You are on page 1of 1

Rohit Talreja, Maya Anjur­Dietrich BIOE 123

Ethical Implications of Biotic Games Some critics argue that allowing biotic games with single­celled organisms will open the door to using increasingly complex organisms as controllable elements in games. The concerns are two­fold, that biotic games allow players and scientists to “play God” over a group of other organisms and control their movements, and that it could potentially escalate to the point where these organisms are cognitively advanced enough that “playing” with them would be unethical. While this is physically possible, it is not at all probable since scientific institutions and scientists themselves are subject to a lot of oversight, both internal in the form of IRBs or other review committees as well as national statutes or laws governing acceptable research practices. In both cases, there are check and balances in place to protect both the researchers and the creatures they study from unethical practices. We feel, therefore, that the “slippery slope” or “Promethean” arguments against designing educational tools or games around controlling simple organisms is too alarmist given the amount institutional regulation of biological research and the educational nature of the studies. Biotic games face the challenge that the ethicality of manipulating living things for the sole purpose of human enjoyment is questionable. However, after discussion, we have determined that we believe that not only are the creatures not being harmed, but the biotic game will lead to increased education about science and about the Euglena themselves. First off, the Euglena are not being removed from their natural habitat and are, in fact, probably living longer than they would in the wild. Next, they are instinctively phototaxic, meaning that we, as researchers and game developers, are not imposing new or dangerous behaviours through training. Finally, both from the paper and from careful analysis of our actions, we believe that the Euglena are not suffering at any point during the biotic game process. Further, we hope that by playing the game, people will be become interested in both how the game was developed and in the Euglena themselves. For this reason, we added a specific function to our game to allow users to bring up a window with basic information about Euglena and links to more information to continue their learning about the organisms and biotic games in general. In the end, we decided that biotic games are beneficial to research and the public as long as the focus of the game is on education, not just about the game but also about the process of making the game and about the organisms used in the game.