COLLEGE PARK HIGH SCHOOL 201 VIKING DRIVE PLEASANT HILL, CA 94523 (925) 682-7670

www.mdusd.k12.ca.us/collegepark

ADMINISTRATION
Barbara Oaks Steven Nixon Jennifer Bartoli Peter Aloo Irene Keenan Amy Bush Sarah Wiebe Principal Vice Principal Vice Principal Vice Principal Vice Principal Student Services Coordinator Student Services Coordinator

STAFF
Jennifer Ferrari Ana Aguilar Maggie Bowker Gisele Hayes Mary Lee Lyn Jones MaryAnne Shaw Janet Monroy Sheila Welsh Janet Fitzpatrick Debbie Lindstrom Office Manager Administrative Secretary Administrative Secretary Administrative Secretary Administrative Clerk Registrar Treasurer Student Resource Technician Attendance Secretary College & Career Advisor Instructional Media Assistant Psychologist

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CPHS Vision and Mission Statement Introduction
A Student’s Guide for Successful Educational Planning Parents as Partners in Planning A Word About Schedule/Schedule Change Requests Special Education 3 4 4 5 6-7 8-10 11-13 14-17 18-21 22-25 26-29 30-32 33 34 35 35-36 36 37 38 39-40 40 Page 1-2

Small Learning Communities/Career Integrated Academics
Introduction Business Careers Environmental Careers Fitness & Health Careers Human Services Careers Performing Arts Careers Teaching & Learning Careers Visual Arts Careers

Graduation Requirements College Guidance Section
Graduation Table Advanced Placement Independent Colleges and Universities Community Colleges UC and CSU Requirements UC/CSU Information College Entrance Examinations Other Testing Programs

Course Descriptions
Business/Computer English English Electives Foreign Language Home Economics Mathematics Physical Education Physical Education (Electives) Science Science (Elective) Social Science Social Science Electives Visual and Performing Arts Miscellaneous (Student Aides) ROP (Regional Occupational Program) at College Park High School 41-42 43-45 46-47 48-52 52 53-57 58 58-60 61-65 65 66-68 69-70 70-80 81-82 83 84 85-91

Alternative Educational Programs Course Information Index

COLLEGE PARK HIGH SCHOOL VISION: OUR VISION: At College Park High School, we believe that all students can learn. We work as a team to ensure student achievement by providing the content, skills, and processes needed to be successful.

COLLEGE PARK HIGH SCHOOL MISSION STATEMENT: College Park High School, in partnership with our community, is committed to academic excellence that leads to a positive and confident approach to life and to a lifelong love of learning. We will educate our students to think critically and creatively, make choices responsibly and honestly and resolve differences peacefully. Students will increase their understanding of themselves and others, and become active, involved citizens who will be empowered to welcome intellectual and social challenges.

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EXPECTED SCHOOLWIDE LEARNING RESULTS (ESLR’s)
Our goal is that all students will be:

COMMUNICATORS who…
Speak, listen, read and write thoughtfully and critically Express themselves with clarity and confidence Create original high quality work Use artistic, mathematical, and technological skills to convey ideas Collaborate with others

PROBLEM SOLVERS who…
Employ a variety of logical, analytical and creative thinking skills to reach solutions Adapt to new situations with assurance and open-mindedness Resolve conflicts successfully Prioritize tasks and use time wisely Use available resources effectively to choose colleges, training programs, and careers

HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS who…
Demonstrate positive attitudes and self-confidence Have a sense of belonging in the school and in the community Value and practice physical fitness through exercise and good nutrition Make wise choices about substances, relationships and safety Set goals for themselves and show honesty and perseverance in reaching those goals

SOCIALLY AND PERSONALLY RESPONSIBLE CITIZEN
Who… Take responsibility for and pride in their own actions Understand and respect cultural and personal differences Contribute time, energy, and talent to improve the quality of life for others Demonstrate ability to participate actively in a democratic society Apply high standards and expectations to themselves

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Introduction
This course description catalog was developed by the College Park High School staff to help you, our students and parents, to better understand our educational program and to make intelligent and informed choices. The course curricula follow the California State Standards. We are proud to offer this curriculum to you. Please carefully consider the course descriptions and related information found in this catalog. Remember that educational growth and personal development will result after a process of informed decision making.

A Student’s Guide For Successful Educational Planning
1. This booklet was designed for you. Use it like a workbook. 2. Read the information yourself and pursue more information when you need it. Involve your parents. Talk to teachers and administrators who you trust and who know your capabilities and aspirations. Please note General Physical Science and Intro to Biology are not college prep classes and that students must complete Algebra II to be eligible for a 4 year university. Remember that choices which are appropriate for your friends may not be the right ones for you. 3. Consider college entrance requirements when making your choices. Even if you are undecided about college now, the more challenging your educational experience in high school, the more options await you after graduation. When in doubt, always choose the more difficult course or sequence of courses. A recent College Board study disclosed that the more high school academic work students complete, the greater their SAT performance. 4. In any given area, take care to plan a sequence of courses that makes sense. For example, each course in math should logically follow the previous course. 5. Refer to the graduation requirements page which will guide you in fulfilling the subject and credit requirements. Use this sheet as your checklist. Do you need to repeat a requirement because you received a “D” or “F”? (D’s must be made up for college other than community college. F’s must be made up for high school graduation.) Remember, classes repeated to raise a D grade DO NOT earn additional units. The four-year educational plan that you choose must include all of the graduation requirements. Summer school or adult school are strong options to use to make up classes. 6. The business community has advised us that the best way to train our students for careers is to teach them to read, write, compute, be on time, and get along with others. Students will need a skills set of transferable skills in order to be competitive in future careers. Making thoughtful choices now will better prepare them for the future.

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Parents as Partners in Planning
1. Parents must approve and sign all student course request cards. College Park High School’s graduation requirements are very rigorous. PLEASE PLAN CAREFULLY WITH YOUR STUDENT. a. Students are expected to complete BOTH semesters of a yearlong class. b. Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors are required to enroll in a minimum of six (6) courses. Seniors who have 190 credits at the beginning of their senior year may petition to enroll in five (5) courses (MDUSD Board Policy). Students may receive a maximum of twenty (20) elective credits (4 semesters) of teacher aide or office assistance services towards graduation. Courses failed in all required areas (Math, English, Social Studies, Science, Fine Arts, and PE) must be repeated. a. The UC and CSU systems will NOT accept “D” grades to satisfy course entrance requirements except in accordance with their validation policy. (See page 44). Classes may be repeated to raise a “D” grade. However, such repeated classes DO NOT earn additional credits toward graduation from College Park High School. In order to receive a California high school diploma, students MUST pass the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). The mathematics test includes statistics, data analysis, probability, number sense, measurement, mathematical reasoning, and algebra as well as decimals, fractions, and percents. The reading portion of the test includes vocabulary, informational reading and literary reading. The writing portion of the test includes writing strategies, applications and conventions. Students will initially take the exam in the spring of the 10th grade. It will be offered in the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades. Homework is required by MDUSD Board policy and should be monitored by parents. Parents are partners with the College Park High School staff. We encourage you to maintain ongoing contact with teachers. We are anxious to work together with you in planning your student’s four-year program. You may contact the teachers through their voicemail phone number and/or email address. This information is available online at www.mdusd.k12.ca.us/collegepark.

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A Word About Schedules / Schedule Change Requests COURSE CHANGES
It is crucial that serious consideration be given to each of the courses a student selects as no student-requested course changes will be considered in the fall. Students and parents should consider the expectations of each class requested, especially Honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses, in terms of level of interest, student time and other commitments such as athletics, work, or other out of school activities. The completion of the COURSE REQUEST CARD, when signed by student and parent or guardian, constitutes a contract between student, parent or guardian, and College Park High School. The Master Schedule of classes and the assignment, and possible hiring of teachers to teach those classes, is based on the courses students select in the spring.

COURSE CHANGES WILL BE MADE FOR ACADEMIC MISPLACEMENT OR COMPUTER ERROR ONLY! POLICY FOR DROPPING A CLASS
The Mt. Diablo Unified School District requires all students to enroll in six classes each semester. Students wishing to DROP a class must do so during the first three weeks of the semester with parental and administrative approval. Students dropping a class while maintaining a passing grade will receive a “No Credit” or “Withdrawal” on their records. A student/ parent/ teacher/ administrator conference may be required prior to allowing a student to drop a class. Students dropping a class while maintaining an “F” will receive an “F” on their records. Teachers may recommend a “No Credit” or “Withdrawal” for students in special cases. Students who DROP a class after the third week of the semester will receive a grade of WF. 4

The California State Board of Education adopted the Master Plan for Special Education in 1974, and enacted Assembly Bill 1250 in 1977 which provides for statewide implementation of the Master Plan in California public schools. A major concept in the Master Plan for Special Education is that public education must offer special assistance to exceptional individuals in a setting, which promotes maximum interaction with the general school population, generally referred to as the “least restrictive environment.” There is a formal referral process. However, by high school, most students have already been identified. The goal at College Park High School is to make every effort to comply with the American with Disabilities Act of 2004. DESIGNATED INSTRUCTION AND SERVICES - DIS These services are provided by specialists and include specific services not normally given in a regular classroom and are supportive of the student’s total educational program. They include, but are not limited to, Designated Instruction and Services, student services in speech and language, and Adaptive Physical Education. FULL TIME/PART TIME SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION SERVICES The program provides, directly or indirectly, instructional and other services for students whose needs have been identified by the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) team as being exceptional. Students are assigned to regular classroom teachers for the majority of the school day, services are determined by students’ IEP. Please refer to your case manager for course selection. SPECIAL DAY CLASSES – SDC These classes provide services to a student who has more intensive needs than can be met by regular school programs and the Resource Specialist Programs. Students are enrolled for a majority of the school day and grouped according to similar instructional needs. These classes include mildly handicapped and severely handicapped students. Available to Special Education students are regular academic and elective classes and programs provided by Adult Education and the Regional Occupational Program (ROP). Please refer to your case manager for course selection.

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At College Park High School we adhere to the district philosophy that all students will have a wide range of opportunities to participate in rigorous and relevant learning experiences throughout their education. This will lead them to graduation from high school with the knowledge, skills, values, aspirations, motivation and confidence to succeed in their career endeavors and become independent and contributing members of their community. With these goals in mind, College Park High School has developed two paths for students to provide them with a high quality education in an effort to guide them in developing their own personal academic and career choices. Smaller Learning Communities: Ninth and tenth grade students are clustered randomly into three smaller learning communities: Whitney, Shasta and Lassen. The students share a core group of teachers whose primary goals are to ensure that the students receive the benefit of effective learning opportunities, develop a strong sense of identity, and build connections to College Park High School, both with teachers and with peers. Students belong to the same community for the first two years of high school with the same core of teachers. We believe our smaller learning communities offer the best opportunity for students to develop a strong sense of belonging and connectedness, which will carry them through their high school years, as well as into their adult lives. Career Integrated Academics: Eleventh and twelfth grade students have the opportunity to choose a Career Interest Cluster (CIC) of personal interest. These CICs can be defined as: • A way of giving students the opportunity to choose classes in which they have an interest based upon a broadly defined career choice; • Prepare students with high academic and career skills essential for entry into higher education and/or a career; • Integrate learning and career skills by providing a contextual learning environment that stresses relevance and supports all students in achieving academic standards; and • Provide students with enhanced connections with teachers and a sense of future goals and/or aspirations. Concurrent Enrollment at Diablo Valley College: Students have the opportunity to take elective classes in their area of interest at Diablo Valley College in addition to or in lieu of a CPHS elective class. The electives should be courses other than those offered at CPHS. Students earn can earn both high school and *college credit for these classes (e.g., 3 units at DVC = 10 CPHS credits). The recommended DVC electives are included in this catalog. Students can obtain a class schedule in the CPHS College and Career Center or DVC Counseling Office. Concurrent enrollment forms are available in the Registrar’s office in SSN. (*Note: Some colleges may not give credit for DVC courses taken as high school credit.)

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This graphic shows how College Park High’s curricular goals and co-curricular and extracurricular activities support our Career Interest Clusters:
College/Career Guidance and Planning Cross-curricular collaboration

Career Integration of academic & career learning Interest Clusters (CIC) Senior Experience Exchange (S.E.E.)

Concurrent enrollment & post-secondary articulation

Standards-based assessment & Industry recognized skills credentials

What can a student expect from choosing a Career Interest Cluster (CIC)? • Students are self-selecting into communities of students and teachers with similar interests. • In order to graduate with a CIC focus, the student must complete the courses specified by the CIC. These will include required courses and electives. • Required classes, such as, English, Math and Social Studies, will be linked through crosscurricular projects whenever possible. • Students will be exposed to post-secondary educational opportunities in their interest field. • In some CICs, students will be prepared for and encouraged to take classes concurrently at DVC or other tertiary institutions. • Senior Experience Exchange (S.E.E.) can be linked to the interest area. • Students meeting the requirements to graduate from College Park High School will have the opportunity to wear a special cord with their cap and gown. • Students will graduate from high school having had the opportunity to pursue a career interest.
The following charts* describe our Career Interest Clusters, example schedules and a sampling of employment opportunities for students pursuing the specific interest clusters. *For the Bachelor’s/Advanced Degree and Career/Advanced Training columns: The two columns represent courses students should consider if they are interested in pursuing a career cluster. Typically, occupations which can be pursued through the Bachelor’s/Advanced Degree path require completion of a four-year university degree and/or post-graduate work. Most occupations pursued under the Career/Advanced Training path can be accessed with a high school degree, and community college or technical school training. However, most courses listed under both columns are prerequisites for entering a four-year university. See the CSU/UC requirements schedule for further information.

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The Business Cluster leads to careers in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources, International Business, Management Information Systems, Marketing, Operations Management, Retail, Real Estate, and Insurance.

Directly to Career with
High School Diploma Waitperson Retail Clerk Data Entry Clerk Administrative Assistant Advanced Training

Bachelor’s Degree

Medical Secretary Legal Secretary Office Manager Stock Broker Small Business Owner Real Estate Salesperson

Account Executive Accountant Project Manager Bank examiner Budget Analyst Career Specialist Human Resources Manager Marketing Manager FBI Agent Sales Manager Retail Store Manager Retail buyer Banking Manager Loan Officer Systems Analyst Appraiser Title Officer Real estate Broker Advanced University Degree

CPA General Manager Actuary Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer Management Consultant

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Business Cluster:
Example Class Schedules - (*Courses in bold print are highly recommended as part of the Business Cluster and differentiate this cluster from the other career clusters at CPHS.)

9th Grade
Bachelor’s/

10th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English II or World Perspectives Algebra I; Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig.; Career/ Advanced Training English II or World Perspectives Math

11th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English III or Threads Geometry; Alg II; Alg. II/Trig.; Trig & Adv. Alg Topics; Pre–Calc; AP Statistics Career/ Advanced Training English III or Threads Math

12th
Bachelor’s / Advanced Degree English IV

Grade
Career/ Advanced Training English IV

Advanced Degree English I

Career/ Advanced Training English I

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg Topics; Pre-Calc; AP Calculus AP Statistics

Math

Physical Education

Physical Education

Biology (can be taken in the 9th grade) Physical Education World History or World Perspectives
World Language II, III

Biology; Intro to Biology Physical Education World History or World Perspectives
World Language II, III

Chemistry

Chemistry; Gen. Physical Science E-Virtual Enterprise
U.S. History

E-Virtual Enterprise
U.S. History or

Threads
World Language III, IV

or Threads
World Language III, IV

DVC Elective U.S. Govt./ Economics

DVC Elective U.S. Govt./ Economics

Fine Arts and World Language I, II

Fine Arts and/or World Language I, II

World Language V

World Language V

Business Cluster requirements: CP Graduation Requirements E-Virtual Enterprise
2 semester-long DVC electives

Related Activities: School CPHS Clubs Leadership

Electives Highly Recommend: Systems Application I Systems Applications II Psychology World Language

Community Summer Internships Employment in the field

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Business – Diablo Valley College (DVC) Recommended Electives
Fall Semester
BUS-109 Introduction to Business (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122) This survey course provides an introduction to the study of the modern business enterprise. Included will be an examination of the role of business in a market economy; the evolution, formation, and management of American and international operations; the financial, legal, and environmental issues affecting business decisions; the use of information and technology in business decision-making; and the part marketing plays in developing, pricing, promoting, and distributing products.

Spring Semester
BUSMG-120 Introduction to Management Studies (3 Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122; BUS 109) This course is designed as an introduction to the skills and applications used in modern management practice. Topics may include foundation of management principles; planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling; legal, ethical, and social responsibilities of management. CSU BUSMG-132 Human Resource Management (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122; BUS 109) This course provides a comprehensive study of behavior in organizations, from individual behavior and motivation, to team interaction, to large organizational system issues and practices. The course will explore topics including values, individual and group decision making, leadership and communications, conflict, work design, and organizational culture. CSU RE-160 Real Estate Principles (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122) This is an introductory course for entry into the real estate profession, for investing in real estate or for a better understanding of transfers of real property. The course covers real and personal property acquisition, ownership, estates in real property, contracts, deeds, financing, taxes, property transfer, agency and other essential topics. It will also assist persons preparing for the real estate salesperson's license examination, although it is not specifically or solely designed as a pre-licensing course. CSU HRMGT-100 Orientation to Hospitality Industry (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week.) This is an introduction to the hospitality industry including history, organization, and job opportunities. Field trips provide insight to many types of operations and include a tour of the facility and a question-and-answer period with the owner/manager. Students are required to focus on management parameters, atmosphere, menu, physical layout, staffing, and financial aspects of the business. CSU HRMGT-101 Introduction to the Hotel Management Industry (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent.) This is an overview of the hotel and motel industry. Course traces historical development from early inns to modern hotels and motels. Function and operation of hotels and motels and career opportunities are also explored. CSU

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The Environmental Cluster leads to careers that are involved with the wise use, conservation and management of the earth’s resources.

