
consumers, priced its initial public
offering of 10.5 million shares at
$16 per share and raised $168 mil-
l i on.
The Mountain View company had
initially expected to offer 10 million
shares and expected them to be priced
between $12 and $14 per share.
Coupons.com said in a regulatory
filing that more than 2,000 brands
from more than 700 consumer pack-
aged goods companies and many gro-
cery, drug and mass merchandise retail-
ers use its service. Last year the com-
pany distributed 315 billion coupons,
with 2.8 billion redeemed.
Coupons.com nearly doubles in first trading day
<<< Page 13, Warriors clip
Hawks for third straight win
MORE CCS: MENLO GIRLS’ HOOPS GOES FOR SECOND STRAIGHT TITLE; HMB, BGAME BOYS BATTLE FOR SOCCER SUPREMACY >> PAGE 12
Weekend, March 8-9 2014
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
SANTA CLARA — The Serra basketball
team was playing in its fifth straight Central
Coast Section championship game when the
Padres took the floor against nemesis and top-
seeded Mitty in the Open Division finals at
Santa Clara University’s Leavey Center Friday
night.
Unfortunately for the Padres, they’ll have to
wait until 2015 to have another shot at win-
ning their first CCS title since 2006 as Mitty
rallied from an early deficit and then held off
Serra at the end, 68-60.
It’s the Monarchs fourth straight CCS
championship.
“It hurts,” said Serra coach Chuck Rapp.
“We’ve been here before and we wanted to get
over the hump.”
It’s the third time this season Serra (21-8)
has lost to Mitty (25-4), including twice dur-
ing West Catholic Athletic League play. And it
was in similar fashion: the Padres start strong
before Mitty, ultimately, wears them down.
Serra bolted out of the gate and staggered the
Monarchs with a 13-2 explosion just over
four minutes into the game, but Mitty recov-
ered and started controlling the glass.
And getting the ball down to the post to 6-8
sophomore Ben Kone.
Kone was mostly unstoppable. He scored
16 first-half points and then wore the Padres
down in the second half with 10 more. He also
pulled down 11 rebounds.
“He reminds me of (former Mitty star and
projected NBA lottery pick Aaron) Gordon.
He’s just bigger and stronger than us,” Rapp
said.
Mitty scored the first basket of the second
half to take the lead and never give it back.
The Monarchs kept the Padres at arm’s length
the rest of the way, never leading by more than
six points until the end.
Mitty left the door ajar midway through the
fourth quarter, however, when point guard
Matt McAndrews fouled out with 3:31 to play.
Instead of folding, the Monarchs ran the
Title eludes Serra again
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Serra soccer coach Jeff Panos realizes it
takes more than just a talented team to win a
Central Coast Section title.
He fully understands a bit of luck plays
into it as well.
“The CCS tournament is such a crazy
thing. You can play well all year and have
one bad game and it ends your year,” Panos
said. “I think the stars have to align, too. …
The luck of the draw weighs into it as well.”
The stars are aligning just right for the
Padres so far and they are hoping to put an
exclamation point on a historic year. When
No. 3 Serra (16-2-4) faces No. 5 Gilroy (16-
4-3) 1 p.m. at Westmont High School for
the Division II championship Saturday, the
Padres will become the first Serra soccer
team to appear in a CCS title game.
Gilroy has scored 74 goals this season,
including 30 in Monterey Bay League’s
Gabilan Division where the Mustangs fin-
ished behind league champion Alisal.
“They play with Alisal, Watsonville,
Alvarez — who are all good teams (in the
CCS),” Panos said. “But we played a much
tougher non-league schedule.”
The Padres will have to keep their eye on
Gilroy’s Andre Jimenez, who has accounted
for nearly 50 percent of the Mustangs’ goals
with 25.
“Talking to a couple other coaches … he
appears to be their spark plug,” Panos said.
Serra will counter with Nick Schnabel,
who has been even more impressive, scor-
ing 28 goals against top-caliber competi-
tion.
“I think they’re very similar to us,” Panos
said of Gilroy. “They always have a fantas-
tic team. This is very much going to be a
matchup between two high-octane offens-
es.”
The difference between winning and los-
ing may come down to both teams’ support-
ing cast and, right now, Schnabel is getting
a lot of help. Both Gerald Ingemansson,
who leads the Padres in assists with 11, and
Padres primed for program history
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Gerald Ingemansson, who leads Serra in
assists this season, has given the Padres an
extra boost in CCS, scoring a pair of goals.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Menlo-Atherton boys’ basketball
team can thank a coin flip for fueling its
drive to the Central Coast Section Division
I championship game against Bellarmine 8
p.m. at Independence High School Saturday.
The Bears tied with Sequoia for fourth
place in the Peninsula Athletic League’s
South Division, but the Cherokees got the
final playoff spot from the South Division
into the PAL Tournament after winning a
coin flip against M-A.
“We’ve used that as a driving force (to get
to the CCS finals),” said M-A coach Mike
Molieri. “We’ve just been playing a lot bet-
ter recently. ”
Molieri said it was his team’s inconsistent
offense early in PAL play that cost his squad
a chance to compete for the PAL tournament
title. But the Bears knew if they played to
their capabilities, they could compete —
and beat — anyone, as evidenced by non-
league wins over Sacred Heart Prep, Half
Moon Bay, Menlo School and Valley
Christian. They also have a quality 50-42
loss to St. Francis-Mountain View.
“We’ve played a lot of tough teams at dif-
ficult venues — at Half Moon Bay, at St.
Francis,” Molieri said. “I purposely make
(our non-league schedule) challenging. I’m
not worried about [a .500 record], I’m wor-
ried about getting better. ”
And since a 62-53 loss to Sequoia Jan. 31,
the Bears have won 6-0 in a row, including
two straight in CCS play.
Aseventh win in a row would give M-Aits
first boys’ section title since beating
Cupertino 67-56 in the Division II champi-
onship game. Its the Bears’ first appearance
Snub sparks
M-A’s run to
CCS DI finals
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Serra’s Trevor Brown shoots over Mitty’s 6-8 Ben Kone during the Padres’ 68-60 loss to the
Monarchs in the CCS Open Division championship game Friday night.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
If there was one blemish on the unbeaten
record of the 2013 Woodside girls’ soccer
team, it was the settling for a Central Coast
Section Division I co-championship with
Santa Teresa following a scoreless draw in
the championship game.
Saturday, the fourth-seeded Wildcats will
get a chance to rectify that blemish when
they take on No. 10 Mitty in the Division II
championship game, 1 p.m. at Valley
Christian High School in San Jose
Saturday.
Woodside can expect to face a Mitty squad
that is tough, physical, technically sound
and capable of capitalizing on mistakes.
Woodside (18-2-3) thumped No. 13
Overfelt 9-0 in the first round, but found a
much tougher opponent in the quarterfinals
in No. 12 Saratoga. The Wildcats pulled out
a 2-1 victory. Woodside then outscored No.
1 St. Ignatius 5-3 in penalty kicks to
advance to the finals.
Mitty (17-4-5) prevailed in penalty kicks
in both the first round and quarterfinals
before blasting No. 6 Branham 7-1 in the
semifinals.
The Monarchs will be faced with one of
the best offenses in the section. Woodside
has scored 75 goals in 23 games, averaging
three goals a match, which is a slight tick
better than last’s per-game output.
The offense is paced by a pair of under-
classmen in sophomore Jillienne Aguilera
and freshman Isabella Bascara. Already in
her second varsity season, Aguilera has
pocketed 23 goals in 23 games and has a
two-year total of 39. Bascara has added 14
goals.
The midfield is led by three-year varsity
Mitty between Woodside and second CCS crown in a row
Rivals —No. 1 Menlo School and No. 6 Sacred Heart Prep —meet for DIII championship
See GIRLS, Page 16
See SERRA, Page 16
See BEARS, Page 14 See CCS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s going to be the brawl to settle it all in the Central
Coast Section Division III boys’ soccer championship
matchup between Half Moon Bay and Burlingame.
Having squared off twice in Peninsula Athletic League reg-
ular-season play, the teams split their season series. For
Half Moon Bay, however, the season has been a tale of two
dramatically different halves. The Cougars started by going
3-4 through the first half of the season. They haven’t lost a
game since, winning the last seven games of the regular
season before dominating through two previous rounds of
CCS play, running up a combined score of 7-2 over James
Lick and Aptos.
With an output like that, it’s no wonder the Cougars
earned the No. 1 seed in Division III bracket.
“I think it’s deserving, but I was a little surprised at first
because of when we were 3-4 at the beginning of the sea-
son,” Half Moon Bay head coach Jeff Turgeon said. “I was
like, ‘Guys, we’re not even going to make the playoffs.’ …
But yes, I think we do deserve it.”
According to Turgeon, the team had to hash out some
internal jockeying before they could get on a roll this sea-
son. But his personnel did work out its in-house issues. And
roll they did.
“Once they calmed that down they started to get along
better, they communicated, there was no negative stuff on
the field, and their mindset was very solid going forward,”
Turgeon said.
The Cougars are riding high after a brilliant performance
by Zack Penner in Wednesday’s semifinal win over Aptos.
The junior forward scored four goals en route to a 5-2 win,
including a second-half hat trick to tab a season best for any
Half Moon Bay scorer.
“We moved the ball very well from up top to the outside
mids,” Turgeon said. “And our defense is pretty solid. The
four guys in the back are solid all the time. We haven’t
allowed a lot of goals.”
Burlingame has taken the more traditional low-scoring
route of advancing to the program’s fifth ever champi-
onship appearance. The No. 3-seed Panthers downed
Monterey, 1-0, before a thrilling comeback win over
Soledad, 2-1 in overtime. They boast the strength and speed
to match the Cougars on any given day. And judging by the
physical clash with Soledad Wednesday, Burlingame is just
as endowed with the jockeying gene as Half Moon Bay.
“It’s going to be very aggressive, very fast-paced, like it
was [in our first two games],” Turgeon said. “I’m looking
forward to the same thing. It’s going to be a quick, up-paced
game — a lot of shooting. I’m sure it’s going to be physi-
cal. … I just hope my team stays in control and doesn’t lose
their head, and finishes when they have the opportunity. It
will be a very good game.”
Cougars out to prove worthy of top seed
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s going to be a defensive battle when Menlo and
Castilleja throw down in Saturday’s Central Coast Section
Division IV girls’ basketball final at Independence High
School.
No. 2-seed Menlo (17-11) is the reigning champion that
prides itself on composure, while in turn being able to
absolutely fluster opponents. No. 5-seed Castilleja (20-9)
can wreak havoc with the full-court press and always has the
potential to dominate a game with its superstar starting five.
The difference between the two West Bay Athletic League
powerhouses is where they were a year ago. The Knights are
looking for back-to-back titles after demolishing the CCS
field last season. Paced by then-senior Drew Edelman, the
Knights outscored their opponents 183-125 through three
games in 2013. The closest score of the three was the semi-
final matchup with Scotts Valley, which Menlo won handi-
l y, 58-46.
Castilleja, on the other hand, experienced a dreadful sea-
son in 2012-13. After starting the campaign 3-1, the Gators
were dealt a devastating blow when star senior Lauren Rantz
was lost to injury, after which they barely won another
game. Castilleja finished the year 4-21 overall, including a
winless 0-10 record in the WBALFoothill Division.
After dropping to the lower Skyline Division this season,
Gators head coach Gary Plummer knew his team was playing
for all the marbles in an effort to win league — the only way
they could punch their ticket to the postseason. Castilleja
went on to post a perfect 10-0 record in league play.
“It’s been a long time coming,” Plummer said. “Last year
we had a rough year. ... Our goal from the beginning of the
Menlo faces
strong test in
quest to repeat
See MENLO, Page 14
SPORTS 13
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND— David Lee had 18 points and
six rebounds, reserve Jermaine O’Neal added
17 points and eight rebounds, and the Golden
State Warriors returned home to beat the
Atlanta Hawks 111-97 Friday night for their
third straight win.
Andre Iguodala and Stephen Curry each
scored 13 points to help the Warriors build a
66-52 halftime lead and go ahead by 20 in the
fourth quarter. Golden State, fresh off a 4-2
road trip, is 8-2 since the All-Star break and
beginning to look like the team that roared to
the second-round of the playoffs last year.
Paul Millsap had 16 points and seven
rebounds after missing the last five games
because of a bruised right knee for the Hawks,
who have lost five straight. Mike Scott added
14 points and DeMarre Carroll and Jeff Teague
scored nine points apiece as Atlanta contin-
ued its late-season slide.
Golden State began a stretch of nine of 11
and 13 of its final 20 games at Oracle Arena.
The Warriors want to use the finishing stretch
to re-establish their home-court advantage
and make a run at the Los Angeles Clippers,
who are four games ahead in the Pacific
Division.
The Warriors, who needed Iguodala’s 3-
pointer as time expired to beat the Hawks
101-100 in Atlanta on Jan. 3, allowed little
drama in the rematch.
Draymond Green’s 3-pointer capped a run
that put the Warriors ahead 97-77 with 6:09
remaining in the fourth quarter. The depleted
Hawks, with big men Al Horford and Gustavo
Ayon out for the season, never seriously chal-
lenged.
The only major setback for the Warriors
came when shooting guard Klay Thompson
limped to the locker room six minutes into
the first quarter with a strained lower back. He
did not return for precautionary reasons, the
team said.
Thompson has been Golden State’s most
durable player the past three years. He has
played in a franchise-record 211 straight reg-
ular-season games to start his career.
The teams traded baskets for most of the
first half until the Warriors put together a
thrilling 12-1 spurt in the closing minutes.
Green intercepted a pass near center court
and then lobbed a no-look, alley-oop pass to
Harrison Barnes. On Atlanta’s next posses-
sion, Barnes blocked Scott’s layup against
the glass, and Curry converted a finger-roll
layup through traffic on the other end to give
Golden State a 66-52 lead at the break.
Four Warriors post double-figures in win
Lincecum honing form
as Giants blank Royals
Kazmir deals in A’s debut
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SURPRISE, Ariz. — Tim Lincecum pitched
three strong innings and Hunter Pence homered
as the San Francisco Giants beat the Kansas
City Royals 5-0 on Friday.
The two-time NL Cy Young Award winner is
coming off his third straight losing season. The
Giants re-signed him to a two-year, $35 million
contract in the offseason.
“Since the contract got finalized, it’s just
about focusing on the season and the two years
ahead of me,” Lincecum said.
Lincecum allowed two hits in the first inning,
including a leadoff double to Norichika Aoki,
who was out trying to steal third.
Lincecum’s fastball was mostly in the 89-91
mph range.
“I’m not really too worried about trying to get
it up or where it is at,” Lincecum said. “It’s all
about placement. I know if I set my sights low
in the zone I’ll be better off.”
Pence hit his first home run to center in the
sixth off Wade Davis.
Giants non-roster invitee Mark Minicozzi,
who played for independent league teams from
2009-11, homered off Jon Rauch in the two-run
ninth.
The Royals, who entered the game with a
Cactus League-leading .332 batting average,
managed just four hits,
By Don Ketchum
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Scott Kazmir pitched three
sharp innings in his Oakland debut, sending
the Athletics to a 2-0 victory over the
Arizona Diamondbacks on Friday.
Kazmir, a left-hander who signed a two-
year, $22 million deal with the A’s over
the winter, gave up two hits and struck out
two.
Left-hander Wade Miley had a strong effort
for Arizona, pitching five innings and giv-
ing up an unearned run on three hits. He
walked one and struck out four.
The unearned run came in the fifth inning
when Josh Reddick scored on a grounder by
Stephen Vogt that was booted for an error by
Arizona shortstop Didi Gregorius.
Daric Barton drove in Oakland’s second
run with a single in the eighth.
Athletics: After pitching in a game with
Oakland for the first time, Kazmir said:
“Now it feels like I’m actually contributing.
I tried to keep my emotions in check and not
do too much.”
“In that third inning I started getting
tired, but all in all I am pleased,” he said.
Oakland outfielder Billy Burns, who leads
the majors with seven stolen bases this
spring, fell short in his bid for No. 8 when
he was thrown out at second by
Diamondbacks catcher Henry Blanco in the
third inning.
SPORTS 14
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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in the finals since a 71-46 loss to Mitty in the
2008 final.
“The kids are excited,” Molieri said.
The Bears will use a patient and methodical
half-court offense to try and slow down the
Bells, who Molieri expects will want to get out
in transition and run.
The Bears, however, are well suited to the
half-court game with the sharp-shooting
prowess of guard Royce Branning and the inside
presence of post player Oliver Bucka, who has
come on strong over the second half of the year.
“We’re playing a lot better on offense, now
with Oliver in the middle and Royce getting
back his stroke,” Molieri said. “Finally, our big
guy (Bucka) started playing a lot better offen-
sively and defensively and on the boards.”
Bucka really stepped up when Branning went
into a scoring slump midway through the PAL
season. Molieri said he was expecting that all
season from Bucka, but attributed some of
Bucka’s early-season troubles to dealing with
the football recruiting process.
“After that process went away in January, we
started to play better ball,” Molieri said. “It’s
been huge. We expect that from Oliver.”
The Bears will need to be on top of their game
to knock off Bellarmine. Atough year in West
Catholic Athletic League made the Bells record
look worse than the talent they have, but
Molieri doesn’t put a lot of stock in
Bellarmine’s record.
“[The Bells] know how to win. They have
numerous Division I titles. They’re going to be
battle tested,” Molieri said. “But that’s why we
play St. Francis, why we play Sacred Heart Prep,
play Valley Christian, scrimmage against Serra.
We at least know how it feels (to play CCS cal-
iber teams) and what to do to play at that level.”
Continued from page 11
BEARS
season was to go undefeated in league and to
get to this CCS championship game. Now
we’ve accomplished our goal and we’ve got
one more goal: to go out and try to win it.”
Despite being the bracket’s lower seed,
Castilleja, on paper, looks to be a clear
favorite.
Gators center Yasmeen Afifi is a force to be
reckoned with in the paint. The 6-3 junior has
pulled down over 300 rebounds through 29
games this season. And while Afifi averages
13.9 points per game, she isn’t even the
team’s best scorer. That distinction belongs
to co-captain Paige Vermeer, who has netted a
14.4 scoring average. Sophomore Ellie Chen
has been quiet through the CCS playoffs, but
the 5-6 guard rocked 23 points in Castilleja’s
WBAL playoff opener against Harker, while
averaging 10.6 points per game on the year.
So perhaps its fitting that the red-and-black
color scheme of Castilleja’s uniforms some-
what resembles that of the Chicago Bulls
because, like the classic Bulls teams of the
‘90s, the Gators feature a dominant superstar
surrounded by several other superstar-caliber
talents.
But Menlo has some superstar synthesis as
well. With sophomore Hannah Paye averag-
ing 13.1 points per game and a 30-percent
mark from beyond the 3-point arc, the
Knights have a shooter who is a viable threat
to take over any game. But the matchup to
watch will be in the post with Menlo’s soph-
omore tandem Olivia Pellarin and McKenzie
Duffner dueling with Afifi. And if the Knights
can work the boards as a team as they have all
season, they might just have a chance of per-
severing in the post matchup. Keep in mind,
five Menlo players have surpassed the 100-
rebound plateau this season.
For the Knights’ offense, it is all about
playing crisp and clean. They absolutely flus-
tered King’s Academy in Tuesday’s CCS semi-
final, causing 24 turnovers en route to a 60-46
win. Menlo’s upbeat style of play has a ten-
dency to have an adverse effect on the offense
though. And the only chance the Knights
have of hanging with Castilleja is to play a
clean game.
“I think if we keep it clean and we keep it
consistent, we’ll be good about matching up
with [Castilleja],” Menlo senior Donya
Dehnad said. “I mean ‘clean’ as in keeping our
offense clean, make good passes, minimize
our turnovers, minimize points off turnovers.
That’s gotten us into a lot of trouble this sea-
son and I think if we do that we’ll be success-
ful.”
Menlo’s ultimate goal is to return the repeat
epidemic to the CCS Division IV bracket.
Until the last two seasons — when Notre
Dame-Belmont won the crown in 2011 and
Soquel won it in 2012 — repeats spanned
from the turn of the century, with Santa Cruz
(2009 and ’10 champs), Valley Christian (’07
and ’08), Sacred Heart Cathedral (’05 and ’06),
Notre Dame-Salinas (’03 and ’04), and Sacred
Heart Prep (’99, ’00, ’01, and ’02).
Tip-off for Saturday’s championship game
is scheduled for 2 p.m.
Continued from page 12
MENLO
offense through Connor Peterson, who ran
it to perfection as his bucket off the dribble
put the Monarchs up 64-58 with less than
two minutes to play.
“I thought we could ratchet up the pressure
(with McAndrews out). I thought there
might be a little opening (to steal the
game)” Rapp said. “But Peterson is so solid.
“[Mitty is] a tough cover. ”
Serra gave the Monarchs their best shot,
however. With Danny Mahoney — who fin-
ished with 18 points — running the Padres
offense, they jumped all over them early.
After Kone had a tip in for the first points of
the game, Serra reeled off 13 unanswered
points, with Cory Cravalho draining a 3-
pointer and slashing to the basket for a
layup to lead the charge.
Mitty finally settled in and methodically
started their comeback, with Kone doing the
damage with six points over the final 3:23
of the first quarter to cut the Monarchs
deficit to 21-13.
The quarter break gave the Padres just
enough of a breather and they came out fir-
ing to start the second, hitting their first
three shots of the quarter. Center Trevor
Brown converted a three-point play, Sean
Watkins nailed a 3 and Cravalho scored on a
fast-break layup to give Serra its biggest
lead of the night, 29-13, with 6:40 left in
the half.