Directly to Career with
High School Diploma Emergency Responder Environmental Technologist Environmental Health Technician Park Maintenance Land and Water Conservation Technician

Bachelor’s Degree Architect Botanist Chemical/Civil Engineer Ecologist Environmental Analyst Environmental Lobbyist Forester Geographer Groundwater Geologist Hydrologist Marine Biologist Meteorologist Oceanographer Park Ranger Range Conservationist Seismologist Soil Engineer Teacher Writer Zoology

Advanced Training Firefighter Forestry Technologist Hazardous Waste Land Management Technician Pollution Control Technician Sanitation Inspector Safety Inspector Water Treatment Plant Operator Management Technician

Advanced University Degree

Urban Planner College Professor Environmental Lawyer

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Environmental Studies Cluster:
Example Class Schedules - (*Courses in bold print are highly recommended as part of the Environmental Cluster and differentiate this cluster from the other career clusters at CPHS.)

9th Grade
Bachelor’s/

10th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English II or World Perspectives Algebra I; Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Career/ Advanced Training English II or World Perspectives Math

11th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English III or Threads Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topcis Pre–Calc; AP Statistics Chemistry Career/ Advanced Training English III or Threads Math

12th
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English IV

Grade
Career/ Advanced Training English IV

Advanced Degree English I

Career/ Advanced Training English I

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Earth Science I

Earth Science I

Biology (Can be taken in 9th grade)

Biology; Intro to Biology

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

AP Environmental Science
U.S. History or

Earth Sci. II; Chemistry; Gen. Physical Science (GPS); Biotech Earth Science II

Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topcis; Pre-Calc; AP Calculus AP Statistics Physics or AP Biology

Math

Earth Sci. II Physiology; Marine Biology/ Zoology

DVC Elective DVC Elective
U.S. Govt./ Economics

World History or World Perspective Fine Arts and World Language I, II Fine Arts and/or World Language I, II
World Language II, III

World History or World Perspective
World Language II, III

U.S. History

or Threads

U.S. Govt./ Economics

Threads
World Language III, IV World Language III, IV

World Language V

World Language V

Environmental Cluster requirements: 4 years English 4 years Mathematics 3 years Social Science 2 years of World Language * 4 years of Science 2 DVC semester-long electives John Muir Path**: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, AP Environmental Science Jacques Cousteau Path: Intro to Biology, General Physical Science, Earth Science, Marine Biology/ Zoology, *Spanish should be considered due to its relevance to California’s future population growth

Related Activities: School Recycling Club Campus clean-ups Leadership Internships

Community Restoration Projects Clean-ups Local activism Volunteerism ** John Muir Path offers a rigorous and challenging course of study

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Environmental Studies – Recommended DVC Electives
Alternative Energy Systems (AET) AET-120 Introduction to Alternate Energy Systems (2 DVC Units = 6 CPHS Credits, 36 hours lecture / 18 hours laboratory per term.) This course will cover present-day energy systems, and then cover an in-depth analysis of the design and installation of alternate energy systems. Alternate energy systems to be covered in detail are solar water heating systems, solar electrical systems, wind electrical systems, wind mechanical systems, small hydro-electrical systems and unique conservation methods. Also presented are topics on geothermal energy, fuel cells, and biomass systems. Additional topics include applications of alternate energy in transportation, industrial, commercial and residential systems. CSU AET-130 Photovoltaic Systems Design and Installation (2 DVC Units = 6 CPHS Credits, 2 hours lecture / 1 hour laboratory per week) This course will show students how to do solar site evaluations, electrical load calculations, solar system size calculations, and installation techniques. This course will help students design and install their own solar system and/or obtain skills for employment. CSU Horticulture (HORT) HORT-110 Introduction to Horticulture (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits 3 hours lecture / 3 hours laboratory per week). Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent. This course explores the biology and economics of growing and caring for plants. The course covers the breadth of basic horticulture practices and the biological and environmental principles on which they are based. The students are exposed to a variety of field studies that stress the practical applications of horticulture Science: propagation, plant identification, pest/ disease identification and control options, environmentally safe use of pesticides, and factors for favorable plant growth. There will be an overview to the different aspects of the horticulture industry. CSU, UC Select one of the following: HORT 141 Tree Identification HORT-143 Shrub Identification HORT-145 Ground Covers and Vines Identification (Each class 3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week). Recommended: HORT 110 and eligibility for Eng 122 or equivalent. Taxonomy identity, growth habits, landscape values and nativities of landscape trees, shrubs, or groundcovers and vines, native and exotic. CSU. (See DVC Catalog for individual course descriptions.)

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The Fitness and Health Cluster leads to careers that are involved in providing medical research, medical care, and emergency medical services. It centers around the physical body and maintaining it.

Directly to Career with
High School Diploma Nurse’s Aide Home Health Aide Physical Therapist Aide Occupational Therapist Aide EKG Technician Advanced Training Certified Nursing Assistant EEG Technician

Bachelor’s Degree

Music Therapist Recreational Therapist Dietician Nutritionist Occupational Therapist Physician’s Assistant Physical Therapist Registered Nurse Physical Education Teacher Leisure Industry Entrepreneur

EMT Technician
Dental Technician Cardiovascular Technician Respiratory Therapist Radiology Technician Surgical Technician Ultrasound Technician Diagnostic Sonographer Radiation Therapist Nuclear Medicine Technician Dental Hygienist Exercise Instructor Optician

Outdoor Recreation Specialist
Sports Director Event Planner Social Worker Advanced University Degree

Chiropractor Dance Therapist Epidemiologist Audiologist Pharmacist Physician Surgeon Optometrist Podiatrist Dentist Veterinarian Speech Language Pathologist

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Fitness and Health Cluster:
Typical Class Schedules – (Courses in bold print are highly recommended as part of the Fitness & Health Cluster and differentiate this cluster from the other career clusters at CPHS.)

9th Grade
Bachelor’s/

10th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English II or World Perspectives Algebra I; Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Career/ Advanced Training English II or World Perspectives Math

11th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English III or Threads Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre–Calc; AP Statistics Chemistry Career/ Advanced Training English III or Threads Math

12th
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English IV

Grade
Career/ Advanced Training English IV

Advanced Degree English I

Career/ Advanced Training English I

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Intro to Alg; Algebra; Geometry

Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre-Calc; AP Calculus AP Statistics Physics

Math

Biology (can be taken in 9th grade) Physical Education Physical Education Physical Education

Biology; Intro to Biology Physical Education

Chemistry; Gen. Physical Science; Biotech Physiology; Physical Education elective
U.S. History

Physiology or AP Biology

Health DVC Elective

Fitness DVC Elective

World History or World Perspective Fine Arts and/or World Language I, II Fine Arts and/or World Language I, II
World Language II, III

World History or World Perspective
World Language II, III

U.S. History or

or Threads

U.S. Govt./ Economics

U.S. Govt./ Economics

Threads

World Language III, IV

World Language III, IV

World Language V

World Language V

Fitness & Health Cluster requirements:
CPHS Graduation Requirements

Related Activities:
School HOSA Club (Health Occupations Students of America) CPHS Sports Participation Leadership

Fitness Path: Physiology, 4 years of Physical Education including; 2 DVC semester-long fitness electives. Health Path: Biology, Chemistry, Physiology or AP Biology, and 2 DVC semester-long health electives.

Community Sports Club Coaching Lifeguard

Volunteer in health/care

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Fitness and Health - Recommended DVC Electives
Health Science (HSCI) Fall Semester
HSCI-230 Advanced First Aid/CPR (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122). An advanced survey of emergency and nonemergency procedures and techniques used in the pre-hospital setting; including basic life support CPR and first aid. This course is required training for medical professionals. CSU

Spring Semester
HSCI-140 Human Sexuality (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122). This is an introductory course examining human sexuality from a biological and cross-cultural perspective. Historical and traditional influences, as well as current perspectives will be presented. This course will facilitate students' knowledge of each other's cultures and traditions as they relate to sexuality. Topics that will be examined include sexual anatomy and physiology, gender issues, sex research, relationships and intimacy, communication, sexual behaviors, sexual orientation, sexual minorities, contraception, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases, and enhancing sexual fulfillment. CSU, UC HSCI-170 Women's Health (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course is an exploration of the biological, socio-political, and psychological aspects of women's health and medical care in contemporary society. The course examines current scientific knowledge and human behavior as it relates to health issues of particular concern to women such as self-health, reproductive management, menopause, nutrition, health research, breast cancer, infectious disease and stress. Transfer Credit: UC credit limitations. CSU Also Recommended HSCI-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) (0.5 DVC Units = 0 CPHS Credits, Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122). This course is designed to teach lifesaving skills to be used in respiratory and cardiac emergencies. CSU DENTL-110 Overview of the Dental Profession (1.5 DVC Units = 4.5 CPHS Credits, Credit/No Credit, 7 hours lecture per term). This course is an overview of dental profession with special emphasis on assisting, hygiene, and dental technology concepts. It may be particularly helpful to those students desiring to enter the dental assisting, dental hygiene, or dental technology programs. Note: This course is open to all students. Students interested in a dental career can apply to admission into one of the three dental programs. Credit/No Credit grades are recorded as a C on the high school transcript. CSU

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Fitness and Health - DVC Recommend Electives
Fitness
HSCI-230 Advanced First Aid/CPR (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122). An advanced survey of emergency and nonemergency procedures and techniques used in the pre-hospital setting; including basic life support CPR and first aid. This course is required training for medical professionals. CSU PETHE-259 Sports Psychology (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122). This sports psychology course is designed to help students learn psychology skills that enable them to be aware of the techniques for peak performance in sports. This course will also focus on establishing a winning environment where one can establish a goal and work toward it. CSU PETHE-279 Overview of Sports Medicine & Fitness Professions (2 DVC Units = 6 CPHS Credits, 2 hours lecture per week). This course will acquaint students with various sports medicine, fitness and health care professions. Information to be presented includes job descriptions, educational and certification requirements, work environment and potential salary range. CSU PETHE-281 Principles of Optimizing Human Performance (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week). This course explores the body's adaptations to exercise and teaches students how to develop strength and conditioning programs to maximize these adaptations. The information presented is valuable for students interested in professions such as personal training, physical therapy, athletic training/sports medicine, teaching and coaching, as well as for people who just want to improve their own athletic performance. This knowledge should allow students to sit successfully for the A.C.E. and N.S.C.A. personal training exams. Transfer Credit: UC credit limitations. See counselor. CSU Also Recommended HSCI-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) (0.5 DVC Units = 0 CPHS Credits, Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122.) This course is designed to teach lifesaving skills to be used in respiratory and cardiac emergencies. CSU

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The mission or goal of this cluster is to introduce students to the extremely broad concept of Human Services. In our service oriented society, the benefit to the understanding of people, their needs and wants, is critical to success in a variety of careers. Exposure to the individual, to society and to legal norms (both criminal and civil) can provide options in pursuing paths of interest in higher education. Possible careers attached to this cluster range from anthropologist to zoning planner and every letter in-between. The president of Bank of America once said that he would rather have a person educated in liberal arts who needed business training than a person educated in business who needed liberal arts training. Training in human services will lead to employment in fields directly related: social worker, educator, lawyer, counselor, or psychologist. It will also support any field that requires contact or understanding of people: medical professional, urban planner, advertising, business executive, politician, non-government organization, aid worker, and small business owner.

Directly to Career with
High School Diploma Retail Sales Waitress Civil Servant Receptionist

Bachelor’s Degree

Advanced Training

Retail Management Firefighter Police Officer Banker Journalist Travel Agent Advanced University Degree

Criminologist Family Case Worker Politician Sociologist Energy Economist Labor Relations Arbitrator Legislator Consultant Historian Anthropologist Geographer Paralegal Probation Officer Market Research Analyst

Counselor Clergy

Attorney City Planner Teacher Business Manager Psychologist

18

Human Services Cluster:
Typical Class Schedules - (*Courses in bold print are highly recommended as part of Human Services Cluster and differentiate this cluster from the other career clusters at CPHS.)

9th Grade
Bachelor’s/

10th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English II or World Perspective Algebra I; Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Career/ Advanced Training English II or World Perspective Math

11th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English III or Threads Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre–Calc; AP Statistics Chemistry; Physics; Earth Sci. II Career/ Advanced Training English III or Threads Math

12th
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English IV

Grade
Career/ Advanced Training English IV

Advanced Degree
English I

Career/ Advanced Training English I

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry;

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry;

Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre-Calc; AP Calculus AP Statistics

Math

Biology (can be taken in 9th grade)

Biology; Intro to Biology

Chemistry; Physics; Earth Sci. II; Biotech; Gen. Physical Science Social Studies Elective
U.S. History

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Social Studies Elective
U.S. History or

DVC Elective

DVC Elective

World History or World Perspective

World History or World Perspective World Language II, III

U.S. Govt./

or Threads

U.S. Govt./ Economics

Threads
World Language III, IV World Language III, IV

Economics
World Language V World Language V

Fine Arts and World Language I, II

Fine Arts and/or World Language I, II

World Language II, III

Human Services Cluster Grade of “C “or better in all of the following: a. U.S. History, U.S. History Honors or U.S. History AP, Government or Government AP Economics or Economics AP b. Grade of “C” or better in two of the following yearlong Social Studies electives: 1. Psychology or Psychology AP 2. Developmental Psychology of Children 3. Citizen Law, Intro to Law 4. Spanish c. 2 DVC semester-long electives

Paths: Social Science Administration of Justice Related Activities: School Clubs Leadership Internships Community Community service Social / Political Action

19

Social Sciences - Recommended DVC Electives
Fall Semester CARDV-130 Careers in Social Service (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits). This course is an exploration of careers in Social Services and related fields. Emphasis is focused on job search techniques and career decision-making. Students will investigate specific Social Service and/or Human Service careers, become acquainted with related programs, analyze existing job market opportunities and conduct a self-assessment of interests, skills and abilities. Work attitudes and values will be clarified. Spring Semester ADS-101 Introduction to Substance Abuse and Treatment (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course provides basic core knowledge and theories about addiction, treatment, and public policy. CSU POLSC-120 Introduction to Politics (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course is an introduction to the concepts of politics and the state and relationship of the state and individual, as applied to the American political system. Comparison of the American and selected other political systems. CSU, UC PSYCH-122 Psychology in Modern Life (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course examines the psychological, physiological and cultural factors involved in personality development, interpersonal relationships, and the relevance of psychology to social processes. CSU, UC PSYCH-230 Abnormal Psychology (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent) This course is a study of the causes and symptoms of psychological disorders, highlighting the latest biological findings; topic areas include cultural differences, controversies, and the treatment and prevention of behavior disorders; multiple theoretical perspectives are used to examine the biological, psychological, and social factors creating abnormality; the DSM classification system. SOCSC-110 General Course in Social Science (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122). This course is an examination of the historical development of American culture and institutions in order to understand differing perspectives on the individual in society. Particular attention is given to: a) the historical development of social science theories for explaining the individual in society, and b) the implications of these theories for the individual's life in contemporary America and America of the past. Emphasis is given to the historical development of social class, race, ethnicity, and gender in the United States from colonial times to the present. CSU, UC

20

Administration of Justice (ADJUS) DVC Recommended Electives
Fall Semester
ADJUS-120 Introduction to the Administration of Justice (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course addresses the history and philosophy of justice as it evolved throughout the world. It addresses in detail: a) the American system of justice and the various sub-systems, i.e. the police, the courts, corrections, etc.; b) the roles and interrelationships of criminal justice agencies; c) concepts of crime causations, punishments, and rehabilitation; and d) issues pertaining to ethics, education and training for participants in the criminal justice system. CAN AJ2; CSU,UC

Spring Semester ADJUS-121 Criminal Law (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course involves a detailed analysis of: a) the historical development and philosophy of American law; b) statutory law, including classifications, definitions and legality; c) case and constitutional law as it applies to situations and individuals in the justice system; and d) methodology and concepts of law and their role as a social force. The course emphasizes California criminal statutes. CSU, UC ADJUS-122 Criminal Procedure (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course examines in detail the legal processes from pre-arrest, arrest through trial, sentencing and correctional procedures; a review of the history of case and common law; conceptual interpretations of law as reflected in course decisions; a study of case law methodology and case research as the decisions impact upon the procedures of the justice system. California law and procedures are emphasized. CSU ADJUS-203 Physical Evidence and the Crime Laboratory (4 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture / 3 hours laboratory per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course is an in-depth analysis and discussion of the nature and significance of various types of physical evidence commonly found at crime scenes. Areas of emphasis include: (1) the use of physical evidence in the forensic setting, (2) types of physical evidence, (3) the identification, collection and packaging of physical evidence, (4) principles of crime scene photography, (5) crime scene sketching, (6) evidence collection techniques: casting shoe and tool marks, lifting latent fingerprints and (7) the preservation of trace evidence, i.e. physiological fluids, hair, soil, fibers, glass, etc. This is a "hands on" class combining the theoretical concepts associated with use of physical evidence in the forensic setting with student involvement in the processing of simulated crime scenes. The lab component, will focus on the student applying the principles learned in lectures and will be mandatory. CSU

21

The Performing Arts Cluster helps students to learn valuable skills for the future. They are exposed to new forms of creative expression that develop confidence that will help them throughout their lives. Students in these fields are often passionate about music, voice and performance.

Directly to Career with
High School Diploma Dancer Singer Disc Jockey Radio Operator Puppeteer Announcer/Narrator Prop Master

Bachelor’s Degree

Music Teacher Orchestra Member Director Film Critic Playwright Producer Broadcast Technician

Advanced Training Sound Engineer Newscaster Audiovisual Technician Makeup Artist Choreographer Actor Lighting Director Music Teacher

Advanced University Degree Art/Music Therapist Conductor Opera Singer College Teacher Stage Manager

22

Performing Arts Cluster: Band, Choir, Drama
Typical Class Schedules - (*Courses in bold print are highly recommended as part of the Performing Arts Cluster: Band, Choir, Drama, and differentiate this cluster from the other career clusters at CPHS.)

9th Grade
Bachelor’s/

10th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English II or World Perspective Algebra I; Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Career/ Advanced Training English II or World Perspective Math

11th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English III or Threads Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre–Calc; AP Statistics Chemistry; Physics; Earth Sci. II Career/ Advanced Training English III or Threads Math

12th
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English IV

Grade
Career/ Advanced Training English IV

Advanced Degree English I

Career/ Advanced Training English I

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Performing Arts Elective

Performing Arts Elective

Biology (can be taken in 9th grade)

Biology; Intro to Biology

Chemistry; Physics; Earth Sci. II; Biotech; General Physical Science Advanced Performing Arts Elective
U.S. History

Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre-Calc; AP Calculus AP Statistics DVC Elective (optional)

Math

DVC
Elective (optional)

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Advanced Performing Arts Elective
U.S. History or

Advanced Drama, Choir , Band U.S. Govt./ Economics

Advanced Drama, Choir, Band U.S. Govt./ Economics

Performing Arts

Elective

Performing Arts

Elective

World History or World Perspective

World History or World Perspective

or Threads

Threads

Fine Arts and World Language I, II

Fine Arts and/or World Language I, II

World Language II, III

World Language II, III

World Language III, IV

World Language III, IV

World Language V

World Language V

Performing Arts Cluster requirements: Band, Choir, Drama

Related Activities School Participate in school events Internships Community Summer internship Participate in community performances Volunteerism

a. CPHS graduation requirements b. 3 years participation in Performing Arts (2 years in Advanced subjects) c. 2 semester-long DVC electives (optional)

23

Performing Arts - DVC Recommended Electives
Drama DRAMA-111 Fundamentals of Stage Production (Lighting) (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits). This course offers theory and techniques of stage lighting including the function of lighting equipment, the operation of basic dimmer systems, and the creation of light designs for selected plays. DRAMA-126 Acting on Camera (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 2 hours lecture / 3 hours laboratory per week. Recommended: DRAMA 122 and 123 or equivalent). This course offers practical training and practice in acting on camera for the performer. Close attention to those techniques of acting that have special application to television and film. DRAMA-127 Auditioning Techniques (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: DRAMA-122 or equivalent). The course will cover the elements of auditioning techniques that include, but not limited to: monologue selection, styles, actor's preparation, research, theory and practical application. Students will learn to prepare for college, community and professional theatre auditions and create a portfolio. CSU. DRAMA-170 Introduction to Musical Theater (4 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 4 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Music 170 or equivalent). This course develops audition and performance skills combining singing, dancing, and acting in the presentation of scenes, as well as the rehearsal and performance of dance routines from a variety of musicals. A survey of the history and development of musical theater is included. CSU, UC

Instrumental MUSIC-127 Jazz Theory and Improvisation (.05–1 DVC Units = <1 DVC unit = 0 CPHS Credits, 1 DVC Unit = 3.5 CPHS Credits). Audition required and ability to perform at an intermediate level on a musical instrument; MUSIC 122 and eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent.) This course offers a study and performance of jazz music with emphasis on improvisation and writing for the small jazz ensemble. Lecture-demonstration, small group (combo), and individualized instruction through listening and playing of recordings. CSU, UC MUSIC-122 Theory and Musicianship I (5 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 6 hours lecture per week. Recommended: MUSIC 150 or equivalent keyboard proficiency). This course is a study of the fundamentals of Western music applicable to both classical and popular styles: notation; fundamental theoretical concepts; musicianship skills including sight singing, rhythmic training, ear training, dictation, and keyboard realization; and basic compositional skills. CSU, UC

24

Performing Arts - DVC Recommended Electives
MUSLT-113 Introduction and History of Jazz and Rock Music (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course covers the introduction and history of jazz and rock music from traditional, ragtime, boogie-woogie, swing, bebop, and cool, to various contemporary jazz, rock and fusion art forms. The class explores the contributions and conflicts of African-Americans throughout the history and development of this American music. CSU, UC
VOCAL

MUSIC-120 Introduction to Music Skills (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122). A music fundamentals course including music reading, ear training, sight singing, keyboarding knowledge, notation, key and time signatures, intervals, scales and chords through group participation. This course is intended for the general music student. Transfer Credit: UC credit limitations. CSU MUSIC-122 Theory and Musicianship I (5 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 6 hours lecture per week. Recommended: MUSIC 150 or equivalent keyboard proficiency). This course is a study of the fundamentals of Western music applicable to both classical and popular styles: notation; fundamental theoretical concepts; musicianship skills including sight singing, rhythmic training, ear training, dictation, and keyboard realization; and basic compositional skills. CSU, UC MUSIC-170 Applied Voice Training (1 DVC Unit = 3.5 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week). This course is a study of the fundamentals of vocal tone production, breathing, vocal placement, and song interpretation as it applies to standard vocal repertoire. CSU, UC

25

The Teaching and Learning Cluster explores careers in various educational fields, including preschool, daycare, public/private school settings, coaching, sports/recreation, and business and corporate training.

Directly to Career with
High School Diploma Classroom Instructional Assistant Coaching Assistant Camp Counselor Recreation Assistant Receptionist/Information Clerk Parent

Bachelor’s Degree

Advanced Training Preschool Teacher Athletic Trainer Family Childcare Provider Senior Citizen Activity Director Children / Family Photographer Travel Agent Employee Trainer Salesman High School Teacher Librarian

Elementary Teacher Translator Museum Technician Park Ranger Probation Officer High School Teacher Youth / Adult Recreation Director Family Caseworker Librarian Instructional Coordinator Curator Museum Director Conservator

Advanced University Degree

Counselor School Vice Principal School Principal Attorney University Professor Child & Family Psychologist

26

Teaching and Learning Cluster:
Example Class Schedules - (*Courses in bold print are highly recommended as part of the Teaching & Learning Cluster and differentiate this cluster from the other career clusters at CPHS.)

9th Grade
Bachelor’s/

10th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English II or World Perspective Algebra I; Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Career/ Advanced Training English II or World Perspective Math

11th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English III or Threads Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre–Calc; AP Statistics Chemistry; Physics; Earth Sci. II Career/ Advanced Training English III or Threads Math

12th
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English IV

Grade
Career/ Advanced Training English IV

Advanced Degree
English I

Career/ Advanced Training English I

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Math

Alg II; Alg.II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre-Calc; AP Calculus AP Statistics

Math

Biology (can be taken in 9th grade)

Biology; Intro to Biology

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education
World History or World Perspective

Physical Education
World History or World Perspective World Language II, III

Careers in Teaching (ROP)
U.S. History or

Chemistry; Physics; Earth Sci. II; Biotech; Gen. Physical Science Careers in Teaching (ROP)
U.S. History

DVC Elective U.S. Govt./ Economics

DVC Elective U.S. Govt./ Economics

or Threads

Threads
World Language III, IV World Language III, IV

Fine Arts and World Language I, II

Fine Arts and/or World Language I, II

World Language II, III

World Language V

World Language V

Paths: Early Childhood Education K – 12 Education Library Studies Teaching & Learning Cluster requirements: CPHS graduation requirements Careers in Teaching (ROP) 2 DVC semester-long electives Internship

Related Activities: School Future Educators Club TA (Teaching Assistant) Leadership Internships

Electives highly recommended
Developmental Psychology of Children World Language Public Speaking

Community Babysitter Camp counselor Coaching Volunteerism

27

Teaching and Learning - Recommended DVC Electives
Early Childhood Education
FAMLI-125 Exploratory Experience With the Young Child (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Co-requisite: FAMLI 124 or equivalent (may be taken prior to enrollment in FAMLI 125). This course offers specific training in observing, recording and evaluating the behavior of the preschool child. Includes history and philosophy of early childhood education. Orientation to careers working with children. Introduction to curriculum components with discussion on selecting and evaluating learning materials. Attention is given to the preparation of the basic curriculum areas of the child care center in the indoor and outdoor environment. CSU FAMLI-126 Health, Safety, and Nutrition for the Young Child (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course is designed to provide knowledge of health, safety, and nutrition issues to child care providers in child care centers and preschool settings. Health concerns which affect young children and their care environments as well as sanitation, disease control, and basic first aid are covered. Knowledge about safety for the individual child and the design of a safe learning environment are emphasized. Planning and organizing nutritious food programs which integrate the food curriculum into the existing program, involving children in food preparation is stressed. CSU

K-12 Education
Fall Semester EDUC-120 Teaching As a Profession (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 2 hours lecture / 3 hours laboratory per week). The course invites the student to explore teaching as a profession. Effective teaching, experiences and expectations of a teacher, foundations of teaching, critical issues in education, student diversity and job options are emphasized. Students are required to complete 54 hours of field observation and field work. This course is designed for students considering teaching as a profession, and for parents of children in the American school system who want to be informed of current issues and practices in education. CSU Spring Semester FAMLI-126 Health, Safety, and Nutrition for the Young Child (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course is designed to provide knowledge of health, safety, and nutrition issues to child care providers in child care centers and preschool settings. Health concerns which affect young children and their care environments as well as sanitation, disease control, and basic first aid are covered. Knowledge about safety for the individual child and the design of a safe learning environment are emphasized. Planning and organizing nutritious food programs which integrate the food curriculum into the existing program, involving children in food preparation is stressed. CSU PSYCH-190 Psychology of Adolescence (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course is a survey of adolescent development and the problems of adolescents. CSU, UC

28

Special Education
Fall Semester SPEDU-101 Introduction to Disabilities (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course examines historical and cultural developments of disability issues, and compares international perspectives to understand the changing roles of people with disabilities. The legal and functional definitions of physical, communicative, sensory, psychological, neurological, and developmental disabilities will be emphasized. Acquired versus congenital disabilities will be differentiated, and all forms of chronic/progressive illnesses will be explored. CSU Spring Semester SPEDU-102 Historical Perspectives of Disabilities And the Law (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course will examine the legal rights of the disabled, beginning with historical roots of the disability movement in the United States. Essential understanding of the earliest to current legislation governing access to education in federal, state, and local legal mandates will be emphasized. CSU SPEDU-103 Prosocial Skills Strategies for the Special Education Paraprofessional (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course explores the basic principles of pragmatic prosocial skills strategies used by the Special Education Paraprofessional within the educational workplace. Students will learn effective communication techniques to facilitate and manage appropriate student behavior and learning. CSU

Library Studies
Fall Semester L-103 Access to Library Materials (2 DVC Units = 6 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course introduces students to the full array of access services in a variety of library settings. Special skills and job analysis for paraprofessionals will be discussed as they relate to providing and preserving access to library patrons. The course will also consider the philosophy of access services from a historical perspective to the present. CSU Spring Semester L-105 Reference and Research Services: Tools and Techniques (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 3 hours lecture per week. Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). This course is an introduction to print and online information resources used in a variety of library and information center settings. Students learn effective techniques for assisting patrons and are provided an opportunity to develop reference service skills by using a wide variety of print and online resources. CSU Also Recommended L-100 Introduction to a Career in Library and Information Technology (1 DVC Unit = 0 CPHS Credits. Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 122 or equivalent). An introduction to the dynamic field of library and information studies for paraprofessionals, this course offers an exploration of the various types of libraries and information centers, the skills necessary for a successful career in the field, and the job opportunities in libraries and information centers. CSU.

29

The Visual Arts Cluster brings out the creative and imaginative characteristics in our students and makes art a fun experience. Students will learn about art and different types of media to express themselves. Our vision is to have a successful art program filled with students who are excited about learning of the many types of visual art available including ceramics, film production, photography, fine art, glass and design.

Directly to Career with
High School Diploma Apprentice Background Artist Desktop Publisher Draftsperson Sign maker Sculptor Floral Designer Merchandise Displayer Artist Advanced Training Advertising Designer Art Historian Craftsman Print Maker Animator Interior Designer Photographer Print Maker Cartoonist Fiber Artist Fashion Illustrator Recreation Director Carpenter Graphic Designer Videographer Ceramics/Potter Art Dealer Metal Smith Illustrator Fashion Designer

Bachelor’s Degree

Animator Automobile Designer Art Teacher Filmmaker Museum Curator Magazine Editor Owner / Manager of Art Gallery Packaging Designer Forensic Photographer Advanced University Degree College Art Professor Architect Art Therapist Movie Maker Set Designer

30

Visual Arts Cluster: Art, Ceramics, Design, Photography, Film Production
Example Class Schedules -(*Courses in bold print are highly recommended as part of the Visual Arts Cluster: Ceramics, Design, Photography, Film Production, and differentiate this cluster from the other career clusters at CPHS.)

9th Grade
Bachelor’s/

10th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English II or World Perspective Algebra I; Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Career/ Advanced Training English II or World Perspective Math

11th Grade
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English III or Threads Geometry; Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre–Calc; AP Statistics Chemistry; Physics; Earth Sci. II Career/ Advanced Training English III or Threads Math

12th
Bachelor’s/ Advanced Degree English IV

Grade
Career/ Advanced Training English IV

Advanced Degree
English I

Career/ Advanced Training English I

Intro to Alg; Algebra I; Geometry

Math

Alg II; Alg II/Trig; Trig & Adv. Alg. Topics; Pre-Calc; AP Calculus AP Statistics

Math

Visual Arts

Elective

Visual
Arts Elective Physical Education

Biology (can be taken in 9th grade)

Biology; Intro to Biology

Chemistry; Physics; Earth Sci. II; Biotech; Gen. Physical Science

DVC Elective (optional)

DVC Elective (optional)

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Advanced Visual Arts Elective
U.S. History or

Advanced Visual Arts Elective
U.S. History

Advanced Visual Arts Elective U.S. Govt./ Economics

Advanced Visual Arts Elective U.S. Govt./ Economics

Visual
Arts Elective Fine Arts And World Language I, II

Visual
Arts Elective Fine Arts and/or World Language I, II

World History or World Perspective World Language II, III

World History

or Threads

or World Perspective
World Language II, III

Threads
World Language III, IV World Language III, IV

World Language V

World Language V

Visual Arts Cluster requirements: Art, Ceramics, Design, Photography, Film production
CPHS graduation requirements 3 years participation in Visual Arts (2 years in Advanced subjects) Recommended: ROP Computer Art & Animation ROP Multi-Media Video Production 2 DVC semester-long classes

Related Activities School Participate in school events
Internships Community Summer internship Participate in community competitions

31

Visual Arts – Recommended DVC Electives
ART-140 Introduction to Sculpture and 3-D Design (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 2 hours lecture / 4 hours lab per week. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 116/118). This course is a hands-on introduction to understanding the basic elements of three-dimensional form, volume, and spatial relationships through varied mediums and methods of sculptural formulation. ART-141 Sculpture I (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 2 hours lecture / 4 hours lab per week. Recommended: Eligibility ART 140 or equivalent; eligibility for ENGL 116/118). A continuation of ART 140, this course allows for further exploration of processes and principles of volume design, with representational and non- objective subject matter. This Class allows for more independent study, giving students a less structured approach to problems in sculpture. Students are expected to maintain a conceptual dialogue with the instructor. ART-142 Metal Art I (3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits, 2 hours lecture / 4 hours laboratory per week Recommended: Eligibility ART 140 or equivalent; eligibility for ENGL 116/118). The class offers a comprehensive introduction to various metal sculpture processes. This course involves mold- making techniques for casting bronze, aluminum, and iron objects, as well as basic welding and blacksmithing of steel sculpture. Emphasis will be on 3-D design quality, craftsmanship, and subject matter. ARTHS-190 Topics in Art History (1–3 DVC Units: Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 116/118). This course offers an analysis and appreciation of art through the problem-solving approach. Means of understanding the visual arts and their interrelationships with each other and with their social environment are emphasized. The content of this course changes each semester, depending on specific topic. (Note: <1 unit DVC=0 Credits CPHS, 1 unit DVC=3 CPHS Credits, 2 DVC Units = 6 CPHS Credits, 3+ DVC Units=10 CPHS Credits.

Multimedia and Photography
Fall Semester
MULTM-110 Digital Imaging Process & Technique I (1.5 DVC Units = 4.5 CPHS Credits. 27 hours lab per term. Recommended: Basic computer editing and file management skills). This course is an introduction to digital imaging. The course will provide students with direct hands-on experience creating computer images and with experience in editing digital images from scanned graphics and digital photography. CSU (Note: Students are advised to inquire with CPHS Multimedia teacher to determine the appropriate placement level at DVC). MULTM-111 Digital Imaging Process and Technique II (1.5 DVC Units = 4.5 CPHS Credits, 18 hours lecture / 27 hours laboratory per term. Recommended: MULTM 110 or equivalent). This is a course that builds on the introductory concepts of digital imaging. Students will engage in production of digital images suitable for printing and multimedia applications. Emphasis is on composition, practical color theory, and advanced software topics such as the use of masks, paths, and further exploration of layers. CSU (Note: Students are advised to inquire with CPHS Multimedia teacher to determine the appropriate placement level at DVC.).