The Padres then went four minutes and two
seconds without a point, as Mitty got back
into the game with a 13-0 run to cut the
Serra lead to 29-26 with 3:03 left in the
half.
By the time the halftime horn sounded,
Mitty had come all the way back and trailed
35-34.
Mitty scored the first six points of the
third quarter to take a 40-35 lead and while
Serra managed to tie the score three times in
the quarter, the Padres could never pull ahead
as Mitty managed to hold a 52-48 lead
going into the fourth quarter.
The Padres could have been down a lot
more if not for the play of Brown. He was
the surprise offensive star for Serra, scoring
13 points and pulling down six rebounds
while giving up six inches to Kone. He
flipped in what only can described as a hook
shot before knocking down a free-throw
line jumper in the third quarter, tying the
game at 42 and 44, respectively.
“We would have been in trouble (without
Brown),” Rapp said. “Just a real credit to
him. … He’s been an unsung hero.”
Serra got as close as two early in the
fourth quarter, 54-52, but the Monarchs held
off the Padres down the stretch.
“We had moments where we looked really
good, where our offense was moving,
looked good in transition,” Rapp said. “We
just couldn’t really sustain it.”
Continued from page 11
CCS
SPORTS 15
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Boys’ basketball
Saturday
DivisionI
No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (18-8) vs. No. 4 Bellarmine
(11-16), 8 p.m. at Independence High School
DivisionIVchampionshipgame
No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (19-7) vs. No. 7 Harker (18-
9), 4 p.m. at Independence High School
Girls’ basketball
Saturday
DivisionIVchampionshipgame
No.2 Menlo School (17-11) vs. No.5 Castilleja (19-9),
2 p.m. at Independence High School
Boys’ soccer
Saturday
DivisionII championshipgame
No.3 Serra (16-2-4) vs. No.5 Gilroy (16-4-3),1 p.m.at
Westmont High School
DivisionIII championshipgame
No. 3 Burlingame (15-4-3) vs. No. 1 Half Moon Bay
(16-5-1), 6 p.m. at Westmont High School
Girls’ soccer
Saturday
DivisionII championshipgame
No. 4 Woodside (18-2-3) vs. No. 10 Mitty (17-5-4), 1
p.m. at Valley ChristianHigh School
DivisionIII championshipgame
No. 1 MenloSchool (17-3-2) vs. No. 6 Sacred Heart
Prep (19-2-2),6 p.m.at Valley ChristianHigh School
CCS PAIRINGS
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 62 40 17 5 85 195 138
Montreal 65 35 23 7 77 166 162
Toronto 64 33 23 8 74 189 195
Tampa Bay 63 34 24 5 73 180 163
Detroit 63 29 21 13 71 171 176
Ottawa 63 27 25 11 65 177 206
Florida 63 24 32 7 55 154 201
Buffalo 63 19 36 8 46 127 186
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 63 42 17 4 88 201 157
Philadelphia 63 33 24 6 72 180 184
N.Y. Rangers 64 34 26 4 72 168 162
Columbus 63 32 26 5 69 185 178
Washington 64 29 25 10 68 188 195
New Jersey 64 27 24 13 67 156 163
Carolina 63 27 27 9 63 156 179
N.Y. Islanders 66 24 33 9 57 181 224
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 62 42 14 6 90 206 142
Chicago 64 37 13 14 88 221 171
Colorado 63 41 17 5 87 195 168
Minnesota 62 34 21 7 75 153 150
Dallas 63 30 23 10 70 181 176
Winnipeg 64 30 27 7 67 177 184
Nashville 63 26 27 10 62 152 190
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 64 43 14 7 93 207 157
San Jose 64 40 17 7 87 195 157
Los Angeles 64 36 22 6 78 155 135
Phoenix 63 29 23 11 69 175 182
Vancouver 65 28 27 10 66 151 173
Calgary 63 25 31 7 57 149 189
Edmonton 64 22 34 8 52 160 208
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
NHL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 34 26 .567 —
Brooklyn 30 30 .500 4
New York 23 40 .365 12 1/2
Boston 21 41 .339 14
Philadelphia 15 46 .246 19 1/2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 43 16 .729 —
Washington 32 29 .525 12
Charlotte 29 33 .468 15 1/2
Atlanta 26 34 .433 17 1/2
Orlando 19 44 .302 26
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
x-Indiana 46 16 .742 —
Chicago 34 28 .548 12
Detroit 24 38 .387 22
Cleveland 24 39 .381 22 1/2
Milwaukee 12 49 .197 33 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 45 16 .738 —
Houston 43 19 .694 2 1/2
Dallas 37 26 .587 9
Memphis 35 26 .574 10
New Orleans 25 37 .403 20 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 46 16 .742 —
Portland 42 20 .677 4
Minnesota 31 30 .508 14 1/2
Denver 27 34 .443 18 1/2
Utah 21 41 .339 25
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 43 20 .683 —
Golden State 39 24 .619 4
Phoenix 36 25 .590 6
Sacramento 22 40 .355 20 1/2
L.A. Lakers 21 42 .333 22
NBA GLANCE
AmericanLeague
W L Pct
Cleveland 8 1 .889
Tampa Bay 5 1 .833
Baltimore 5 2 .714
Seattle 7 3 .700
Oakland 6 3 .667
Kansas City 5 3 .625
Minnesota 5 3 .625
New York 6 4 .600
Detroit 5 4 .556
Toronto 4 5 .444
Chicago 3 4 .429
Houston 3 4 .429
Los Angeles 3 5 .375
Boston 2 5 .286
Texas 2 6 .250
National League
W L Pct
Miami 6 2 .750
Pittsburgh 6 2 .750
Giants 6 3 .667
Washington 5 3 .625
Los Angeles 4 4 .500
Milwaukee 5 5 .500
Arizona 5 6 .455
Colorado 4 6 .400
Cincinnati 4 7 .364
Chicago 3 6 .333
San Diego 3 6 .333
St. Louis 2 4 .333
New York 2 5 .286
Atlanta 2 7 .222
Philadelphia 1 8 .111
Friday’sGames
Minnesota 6, Pittsburgh 5
Miami 7, St. Louis (ss) 3
Baltimore 15, Philadelphia 4
Tampa Bay 6,Toronto 3
Washington 8, Houston 5
Boston 4, Atlanta 1
N.Y. Mets 5, St. Louis (ss) 5, tie
Cincinnati (ss) 10, Seattle 9
Chicago White Sox 4, Cincinnati (ss) 3
San Diego 6, Milwaukee 2
Chicago Cubs (ss) 3, L.A. Angels (ss) 2
L.A. Dodgers 2,Texas 1
Oakland 2, Arizona 0
SPRING TRAINING GLANCE
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Optioned LHP Mike
Belfiore to Norfolk (IL). Reassigned RHP Tim Alder-
son and LHP Nick Additon to minor league camp.
BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with Ps
Drake Britton, Rubby De La Rosa, Felix Doubront,
AnthonyRanaudo,AllenWebster,AlexWilson,Bran-
don Workman and Steven Wright; Cs Dan Butler,
Ryan Lavarnway and Christian Vazquez; INFs Xan-
der Bogaerts, Garin Cecchini, Brock Holt and Will
Middlebrooks; and OFs Jackie Bradley Jr., Bryce
Brentz, Alex Hassan and Daniel Nava on one-year
contracts.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Released RHP Brad
Penny from his minor league contract.
SEATTLE MARINERS —Announced the resigna-
tion of third base coach John Stearns. Promoted
Tacoma (PCL) manager Rich Donnelly to third base
coach.
TEXASRANGERS —Optioned RHP Matt West to
Myrtle Beach (Carolina). Assigned C Jose Felix to
minor league camp.Added C Patrick Cantwell from
minor league camp.
National League
SANDIEGOPADRES —Claimed OF Alex Castel-
lanos off waivers from Texas. Placed LHP Cory
Luebke on the 60-day DL.
NBA
NBA—SuspendedMilwaukeeFErsanIlyasovaone
game for punching Sacramento F Reggie Evans in
the stomach during Wednesday’s game.
NFL
DALLASCOWBOYS—Released C Phil Costa.
INDIANAPOLISCOLTS—Agreed to terms with P
Pat McAfee on a five-year contract.
JACKSONVILLEJAGUARS—Re-signed QB Chad
Henne on a two-year contract.
MINNESOTAVIKINGS—Re-signed CB/PR Marcus
Sherels.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Released WR Lance
Moore.
SEATTLESEAHAWKS—Signed OL Lemuel Jean-
pierre and S Jeron Johnson to one-year contract
extensions.
TENNESSEE TITANS —Agreed to terms with DE
Ropati Pitoitua on a multi-year contract.
TRANSACTIONS
16
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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starter junior Lauren Holland, who has
dished out 13 assists this season.
The Wildcats are far from a three-headed
monster. Fifteen of 17 players have record-
ed at least one assist this season and 11 dif-
ferent players have scored.
The real secret to the Wildcats success,
however, is their defense, which has
allowed seven goals this season. They have
surrendered three over their last 10 games.
In addition, the Wildcats’ best defender —
sweeper Giana Rosati — is also one of their
most lethal goal scorers, especially on free
and corner kicks, as Rosati is one of the
most dangerous CCS players in the air.
The Monarchs counter with an offense
that has scored 63 goals is averaging 2.5
goals per contest. They finished second in
the West Catholic Athletic League and are
always a threat to win the CCS crown, hav-
ing won two of the last three section titles.
Mitty’s offense is led by Marquel Love’s
13 goals and Ashley Kirchick’s 11.
The defense has allowed 23 goals, but
playing in the WCAL is a lot tougher than
any other league in CCS. Only nine of
Mitty’s goals against came against non-
WCAL opponents.
Division III
No. 1 Menlo School (17-3-2) vs.
No. 6 Sacred Heart Prep (19-2-2)
Not many games will ever carry as many
bragging rights as a matchup between these
two rivals.
Not only have the two battled for West Bay
Athletic League supremacy, they are both
perennial contenders for Division III section
crowns. SHP won the 2009 title, while
Menlo will be looking for its second title in
three years.
The Knights captured the WBAL champi-
onship this past season, going unbeaten in
the process. They tied and beat the Gators in
their two regular-season meetings and will
be hoping to even the 2014 series with the
biggest win of all.
Menlo has proven to be one of the best
teams in the section. It got a huge non-
league win over Mountain View, which was
the No. 1 seed in the Division I bracket, and
went 2-0-1 against PAL Bay Division
teams, including a 2-0 victory over
Burlingame.
The Knights offense has amassed 55
goals this season and is led by Sierra Stritter
and Chandler Wickers.
The defense has given up just 10 goals and
has recorded 14 shutouts.
The Gators may be playing their best soc-
cer of the season right now, putting togeth-
er three solid performances since the play-
off started.
Sophomore Tierna Davidson has quickly put
her name on the short list of top goal scorers
in the section, having buried 23 goals this
season to go along with 12 assists.