Spring Semester
MULTM-115 Digital Imaging Process and Technique III 3 DVC Units = 10 CPHS Credits) 2 hours lecture / 3 hours lab per week. Recommended: MULTM 111 or equivalent). This is a course that builds on the intermediate concepts of digital imaging. Students will engage in production of bitmap and vector images suitable for printing, multimedia presentations and web delivery. Topics will include advanced use of alpha channels, advanced color correction, advanced production text, import/export issues and imaging for the web. The course will involve hands-on work with a variety of digital workstations and multimedia software applications. CSU
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SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS: All classes equal 5 credits each semester or 10 credits a year ENGLISH: 40 CREDITS (4 YEARS) English I, English I Pre-honors, English II, English II Pre-honors, World Perspectives, English III, English III/American Threads, English III Honors, English IV, English IV AP MATHEMATICS: 30 CREDITS (3 YEARS) Introduction to Algebra, Algebra, Geometry, Algebra II, Algebra II/Trig, Algebra Concepts, Senior Math, Trigonometry/Adv. Algebra, Pre-Calculus Honors, Calculus AP, Statistics AP SOCIAL STUDIES: 30 CREDITS (3 YEARS) World History, World History AP, World Perspectives, U.S. History, U.S. History/American Threads, U.S. History Honors, U.S. History AP, U.S. Government/Economics, U.S. Government AP/Economics AP BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE: 10 CREDITS (1 YEAR) Biology I, Biotechnology, Intro to Biology, Physiology, Marine Biology/Zoology, Biology AP, Environmental Science AP PHYSICAL SCIENCE: 10 CREDITS (1 YEAR) Earth Science I, Earth Science II, General Physical Science, Chemistry, Chemistry Honors, Physics, Physics H VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE: 10 CREDITS (1 YEAR) Art I, Art II, Art Advanced, Art Design A/B, Art Design II-3 Dimensional Glass, Advanced Art-3 Dimensional, Art II Drawing & Painting, Ceramics I, Ceramics II, Ceramics Advanced, Drama I, Drama II, Drama III, Drama IV, Intro to Film Studies, Video Production I, Video Production II, Photography Art I, Photography Art II, Photography Advanced, Concert Choir, Mixed Chorus, Vocal Ensemble, Treble Choir, Band Concert, Band Symphonic, Band Jazz, Orchestra Instrumental, Wind Ensemble, Exploring Art, Exploring Music OR French I, French II, French III, French IV AP, French V AP, German I, German II, German III, German IV AP, Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III, Spanish IV AP, Spanish V AP PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 20 CREDITS (2 YEARS) PE 9, Individual & Dual Activities, Personal Fitness, Aerobics, Weight Training, Self Defense, Team Sports, Bowling, Dance I, Dance II

ELECTIVES: 80 CREDITS
All classes in the above categories which exceed the minimum required for that category and all other classes. Maximum allowed: PE 40 credits, Office/Teacher Asst. (OA, TA) 20 credits, Work Experience Education (WEE) 40 credits

TOTAL CREDITS: (REQUIRED SUBJECTS AND ELECTIVES) 230 CREDITS
EXAMINATION CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAMINATION: All students must pass the CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAMINATION (CAHSEE) consisting of mathematics and language arts. The exam is administered in the 10th grade and again in the 11th and 12th grade if not previously passed.

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Subject
English

Units 40

Grade 9
English I

Grade 10
English II

Grade 11
English III

Grade 12
English IV

Mathematics

30

Math

Math

Math

Science

20

Life Science
(or 10 grade)
th

Life Science Physical (or 9th grade) Science PE

Physical Education Social Studies

20

PE 9

30

World History

US History

US Government /Economics

Fine Arts or World Language Electives

10

80

Total

230

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Advanced Placement Program *
Advanced Placement (AP) courses offer our students the opportunity to do college level work at College Park High School. The curriculum for these courses is standard throughout the country and is very rigorous. The courses are available to qualified, academically talented students in the tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades. Students will earn an additional grade point: A=5, B=4, C=3, the same as for honors courses. These classes are yearlong classes so students may not drop at the end of the first semester. Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examinations(s) in the spring. Many colleges will give college credit based on the student’s score(s) on the examinations(s). Check with the individual colleges to find out which examinations and passing scores they will accept. Each three-hour test is administered annually in May. An AP grade report is sent in July to the student, high school and college(s) if requested. Applications are in the College and Career Center. Check with the College and Career Center (Ext. 3227) for cost of exam. (Note: Students are not required to enroll in an AP Course in order to take an AP exam).

Honors Program *
Honors (H) courses offer to our students the opportunity to do an enriched and/or accelerated rigorous curriculum in several areas. The courses are available to qualified, academically talented students in the tenth through twelfth grades. Students will earn an additional grade point: A=5, B=4, C=3 for honors classes. Acceptance of the numbers of honors credits varies by university. Honors classes are yearlong courses and all students are expected to complete the yearlong course requirements. *It is always to a student’s advantage to take the most rigorous academic schedule that they are able to manage because colleges evaluate on how “challenging” the curriculum has been.

College Information
Students may take college courses with administrative approval if classes are NOT available at CPHS. Students must complete a Concurrent Enrollment Form through the Registrar’s office no later than the drop date the college allows. College units will be converted to high school credit as follows: 1 unit = 3 credits, 2 units = 6 credits, 3+ units = 10 credits. It is the student’s responsibility to provide a copy of the college transcript to the CPHS Registrar. Additional grade points for honors will only be given for specific courses, which are more advanced than our most advanced college preparatory courses and are approved by CPHS as honors courses. (Approved honors courses are: DVC’s English 150-151, 262-263, 252-253, and 272-273. The English courses are given 5 credits each semester if used as honors courses.)

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY (CSU) INFORMATION
The twenty-three campuses of the California State Universities are located in Bakersfield, Chico, Dominguez Hills, Fresno, Fullerton, East Bay, Humboldt, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Northridge, Pomona, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, San Marcos, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Monterey Bay, the Maritime Academy in Vallejo and the Cal State Channel Islands in Ventura. The California State University selects applicants from the top one-third of California’s high school graduates. Admission is based on the student’s grade point average and score on either the American College Test (ACT) or SAT Reasoning test. The GPA is based on classes completed in the 10th and 11th grades, (excluding grades in physical education) and includes bonus points for each “C” or better grade in approved honors courses. Up to eight semesters of AP/H courses taken during the last two years of high school are accepted. Up to 2 semesters of AP/H courses taken in the 10th grade can be counted in the eight semesters. To be eligible for admission to the system, but not necessarily to a specific campus or major, students with a recomputed grade point average below 3.0 must present a minimum corresponding ACT composite or SAT I total score. The higher the GPA, the lower the test scores required. Students with a 3.00 or higher GPA are eligible with any score on the ACT or SAT. Students must have a minimum recomputed GPA of 2.0. Students must meet the eligibility index with grade point average and test scores.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (UC) INFORMATION
The 10 campuses of the University of California are located in Berkeley, Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, Riverside, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Merced, and San Francisco. The San Francisco campus provides graduate programs in the health professions. The University of California selects students who rank at the top of California’s high school graduates. Admission eligibility is based on the student’s grade point average in a specific sequence of high school courses referred to as the “a-g subjects” and a score on the American College Test (ACT) or SAT. The University also uses scores from two SAT subject tests from different subject areas*. The University of California uses the highest verbal and math score from a single sitting of the SAT I and certified college preparatory subjects completed in the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades. Courses taken in 9th grade can be used to meet the Subject Requirement if you earn a grade of “C” or better, but they will not be used to calculate the student’s GPA.

INDEPENDENT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
Admissions requirements vary at private (independent) colleges and universities. The University of California testing requirement and configuration of course requirements will generally meet or surpass requirements at independent colleges. Check catalogs, websites or write or call admission offices for specific requirements. Contact the College and Career Center at CPHS for guidance.

COMMUNITY COLLEGES
California citizens are free to enroll in any of the community colleges in California. Courses offered include one and two-year vocation programs, courses leading to an Associate of Arts degree and also course work leading to a transfer to the junior level at a four-year college. Minimum eligibility for admission to a community college is any one of the following: (a) high school diploma, (b) passing score on the California High School Proficiency Exam, or (c) age 18. Placement tests in Math, English, and Writing are required prior to enrollment.

Who to Contact…
Los Medanos College 2700 East Leland Road Pittsburg, CA 94565 (925) 439-2181 Contra Costa College 2600 Mission Bell Drive San Pablo, CA 94806 (510) 235-7801 Diablo Valley College 321 Golf Club Road Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 (925) 685-1230

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA / CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS

“a-g” Subject Requirements
a. History

UC/CSU Admission Requirements
2 years

CPHS Class Offering

b. English

4 years

c. Mathematics

3 years

a-History World History, World History AP, World Perspectives (allowing I unit for World History), U.S. History/American Threads, (allow 1 unit for U.S. History), U.S. History H, US History AP, U.S. Government, U.S. Government AP b-English English I, English I Pre-Honors, English II, English II Pre-Honors, English II/World Perspectives (allowing 1 unit for English II), English III/American Threads (allow 1 unit for English III), English III H, English IV, English IV H/AP c-Mathematics (must include Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II or Algebra II/Trig to fulfill the “c” requirement) Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Algebra II/Trig, Trigonometry/Adv. Algebra, Pre-Calculus H, Calculus AP, Statistics AP d-Laboratory Science Biology I, Biology AP, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Chemistry H, Physics, Physics H, Physiology, Environmental Science AP, Earth Science II* *meets CSU requirement for lab science but not UC. e-World Language French I, French II, French III, French IV AP, French V AP, German I, German II, German III, German IV AP, Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III, Spanish IV AP, Spanish V AP f-VAPA Art I, Art II, Art II Drawing & Painting, Art Advanced, Art Design A/B, Art Design 3-Dimensional, Advanced Art-3 Dimensional, Ceramics I, Ceramics II, Ceramics Advanced, Dance I, Dance II, Drama I, Drama II, Drama III, Drama IV, Intro to Film Study, Intro to Film Study Adv, Photography Art I, Photography Art II, Photography Advanced, Video Production I, Video Production II, Choir Concert, Choir Treble, Band Concert, Band Symphonic, Band Jazz, Orchestra Instrumental, Wind Ensemble, ROP Computer Graphic Arts, Multimedia, Art and Animation g-Elective Courses (All courses listed under a-g with exception of * math courses, plus the following): Creative Writing, Earth Science I, Earth Science II, Economics, Economics AP, Geography, Journalism I, II, III, IV, Marine Biology, Psychology, Psychology AP, Zoology, 37

d. Laboratory Science

*2 years (3 recommended)

e. Language Other Than English

2 years (3 recommended)

f. Visual & Performing Arts (VAPA)

1 year

g. College Preparatory Electives

*1 year

Additional UC/CSU Information
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (UC) *Validation of Mathematics Math is a skill building subject. Students may clear subject omissions and scholarship deficiencies by earning grades of “C” or higher in appropriate, more advanced courses in college preparatory math. This is called validation. Example: A “D” in the first semester of Algebra I would be cleared if the student earns a “C” or higher in the second semester of Algebra I or if the student earns a “C” or higher in Algebra II. “D” or “F” grades earned in Geometry or Algebra II are cleared with a “C” or higher in Trigonometry. Both grades are used in calculating GPA. Note: PCM series is sometimes evaluated on a school-byschool basis. *Validation of Science. In all other sciences the student must repeat a poor grade or receive an acceptable score on the SAT II or AP/IB exam in that subject area. Laboratory Requirements To meet the “d” requirement, a student must take courses in at least two of the fundamental disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics. Please consult your school’s certified “g” course list to learn which courses are “d” laboratory science approved. Test Requirements Students must take the SAT or ACT and two SAT Subject Test. Typically, a passing score for an AP tests is “3” Other UC’s do require the applicant’s list of awards, Honors, extra-curricular activities, community service, and jobs held during high school. High School Grade Point Average The academic grade point average (GPA) is calculated on all academic courses completed in the subject areas specified by the University’s eligibility requirements (the “a-g” subjects), including additional points for completion of University-certified honors courses (see bullet below). It is recommended that the maximum value allowed for the GPA shall be 4.0. Honors Points Honors points are the number of points and performance in University-approved honors courses, College Board Advanced Placement courses, International Baccalaureate Higher Level courses and transferable college courses completed. It is recommended that caution be exercised in order not to assign excessive weight to these courses, especially if considerable weight already has been given in the context of the first criterion. Additionally, in recognition of existing differences in availability of these courses among high schools, it is recommended that reviewers assess completion of this coursework against the availability of these courses at the applicant’s secondary school. WEBSITE: WWW.UCOP.EDU/PATHWAYS.HTML CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY (CSU) *Validation of Mathematics. Students may validate the requirement for three years of college preparatory mathematics (Beginning and Intermediate Algebra and Geometry) with a grade of “C” or better in a higher level college preparatory mathematics course such as Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry, and Calculus.

Validation of “D” grade in the first semester of a year course. CSU will require that applicants have a grade of “C” or better in each term of the required “a-g” courses, except that a “D” grade may be validated with a higher grade in the second semester or the next higher level course in Chemistry, languages other than English, and Mathematics.

Laboratory Science CSU’s require that the two years of lab science include at least one biological science and at least one physical science from the UC list of approved lab sciences in the “d” lab science area.

Test Requirements SAT or ACT Some campuses waive the SAT score if the student has a GPA of 3.0 or higher.**

Honors points CSU will award honors points in calculating the GPA for up to 8 semester courses taken in 11th and 12th grades, including up to two 11th grade International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement, or Honors courses with 11th or 12th grade course content in 10th grade.

High School Grade Point Average Beginning for admission to fall 2004 the high school grade point average calculation will include only those grades earned in approved college preparatory courses taken during the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades.

WEBSITE: WWW.CSUMENTOR.edu

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*It should be noted that the best approach to take when a student has received a “D” as a semester grade is to re-take the class for a higher grade. Due to the high volume of students applying to UC’s and CSU’s, many campuses will reject a student regardless of their validation policy if the student has a “D” semester grade in required courses. **Because of the competition for spaces in impacted schools, many CSU’s do not waive the SAT score requirements.

College Entrance Examinations
The ACT (American College Test) and SAT Reasoning are college entrance tests. University of California and other selective universities also require 2 or more SAT Subject Tests. Most colleges and universities accept both the ACT and SAT, however, it is not necessary to take both tests. Some students perform better on one test over the other. Colleges will use the higher score so it can be beneficial to take both tests. Information regarding testing dates and registration may be obtained in the College Park High School College and Career Center.

PSAT
The Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test is a preliminary SAT given once a year on a Saturday in October. This test, when taken in the Junior year, is used to qualify candidates for the National Merit Scholarship Program. Sophomores who have completed Alg II may want to take the PSAT as a practice test.

PLAN
PLAN is the practice version of the ACT. A Sophomore who has not completed Geometry, but wants to take a practice test, should consider this alternative. It includes an interest inventory, which complements the career unit in Sophomore English classes. PLAN will probably be given on a Saturday morning in late October or early November.

ACT
The American College Test is designed to measure classroom achievement in four broad content areas; the ability to reason, and the application of problem-solving skills. The test takes approximately three hours and covers English Usage, Mathematics, Science Reasoning, and Reading. The score is based on the number of correct answers given with no penalty for wrong guesses. Score reports are sent directly to the student as well as the high school. Most colleges and universities nationwide accept the ACT.

SAT REASONING TEST
The SAT is designed to measure academic aptitude in writing, reading comprehension and mathematical areas. The test takes about four hours and includes an essay. There is a scoring penalty for incorrect guesses. Scores are reported to the high school and to the student. Most colleges and universities nationwide accept this test.

SAT SUBJECT TEST
Some colleges and universities, including the University of California, require a student to take one or more subject tests. Students are given one hour for each test and can take up to three tests at one sitting. The University of California requires two subject tests of the student’s choice. The tests are offered in five categories: Literature, History, Math, Science and Language. It is not permissible to submit two tests from the same category. It is appropriate to take these as soon as possible after completing a specific subject. The SAT Subject tests offered are: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Literature United States History World History Math Level I (not acceptable to UC) Math Level 2 (acceptable to UC, recommended for students wishing to major in science or engineering) Biology, E.M (Ecological/Molecular) Chemistry Physics

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Languages Reading Only ♦ ♦ ♦ French German Modern Hebrew ♦ ♦ ♦ Italian Spanish Latin

Languages Reading and Listening ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Chinese ♦ Korean French ♦ Spanish German ♦ Japanese ELPT – English Language Proficiency Test

Be sure to check the requirements of the colleges you are interested in before deciding which tests to take.

Other Testing Programs
There are a number of tests that high school students take during the course of their high school years. Some tests are mandated by the State of California or by the Mt. Diablo Unified School District as part of the graduation requirements. Other testing may be optional depending upon the student’s interests and educational goals.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program is a program of college-level courses and exams for secondary school students. Over 90 percent of colleges give credit and/or advanced placement status to students who score in the upper range of the test. The examination is scored on a five point scale: 5 (extremely well qualified) to 1 (no recommendation). Each threehour test is administered annually during the month of May. An AP Grade Report is sent in early July to each student’s home address, high school, and to the student’s college, if requested. Students are not required to take AP exams, however, if a student is in an AP class, colleges prefer that the student take the AP test.

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COURSES OFFERED AT COLLEGE PARK

SYSTEM APPLICATIONS I (6012), SYSTEM APPLICATIONS II (6013) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Computer and Information Literacy or consent of instructor System Applications I Basic information - processing introduces students to word processing and spreadsheet programs through the use of a variety of business applications. In addition, students will learn about software, hardware, operating systems, and information access on the web. System Applications II This is a continuation of System Applications I. Advanced Information processing focuses on desktop publishing and presentation software and advanced spreadsheet and basic database applications. Other topics include portfolio development, employment search skills, and an overview of current telecommunication use. ART AND ANIMATION WITH COMPUTERS (ROP) (7356) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: age 16 Students will learn how to draw basis cartoon characters on a computer, and using storyboarding create 2D Internet cartoons and QuickTime movies. They will also be introduced to 3D animations and will use different software programs to create special effects and animated cartoons. Working in teams, students will storyboard, film and edit short movies adding transitions, music, special effects, and movie credits. Each student will make a portfolio website using HTML to display their work on the Internet and will also burn their work to a CD or DVD. This course has UC credit approval. COMPUTER MULTI MEDIA (ROP) (9104) Grades: 11-12 (Year) and age 16 Prerequisite: None Computer Multimedia is a beginning course where students will work both individually, and in teams, to produce multimedia projects and presentations that will be burned onto CD’s and DVD’s. Topics covered included web design, editing movies, digital photography, scanning, editing photos, and the use of iTunes. Students will be introduced to HTML, JavaScript, Macromedia Flash, and Adobe Photoshop. A Website will be created by each student to display their projects. This class is articulated with Diablo Valley College and students can receive college credits, if they complete the class and pass a written test. This course has UC credit approval.
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e-VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE (6164) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Algebra I with a “C” or higher, 1 letter of recommendation from another teacher, interview selection process. e Virtual Enterprise is a simulated business that is set up and run by students to prepare them for working in a real business environment. With the guidance of a teacher (consultant) and real-world business partners, the students determine the nature of their business, its products and services, its management and structure, and engage in the daily operations of running a business. Emphasis is placed on using current business software, communications, and the Internet for business transactions. Career path skills, such as project planning and management, presentation skills and team development, are practiced. The student will choose an area of expertise to specialize in, from accounting to marketing, and will either lead or participate in the development of the business department. In order to provide a genuine experience of interaction with other businesses within the Virtual Enterprise network, students will participate in trade fairs in Northern and Southern California. WORK EXPERIENCE EDUCATION (9400) Grades: 11-12 and age 16 (Year) Pre requisite: Paid employment to meet program standards with parental approval. There is a limited enrollment. Students must have all paperwork completed and teacher’s approval before being enrolled in class. Students must have a job and submit an application and training agreement. Work Experience education is an instructional program that combines in-school learning with on-thejob training and supervision and community. Students attend weekly seminars that cover areas of job search, survival and advancement; economic, career, and self-awareness; and other meaningful career related information, coupled with the related instruction and actual on-the-job training. Students learn many skills while they are compensated for their efforts through employment in the business community and receive school credit for their work.

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ENGLISH I (0010) Grade: 9 (Year) Prerequisite: Eighth (8th) Grade English UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) English I is a required one-year freshman class designed to help students continue development in the language arts: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. This course includes instruction in composition, spelling, vocabulary, grammar, and the interpretation of literature. Skills and concepts are taught in an integrated way to be mutually emphasized and to align with the state and district adopted standards. ENGLISH I (Pre-Honors) (0012) * Grade: 9 (Year) Prerequisite: Eighth (8th) Grade English UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) This is an elective freshman course designed to emphasize the four language arts of reading, writing, speaking, and listening in challenging ways. It includes instruction in composition, spelling, vocabulary, grammar, and the interpretation of literature through a variety of literary genres. This course is recommended for students who are highly motivated, are able to pursue topics in depth, and can assume individual responsibility for their progress. Skills and concepts are taught in an integrated way to be mutually emphasized and to align with the district-adopted standards. *English I (Pre-Honors) is NOT an Honors course, nor is it a prerequisite for English II (Pre-Honors). (This course is aligned with the MDUSD adopted Language Arts Content Standards.) ENGLISH II (0060) Grade: 10 (Year) Prerequisite: Ninth (9th) Grade English UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) English II is a required one-year sophomore class. This course continues the emphasis on the four language arts: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Additional exposure to various types of literature and continued emphasis on developing written expression are stressed. Skills and concepts are taught in an integrated way to be mutually emphasized. (This course is aligned with the MDUSD adopted Language Arts Content Standards).

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ENGLISH II (Pre-Honors) (0065) * Grade: 10 (Year) Prerequisite: Ninth (9th) Grade English UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) English II Pre-Honors is an elective course that fulfills the English II requirement. This course continues the emphasis on the four language arts: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It stresses additional exposure to various types of literature and continues the emphasis on developing written expression. Skills and concepts are taught in an integrated way to be mutually emphasized. This course is designed for students who are highly motivated, able to assume considerable responsibility for their progress, and willing to pursue topics in depth. *English II (Pre-Honors) is NOT an Honors course, nor is it a prerequisite for English III (Honors). (This course is aligned with the MDUSD adopted Language Arts Content Standards. ENGLISH II/ WORLD PERSPECTIVES * This course fulfills the sophomore year English requirement and must be taken concurrently with World Perspectives World History. Grade: 10 (Year) Prerequisite: Ninth (9th) Grade English UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) This course fulfills both the sophomore English and World History requirements through an interdisciplinary approach, which emphasizes the connection between history and literature. The course combines the study of literature and its historical context while still focusing on the literature. Students will gain a deeper understanding of literature and the perspective of history. *This class is equivalent to English II. ENGLISH III (0130) Grade: 11 (Year) Prerequisite: Tenth (10th) Grade English II UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) English III is a required junior class. This course will enable students to continue developing their abilities in the skills of English. Works of literature, with an emphasis on American authors, will be studied; composition work will emphasize developing ability in a variety of written modes. Skills and concepts are taught in an integrated way to be mutually emphasized. (This course is aligned with the MDUSD adopted Language Arts Content Standards). ENGLISH III / AMERICAN THREADS (3070) This course fulfills the junior year English requirement and must be taken concurrently with U.S. History / American Threads. Grade: 11 (Year) Prerequisite: Tenth (10th) Grade English II UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) This course fulfills both the junior English and U.S. History requirements through an interdisciplinary approach, which emphasizes the multicultural nature of American society. The course combines these two primary disciplines while weaving other elements of the humanities into the curriculum. Students will gain a holistic sense of the American experience.
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ENGLISH III HONORS (0125) Grade: 11(Year) Prerequisite: Tenth (10th) Grade English II and successful completion of application procedures. UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) English III Honors is a one-year course for a limited number of students who are highly motivated, able to assume considerable responsibility for their progress, and willing to pursue topics in depth. Intensive study of works of American literature and advanced forms of composition will be required. The course will have a comprehensive written final examination. Students will be selected by an application process. ENGLISH IV (0190) Grade: 12 (Year) Prerequisite: Eleventh (11th) grade English III UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) English IV is a required one-year senior class. In this course students will expand their knowledge of the classics, modern works of world literature, and non-fiction. This course focuses on close reading of literacy works and on advanced forms of composition with development of both style and precision. Skills and concepts are taught in an integrated way to be mutually reinforcing. (This course is aligned with the MDUSD adopted Language Arts Content Standards.) ENGLISH IV AP (0216) Grade: 12 (Year) Prerequisite: Eleventh (11th) grade English III UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “b” requirement) English IV AP is a one-year course for highly motivated students able to assume considerable responsibility for their progress and willing to pursue topics in depth. Intensive study of works of world literature and advanced forms of composition will be required. The course will have a comprehensive written final examination. ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT (0250) Grade: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Placement by ELD/CELDT Assessment UC and CSU certified: English* (*This course fulfills one year of the UC/CSU “b” requirement for first year English language learners.) This course accelerates the learning of academic English, which students need to succeed in their corecontent classrooms. This course focuses on strategies that enable English Learners to comprehend the language of textbooks, lectures, and discussions. Students learn the kinds of language needed to interact collaboratively with English speaking students in academic settings. The course provides EL students with opportunities to develop their thinking abilities, encourages them to read and write extensively, and offers support and encouragement for success in their core-content studies. The course provides access to textbooks and content topics covered in their core-content classrooms. Instruction is developmental and is thus delivered in ways appropriate to the English proficiency level of each student. The oral language, reading, and writing activities of the course incorporate the cultural background, living experiences, and knowledge that students bring to the classroom.
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ACADEMIC LITERACY (0672) Grade: 9-10 (Year) Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Academic Literacy is a lower division elective designed to aid students who need to strengthen their language arts skills, especially their comprehension of high school level expository text. The course offers direct instruction in meta-cognitive reading strategies to negotiate meaning in increasingly difficult material to prepare students for upper division text-based coursework. Individual assessment of the student’s strengths and weaknesses in reading proficiency is an integral part of the course. CREATIVE WRITING (650) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) Creative Writing is a seminar-style course for students interested in writing. Through whole class instruction, small group work, and individual instruction, students will develop their own voices and styles in writing, and gain skill and confidence in utilizing a writing process in a variety of genres. Students will read a variety of literary selections to use as models and stimuli for writing. (This course is aligned with the MDUSD Language Arts Content Standards.) JOURNALISM I (0770) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) This course introduces students to a variety of writing and editorial skills involved in creating and publishing a newspaper. These skills will be used in the production of the school newspaper. Students will study communication strategies, aesthetics in the art of mass communication, and various media. Students will develop an awareness of journalistic integrity and the balance between the rights and responsibilities of media in a free society. In addition, they will explore careers related to journalism. JOURNALISM II (0780) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Journalism I UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) This course is devoted to the development and publication of the school newspaper. Students will use a variety of writing and editorial skills. Students will assume traditional staff roles related to newspaper production. Students will use communication strategies and knowledge of aesthetics in newspaper design. Students will practice journalistic integrity recognizing their rights and responsibilities as members of the press. In addition, they will examine in depth careers related to journalism.
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JOURNALISM III (0783) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Journalism II UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) This course incorporates all the requirements of Journalism II with heightened leadership responsibilities on the traditional newspaper staff organizational ladder. JOURNALISM IV (0784) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Journalism III UC and CSU certified: English (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) This course incorporates the course of study for Journalism III. It will be based upon an agreement between advisor and student which will provide enriching experiences which may include mentoring, internships and special projects. PUBLIC SPEAKING I (0860) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisites: None *UC/CSU approval pending Public Speaking I is an elective course designed to help students develop oral language skills in a variety of planned and spontaneous public speaking situations, and to gain research and organizational skills necessary for a variety of types of oral presentations. YEARBOOK (0810) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None This course introduces students to a variety of writing and layout skills involved in creating the school yearbook. Students will study design theories, the aesthetics of composition, and the evolution of visual communication. These elements will then be applied to learning in other art forms across the curriculum. The pace and setting of the course will simulate the professional work environment, preparing students for a variety of post-graduation careers. ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT (0249)* Grade: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Placement by ELD/CELDT Assessment This course enables students to acquire communicative competence in English. The course enhances the student’s self-confidence and promotes language proficiency for personal, social, and educational purposes. A special emphasis is placed on developing the student’s academic English proficiency. Performance objectives describe what a second-language learner should be able to do by the end of the course. Instruction is developmental and includes a variety of communicative, meaning-based approaches, which incorporate a range of thinking skills. The course fosters an appreciation of the cultural diversity of all students. *This course is a mandatory elective for English language learners until they have met all the English requirements as specified by California state law.
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The World Language Department at College Park High School offers three living languages: French, German, and Spanish. At all levels emphasis is placed on mastery of the four language skills of speaking, understanding, reading and writing as well as comparative cultures study commensurate with the level of language of the student. A language is first and foremost an oral skill that cannot be mastered without daily oral language. Therefore, oral participation is mandatory at all levels and is an integral part of the student’s grade each quarter. Good attendance is a must. SPANISH I (5700) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level I Spanish is a performance-based course in which students use listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills to begin to developing fluency in Spanish. While using these skills in exploring a variety of familiar themes or topics, students build confidence in a solid foundation for future language learning. Students will communicate within the context of learned vocabulary and structure. They begin understanding the nature of language and recognize similarities and differences between target culture(s) and American culture. In a learning environment that is supportive and conducive to the development of new perspectives, students may acquire intercultural awareness and experience personal and academic growth through positive personal interactions. SPANISH II (5710) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Spanish I or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level II Spanish is a performance-based course in which students use listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to continue to develop fluency in Spanish. While using these skills in a variety of familiar themes or topics, students continue to build confidence and a solid foundation for future language learning. Students communicate within the context of expanded vocabulary and structure. They expand their understanding of the nature of language and target culture(s). In a learning environment that continues to be supportive of and conducive to the development of new perspectives, students acquire intercultural awareness and experience personal and academic growth through positive personal interactions. SPANISH III (5720) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Spanish II or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level III Spanish is a performance-based course in which students progress on the continuum of developing fluency in Spanish. Students participate in activities spanning a variety of themes and topics. They begin to transition from topics of the immediate environment to those of more global
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perspectives. They communicate with increasing fluency and control of vocabulary and structure. As they begin the study of literature of the target culture, they expand their intercultural knowledge and awareness. SPANISH IV HONORS (AP) (5730) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Spanish III or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level IV Spanish is a performance-based course in which students progress on the continuum of developing fluency in Spanish, as they pursue their own interests in the language. They become independent users of the language as they participate in activities spanning a variety of themes and topics. They transition from topics of the immediate environment to those of more global perspectives. They begin to adapt vocabulary to personal needs. As they continue the study of literature of the target culture, they further expand their intercultural knowledge and awareness. The students who choose to pursue the AP Spanish program will develop both practical and long-range intellectual benefits. In addition to the intrinsic benefits, students receiving a score of 3 or higher on the AP Spanish Language Examination, may receive credit or placement, or both, in advanced courses at the college level. SPANISH V HONORS (AP) (5740) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Spanish IV or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level V Spanish is a performance-based course in which students progress on the continuum of developing fluency in Spanish, as they pursue their own interests in the language. They become independent users of the language as they participate in activities spanning a variety of themes and topics. They transition from topics of the immediate environment to those of more global perspectives. They adapt vocabulary to personal needs. As they continue the study of literature of the target culture, they explore genres, the works of various authors, and further expand their intercultural knowledge and awareness. The students who choose to pursue the AP Spanish program will develop both practical and long-range intellectual benefits. In addition to the intrinsic benefits, students receiving a score of 3 or higher on the AP Spanish Literature Examination may receive credit or placement, or both, in advanced courses at the college level. FRENCH I (5050) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level I French is a performance-based course in which students use listening, speaking, and writing skills to begin to develop fluency in French. While using these skills in exploring a variety of familiar themes or topics, students build confidence and a solid foundation for future language learning. Students will communicate within the context of learned vocabulary and structure. They begin to understand the nature of language and recognize similarities and differences between target culture(s) and American culture. In a learning environment that is supportive of and conducive to the development of new perspectives, students may acquire intercultural awareness and experience personal and academic growth through positive personal interactions.

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FRENCH II (5060) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: French I or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level II French is a performance-based course in which students use listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to progress on the continuum of developing fluency in French. While using these skills in a variety of familiar themes or topics, students continue to build confidence and a solid foundation for future language learning. Students communicate within the context of expanded vocabulary and structure. They expand their understanding of the nature of language and the target culture. In a learning environment that continues to be supportive of and conducive to the development of new perspectives, students acquire intercultural awareness and experience personal and academic growth through positive personal interactions. FRENCH III (5070) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: French II or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level III French is a performance-based course in which students progress on the continuum of developing fluency in French. Students participate in activities spanning a variety of themes and topics. They begin to transition from topics of the immediate environment to those of more global perspectives. They communicate with increasing fluency and control of vocabulary and structure. As they begin the study of literature of the target culture, they expand their intercultural knowledge and awareness. FRENCH IV HONORS (AP) (5080) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: French III or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level IV French is a performance-based course in which students progress on the continuum of developing fluency in French, as they pursue their own interests in the language. They become independent users of the language as they participate in activities spanning a variety of themes and topics. They transition from topics of the immediate environment to those of more global perspectives. They begin to adapt vocabulary to personal needs. As they continue the study of literature of the target culture, they further expand their intercultural knowledge and awareness. The students who choose to pursue the AP French program will develop both practical and long-range intellectual benefits. In addition to the intrinsic benefits, students receiving a score of 3 or higher on the AP French Language Examination, may receive credit or placement, or both, in advanced courses at the college level. FRENCH V HONORS (AP) (5090) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: French IV or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level V French is a performance-based course in which students progress on the continuum of developing fluency in French, as they pursue their own interests in the language. They become independent users of the language as they participate in activities spanning a variety of themes and topics. They transition from topics of the immediate environment to those of more global perspectives.
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They adapt vocabulary to personal needs. As they continue the study of literature of the target culture, they explore genres, the works of various authors, and further expand their intercultural knowledge and awareness. The students who choose to pursue the AP French program will develop both practical and long-range intellectual benefits. In addition to the intrinsic benefits, students receiving a score of 3 or higher on the AP French Language Examination may receive credit or placement, or both, in advanced courses at the college level. GERMAN I (5280) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level I German is a performance-based course in which students use listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to begin to develop fluency in German. While using these skills in exploring a variety of familiar themes or topics, students build confidence and a solid foundation for future language learning. Students will communicate within the context of learned vocabulary and structure. They begin to understand the nature of language and recognize similarities and differences between the target culture and American culture. In a learning environment that is supportive of and conducive to the development of new perspectives, students may acquire intercultural awareness and experience personal and academic growth through positive personal interactions. GERMAN II (5290) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: German I or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level II German is a performance-based course in which students use listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to progress on the continuum of developing fluency in German. While using these skills in a variety of familiar themes or topics, students continue to build confidence and a solid foundation for future language learning. Students communicate within the context of expanded vocabulary and structure. They expand their understanding of the nature of language and the target culture. In a learning environment that continues to be supportive of and conducive to the development of new perspectives, student acquire intercultural awareness and experience personal and academic growth through positive personal interactions. GERMAN III (5300) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: German II or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level III German is a performance-based course in which students use listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to progress on the continuum of developing fluency in German. Students participate in activities spanning a variety of themes and topics. They begin to transition from topics of the immediate environment to those of more global perspective. They communicate with increasing fluency and control of vocabulary and structure. As they begin the study of literature of the target culture, they expand their intercultural knowledge and awareness.