Freshman Olivia Athens gives SHPa potent
one-two punch this season and for the next
couple to come as she has 13 goals and a team-
leading 14 assists.
Defensively, the Gators have allowed only
seven goals — three of which belong to
Menlo — and have posted 15 shutouts.
Continued from page 11
GIRLS
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Jillienne Aguilera has led a potent Woodside offense with 23 goals and has 39 in two years.
David Tillack have scored a pair of goals in
their last two games.
“David has been a surprise in that regard,”
Panos said. “He’s worked hard for four
years.”
While Panos believes it takes a little bit
of luck to win a CCS title, he also believes
team chemistry can go a long way in the
Padres making some of that luck on their
own.
“The team chemistry is also really great.
Never underestimate that,” Panos said. “To
me, [championship teams] are the ones who
can get the team chemistry going in the
shortest amount of time.”
That chemistry have been forged, partial-
l y, by the success the Padres have had this
season. They finished second in the West
Catholic Athletic League, and have spent a
bulk of the season getting on the scoreboard
early in games. They continued that trend
during CCS, scoring in the seventh minute
in a 4-2 win over Willow Glen in the quarter-
finals and scoring in the sixth minute in a 3-
1 win over Leigh in the semifinals.
“I think there is a lot of confidence in what
we do early and it’s happened so many times
there’s this belief it will happen again,”
Panos said. “I think that early goal gives the
defense confidence knowing they don’t have
to worry about making a little mistake.”
Getting early goals also makes it easier
for the Padres to come back when they have
lost the lead this season.
“Coming from behind — we’ve done that
four or five times this year,” Panos said,
most recently when Serra fell behind 2-1 to
Willow Glen in the quarterfinals. “These
guys go at it when their backs are up against
the wall.
“Consistent offense been the [key to our
success]. We haven’t struggled to score
goals early or from behind.”
Continued from page 11
SERRA
By Janani Kumar
T
he night before I was set to leave,
the excitement of it all turned to
pure terror. I remember thinking:
“Oh my gosh. What have I gotten myself
into?!”
Last week, I went as a
counselor for a program
known as Outdoor
Education, a one week
camp for fifth-graders in
which they learn about
the importance of pre-
serving nature.
I remember having lit-
erally the best week ever when I went as a
camper.
After arriving at the camp, I was sent to
my first meeting where I met all the other
cabin leaders and the head coordinators. I
was the only one from Burlingame High
School who went that week so, at first, not
knowing anyone was unfavorable, howev-
er, by dinner that night we had all become
friends.
Let’s just say that I really lucked out with
my (15!) cabin kids; they were all pretty
receptive and cooperative, which was really
impressive considering their age. After
they left for an activity, I regrouped with
the head coordinator and the other cabin
leaders for a meeting to share how our “get
to know each other” activities went and to
share any concerns about our kids.
That week, I not only formed a family
with my kids as their big sister, but also
with the entire Outdoor Ed staff and the
cabin leaders. That was one major differ-
ence from when I was a camper. I do not
really remember any other cabin leaders
from my year but, this time, there was that
inevitable bond between us, because we
were going through the same challenges as
a big sibling to our cabin kids. We would
have these meetings every day as a time to
What I
learned
at camp
Susan’s Travels,
Tours + Trips
The Cocoanuts
in Ashland, Ore.
SEE PAGE 19
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
One of the many surprises in Wes
Anderson’s rich, layered and quirkily enter-
taining new film, “The Grand Budapest
Hotel,” is the emergence of a new comic
actor, one with impeccable timing and just
the right mix of gravitas and utter zaniness.
Ladies and gents, meet Ralph Fiennes.
You might not immediately think the man
who played the tragic count in “The English
Patient,” an evil war criminal in
“Schindler’s List,” a violent Coriolanus,
and oh yes, Voldemort, would be a natural in
comedy. But he proves a deft, daft partner to
Anderson in this, their first collaboration.
The film itself is a madcap caper on one
level. On another, it’s a look at a dying
world, and way of life, in the period between
the two world wars, with the specter of
totalitarianism looming. Just like the fic-
tional hotel in the title, the movie is a
meticulously constructed confection, fea-
turing the extreme attention to detail that
Anderson is famous for.
The Grand Budapest Hotel is set in a spa
town in the fictional Republic of Zubrowka,
somewhere in eastern Europe. It’s a place
where wealthy older women come to be
pampered.
That’s where Monsieur Gustave (Fiennes)
comes in. An old-school concierge, Gustave
lives to please his customers. And so the
Fiennes shows comic chops in Anderson film
Sweet, geeky jaunt
‘Mr. Peabody & Sherman’
modernizes the duo’s story
By Jessica Herndon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Animated films have seen their share of uptight dads — the most
memorable being merman Triton and his strict rule over daughter
Ariel in “The Little Mermaid” and the over-protective caveman
Grug in the prehistoric journey “The Croods.” Mr. Peabody the
dog in the charming “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” is no different.
As the aforementioned papas learned, this overbearing bea-
gle must eventually loosen the leash he has on his
adopted son, Sherman. But this is
especially difficult for Mr. Peabody,
since Sherman is not only a lively
youngster, but a human one.
Heartfelt and snappy, DreamWorks
Animation’s “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” fol-
lows the wild adventures that bond a dog and
his boy. Within the first few moments, we dis-
cover Mr. Peabody (voiced by a tenacious and
loveable Ty Burrell) is a pseudo-intellectual dog
who attended Harvard. Meticulous and reserved,
Mr. Peabody’s success has earned him an impres-
sive penthouse in New York City and the con-
sent to adopt Sherman (voiced by child
actor Max Charles of ABC’s “The
Neighbors”), who he found abandoned in
a cardboard box as a baby.
Like last year’s wacky, yet underwhelm-
ing “Free Birds,” this animated feature
features time-travel. Luckily, “Peabody &
Sherman” offers a tighter plot and
adorably geeky dialogue, thanks to writer
Craig Wright (“Six Feet Under”). Via a time-
machine he’s invented, papa Peabody has
enriched Sherman’s upbringing with visits to
past eras and the benchmark events within them —
like Vincent van Gogh’s creation of “The Starry
Night.”
Back in the 1950s and early 1960s, Mr. Peabody
and Sherman first appeared in “Peabody’s
Improbable History,” a segment within the ani-
mated television series “Rocky and His Friends”
and later “The Bullwinkle Show.” The latest film
modernizes the duo’s story, time-machine still
included, into a 3-D jaunt.
Now in elementary school, Sherman, a cute kid
with wild red hair and huge glasses, is curious and
frisky. On his first day of class, a brainy blonde
named Penny (voiced by Ariel Winter of
“Modern Family”) starts a fight with Sherman
when he challenges her knowledge of George
Washington, who he’s actually met in his time
travels.
Despite the aptitude of Mr. Peabody and
Sherman, we never really get another
glimpse of Penny’s intelligence, even
as she becomes a central character.
See PEABODY, Page 18
See STUDENT, Page 18
The Grand Budapest Hotel is set in a spa town in the fictional Republic of Zubrowka,somewhere
in eastern Europe.
See FIENNES, Page 18
18
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
unwind and just reflect on our leadership
abilities and focus on the upcoming activi-
ties for the next day.
Being a cabin leader was not a walk in
the park. I definitely had a lot of fun but, as
cabin leader, I had infinitely more respon-
sibilities: gather all the children every-
where quickly, make enough group trips to
the restroom, not let any child go unattend-
ed even for a little while, all while being
very sensitive to the children.
Establishing myself as a nice but fair cabin
leader was definitely the most challenging
part of the week. I had to make sure my
kids knew that I was there for them, as a
few got extremely homesick during the
nights. I would spend a lot of time calming
them down and, in one severe case, take
one child to the health center because her
homesickness manifested itself physically.
I got tremendous satisfaction reading the
“cabin leader reviews” which the kids filled
out midweek, in which some children wrote
that I really helped them overcome their
anxiety. I was not only a mediator in their
occasional arguments and a guardian, but
also a counselor.
I am so glad I decided to do this. I think
it is more than fair to say that I will miss
my kids, the staff and the other cabin lead-
ers very much, though we knew each other
for just a week. My kids and I were sad to
see each other go, but I think we all drew
something really special from that week,
something that can only be gained through
experience. It is something that cannot be
described through words on paper.
Janani Kumar is a senior at Burlingame High
School. Student News appears in the weekend edi-
tion. You can email Student News at news@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
Instead, she’s mostly obnoxious and when
Sherman takes her for a ride on the time
machine, she leads him to be disobedient.
But she also encourages him to be a risk-
taker, fostering his individuality and that of
the little ones watching. It’s here that Mr.
Peabody learns a thing or two about parent-
ing. He must remain in control, while
allowing Sherman to make mistakes.
As Mr. Peabody and Sherman visit ancient
Egypt, the French Revolution and the
Trojan War, historical tidbits unfold in cun-
ning ways. However, aspects of their adven-
tures, like Leonardo da Vinci’s weird robot
baby invention, are often too loony. But
the story, with additional voices by
Stephen Colbert, Leslie Mann and Allison
Janney, does have the ability to inspire
kids’ curiosity about historical bench-
marks. And though a few corny jokes may
go over their heads — “Perhaps I’m an old
Giza,” Mr. Peabody says after leaving
Egypt — jabs at Spartacus and Bill Clinton
will make adults giggle.
Directed by Rob Minkoff (“The Lion
King,” “Stuart Little”) and with Jason
Schleifer ( “Megamind”) as the head of char-
acter animation, the visuals are stylish and
clean. But the 3-D effect is unnecessary.
Danny Elfman, whose credits include “Big
Fish” and 14 Tim Burton films, crafts a score
that’s sprightly and sentimental. The most
touching moments come during montages
of Mr. Peabody and Sherman playing
sports.
The kiddie film is a big wet kiss for dogs
and dog lovers that champions loyalty and
bravery as not only traits of canines, but as
universal attributes.
“Mr. Peabody & Sherman,” a Fox release,
is rated PG for “some mild action and brief
rude humor.” Running time: 92 minutes.
Two and a half stars out of four.
Continued from page 17
PEABODY
services he provides (wink wink) go beyond
simply making sure the flowers are fresh and
the wine chilled.
Gustave is persnickety, pompous and
vain. But he’s committed to doing his job as
well as it can be done. He’s indeed a creature
of a fast-disappearing Old World.
But we’re getting ahead of ourselves. Or
rather, behind ourselves, because the film
hopscotches between three time periods.
We begin in 1985. A middle-aged writer
(Tom Wilkinson) is recalling his stay at the
Grand Budapest some 20 years earlier.
Suddenly we’re back in 1968, in the hotel,
which is a shell of its former glory — it’s an
ugly, post-Communist relic, with really bad
furniture. That same writer (now played by
Jude Law) encounters the hotel’s mysterious
owner, Mr. Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham),
who offers to tell him his story.