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GERMAN IV HONORS (AP) (5310) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: German III or consent of instructor UC and CSU certified: Foreign Language /Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “e” requirement) Level IV German is a performance-based course in which students progress on the continuum of developing fluency in German, as they pursue their own interests in the language. They become independent users of the language as they participate in activities spanning a variety of themes and topics. They transition from topics of the immediate environment to those of more global perspective. They begin to adapt vocabulary to personal needs. As they continue the study of literature of the target cultures, they further expand their intercultural knowledge and awareness. The students who choose to pursue the AP German program will develop both practical and long-range intellectual benefits. In addition to the intrinsic benefits, students receiving a score of 3 or higher on the AP German language examination, may receive credit or placement, or both, in advanced courses at the college level. INFORMATION ABOUT THE ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) TESTS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE Advanced Placement (AP)Tests in foreign languages, with emphasis upon language or literature, are given each spring. Students who are successfully completing levels IV or V of a foreign language are encouraged to take these tests. A passing score on one Advanced Placement Test may earn for the student college credit and advanced standing upon entrance to most colleges and universities. Preparation for the Advanced Placement Tests is seen by universities as serving to stimulate high school students to higher achievement.

FOODS I (8300), FOODS II (8310) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None Foods I includes the study of nutrition, consumer skills, and the selection, preparation and care of foods while reinforcing academic, leadership, technology and decision-making skills. Career pathways are taught and reinforced throughout. Foods II is an advanced study of nutrition, consumer skills, and the selection, preparation, and care of foods. Basic academic, leadership, decision-making, and technology skills are reinforced. Career pathways are taught and reinforced throughout the course.
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High School Diploma requirement: Passing grade in/Algebra I

(3 years required)

AP Statistics

Geometry 8th Algebra Algebra 8th Pre-Algebra II

Algebra II/Trig

Pre Calculus Honors Trigonometry & Advanced Topics

AP Calculus

Algebra II

Intro to Algebra AIMS Elective / math support
*Available to all 11th and 12th grade students

*Senior Math *Algebra Concepts and Skills

Algebra Preparation (8th grade) Intro to Algebra (9th grade) Algebra Concepts & Skills (11th/12th grade)

Designed to cover the key concepts of Algebra and the computational skills necessary to be successful (first half of Algebra book) Designed to provide the concepts and skills necessary for Algebra (first half of Algebra book) Designed to provide the skills and concepts necessary to meet the district’s rigorous academic standards in mathematics
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Note:
1. 2. 3. 4. All students enter math at the level recommended by their eighth grade teacher. Students who need a slower pace and review of basic skills should take Introduction to Algebra. Students must earn 30 credits of math to graduate from College Park High School. Students progress through courses according to the flow chart above. Solid lines indicate the normal progression. Note alternate paths that some students might take depending on their level of success. 5. In order to meet the “a-g” UC and CSU requirements in math, a student must complete Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra II or Alg II/Trig. with a grade of “C” or better.

Warning to Parents and Students Taking a course that is beyond a student’s preparation or ability will have a detrimental effect on the student and his/her progress. Choose the appropriate math course, keeping in mind prerequisites and the ability and motivation of the student. For college prep courses, Algebra I and above, expect at least 90 minutes of homework per block period.
Note to parents and students regarding calculators: Most college prep courses (Algebra I and above) at College Park are taught on the assumption that students own or have regular access to a programmable graphing calculator. Most teachers use the T182 in class on a regular basis. We recommend the T1-83, TI-84 or TI-89 for Algebra I – Calculus. ALGEBRA CONCEPTS AND SKILLS (1056) Grades: 11-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I (Recommended for students who did not perform well in Algebra) This course is designed for students to further develop an understanding of functions, algebra, geometry, statistics and probability, measurement, number, logic and language, in a non-calculator setting. The emphasis of this course is to provide the concepts and skills necessary to meet the district's rigorous academic standards in mathematics. (This course is aligned with the MDUSD adopted Math Content Standards.) INTRO TO ALGEBRA I (1300) Grades: 9-10 Prerequisite: Assessment test and/or teacher recommendation This course introduces 15 of the 25 California State Mathematics Standards for Algebra I focusing on linear algebra. Emphasis is on writing, solving, and graphing linear equations. The ability to communicate mathematical reasoning and understanding will be incorporated in all the topics. In addition, algebraic skills and concepts are developed and used in a wide variety of problem solving situations. The course builds the foundation for success in the Algebra I course, which includes the quadratic standards.

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SENIOR MATH (1920) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None Senior Mathematics provides senior students (and juniors when space permits) the opportunity to study mathematics through applications. Senior Mathematics concentrates on consumer and occupational mathematics, and preparation for the mathematical sections of employment tests. Senior Mathematics develops skills in areas such as credit buying, sales, tax, markups, discounts, measuring devices and estimation. ALGEBRA I (1310) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Qualifying score on assessment test and/or teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified (Fulfills UC/CSU “c” requirement) This course covers the 25 California State Mathematics Standards for Algebra I. Emphasis is on writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations. The ability to communicate mathematical reasoning and understanding will be incorporated into all math topics. In addition, algebraic skills and concepts are developed and used in a wide variety of problem-solving situations. This course is the first course in the three-year mathematics requirement for four-year college admission. GEOMETRY (1320) Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I UC and CSU certified (Fulfills UC/CSU “c” requirement) This course provides the student with the knowledge of concepts and skills identified in the California State Mathematics Standards for Geometry. The ability to communicate mathematical reasoning and understanding will be incorporated in all math topics. In addition, students will develop their ability to construct formal, logical arguments and proofs in geometric settings and problems. This course is the second course in the three year mathematics requirement for four-year college admission. ALGEBRA II (1330) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry UC and CSU certified (Fulfills UC/CSU “c” requirement) This course provided the student with the knowledge, concepts and skills identified in the California State Math Standards for Algebra II. The ability to communicate mathematical reasoning and understanding will be incorporated in all math topics. In addition, students will develop their ability to construct formal, logical arguments in algebraic settings and problems. This course is the third course in the three-year mathematics requirement for four-year college admission.

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ALGEBRA II / Trigonometry (1340) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry. Qualifying score on assessment test and/or teacher recommendation. UC and CSU certified (Fulfills UC/CSU “c” requirement) This course provides the student with the knowledge, concepts, skills identified in the California State Math Standards for Algebra II and Trigonometry. The ability to communicate mathematical reasoning and understanding will be incorporated into all topics. In addition, students will develop their ability to construct formal, logical arguments in algebraic and trigonometric settings and problems. This course is the third course in the three-year mathematics requirement for four-year college admission. TRIGONOMETRY AND ADVANCED ALGEBRA TOPICS (1350) Grade: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra II and teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified (Fulfills UC/CSU “c” requirement) The first semester of this course is a study of trigonometry. During the second semester selected advanced algebra topics are studied. These topics include logarithms, sequences and series, matrices and determinants, probability and statistics. The course is culminated with use of the computer to enhance understanding of the concepts studied in this course. STATISTICS (AP) (1530) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Algebra II UC and CSU certified (Fulfills UC/CSU “c” requirement) The purpose of this is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four board conceptual themes: • • • • Exploring data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns Planning a study: Deciding what and how to measure Anticipating patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation Statistical inference: Confirming models

Rationale In colleges and universities, the number of students who take a statistics course is almost as large as the number of students who take a calculus course. At least one statistics course is typically required for majors such as engineering, psychology, sociology, health science, and business. Every semester more than 170,000 students take their first statistics course from the Mathematics or Statistics Department at a college or university. The vast majority of these students take a non-calculus based introductory course that is equivalent to the Statistics AP course. A large number of other students take a similar introductory course from other departments who teach their own statistics course. Science, engineering, business, and mathematics majors usually take an upper division calculus-based course in statistics, for which the Statistics AP course will be effective preparation.

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PRE-CALCULUS HONORS (1405) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: “B” or better in Trigonometry & Advanced Topics, or Algebra II/Trigonometry and Teacher recommendations UC and CSU certified (Fulfills UC/CSU “c” requirement) Pre-Calculus is considered to be the fourth year of a very strong high school mathematics program, but is also taught at the college level where it is the second college level course in mathematics after trigonometry. Pre-Calculus Honors refines the Trigonometric, Geometric and Algebraic techniques needed in the study of Calculus. New skills will be introduced and many old skills will be pushed to new heights with a conceptual understanding beyond the reach of most high school students. CALCULUS AB HONORS (AP) (1360) Grade: 12 (Year) Prerequisite: “B” or better in Pre-Calculus UC and CSU certified (Fulfills UC/CSU “c” requirement) This course consists of the study of functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, and applications of the principles of differential and integral calculus. The course will prepare students for the Advanced Placement Test in Calculus AB. AIMS I (Academic Intervention for Math Success) (1301) (ELECTIVE) Grades: 9-10 (Year) Pre requisite: None This course provides the student with the basic mathematical skills and knowledge required for success in the study of Algebra. It is designed to support students who are currently taking Introduction to Algebra. It will strengthen the student’s understanding and mastery of pre-algebra concepts while helping them to be successful in Introduction to Algebra. This course will use a variety of materials, presentation styles, and activities in order to engage students who may have had prior difficulty in mathematics. AIMS II (Academic Intervention for Math Success) (1302) (ELECTIVE) Grades: 9-12 (year) Prerequisite: None. This course is recommended to take concurrently with Algebra I. This course does not fulfill one year of the three-year mathematics requirement. This course provides the student with the basic mathematical skills and knowledge required for success in the study of Algebra. It is designed to support students who are currently taking Algebra I. It will strengthen the student’s understanding and mastery of Algebra concepts while helping them to be successful in Algebra I. This course will use a variety of materials, presentation styles, and activities in order to
engage students in learning who may have had prior difficulty in mathematics.

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All students purchase and wear a Physical Education uniform. Base price is $20.00. Students are to be enrolled in physical education for their first two years in high school unless individually exempted in accordance with the Education Code. The maximum credit which may be earned for graduation in physical education is 40 units. PHYSICAL EDUCATION – GRADE 9 (8520) Grade: 9 (Year) Prerequisite: None Ninth grade physical education is composed of activities from the eight areas included in the Physical Education Handbook and the model curriculum standards. It will also include a cognitive-based, health-related fitness program. This year forms the core program and will be the base for a sequentially developed elective program. All students will be exposed to the areas of aquatics, combatives, physical activity, gymnastics/tumbling, individual and dual sports, mechanics of body movement, rhythm and dance, team sports and a cognitive-based, health-related fitness program. CPHS PE Department recommends one of these two (2) courses to fulfill the 2nd year of the physical education requirement and to be taken in the 10th grade. PHYSICAL EDUCATION * (8740) Individual / Dual Activities Grade: 10 - 12 (Year) Prerequisite: None Individual and dual activities consist of the following units of instruction that range from four to nine weeks: tennis, badminton, swimming, golf, archery, and social dance. In these activities, we will review, increase and test the basic skills, mechanics, and knowledge learned in the core program. Cognitive-based physical and health-related concepts and grade level physical fitness performance objectives will be reviewed, applied and evaluated for all grade levels. TEAM SPORTS I (8870) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of 9th grade PE Team Sports consist of the following units of instruction: volleyball, football, soccer, speedball, basketball, and softball. Instruction in skills will be provided in each activity. Cognitive-based physical and health-related concepts and grade level physical fitness performance objectives will be reviewed, applied and evaluated for all grade levels.
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BOWLING I (8650) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Pre requisite: Completion of 9th grade PE
• Students must provide their own transportation.

Bowling is an off-campus course that is taught at various bowling alleys within our district. Individual instruction is given and leagues are formed. Averages are kept for each student. Various tournaments may be held each semester. Cognitive-based physical and health-related concepts and grade level physical fitness performance objectives will be reviewed, applied and evaluated for all grade levels. BOWLING II (8900) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of Level 1
• Students must provide their own transportation.

Bowling is an off-campus course that is taught at various bowling alleys within our district. Individual instruction is given and leagues are formed. Averages are kept for each student. Various tournaments may be held each semester. Cognitive-based physical and health-related concepts and grade level physical fitness performance objectives will be reviewed, applied and evaluated for all grade levels. DANCE I (8710) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None Dance I is a class that introduces students to the study of fundamental forms of movement which will allow them to create their own dance compositions. Students will study different dance styles and forms which will include historical and cultural information on dance. This class is designed for all students with or without previous experience in dance and can prepare students for more advanced classes. PERSONAL FITNESS (8930) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of 9th grade PE Personal fitness is a course designed to meet the individual needs of students in the area of fitness, specifically in the areas of cardio respiratory fitness, strength fitness, endurance fitness, and nutrition.

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AEROBICS (8970) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of 9th grade PE Aerobics includes knowledge of exercise physiology and body mechanics. Jogging, swimming, bicycling and aerobic exercise to music are used to improve the cardio respiratory, strength, and endurance fitness level of students. Cognitive-based physical and health-related concepts and grade level physical fitness performance objectives will be reviewed, applied and evaluated for all grade levels. WEIGHT TRAINING I (8890) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of 9th grade PE Weight Training is a three-day-a-week-work-out program. The off days are used for cardio-respiratory fitness. Various team sports are also offered during off days. Workouts are based upon the set/repetitions concept. Free bar, universal machines, and dumbbells are the major sources of training. Students are grouped by abilities and each student works on his/her own individual capacity. Cognitive-based physical and health-related concepts and grade level physical fitness performance objectives will be reviewed, applied and evaluated for all grade levels. WEIGHT TRAINING II (8480) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of Level 1 This course focuses primarily on mastery of skills and techniques taught in Level I and the identification of muscle groups involved. Advanced techniques and skills are taught, plus the development of individual programs which include development of short-and long-term goals. Emphasis on development of lifting concepts, maintenance of muscle tone, endurance and establishment of a system of self-evaluation. Cognitive-based physical and health-related concepts and grade level physical fitness performance objectives will be reviewed, applied and evaluated for all grade levels.

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1 year of Life Science / 1 year of Physical Science required for high school graduation

Life Sciences
INTRO TO BIOLOGY (2010) Grades: 9-12 (Year), (normally 10) Prerequisite: None Intro to Biology covers basic concepts concerning living things and their environment. Topics include: The introduction to chemistry of life, cells, basic genetics, evolution and classification, ecology and some aspects of anatomy and physiology. Basic techniques, concepts, and vocabulary will be emphasized. General Life Science does not meet the “a-g” requirements for CSU/UC admission. It does, however, meet entrance requirements for community and vocational colleges. BIOLOGY I (2110) *(CPHS recommends concurrent enrollment in Geometry for 9th grade students choosing this course due to the rigorous core content.) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) Biology is the study of living things and their relationships with other living things and with the physical environment. Included is the study of life processes such as growth, reproduction, and metabolism, and the flow of energy through living systems. Genetics, evolution of life forms, classification of living things, the structure and function of molecules, cells, tissues, organs and systems that make up living organisms, are also studied. Attention is given to the human species and its relationship to other life. Science attitudes, thinking processes and skills, and applications of science and technology to social problems and personal decision making are emphasized. Biology I qualifies as a laboratory science course in meeting the University of California “d” or “g” admission requirement. (UC requires completion of PCM I/Algebra in order to satisfy their requirement.) PHYSIOLOGY (2840) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Biology UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) This is a laboratory course that includes a detailed and comprehensive study of the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Concepts from the physical sciences are developed and applied as needed. Science attitudes, thinking processes, laboratory and communication skills and technology are incorporated. Personal as well as global health issues are emphasized. This course qualifies as a laboratory science in meeting UC entrance requirements.

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MARINE BIOLOGY (2200), ZOOLOGY (2920) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Biology UC and CSU certified: (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) This course deals with marine environments and the living things that inhabit them. The content includes the physical and chemical properties of water; characteristics of oceans and their interaction with land and with the atmosphere; aquatic ecosystems and how human activity both affects and is affected by aquatic environments and ecosystems. Laboratory and field work is integral to the course and includes study of both live and preserved specimens. BIOLOGY (AP) (2044) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) The Biology AP course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. After showing themselves to be qualified on the AP examination, some students, as college freshmen, are permitted to take upper-level courses in biology or register for courses for which biology is a prerequisite. Other students may have fulfilled a basic requirement for a laboratory-science course and will be able to take other courses to pursue their majors. Biology AP includes those topics regularly covered in a college biology course for majors or in the syllabus from a high-quality college program in introductory biology. The college course in biology differs significantly from the usual first high school course in biology with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the kind of laboratory work done by students, and the time and effort required of students. The textbooks used for Biology AP should be those also used by college biology majors. The kinds of labs done by AP students must be the equivalent of those done by college students. The Biology AP course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of a first course in high school biology and one in high school chemistry as well. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. BIOTECHNOLOGY (2250) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: 1 year Biology with grade of “C” or better. One (1) year of Chemistry recommended. UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) Biotechnology uses new techniques in biology and chemistry to develop beneficial products for medicine, agriculture, and forensic. The course will emphasize the development of lab skills and cover basic concepts that are used in the biotechnology industry. Current issues in biotechnology that will affect our lives in the future will also be studied. (If this course is not offered next year, your alternate selection will be added to your schedule.)

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (AP) (2362) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Biology I or concurrently enrolled, Completion of Algebra I with grade “B” or better UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college level course in Environmental Science. Environmental Science AP is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates material from Biology, Earth Science, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Social Sciences to come to an understanding of the natural world and the forces that affect it. Topics include an in-depth exploration of ecosystems, populations, renewable and non-renewable resources, environmental problems, and the impact of human activities on the earth. Students will do comprehensive reading, laboratory and field work, and projects, as well as examine careers in Environmental Science. The curriculum is aligned to that recommended by the College Board, and students are expected to take the AP Exam offered by the College Board.

Physical Science
CHEMISTRY I (2270) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I with grade of “C” or better. Concurrent enrollment in Geometry and current math/science teacher recommendation/test evaluation. UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) Chemistry is the study of the structure of matter - atoms, molecules, crystals, solutions – and how that structure is related to the properties and behavior of matter. A quantitative approach is used to investigate the processes that occur during chemical change, when matter changes its form, and with the energy that is always involved with those processes. Basic principles of chemistry are developed and applied to real life situations. This course is designed to provide a solid foundation for further study of science. The course meets the criteria for laboratory science courses in the UC and California State Universities and Colleges entrance requirements CHEMISTRY I HONORS (2280) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of Geometry with grade of “B” or better. Concurrent enrollment in Alg II/Trig and current math/science teacher recommendation/test evaluation. UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) Chemistry is the study of the structure of matter-atoms, molecules, crystals, solutions – and how that structure is related to the properties and behavior of matter. A quantitative approach is used to investigate the processes that occur during chemical change, when matter changes its form, and with the energy that is always involved with those processes. Basic principles of chemistry are developed and applied to real life situations. Chemistry I Honors differs from Chemistry I in that the pace of instruction is faster, additional topics are included, and many topics are treated in greater depth and with more application of mathematics. Chemistry I Honors meets the criteria set forth by the University of California and California State Universities and Colleges for a laboratory science honors course.

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EARTH SCIENCE I (2380) Grade: 9 (Year) Prerequisite: Currently enrolled in Algebra I, “C” or better in 8th grade Science CSU certified: Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) Earth Science I is a laboratory course designed to provide a rigorous introduction to high school science for students who anticipate taking Chemistry and/or Physics. Earth Science is designed to provide a full year course for students who have a particular interest in the earth sciences. Earth Science I includes content drawn from astronomy, geology, meteorology, and hydrology. Many basic concepts of chemistry and physics are also developed in the context of earth science topics. Science attitudes, thinking processes and skills, application of appropriate mathematical concepts and skills, and applications of science and technology to social problems and personal decision making are emphasized. Earth Science I meets the UC “g” requirement for elective courses. EARTH SCIENCE II (2390) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: One year of any science, completion of Algebra I with a grade of “C” or better CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills a UC “g” requirement, or CSU “d” requirement) The course is intended as an alternative to Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science I, or General Physical Science. The content includes major ideas selected from astronomy, geology, meteorology, oceanography, and cartography. Topics will be treated in greater depth than in a survey course such as Earth Science I. Selection of research topics will be based to some extent on student interests. Science attitudes, thinking processes and skills, as well as applications of science and technology to social problems and personal decision making, are emphasized. GENERAL PHYSICAL SCIENCE (2500) Grades: 11-12 (normally 11) (Year) Prerequisite: None This is a course designed to fulfill the physical science graduation requirement for students who do not elect chemistry, physics or earth science. Content includes major ideas relevant to astronomy, geology, meteorology, oceanography, chemistry and physics. General Physical Science attitudes, thinking processes and skills, and applications of science and technology to social problems and personal decision making. This course does not meet UC or CSU laboratory science entrance requirements. Labs included as appropriate. PHYSICS (2720) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra and Geometry UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) Physics is a laboratory course that provides a systematic understanding of the fundamental principles of physical phenomena that govern chemical, biological, terrestrial and astronomical processes. The course provides a foundation for the intensive studies of most of the other sciences and for an understanding of many technological applications of science. Major areas of content include mechanics, work and energy, wave motion, light, electromagnetism, modern atomic and nuclear physics. Science attitudes, thinking processes, and skills, and applications of science and technology to social problems and personal decision making are emphasized. The course qualifies as a laboratory science in meeting UC entrance requirements.
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PHYSICS HONORS (2725) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra II/Trig with a grade of “B” or better and permission of instructor UC and CSU certified: Lab Science (Fulfills UC/CSU “d” requirement) Physics Honors is an intensive study into the physical phenomena that govern the events that occur in the world around us. Mathematical analysis and problem solving approaches are emphasized. Laboratory exercises will require students to apply knowledge to new situations and require them to work in situations that require unique and imaginative solutions. Physics Honors is intended for the serious student with an interest in the sciences or science-related careers. Topics discussed are mechanics, vectors, forces, gravity, energy, thermodynamics, gas laws, waves, electromagnetism, nuclear physics, and modern physics.

HEALTY LIVING (2907) Grade: 9 Prerequisite: None
You must choose a semester class to fulfill the year long requirement. Semester class choices include Systems Applications I or Exploring Arts/Music.

This course provides for development, delivery, and evaluation of planned sequential health curriculum for high school students. It is designed to influence positively student’s knowledge, attitude, skills, and behaviors related to health. Creating health literacy is the central theme throughout this course and is reiterated and reinforced in the sequential areas. The following nine areas will be addressed: Personal health, consumer and community health, injury prevention and safety, substance abuse, nutrition, environmental health, sexual health, individual growth and development, communicable and chronic diseases. ROP EMERGENCY MEDICAL CAREERS – First Responder (2572) Grades: 11-12 (Year) and age 16 Prerequisite: None This course instructs students to the level of First Responder. The First Responder is the first person on the scene of an accident or medical emergency who has the skills to help maintain a person’s life until advanced medical support arrives. This is an introduction to the medical field for students interested in medicine or hospital health. Topics include CPR, medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, scene/patient assessment, traumatic emergencies, wilderness first aid, and emergency care. After completion of this class, students will be prepared to take the Emergency Medical Technician course to increase their skill level for EMT certification.
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WORLD HISTORY (3490) Grade: 10 Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement) This course offers a study of world civilization with an emphasis on cultures from the mid-18th through the 20th centuries. It will also integrate trends from previous periods as a way of developing appropriate historical context. Students will have opportunities to study significant historical developments and events during these periods; students will also demonstrate competency in thinking historically, understanding the relationship between the individual and community, and in applying the social science method. WORLD HISTORY AP (3540) Grade 10 Prerequisite: English I completion with a grade of “B” or better and teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement) This course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. Focused primarily on the last thousand years of the global experience, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, has set the human stage. This course offers motivated students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the processes that, over time, have resulted in the knitting of the world into a community. Students will be prepared to take the AP exam in World History. WORLD PERSPECTIVES * This course fulfills both the sophomore English and World History requirement and must be taken concurrently with World Perspectives English. Grade: 10 Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement) This course fulfills both the History and English requirements through an interdisciplinary approach, which emphasizes cultures from the mid-18th century through the 20th centuries. The literature taught in the English component reinforces the cultural integrity of the time. *This class is equivalent to World History. UNITED STATES HISTORY / AMERICAN THREADS (3070) This course fulfills the junior year U.S. History requirement and must be taken concurrently with English III / American Threads. Grade: 11 (Year) Prerequisite: English II UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement) This course fulfills both the junior English and U.S. History requirements through an interdisciplinary approach, which emphasizes the multicultural nature of American society. The course combines these
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two primary disciplines while weaving other elements of the humanities into the curriculum. Students will gain a holistic sense of the American experience. UNITED STATES HISTORY (3530) Grade: 11 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement) The primary focus of this course will be to explore the major events, personalities, social, cultural, political, economic and technological changes that have shaped United States history in the 20th century. The course begins with a selective review of American history from the Age of Discovery to the Gilded Age, with an emphasis on: the nation’s beginnings, the origins of democratic government, the rise of sectionalism and the industrial transformation of the United States. The course continues with an intensive study of the history of the United States in the twentieth century. Major historical units will include: the Progressive Era, World War I, the 1920’s, the New Deal and the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War and the 1950’s, the 1960’s, the 1970’s, and contemporary America. Students will develop a sense of historical connection and an appreciation of historical time, involving the concepts of the past, present, and future. Students will expand their historical literacy regarding twentieth century United States history. Finally, the course will promote democratic values and good citizenship through its examination of the evolution, effectiveness and abuse of democratic institutions in America. UNITED STATES HISTORY HONORS (3532) Grade: 11 (Year) Prerequisite: World History completion with a grade of “B” or better and teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement) The primary focus of this course will be to explore the major events, personalities, social, cultural and technological changes that have shaped United States history from the 17th to the 20th centuries. The course begins with an in-depth review of American history from the Age of Discovery to the Era of Reconstruction with an emphasis on the geography of the new world; early European exploration; colonization and settlement; the American Revolution and the creation of the new nation; manifest destiny, slavery and abolitionism; the Civil War and Reconstruction. The remainder of the course will be: an intensive study of the political, economic, social, cultural and technological changes that have taken place in the United States in the late 19th and 20th centuries. The major units will be the industrial development of the United States; the emergence of modern America; the Great Depression and World War II; the post-war United States and contemporary America. Students will develop a sense of historical connection and an appreciation of historical time, involving the concepts of the past, present and future. Students will also expand their historical literacy regarding 20th century American history. Finally, the course will promote democratic values and good citizenship through its examination of the evolution, effectiveness and abuse of democratic institutions in America. UNITED STATES HISTORY (AP) (3531) Grade: 11 (Year) Prerequisite: World History completion with a grade of “B” or better and teacher recommendation, UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement) The aim of U.S. History AP is to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory U.S. History courses and to prepare students for successful
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completion of the AP exam. This course will explore the major events, personalities, social, cultural, and technological changes that have shaped U.S. history from the 15th to the 20th centuries.

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (3280), ECONOMICS (3150) Grade: 12 (Year) Taken in conjunction UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement for Government; “g” for Economics) The Government course will study the basic structure of American government, exploring what the role of government should be under our Constitutional system. Supporting objectives include historical political theories essential to the establishment of our system of government, supplemented by the social, economic, and religious institutions which influenced it. Further, an objective is to expose students to participatory government experiences leading to an informed electorate, capable of taking responsibility and leadership in society. The Economics course will explore the basic principles and operations of the free market economy in the context of choices among scarce resources. Further, students will gain understanding of our role in the global economy, illustrating our interdependence. Lastly, students will develop skills for personal economics. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (AP) (3262) / ECONOMICS (AP) (3141) Grade: 12 (Year) Taken in conjunction Prerequisite: US History with a grade of “B” or better and teacher recommendation. UC and CSU certified: History (Fulfills UC/CSU “a” requirement for Government; “g” for Economics) US Government The aim of U.S. Government AP is to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory U.S. Government and Politics courses and to prepare students for successful completion of the A.P. exam. This course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the U.S. and familiarize the student with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Economics The AP course in Macroeconomics gives students an understanding of the Macroeconomics: principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. This course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic and international economics. Microeconomics: The AP course in Microeconomics gives students an understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.

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CITIZEN LAW A/B (3690) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None This course is an introduction to the American Justice System. The course presents basic fundamentals of criminal and civil law. It also addresses trial procedures and the major institutions of the justice system. The course emphasizes an understanding of our legal system and an appreciation for its effectiveness. Students develop a framework for intelligent decision-making, leadership, and responsibility as citizens in society. INTRO TO LAW (ROP) (3692) Grades: 11-12 (Year) and age 16 Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) This course is designed to give the high school student a working knowledge of the legal system in the United States. This course is concerned with developing an understanding of the role of the law in our society and an awareness of one’s rights and responsibilities under the constitution. Emphasis is placed on having the student participate in numerous classroom activities to stimulate the legal process. GEOGRAPHY (3610) Grades: 9-10 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) This course is the study of people, places, and the environment through the application of the five themes of geography. Students will investigate the interconnections between the environment and human activities and develop basic geographic skills. Students will study the physical aspects of our planet in order to more fully understand how these elements impact human society. This course aligns with and supports the MDUSD History/Social Science standards and courses of study for World Civilizations and United States History. PSYCHOLOGY (3770) Grades: 11-12 (Year) UC and CSU certified: Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) The major goal of Psychology is to systematically study individual behavior and human mental processes to gain an understanding of the self and others. The course will explore cognitive aspects of the mind, or how humans think and feel about the world around them. The course will provide opportunities for students to become knowledgeable about the importance of attitudes, feelings, and values for themselves and others in determining human behavior; the scientific basis of behavior, the process of human development as a lifelong journey.

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PSYCHOLOGY (AP) (3774) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Successful application UC and CSU certified: Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) The aim of Psychology AP is to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory psychology courses and to prepare students for successful completion of the AP exam. The course will introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology. Students also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. SOCIOLOGY (3870) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “g” requirement) Sociology is the behavioral science that studies human society and social behavior. This course will make students aware of sociological forces that shape the structure of life in the United States and the world. The students will examine concepts such as family structure, culture, crime, adolescents, aging, and religion. They will also explore concepts relating to social change and world population.

INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (0840) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Film is one of the major collaborative art forms of the 20th century. This course will examine the many aspects of this art form, such as the history and aesthetics of film and other moving images. It will examine film in terms of vocabulary, criticism, grammar, production elements, genre, collaboration, acting, modes of music, historical context, and career opportunities. (As of the publication of this catalog, this course is not approved for UC/CSU “f” requirement for 05-06 school year.)

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ADVANCED FILM STUDIES (0845) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Introduction to Film Study, Video Production I, II or teacher permission UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement or the “G” elective requirement) This course is designed for students who have a serious interest in cinema as major art form of the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will use the language and tools learned in Introduction to Film Study to focus on the work of outstanding directors of the past and present. All of the directors studied have made a significant contribution to the development of film, have a compelling vision and unique style, and have a personal stamp that cuts across films, genres, and decades. VIDEO PRODUCTION I (9101) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Students will learn the basic aspects of video production, both in front of and behind the camera. They will study the techniques of video production and create their own theme-based video projects. There will be an emphasis on the uses of communication (speech, language, and writing) and organizational skills. This course includes aesthetics, cultural aspects, and the history of television and video production and is aligned to the Mt. Diablo Unified School District Visual and Performing Arts standards. VIDEO PRODUCTION II (9102) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Video Production I UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) This class is designed for all students with or without previous experience in video production and will prepare students for more advanced classes. This class includes advanced instruction in all aspects of video/audio production, from techniques for on-camera talent (as a spokesperson, news anchor, and dramatic performer), to script writing, storyboarding, studio operation, directing, producing, linear and digital editing of video productions. Students will develop a portfolio (demo reel) of their work as well as other projects. The Video II students will work with the instructor on refining techniques and on major video projects. Theme-based projects skills will support other curricular areas and serve as a link from school to professional careers. The class stresses the practical use of communication (speech, language, and writing), computer, and organizational skills. This course includes aesthetics, cultural aspects, and the history of television and video production and is aligned to the Mt. Diablo Unified School District Visual and Performing Arts standards.

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PHOTOGRAPHY ARTS I (4420) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement)
* In order to gain maximum educational benefit from your photography class, student should have access to a 35mm film camera with manual focusing and exposure control.

Photography, as a non-verbal language, allows all students, in a differentiated setting, to increase their visual perception and provides a medium for creative expression. The history of photography will be evaluated in the context of historical, social, cultural and artistic developments. In producing their own work and by studying the photographs of others, all students will develop a base for making informed aesthetic judgements. Students will learn to operate 35 mm cameras and light meters while using black and white film. They will process negatives, create proof and enlargement prints, and learn the basics of design and lighting theories related to photography. Students will be challenged with assignments that replicate professional work with the enhancement of critical thinking skills. They will learn how to apply elements from the study of photography to other art forms, content areas, and careers. PHOTOGRAPHY ARTS II (7750) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography Arts I or approval of instructor UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement)
* In order to gain maximum educational benefit from your photography class, student should have access to a 35mm film camera with manual focusing and exposure control.