Which brings us back in time again, to
the years between the wars, when the hotel
looked like a strawberry-frosted wedding
cake. Mr. Moustafa is now a young lobby
boy, Zero (Tony Revolori) an ambitious lad
whom Gustave takes under his wing.
The plot gets going with the death of
Madame D — an 84-year-old, extremely rich
dowager countess (Tilda Swinton, barely
recognizable in amazing makeup) and for-
mer lover of Gustave. Turns out she’s left
him a priceless painting. But her imperious
son Dmitri (Adrien Brody, having fun here)
won’t have this smarmy concierge get a
piece of the family fortune. Gustave swipes
it anyway.
Gustave is eventually caught and sent to
prison camp, where, with a fellow inmate
(Harvey Keitel, no less), he plots escape.
They make it out, leading to more amazing
chases, involving motorcycles, a mountain
cable car, a ski jump, a bobsled run, and a
confession booth in a monastery. There’s a
wild shootout across hotel balconies. And
there’s the funniest scene in the film, a mon-
tage of old-world concierges across Europe,
banding together to try to help Gustave.
You’ll spot Anderson regular Bill Murray
here, as well as Jason Schwartzman and, in a
quick moment, Owen Wilson. Edward
Norton is funny as a determined military
police chief. Willem Dafoe is Dmitri’s ultra-
violent henchman, and Jeff Goldblum the
unfortunate lawyer who runs afoul of him.
Saoirse Ronan is young Zero’s girlfriend.
But in the end it’s Fiennes who makes the
biggest impression. His stylized, rapid-fire
delivery, dry wit and cheerful profanity keep
the movie bubbling along. Here’s to further
Fiennes-Anderson collaborations.
“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” a Fox
Searchlight release, is rated R by the
Motion Picture Association of America for
“language, some sexual content and vio-
lence.” Running time: 100 minutes. Three
and a half stars out of four.
Continued from page 17
FIENNES
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FLESH AND METAL: BODY AND MACHINE IN EARLY 20TH-CENTURY ART IS JOINTLY
ORGANIZED BY THE CANTOR ARTS CENTER AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY AND
THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART.
FERNAND LÉGER, DEUX FEMMES SUR FOND BLEU (TWO WOMEN ON A BLUE
BACKGROUND), 1927; SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, FRACTIONAL
GIFT OF HELEN AND CHARLES SCHWAB; © ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS),
NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS; PHOTO: BEN BLACKWELL.
NOV 13

MAR 16
museum.stanford.edu
F L E S H
AND
M E T A L
Body and Machine in Early 20th-Century Art
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
THE COCOANUTS GROW WILD
(AND WACKY) AT THE OREGON
SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL IN ASH-
LAND. You can bet your life that the secret
word is laughter as Groucho, Chico and
Harpo get caught up in (and create most of)
the shenanigans at the down-on-its-luck
Hotel de Cocoanut during the Florida land
boom of the 1920s. The Oregon
Shakespeare Festival’s delightful restaging
of The Cocoanuts, the Marx Brothers’ 1925
Broadway hit, lets the trio run amok, on
stage and in the audience, with hysterical
results. Two hours and 45-minutes includ-
ing one 15-minute intermission. Music and
lyrics by Irving Berlin. Book by George S.
Kaufman. Adapted by Mark Bedard. Directed
by David Ivers. Through Nov. 2.
AN ASIDE. Director David Ivers said,
“The Cocoanuts celebrates the best that the
Marx Brothers and musical theatre have to
offer: a score comprising some of Irving
Berlin’s early works and the anarchistic
comedy to be found only in the Marx
Brothers themselves.”
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW? After a
wildly successful run on Broadway with the
show, the Marx Brothers filmed The
Cocoanuts in 1929 at Paramount’s Astoria
Studios in Queens, N.Y. Their first feature-
length film, it was made soon after the addi-
tion of synchronized sound permitted talk-
ing movies.
WHAT’S ON THE PROGRAM. The
Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s 2014 sea-
son includes The Tempest (now through
Nov. 2), The Cocoanuts (now through Nov.
2), The Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window
(now through July 3), The Comedy of
Errors (now through Nov. 2), Water by the
Spoonful (March 26-June 20 and Sept. 4-
Nov. 2), AWrinkle in Time (April 16-Nov.
1), Richard III (June 3-Oct. 10), Into the
Woods (June 4-Oct. 11), The Two
Gentlemen of Verona (June 5-Oct. 12),
Family Album (July 1-Aug. 31), and The
Great Society (July 23-Nov.1). For ticket
information visit www.osfashland.org call
(800) 219-8161 or email
boxoffice@osfashland.org.
THE PLAY’S THE THING. During
Ashland’s Fourth of July celebration in
1935, local college Professor Angus L.
Bowmer arranged the first performances of
what is now the internationally renowned
Oregon Shakespeare Festival.
Approximately 125,000 people come from
around the world annually to view the pro-
ductions, which run February through Nov.
The season includes four plays by
Shakespeare and seven by classic and con-
temporary playwrights, rotating in reper-
tory in three theaters. The outdoor Allen
Elizabethan Theatre (1,190 seats) is the
oldest existing full-scale Elizabethan stage
in the Western Hemisphere.
A WALK IN LITHIA PARK. Ashland’s
lovely 93-acre forested Lithia Park, listed
on the National Register of Historic Places,
runs along Ashland Creek, whose water has
the second-highest concentration of (pre-
sumably beneficial) lithium in any natural
spring (the highest being in the famous
springs of Saratoga, N.Y.). The park, just a
block from the theaters, has two duck
ponds, a large playground, tennis courts
and miles of hiking trails. A perfect place
to stretch your legs between performances.
TAKE A ROAD TRIP TO ASHLAND
WITH AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATER. Meet actors, rub shoulders
with A.C.T. artistic staff and play a part in
an insider’s experience alongside fellow
theater enthusiasts on a July 17-21 road
trip to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.
Included are luxury round-trip bus trans-
portation; four nights of first-class hotel
accommodations at the historic Ashland
Springs Hotel; tickets to five performances
(plus optional additional performances);
backstage tours; a wine tour to
Jacksonville including lunch; breakfast
each morning; discussions and receptions
with guest artists; a welcome reception buf-
fet dinner at the hotel; and a farewell dinner.
Deadline for reservations is May 1 with an
early bird discount for booking by March
15. To request information contact Helen
Rigby at hrigby@act-sf.org or (415) 439-
2469.
FROM PAGE TO STAGE: JOIN
ROAD SCHOLAR IN ASHLAND. Road
Scholar, formerly known as Elderhostel,
provides perennially popular programs at
the Oregon Shakespeare Festival that com-
bine the usual pluses of packages tours and
the advantages of travel with intellectually
curious friends. Attend performances;
explore the architecturally unique OSF the-
atres with a behind-the-scenes field trip led
by an OSF company member; learn about
repertory theatre history and the life of an
actor; and enjoy performances by the
award-winning theater company. Get
details about Road Scholar’s Ashland pro-
grams by visiting www.roadscholar.org or
calling (800) 454-5768.
AND REMEMBER: Don’t keep forever
on the public road, going only where oth-
ers have gone and following one after the
other like a flock of sheep. Leave the beat-
en track occasionally and dive into the
woods. Alexander Graham Bell.
Susan Cohn is a member of the American Theatre
Critics Association, the North American Travel
Journalists Association and the International Food,
Wine & Travel Writers Association. She may be
reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
JENNY GRAHAM
IT’S MARX MADNESS AT THE OREGON SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL. Harpo (Brent Hinkley), Chico
(John Tufts) and Groucho (Mark Bedard) make an entrance in The Cocoanuts,the 1925 screwball
stage musical that became their first feature-length film.Through Nov. 2 in Ashland, Ore.
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Sens. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Ted Cruz, R-
Texas; Reps. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., and
Joaquin Castro, D-Texas.
NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
Tony Blinken, deputy national security
adviser; New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan.
CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.; former Vice
President Dick Cheney; former Secretary
of State James Baker.
CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Blinken; former Fla. Gov. Charlie Crist;
Zygimantas Pavilionis, Lithuania’s
ambassador to the United States; Marina
Kaljurand, Estonia’s ambassador to the U.S.
‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Paul; former Defense Secretary Robert
Gates.
Sunday news shows
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, MARCH 8
San Bruno AARP Chapter General
Meeting. 10 a.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road,
San Bruno. Pre-meeting social
begins at 9 a.m.
Intergenerational hike. 10 a.m. to
11 a.m. 555 Guadalupe Canyon
Parkway, Brisbane. Meet at the park-
ing lot at the main entrance to San
Bruno Mountain State and County
Park ($6 parking fee). Bring water
and a snack or lunch. Dress for var-
ied weather. For more information
contact sanbruno@mountain-
watch.org.
Free Covered California consulta-
tions. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Grand
Avenue Branch Library, 306 Walnut
Ave., South San Francisco. No regis-
tration required. Please bring: cur-
rent income of all family members
on application, legal resident card or
certificate of naturalized citizenship,
copy of U.S. citizenship and residen-
cy status, copy of SSN and DOB for
each family member in household.
Also available in Spanish.
Left Bank Brasserie Menlo Park
Hosts Calicraft Brewing Co. Beer
Pairing Event. 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Left Bank Menlo Park, 635 Santa
Cruz Ave., Menlo Park. A La Fête de la
Bière event showcasing the Calicraft
Brewing Co. $30 for a seasonal four-
course prix fixe tasting menu, sam-
pler flight of four Calicraft Brewing
Co. beers (5 oz. pours) for $10 and
pints will for $6. For more informa-
tion or for reservations call 473-
6543.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. Paperbacks
are six for $1, trade paperbacks are
two for $1, and hardbacks are two
for $2. All types of books will be
available for purchase. Proceeds
benefit Belmont Library. For more
information go to www.thefobl.org
or call 593-5650.
Origami Time. 1 p.m. 144 W. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. Origami folding for
all ages and skill levels. All materials
are provided. Free. For more infor-
mation email
craig@reachandteach.com.
‘Forces of Nature’ exhibit. Fourth
Street Fine Art Gallery, 2000 Fourth
St., San Mateo. This exhibit features
artists Maggie Hurley and Joanna
Ruckman. The exhibit will run
through April 18. There will be an
opening event from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
on March 15.
Millbrae Library Chinese Book
Club Event: ‘The Sorrows of Young
Werther!’ 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
movie; 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. discus-
sion. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae.
Dad and Me at the Library Puppet
Show. 2 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Free.
‘The Sound of Music’ by the
Peninsula Youth Theatre. 2 p.m.
Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Tickets are $20. To
purchase tickets call 903-6000 or go
to www.pytnet.org.
Dragon Theater Presents ‘Some
Girl(s).’ 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dragon
Theatre, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. In this dark comedy by Neil
LaBute (’In the Company of Men,’
‘The Shape of Things’) a man has a
life crisis and goes on a cross-coun-
try tour to visit his ex-girlfriends.
$15. For more information go to
dr agonpr oduc t i ons . net / box-
office/2014tickets.html.
In Concert. 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. San
Mateo Performing Arts Center, 600
N. Delaware St., San Mateo. From the
six high schools in the San Mateo
Union High School District, over 270
student musicians perform. Tickets
are $10 for adults and $5 for stu-
dents. For more information contact
Harvey Mittler at 345-9543 or email
harvey.mittler@gmail.com.
To Kill A Mockingbird. 7 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theatre,
3115 Del Monte St., San Mateo. $15
for adults, $10 for students/seniors.
For more information go to
hhs.schoolloop.com/drama.
Doctor Dolittle on Stage. 7 p.m.
Central Middle School, Mustang
Hall, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos. Dr.
Dolittle, presented by San Carlos
Children’s Theater March 16. Tickets
available at
SanCarlosChildrensTheater.com or
at the door, while supplies last.
Yale Spizzwinks Centennial
Concert Series. 7:30 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur Theatre, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. Nation’s old-
est underclassmen a cappella
group; assortment of jazz, pop, rock,
comedy and more. Tickets $15 for
adults, $10 for students. For more
info go to
spizzwinks.ticketbud.com.
‘The Sound of Music’ by the
Peninsula Youth Theatre. 7:30 p.m.
Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Tickets are $20. To
purchase tickets call 903-6000 or go
to www.pytnet.org.
Palo Alto Philharmonic Spring
Chamber Concert. 8 p.m. First
Baptist Church, 305 North California
Ave., Palo Alto. Tickets range from
$10 to $20 and can be purchased at
the door or at www.paphill.org.
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
Left Bank Brasserie Menlo Park
Hosts Calicraft Brewing Co. Beer
Pairing Event. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Left Bank Menlo Park, 635 Santa
Cruz Ave., Menlo Park. A La Fête de la
Bière event showcasing the Calicraft
Brewing Co. $30 for a seasonal four-
course prix fixe tasting menu, sam-
pler flight of four Calicraft Brewing
Co. beers (5 oz. pours) for $10 and
pints will for $6 For more informa-
tion or for reservations call 473-
6543.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. Paperbacks
are six for $1, trade paperbacks are
two for $1, and hardbacks are two
for $2. All types of books will be
available for purchase. Proceeds
benefit Belmont Library. For more
information go to www.thefobl.org
or call 593-5650.
‘The Sound of Music’ by the
Peninsula Youth Theatre. 1 p.m.
Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Tickets are $20. To
purchase tickets call 903-6000 or go
to www.pytnet.org.
Doctor Dolittle on Stage. 1 p.m.
Central Middle School, Mustang
Hall, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos. Dr.
Dolittle, presented by San Carlos
Children’s Theater March 7 to 16.
Tickets available at
SanCarlosChildrensTheater.com or
at the door, while supplies last.
Dragon Theater Presents ‘Some
Girl(s).’ 2 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. In this
dark comedy by Neil LaBute (’In the
Company of Men,’ ‘The Shape of
Things’) a man has a life crisis and
goes on a cross-country tour to visit
his ex-girlfriends. $15. For more
information go to dragonproduc-
t i o n s . n e t / b o x -
office/2014tickets.html.
To Kill A Mockingbird. 2 p.m.
Hillsdale High School Little Theatre,
3115 Del Monte St., San Mateo. $15
for adults, $10 for students/seniors.
For more information go to
hhs.schoolloop.com/drama.
Bay Area Bigfoot Meeting. 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. Round Table Pizza, 61 43rd
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 504-1782.
Miro Quartet Concert. 7 p.m. Pre-
concert talk at 6 p.m. Kohl Mansion,
Great Hall, 2750 Adeline Drive,
Burlingame. $48 for adults, $45 for
seniors, $15 for 30 and under. For
more information call 762-1130.
MONDAY, MARCH 10
Music at Kohl Mansion Presents a
Concert for All Ages. 9:15 a.m.,
10:25 a.m. and 11:35 a.m. Kohl
Mansion, 2750 Adeline Drive,
Burlingame. Emmy Award-winning
dancer-choreographer Yaelisa and
Caminos Flamencos bring the ener-
gy and color of flamenco dancing to
Kohl Mansion’s Great Hall. In this
interactive show for all ages, Yaelisa
and her troupe take audiences on a
whirlwind tour of Spain and its rich
cultural heritage. $6 children, $10
seniors (includes tour of mansion).
For more information go to
www.musicatkohl.org.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
Yana Reznik. 1 p.m. Burlingame
Woman’s Club, 241 Park Road,
Burlingame. A Russian-born classical
pianist will perform. For more infor-
mation go to www.burlingamemus-
icclub.net.
TUESDAY, MARCH 11
RSVP Deadline for Newcomers
Club Luncheon. Send checks to
Janet Williams, 1168 Shoreline Drive,
San Mateo. Noon at Broadway Prime
Restaurant, 1316 Broadway,
Burlingame. $25. For more informa-
tion call 286-0688.
Peninsula Blogging Club. 9:30 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Garland Web Design
Services, 1700 S. Amphlett Blvd.,
Suite 250 B, San Mateo. $10. For
more information go to
http://www.meetup.com/WordPres
s - F o r - B u s i n e s s - o r -
Pleasure/events/168083362/.
Cal MediConnect free presenta-
tion. 2 p.m. Redwood City Public
Library, Community Room, 1044
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. Do
you have MediCare and Medi-Cal in
San Mateo County? If this is you,
your family or friends, attend this
free HICAP presentation. Free. For
more information call 627-9350 or
go to
www.hicapsanmateocounty.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Like Groom, Horsley hopes to contin-
ue his ongoing work like farm labor
housing and solving coastside flooding.
“I love what I do and I want to finish all
of the projects that my office has been
working on,” Horsley wrote in an email
to the Daily Journal.
Horsley said he doesn’t anticipate
campaigning differently in district elec-
tions aside from possibly more precinct
walking in San Carlos. The spread-out
coastside doesn’t make as much sense,
Horsley said, adding that he appears at
enough forums to educate those residents
about his priorities.
Mark Church, chief elections officer
and assessor-county clerk-recorder, is
running for re-election and is challenged
by John K. Mooney who ran as a write-
in candidate against him in 2010.
Coroner Robert Foucrault is chal-
lenged by small businessman Rick
Dalton. Dalton, 48, said he is running to
make a difference and advocate for fami-
lies and loved ones in their most desper-
ate need and time and during a time of the
county being in the midst of “significant
personnel growth.” If elected, Dalton
said he will bring a key attribute of “fis-
cal conservancy” although he notes not
being aware of any financial issue with
the office at this time.
Foucrault, who has been the coroner
since 2001, is emphasizing his experi-
ence with “some extremely challenging
events” like the San Bruno gas line
explosion and Asiana Airlines crash
along with his relationships with law
enforcement.
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe,
Sheriff Greg Munks, Treasurer-Tax
Collector Sandie Arnott and County
School Superintendent Anne Campbell
are all running without challenge for re-
election.
Like most incumbents seeking to
stay, Wagstaffe said he’s motivated for a
second term by wanting to continue the
office’s legacy of prosecution with “high
integrity.” He would also like to do more
community outreach, continue serving
victims and focus on environmental
cases.
Arnott, who took the office three years
ago, said she hopes voters have been
pleased with her efforts including the
establishment of remote tax payment
locations and a live chat feature on the
website. Arnott said her primary focus is
replacing the aging tax system with one
shared by the controller, assessor and
tax collector which she estimates to take
about four years to implement.
Controller is the only county govern-
ment position with an open seat because
current Controller Bob Adler, appointed
to finish out his predecessor’s term, is
retiring. The options are Joe Galligan, a
former Burlingame mayor who unsuc-
cessfully challenged Arnott for treasurer-
tax collector, and Assistant Controller
Juan Raigoza. Raigoza, 47, has worked
in the Controller’s Office for 13 years
and has Adler’s backing, according to
his campaign.
San Mateo County also have two con-
tested judicial races, a bit of a rarity.
Judge Beth Labson Freeman’s appoint-
ment to the U.S. District Court leaves
her seat open and defense attorney Jeff
Hayden and Commissioner Susan
Greenberg are running to fill the spot.
The upcoming retirement of Judge Craig
Parsons leaves another open seat which
is being sought by prosecutor Stephanie
Garratt. Daly City Councilman Ray
Buenaventura and Christiana State, a
temporary judge in small claims for
Santa Clara County Superior Court,
pulled papers but did not qualify, accord-
ing to the Elections Office report after
the deadline Friday.
The remaining judges up for re-elec-
tion — Joseph Bergeron, Richard
DuBois, Don Franchi, Jonathan Karesh,
Steven Dylina and Elizabeth Hill —
have no opposition.
Voters in the Sequoia Union High
School District will also consider a
$265 million bond measure on the June
ballot. The measure is aimed at tackling
overcrowding and enrollment grown. To
pass, the measure needs a 55 percent yes
vote. Half Moon Bay voters will also
choose which option they would like for
the Main Street Bridge — replacing it or
preserving it.
Aside from the local offices, voters
also have representatives in Congress
and the state Legislature to pick.
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
is facing opposition from Michael
Moloney — a past and frequent oppo-
nent — and Robin Chew and Oscar
Alejandro Braun.
Braun is also running for the 18th
District seat held by U.S. Rep. Anna
Eshoo, D-Palo Alto. Rounding out that
ballot is Chris Drew, Robert B.
Ostenberg, Richard B. Fox and Bruce
Anderson.
The 19th district seat is sought by
Assemblyman Phil Ting, D-San
Francisco, and Renato G. Pineda.
State Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-
South San Francisco, is squaring off with
Mark Gilham and Jonathan Emmanuel
Madison in the 22nd District.
State Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-
Menlo Park, is running against Greg
Coladonato in the 24th District.
Continued from page 1
ELECTION
ney Paul DeMeester vowed to appeal the
conviction returned in November but
the prosecution called the guilty verdict
and Friday’s lengthy sentence justice for
Alba and his loved ones. During the
hearing, Alba’s mother also told
Maldonado directly how he has ruined
many lives, including his own, said
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Jurors deliberated roughly three days
before convicting Maldonado who was a
teenager himself when he and co-defen-
dant Erick Romeo Morales killed Alba
and fled Daly City for a decade before
being caught. Aseparate jury convicted
Morales, 32, in February of first-degree
murder and the special allegation of
lying in wait which means, unlike
Maldonado, he will have no chance at
parole when sentenced April 1.
Maldonado was “sad” by the sentence
although it was no surprise, said
DeMeester.
“Our position has always been that
despite what he might have told police
or others, this was Morales’ doing and
so hopefully we’ll get to do this again,”
said DeMeester, referencing the appeal.
Maldonado contended to jurors that
Morales lured Alba to the hangout and
killed him before calling Maldonado to
hide the bloody evidence of a knife,
cellphone and sweatshirt. Maldonado
told jurors he complied out of love for
Morales, whom he knew from their
childhood in Guatemala, and initially
lied to Daly City police about someone
else being the killer because he feared
Morales’ father.
Prosecutor Jeff Finigan told the jury
Maldonado held Alba down while
Morales stabbed him repeatedly in the
neck, arms and torso. Both men were
eyed as suspects but each left Daly City
shortly after the murder. Maldonado
eventually ended up in Florida where,
according to his friend Mario Cajina, he
confessed to the killing and showed a
photo taken of Morales standing over
Alba’s body. Maldonado would later
claim to have taken the photograph as
evidence of who committed the crime.
Maldonado also possessed a locket con-
taining Morales’ photo.
Cajina tipped off Daly City police
who found the buried items in the men’s
former Daly City backyard. During trial,
DeMeester contended Cajina lied to
police about Maldonado’s involvement
because he was angry at having been
kicked out of their shared home.
In 2007, authorities extradited
Maldonado who tried escaping his
armed guards at San Francisco
International Airport by jumping 25
feet over a concrete railing while still
handcuffed. In 2009, two years after
Maldonado’s arrest, Morales was appre-
hended after an East Coast traffic stop
revealed his identity.
Maldonado’s prosecution was then
delayed for four years as courts grappled
with questions over prosecution access
to his psychiatric records. The prosecu-
tion’s victory became a moot point
because Judge Mark Forcum did not
allow the mental health evidence into
trial. On Friday, DeMeester said that
may be part of the appeal because jurors
should have known about his client’s
limited mental abilities to better evalu-
ate his demeanor and police statements.
“It’s obviously an incredibly vital
issue, this exclusion of brain impair-
ment,” DeMeester said.
Morales did not testify on his own
behalf during his own trial but his
defense argued that
Maldonado was the instigator.
Maldonado sexually abused
Morales in Guatemala before
each separately moved to Daly
City where the stalking and
intimidation continued,
defense attorney Tom Kelley
said during trial. In Daly City,
Maldonado told Morales a
secret Guatemalan police
organization wanted him to
kill somebody and then com-
mitted the crime himself but
took the photo of his client
hunched over the body either
as “proof” for the police or for
future blackmail, Kelley said.
Despite the lengthy time it
took to get the cases to trial,
Wagstaffe said the outcome is
worthwhile.
“This has been a long, ardu-
ous journey through the crim-
inal justice system and it’s
just a shame that it took so
long. This is one of those
cases where they say justice
delayed is justice denied but
this time justice persevered,”
he said.
Continued from page 1
MALDONADO
COMICS/GAMES
3-8-14
FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Frontier, once
5 FedEx units
8 Walleyed fish
12 Low voice
13 Hard wood
14 Persuade
15 — does it!
16 Delight
18 Lama’s land
20 Involuntary movement
21 “Mayday!”
22 Seafarer
25 Total
28 Resinous deposits
29 Margarine
33 Nerve cell
35 Cabinet parts
36 Klondike’s territory
37 Forward letters
38 Between ports
39 Himalayan sighting
41 Prefix for classic
42 Innocence
45 Circulars
48 Ms. Arthur
49 Desert plant
53 Spotted horses
56 Rough edge
57 Linen color
58 Sandra or Ruby
59 Persia, now
60 Adroit
61 Former JFK arrival
62 Perimeter
DOWN
1 Light bulb measure
2 Grades 1-12
3 Wild guess
4 Clan emblem
5 Remove
6 Sweden’s sea
7 Flocks of geese
8 Dell output
9 Promises to pay
10 Corn syrup brand
11 New singles
17 Do well
19 Hawk’s gripper
23 Kept in shape
24 Motel vacancy
25 Novelist — Seton
26 — ex machina
27 University at Durham
30 Type of shark
31 Ontario neighbor
32 Norway’s capital
34 Sorrel or bay
35 Goddess
37 AAA suggestion
39 Surrenders
40 Gives the slip
43 Lawyers’ grp.
44 Blake of jazz
45 Mimicked
46 Board game pair
47 Peasant
50 Whey opposite
51 Rugged cliff
52 “Rule Britannia” composer
54 Except
55 Place
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 2014
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — Someone you love
needs your attention. Adjust your priorities to put
your domestic responsibilities first. The way you
feel and the way you are treated will improve as
a result.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Stay on track and
dismiss any projects that do not conform to your
career plans. Keep an open line of communication
with those in a position to help you advance.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Devise a
precise plan for your future. Outline all of the
requirements necessary to see your vision take
shape. Also, remember to plan ahead for any
obstacles you may encounter.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Petty conflicts will
develop quickly if you are excessively tired. Spend
a little time alone. Relax and take a stress-free
break, away from your day-to-day responsibilities.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You will be treated
with suspicion if you exaggerate. It’s not necessary
to brag. Honesty is the most important quality when
it comes to attracting new friends and allies.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You will make a
favorable impression if you stand up for your
beliefs. Your straightforward approach will lead to
an offer from someone influential. A celebration
will enhance your personal life.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — It’s time to focus on
your personal relationships. Make special plans
or include the ones you love in a family project in
order to close any gap that has come between you
and the ones you love.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Unexpected
developments will take you in a new direction.
Don’t wait for change to take place. Now is
the time to make your dreams come true.
Improvements can be made.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Consider the facts
and your available budget when dealing with
investments. Be wary of contracts that allow
others access to your private records.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Stop avoiding
the inevitable. Deal with personal matters
immediately so that you can get on with your life and
do the things you want, without unnecessary stress.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Make a pledge
to take better care of your health. Explore a
new regimen geared toward better nutrition and
frequent exercise. Put a schedule in place and
stick to it.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Surround
yourself with good friends and family. Offer your
assistance to youngsters, and take part in creative
or imaginative games. Lighthearted activity will
lift your spirits.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend • March. 8-9, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
We Need
100 Drivers
Immediately!
º Full and part time
º Good hourly, medical, paid time off
º With or without cargo van or similar
º SF Bay Area routes
º Need clean driving record and 21+
$250 signing bonus
Come to our Open House Job Fair!!!
Saturday, March 8
th
— 9 am to Noon
480 Roland Way, Oakland, CA
Call 408-514-2611 to register for the Job Fair
or schedule an appointment!
Or email: moliver@progisticsdistribution.com
Progistics is the leader in last mile shipping solutions
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
107 Musical Instruction
HAVE YOU ALWAYS
WANTED TO PLAY
THE HARP?
Private lessons in your home or
at San Mateo Studio.
Rentals available.
www.ericamesser.com
(415)786-9143
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
110 Employment
BUSINESS ANALYST (OPERATIONS)
Job Location: South San Francisco, CA
Requirements: Masters in Bus, Fin, Int'l
trade, Econ or equiv. (or BA + 5 yrs).
Exp. in international trading, business
and shipping operations pref'd. Mail Re-
sume: Peking Handicraft Inc. Attn: HR
Dept., 1388 San Mateo Ave, So. San
Francisco, CA 94080.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS -
IRISH HELP AT HOME
HIRING NOW
Home care attendants
wanted in the South Bay
Experience preferred
Work one-on-one in the
client's home
Competitive rates of pay
Call (650) 347-6903
www.irishhelpathome.com
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DAYCARE -
EXPERIENCED DAYCARE Assistant for
fast paced environment. Working with In-
fant & Toddlers. CPR, fingerprinting a
must. (650)245-6950
WE NEED 100 Drivers Immediately!
· Full and part time
· Good hourly, medical, paid time off
· With or without cargo van or similar
· SF Bay Area routes
· Need clean driving record and 21+
Come to our Open House Job Fair!!!
Saturday, March 8 – 9am-Noon
480 Roland Way, Oakland, CA
Call 408-514-2611 to register for the Job
Fair, or schedule an appointment! Or
email:moliver@progisticsdistribution.com
Progistics is the leader in last mile ship-
ping solutions
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 200
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
IN-HOME
CARE Staffng
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed per Month. Taxi Permit
required Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff & Housekeeping Staff
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI & Limo Driver, Wanted, full time,
paid weekly, between $500 and $700
cash, (650)921-2071
23 Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
THE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday,
March 18, 2014 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, CA and take action on the
following items. All interested persons are invited to attend.
416 – 424 Kensington Avenue. Request for a Use Permit to al-
low the construction of an addition to an existing two-family
dwelling which exceeds the .55 FAR guideline per SBMC Sec-
tion 12.200.030.B.2. Recommended Environmental Determi-
nation: Categorical Exemption.
548 San Mateo Avenue. Request for a Use Permit and Park-
ing Exception to allow a martial arts studio within the C-B-D
Central Business District per SBMC Sections 12.96.120.C.7
and 12.100.120. Recommended Environmental Determina-
tion: Categorical Exemption.
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals.
º The candidate will effectivel], professionall] and
accurately represent the Daily Journal’s wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
º The candidate will manage their clients in a heavil]
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
º A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsiol]
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for an
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
º 8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
º B2B sales experience is preferred
º hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
º work well with others
º Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
º A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
110 Employment
TERMITE INSPECTOR
NEEDED -
Great pay, benefits, 401k, medical, den-
tal. Peninsula and San Francisco area.
Branch 3 license preferred. Construction
experiencee / knowledge necessary.
Apply: Western Exterminators, 1320
Marsten Rd, Burlingame.
Email jshiloh@west-ext.com
WINDOW INSTALLER WANTED, F/T,
Experience preferred, CLEAN DMV,
Pacifica location. Call Cynthia
650/359-7306.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259611
The following person is doing business
as: G.E.S, 180 A Utah Ave., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Ground Express Services, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/1998.
/s /Kapo Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259610
The following person is doing business
as: Air & Ground World Transport, 180 A
Utah Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: AG World Transport, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/1998.
/s /Kapo Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259468
The following person is doing business
as: Abcam Burlingame, 863 Mitten Rd.,
Ste. 103, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Epitomics, Inc, DE. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s / Michael Hadjisavas /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259275
The following person is doing business
as: Lindserella, 1646 Virginia Ave., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Lindsay
Joan Brugioni Peterson, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Lindsay Joan Brugioni Peterson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259588
The following person is doing business
as: Bullseye Translation, LLC, 274 Red-
wood Shores Pkwy., #528, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94065 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Bullseye Transla-
tion, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 05/26/2010.
/s/ Nadezhada Mcleod /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/15/14, 02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259694
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Custom Cabinet Refacing, 2) Cus-
tom Refacing 475 Flibert St., HALF
MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: David Mi-
chael Furtado, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ David Michael Furtado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259593
The following person is doing business
as: South City Smile, 2288 Westborough
Blvd., Ste. 106, SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: William C.K. Ho,
2210 Gellert Blvd., #5303, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ William C.K. Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/12/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259592
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Family Smile Center, 1828
El Camino Real, Ste 603, Burlingame,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: William Ho, DDS, APDC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ William C.K. Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/12/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259634
The following person is doing business
as: Dream Graphic Design, 5 Aragon
Blvd. #6, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Catherine Kirchner, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Catherine Kirchner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259666
The following person is doing business
as: Darin Boville Gallery, 501 San Mateo
Rd. Units 8 & 9, HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Darin Boville, 1128 Birch St.,
#370120, Montara, CA 94037. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 02/02/14.
/s/ Darin Boville /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/18/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259708
The following person is doing business
as: Gods & Titans Tattoo, 3127 Jefferson
Ave., Unit #5, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Victor Martinez, 1221 Ruby
St., Redwood City, CA 94061. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Victor Martinez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/20/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/22/14, 03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259784
The following person is doing business
as: Budget Motors, 325 S Maple Ave Ste
28, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Allen Huang, 442 Athens St.,
San Francisco, CA 94080 The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Allen Huang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/26/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14, 03/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259816
The following person is doing business
as: Nubee Motors, 1427 Mission Rd.,
Unit B SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Edmond Jonoubeh, 330 Ash-
ton Ave., Millbrae CA 94030. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Edmond Jonoubeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/01/14, 03/08/14, 03/15/14, 03/22/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259671
The following person is doing business
as: Youth Obstacle Boot Camp, 248 A
Harbor Blvd., BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Brien Shamp’s boot Camps, Person-
al Traning & nutrition, Inc, CA and Kings
Camps & Fitness, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN
11/01/2013.
/s/ Brien Shamp /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/08/14, 03/15/13, 03/22/13, 03/29/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259561
The following person is doing business
as: The Gilded Sports Fan, 990 Alice Ln.,
#5, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Thore
Aatlo, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN.
/s/ Thore Aatlo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/08/14, 03/15/13, 03/22/13, 03/29/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259840
The following person is doing business
as: KV Interior Designs, 535 Pine St.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Karen Ve-
lasquez, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN N/A.
/s/ Karen Velasquez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/08/14, 03/15/13, 03/22/13, 03/29/14).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14. Call 650 490-
0921 - Leave message if no answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
210 Lost & Found
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3 each (650)341-1861
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
295 Art
5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”, signed
Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all. 650-345-
3277
295 Art
6 CLASSIC landscape art pictures,
28”x38” glass frame. $15 each OBO.
Must see to appreciate. (650)345-5502
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
CRAFTSMAN 9 gal 3.5 HP wet/dry vac-
uum with extra filter. $30. 650-326-2235.
FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC stove, $285. as
new! SOLD!
HOOD, G.E. Good condition, clean,
white.. $30. (650)348-5169
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
MINI-FRIG NEW used i week paid $150.
Sell $75.00 650 697 7862
PREMIER GAS stove. $285. As new!
SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
24
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
HO TRAIN parts including engines, box-
cars, tankers, tracks, transformers, etc.
$75 Call 650-571-6295
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
RUSSIAN MEDAL Pins for sale, 68 in
lot, $99 SOLD!
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., SOLD!
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE DOLLS- 2002 Collection- Never
removed from box. Holiday Celebration &
Society Girl. $40.650-654-9252
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
VINTAGE 50'S JC Higgins toboggan, 74"
long & 18" wide. $35. 650-326-2235.
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
SOLD!
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL floor lamp, marble
table top. Good condition. $90. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $55., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
ATT 2WIRE Router, working condition,
for Ethernet, wireless, DSL, Internet.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
FLUORESCENT LIGHTS, Commercial
grade, 4 tubes $9 650-595-3933
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPAD 4, brand new! 16 GB, Wi-Fi, black,
still unopened in box. Tired of the same
old re-gifts? Get yourself something you
really want... an iPad! $500. SOLD!
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
304 Furniture
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER - Five Drawer - $30.
(650)333-5353
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65.
LA-Z-BOY RECLINER, print fabric, me-
dium size. $70. (650)343-8206
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
RECLINING CHAIR (Dark Green) - $55.
(650)333-5353
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOFA SET of two Casual style, Good
condition 62" long. $85.00 Hardly used..
650 697 7862
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA/ UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WALNUT CHEST, small 4 drawer with
upper bookcase, $50, 650-726-6429
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
304 Furniture
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, (650)345-5502
BATH TOWELS(3) - 1 never used(
26"x49") aqua - $15 each SOLD!
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/ cover, washable $25.
(650)578-9208
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(2) stainless steel, tem-
perature-resistent handles, 21/2 & 4 gal.
$5 for both. (650) 574-3229.
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MASSAGING SHOWER Head NEW,
screws on, no tool, only $10
650-595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
BLACK & Decker 17" Electric Hedge
Trimmer. Like new. $20. 650-326-2235.
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DRAIN CLEANER Snake 6' long,
new/unused only $5 (650)595-3933
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
308 Tools
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SCREWDRIVERS, SET of 6 sealed
pack, warranty only $5 (650)595-3933
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
CEILING FAN 44", three lights, Excel-
lent condition, white or wood grain rever-
sible blades. $25. 650-339-1816
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOWN PILLOW; Fully Stuffed, sterilized,
allergy-free ticking. Mint Condition $25
(650)375-8044
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
GREEN CERAMIC flower pot w/ 15
Different succulents, $20.(650)952-4354
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
NALGENE WATER bottle,
$5; new aluminum btl $3 650-595-3933
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SHOWER CURTAIN set: royal blue
vinyl curtain with white nylon over-curtain
$15 SOLD!
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
TWIN BEDDING: 2 White Spreads,
Dust-Ruffles, Shams. Pink Blanket,
Fit/flat sheets, pillows ALL $60 (650)375-
8044
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
311 Musical Instruments
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. SOLD!
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WANTED SILVER Dollars
(650)492-1298
WANTED: HORSE DRAWN
EQUIPMENT
For restoration.
Condition is not critical.
Email location, photo, &
Telephone number. to:
rosekrans@pacbell.net or
call (650)851-7201
316 Clothes
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, $10 (650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $15.00 (650)375-8044
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
SOLD!
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
MANS DENIM Jacket, XL HD fabric,
metal buttons only $15 650-595-3933
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
25 Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Leavenworth and
McHenry: Abbr.
4 Teddy Roosevelt
sobriquet
15 Medium
evocation
16 Like evergreens
17 “... __ the hot sun
count / His dewy
rosary ...”: Keats
18 “I Hope I Get It”
musical
19 Clinking currency
21 __ judicata:
decided case
22 “Sorry to say ...”
23 Sported
24 Mineral in
pumpkin seeds
25 __ Toy Barn:
“Toy Story 2”
setting
26 Prepare for a
poster tube
27 London
Philharmonic
co-founder Sir
Thomas __
29 Sailor’s direction
30 Hidden
31 Prefix with scope
34 KGB agent’s foe
36 Beatles song with
the line, “There’s
one for you,
nineteen for me”
38 Wrap
39 Like many
French Quarter
streets
43 Goalie’s undoing
44 Sextet at
Woodstock
45 Dairy aisle tub
46 Start to amble?
48 Film villain in a
Nehru jacket
49 Stifle
50 Women
51 Keep to oneself
52 Stuck (out)
53 Spaghetti sauce
ingredient
56 Lobbying gp.
57 Delta Tau Chi,
familiarly
58 Kate’s role in
“The Aviator”
59 Maple leaf-eater
60 Make
DOWN
1 Talent scout
discovery
2 A woodpile may
be under it
3 Whiz through, in
a way
4 He said, “Man is
the only animal
that blushes. Or
needs to”
5 Powell’s
successor
6 New England
sch. with a
wildcat mascot
7 They need
connecting flights
8 Playwright
Rattigan
9 Grilled-bread
appetizer
10 Uncertain sounds
11 Deep bow
12 Clarinetist’s effect
13 Author Ferber et
al.
14 Distillery output
20 “Unforgettable”
duet partners
24 __ garden
27 Long-term
investment
strategy
28 The Ducks, on an
ESPN ticker
31 Breakfast buffet
utensil
32 Depart
33 19th-century
bat-and-ball
game
35 Org. that keeps
driving stats
37 Marked for
deletion
40 Greek poetic
stanza
41 Lassitude
42 Italian diminutive
suffix
44 Bagel selection
46 Button on some
receivers
47 Dance version of
a pop hit, often
49 Literary captain
50 Skewer
52 “__, meine
Freude”: Bach
motet
54 __ vez: maybe, in
Pamplona
55 Abrade
By Brad Wilber
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
03/08/14
03/08/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50. (650)637-
0930
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
MOVING SALE
SATURDAY
MARCH 8
9am-4pm
SAN MATEO
42 Chester Way
Furniture, books, house-
wares, art, tools, & more,
all priced to move.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SWIFT ORTHOPEDIC BED, flawless ex-
cellent condition. Queen size. Adjustable.
Originally paid $4,000. Yours for only
$500. (650)343-8206
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
CIMPLER
REAL ESTATE
Cimpler Real Estate - Reinventing
Home Buying
To Buy Smarter Call Artur Urbanski,
Broker/Owner
(650)401-7278
533 Airport Blvd, 4th Flr, Burlingame
www.cimpler.com
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
RENT
1 bedroom bath & kitchen
close to everything Redwood City $1375.
650-361-1200
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY ‘00 Impala, 58K miles, Very
clean! $6,000. Joe, SOLD!
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE ‘99 Van, 391 Posi, 200 Hp V-6,
22” Wheels, 2 24’ Ladders, 2015 Tags,
$4500 OBO (650)481-5296
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBILE ‘99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. $1,500.
(650)740-6007.
SUBARU ‘98 Outback Limited, 175K
miles, $5,500. Recent work. Mint condiit-
ton. High Car Fax, View at sharpcar.com
#126837 (415)999-4947
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2000 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
SOLD!
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Appliance Repair
Cabinetry
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & JANITORIAL
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
Spring Cleaning Special! $65
call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
Concrete
PROFESSIONAL
CONCRETE, MASONRY, &
REMODELING SERVICES
• Paving • Landscaping
• Demolition
(650)445-8444
Mobile (907)570-6555
State Lic. #B990810
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
MARIN CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialists
* custom decks * Framing * remodel-
ing * foundation Rep.*Dry Rot * Ter-
mite Rep * And Much More
Ask about our 20% signing and
senior discounts
(650)486-1298
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels • Framing
• Carpentry Stucco • Siding
• Dryrot • Painting
• Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER’S CLEANING
• Roof and Gutter Repair
• Screening & Seal
• Replace & New Gutters
Free Est. Call Oscar
(650)669-6771
Lic.# 910421
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
HAMZEH PLUMBING
Faucet Repair, Sewer lines, Un-
clog Drains, Water heater repair
and Repair Sewer inspection
People love me on Yelp!
(415)690-6540
27 Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
favorite teams,low prices,
large selection.
450 San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
650 771 -5614
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
Food
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650)515-7792
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
President's Day Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy Coins, Jewelry, Watches,
Platinum, Diamonds.
Expert fine watch & jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave. Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
$29
ONE HOUR MASSAGE
(650)354-8010
1030 Curtis St #203,
Menlo Park
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax & Massage
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
www.unionspaand salon.com
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
28
Weekend • March 8-9, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 3/31/14
WEBUY
$â0
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR

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