Photography, as a non-verbal language, allows all students, in a differentiated setting, to increase their visual perception and provides a medium for creative expression. The history of photography will be evaluated in the context of historical, social, cultural and artistic developments. In producing their own work and by studying the photographs of others, all students will expand their base for making informed aesthetic judgements as learned in Photography Arts I. Students will become proficient in operating 35 mm cameras and light meters while using black and white film. They will process negatives, create proof and enlargement prints and expand their use of the basics of design and lighting theories related to photography. In building their portfolio, students will be challenged with assignments that replicate definitive professional work with the enhancement of critical thinking skills. They will learn how to apply elements from the study of photography to other art forms, content areas, and careers. PHOTOGRAPHY ARTS ADVANCED (ROP) (7755) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography Arts II or approval of instructor UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement)
* In order to gain maximum educational benefit from your photography class, student should have access to a 35mm film camera with manual focusing and exposure control.

Photography, as a non-verbal language, allows all students to increase their visual perception and provides a medium for creative expression. The history of photography will be evaluated in the context of historical, social, cultural and artistic developments. Students learn to understand the
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artistic qualities of the photographic medium while acquiring the techniques for utilizing photography for expressive purposes. Students will become proficient in operating 35-mm cameras and light meters while using black and white film. Instruction includes studio and field techniques, photojournalism, fashion photography, and commercial, portrait, scientific, nature, wildlife and sports photography. In producing their own works and by studying the photographs of others, students will develop a basis for making informal aesthetic judgments. This course has UC credit approval.

ART ADVANCED

ADVANCED CERAMICS

ART II

ART II Draw/Paint

ADV. ART DESIGN 3-D

ART II CERAMICS

ART I

ART DESIGN A/B

ART DESIGN 3D Glass

CERAMICS

EXPLORING ART (4020) / EXPLORING MUSIC (4670) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirements) Exploring Art is a one-semester survey course covering art of the 20th century. Works of art will be examined in terms of their historical precedents, their interrelationship with the social condition’s in which they exist, and their elements and principles of design. Students will also investigate the influence of new technology and materials on works of art. Exploring Music is a one-semester survey course covering the development of music in the 20th century. Music will be examined in terms of its historical precedents, interrelationship with the social conditions in which it exists, and its musical and textural components. Students will also investigate the influence of electronics on the music industry.
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ART I (4130) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Art I is a class that introduces students to the elements of art and principles of design. The history and criticism of visual arts are presented through the use of projects, lectures, films, and slides. This class provides a basic understanding of how to see, evaluate, and interpret experience through a variety of media. The student will respond to, analyze, and make judgments about form, content, techniques, and purpose in works of art as evidenced by creation/evaluation of portfolios. Basic tools and techniques are explained, demonstrated, and practiced to promote creative expression through active student participation. This course supports cross-curricular learning and basic school-to-career awareness. Art I is designed for all students with or without previous experience in the visual arts and can prepare students for more advanced classes. ART II (4140) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art I or equivalent experience with instructor approval UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Art II is an advanced class that expands students’ knowledge and abilities in the fundamentals and principles of two-dimensional art forms. The history and criticism of these forms are presented through the use of projects, lectures, and visual materials. This class provides an expanded understanding of how to see, evaluate, and interpret experience through projects such as pencil, ink, watercolor, acrylic, tempera, oil, collage, pastels, charcoal, and clay. The students will respond to, analyze, and make judgments about form, content, technique, and purpose in works of art as evidenced by the creation and evaluation of portfolios. Related tools and techniques are explained, demonstrated and practiced to promote creative expression through active student participation. Work outside of class is required: portfolio or project preparation, reading, writing, or critical viewing where appropriate. This course continues cross-curricular and school to career awareness. This class is designed for students with previous experience in the visual arts who are prepared for an advanced level of art. ART II DRAWING & PAINTING (4150) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Art I and instructor approval UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) This is an advanced drawing and painting class that expands students’ knowledge and abilities in the fundamentals and principles of two-dimensional art forms. The history and criticism of these forms are presented through the use of projects, lectures, and visual materials. This class provides an expanded understanding of how to see, evaluate, and interpret experience through drawing and painting styles and techniques such as perspective, contour, gesture, portrait, figure, landscape, nonobjective, and abstract. The students will respond to, analyze, and make judgements about form, content, technique, and purpose in works of art as evidenced by the creation and evaluation of portfolios. Related tools and techniques are explained, demonstrated, and practiced to promote creative expression through active student participation. Work outside of class is required: portfolio or project preparation, reading, writing, or critical viewing where appropriate. This course continues cross-curricular and school to career awareness.
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ART ADVANCED (4120) Grades: 11-12 (Year) (Grade 10 students may enroll in Advanced Art with instructor approval) Prerequisite: The successful completion of Art I and Art II, equivalent courses, or instructor approval UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) This is an advanced course of study in art with the intent of developing a portfolio of work that exhibits an in-depth understanding of visual relationships, aesthetics, and a variety of media. Students will develop their own projects with the approval and direction of the instructor. Art of regional civilizations as well as contemporary art will be explored. Works of art will be examined in terms of their historical precedents and their elements and principles of design. Students will also investigate the influence of new technology and materials on works of art and experiment with technological development. This course enhances cross-curricular experiences and school to career opportunities. Students who repeat this course for credit will demonstrate higher levels of investigation and study in each repeated year. ART DESIGN A/B (4241/4242) Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) A This course introduces students to the fundamentals and principles of visual arts. This class provides a basic understanding of how to see, evaluate, and interpret experience through a variety of media such as wire, glass, wood, leather, plaster, computer graphics, etc. Basic tools are explained and demonstrated, and techniques are practiced to promote creative expression through active student participation. The history and criticism of visual arts are presented through the use of projects, films, videos, and slides. Work outside of class is required: portfolio or project preparation, reading, writing, or critical viewing where appropriate. This class is designed for all students with or without previous experience in the visual arts and prepares students for Art Design 4240B and more advanced art classes. B This course provides a deeper understanding of the concepts and techniques learned in Art Design. This class provides a basic understanding of how to see, evaluate, and interpret experience through a variety of media such as wire, glass, wood, leather, plaster, computer generated ideas, etc. Tools are explained and demonstrated, and techniques are practiced to promote creative expression through active student participation. Work outside of class is required: portfolio or project preparation, reading, writing, or critical viewing where appropriate. The history and criticism of visual arts are presented through the use of projects, films, videos, and slides. This course prepares students for more advanced art classes. ART DESIGN II-THREE DIMENSIONAL (GLASS / SAND) (4240) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Art Design II Three Dimensional is a class that introduces students to the fundamentals and principles of the visual arts and is open to any student in grades 9-12. The history and criticism of visual arts are presented through the use of projects, lectures, films, videos and slides. This class provides a basic understanding of how to see, evaluate and interpret experience through a variety of media. Basic tools
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and techniques are explained, demonstrated and practiced to promote creative expression through active student participation. This class is designed for all students with or without previous experience in the visual arts and can prepare students for more advanced art classes ADVANCED ART – THREE DIMENSIONAL (GLASS / SAND) (4246) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Art Design II – Three Dimensional or equivalent experience with instructor approval UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Advanced Art Design-Three Dimensional is a second-year course that expands students’ knowledge and abilities in the fundamentals and principles of three-dimensional visual art forms. The history and criticism of these forms are presented through the use of projects, lectures, and visual materials. This class provides understanding of how to see, evaluate and interpret experience through a variety of such media. Related tools and techniques are explained, demonstrated and practiced to promote creative expression through active student participation. Work outside of class is required: portfolio or project preparation. Reading, writing, or critical viewing where appropriate. This class is designed for all students with previous experience in the visual arts who are prepared for an advanced level of threedimensional design. CERAMICS I (4250) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Ceramics I is a class that introduces students to the fundamentals and principles of the visual arts and is open to any student in grades 9-12. The history and criticism of visual arts are presented through the use of projects, lectures, films and slides. This class provides a basic understanding of how to see, evaluate and interpret experience through a variety of media. Basic tools and techniques* are explained, demonstrated and practiced to promote creative expression through active student participation. This class is designed for all students with or without previous experience in the visual arts and can prepare students for more advanced art classes. *techniques include: pinch, coil, slab, wheel, sculpture, decorating, and glazing works made of clay. CERAMICS II (4260) Grades: 10-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Successful completion of Ceramics I, or demonstrated ability with instructor approval UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Ceramics II is an advanced class that expands students’ knowledge and abilities in the fundamentals and principles of three-dimensional visual art forms. The history and criticism of ceramics are presented through the use of projects, lectures, and visual arts materials. This class provides understanding of how to see, evaluate and interpret experience through projects: wheel throwing, casting, slab, coil, sculpting, glazing, painting, and firing methods. Related tools and techniques are explained, demonstrated and used to promote creative expression through active student participation. Work outside of class is required: project preparation, reading, writing, or critical viewing where appropriate. This class is designed for all students with successful experience in Ceramics I who are prepared for a more advanced level of ceramics.
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CERAMICS ADVANCED (4270) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Ceramics I, II, or demonstrated ability with instructor approval UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Advanced Ceramics is an advanced class that expands students’ knowledge and abilities in the fundamentals and principles of three-dimensional visual art forms. Students must demonstrate the ability to work independently in areas of special interest. The history and criticism of ceramics are presented in greater depth through the use of projects, lectures, and visual arts materials. This class expands and deepens understanding of how to see, evaluate and interpret experience through projects: wheel throwing, casting, slab, pinch, coil, sculpting, glazing, decorating, and ceramic firing methods. Specialized tools and techniques are explained, demonstrated, and used to promote individual creative expression through active student participation. Work outside of class is required (e.g., project preparation, reading, writing, research, critical viewing, and exhibiting). Students will explore possibilities of higher education and/or career opportunities in ceramics. This class is designed for motivated students who are prepared for a more advanced level of ceramics. DANCE I (943) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Dance I is a class that introduces students to the study of fundamental forms of movement which will allow them to create their own dance compositions. Students will study different dance styles and forms which will include historical and cultural information on dance. This class is designed for all students with or without previous experience in dance and can prepare students for more advanced dance classes.

Drama Philosophy
The Dramatics Program at College Park High School is based on the premise that every student has the capacity to create, to communicate, to solve problems individually and cooperatively. Our drama classes will develop each student’s dramatic imagination, problem solving and communicative potential through participation in the dramatic process. This includes not only written or literary drama, but also such non-literary modes as mime, improvisation, movement, development of the senses, oral communication, theatre games and such supportive elements as scenery, costumes/makeup, publicity, props and lights/sound. It will further include other forms of expression such as music, movement, the visual arts, electronic media (video) and film. DRAMA I (0900) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Drama I is a beginning class open to students in grades 9-12. Students will practice the techniques of acting and perform scenes. Play production, theatre history, and theatre of other cultures are also introduced. Students will also develop the ability to evaluate the different aspects of theatre.
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DRAMA II (0910) Grade: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Drama I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Drama II is designed as an intermediate class in Dramatics. To be eligible, the student must have passed Drama I or have the instructor’s permission. The class places stress on the refinement and development of the principles learned in Drama I. DRAMA III (0920) Grade: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Drama I or II, or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Drama III places stress on the refinement and development of the principles learned in Drama I and Drama II. Advanced students are expected to participate in all major productions. Senior drama students are expected to either act in and/or direct one-act plays, plus advance scenes from classical and contemporary theatre.

Vocal Music and Theory
TREBLE CHOIR – Vocal Music II (4880) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Treble Choir – Vocal Music II is a class open to students in grades 9-12 whose voice range is either soprano or alto. Students will learn the elements of vocal techniques and music reading, and sing a wide variety of selections representing different styles, cultures, and periods. Performances for school, the community and at music festivals are an important part of the class instruction. Membership is by audition or teacher recommendation. MIXED CHORUS – Vocal Music I (4890) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None Mixed Chorus – Vocal Music I is a course open to students in grades 9-12. Students will learn proper vocal techniques and will rehearse and perform choral music of different styles, cultures, and periods. Performances for school, community, and music festivals are an important part of the program. This class is designed for all students with or without previous experience in music and can prepare students for more advanced classes. Please note: This class is designed for bass and tenor voices. Students will be auditioned for proper placement.

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EXPLORING ART (4020) / EXPLORING MUSIC (4670) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: None UC and CSU certified: Elective (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirements) Exploring Art is a one-semester survey course covering art of the 20th century. Works of art will be examined in terms of their historical precedents, their interrelationship with the social condition’s in which they exist, and their elements and principles of design. Students will also investigate the influence of new technology and materials on works of art. Exploring Music is a one-semester survey course covering the development of music in the 20th century. Music will be examined in terms of its historical precedents, interrelationship with the social conditions in which it exists, and its musical and textural components. Students will also investigate the influence of electronics on the music industry. CONCERT CHOIR Vocal Music II (4910) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Vocal Music I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Concert Choir – Vocal Music II is a class open to any student in grades 9-12 with teacher permission or audition. Students will learn vocal techniques, the elements of music to a greater degree of difficulty than in Mixed Chorus, and rehearse and perform choral music of different styles, cultures and periods. Performances for school, the community and music festivals are an important part of the class instruction. Concert Choir will help a student prepare for Vocal Ensemble.

Instrumental Music
CONCERT BAND – INSTRUMENTAL II (4690) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Instrumental Music I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Concert Band – Instrumental Music II is open to students in grades 9-12 by teacher recommendation. Students will learn proper instrumental techniques and rehearse and perform instrumental music of different styles, cultures, and periods. Performances for school, the community, and music festivals are an important part of the program. This class is designed for all students with some previous experience in instrumental music and can prepare students for more advanced classes. Marching Band will be a part of the activity of this band. The music teacher can supply additional information regarding this part of the program.

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SYMPHONIC BAND – INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC III (4720) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Instrumental Music II or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Symphonic Band-Instrumental Music III is an advanced instrumental music class. Students must be able to play their instrument with a high degree of skill, and teacher recommendation is required for enrollment in this class. This band will give a number of performances for the general public and at music festivals. Marching Band will be a part of the activity of this band. The music teacher can supply information regarding this part of the program. Membership in this band is by teacher recommendation. WIND ENSEMBLE MUSIC III (4810) Grade: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Instrumental Music I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Wind Ensemble-Instrumental Music III is an advanced instrumental music class open to any students in grades 9-12. Students will learn proper instrumental techniques and rehearse and perform music of an advanced degree of difficulty and of different styles, cultures, and periods. Performances for school, the community, and music festivals are an important part of the program. Students may enroll only with the teacher’s permission. The music teacher can supply additional information regarding this class. JAZZ BAND – INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC III (4700) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite Instrumental Music I or II, or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Jazz Band – Instrumental Music III is an advanced course in jazz. Students must be able to play their instrument with a high degree of skill. The music will consist of professional level commercial and jazz music. Students will be expected to improvise with some skill and to know and understand the harmonic structure of the music that is played. Students will be encouraged to write for this ensemble. The jazz band will perform on many occasions for the general public at music festivals. Membership in the group is by teacher recommendation to insure that the students have a high level of musical skill and to maintain a balanced instrumentation. ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC II (4980) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Instrumental Music I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation UC and CSU certified: Visual and Performing Arts (Fulfills UC/CSU “f” requirement) Orchestra – Instrumental Music II is a course in orchestral music of different styles and periods. Students must possess some ability to perform on their instrument. At times, the group will perform as a full orchestra with the addition of wind and percussion players. A number of concerts will be performed each year for the general public and at music festivals. This class is open to students who already play a string instrument, but with teacher permission, a student who wishes to learn to play an instrument, could be accepted.

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OFFICE AIDE (9500) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Successful application and signing of Code of Conduct contract and administrative approval. May be repeated for credit * Office aides work in various service capacities in the school. Placement is made for the following locations: Student Services North and South, Attendance office,, Main Office, Career Center, I.M.C., Custodial Services. TEACHER AIDE - TA (9090) Grades: 11-12 (Year) at CPHS Prerequisite: Instructor permission, administrative approval and signing of Code of Conduct contract. Elective May be repeated for credit* This program is designed to allow a student to work as an instructional aide under the direct supervision of a teacher. Duties involve tutoring individuals or small groups of students and assisting teachers with the mechanics of instruction. TEACHER AIDE - TA (9550) Grades: 11-12 (Year) at Valley View or Elementary Schools Prerequisite: Approval of Valley View supervising personnel and CPHS administration. Elective May be repeated for credit* This program is designed to allow a student to work as an instructional aide under the direct supervision of a teacher. Duties involve tutoring individuals or small groups of students and assisting teachers with mechanics of instruction. *No more than 20 units as a teacher/office aide may be used toward graduation. LEADERSHIP (9210) Grades: 9-12 (Year) Prerequisite: Required for elected or appointed student body and class officers A year course that develops those unique characteristics, attitudes, and skills which empower a person to make significant changes in self and to move a group of people in new and positive directions. When a student is enrolled beyond one year, he or she has been elected or appointed to an office with increased scope and responsibility. In addition to refining the skills learned previously, the student
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will be expected to complete more difficult projects, prepare and provide peer instruction, and do additional reading, interviewing, and research in the areas of leadership and group process. LEADERSHIP / STUDENT CURRICULUM ASSOCIATE (9210) Grades: 11-12 (Year) Elective These students are selected by staff to represent the student body at Curriculum Associates meetings. See department chairs for further information.

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ROP
STUDENT PROGRAMS
WHAT IS ROP? Operated by the Contra Costa County Office of Education, ROP has been the primary source of career training for high school students in our county for the past 32 years. State certified teachers, high tech equipment, and a commitment to students ensure a positive learning experience. Located on high school campuses, ROP courses are taken as part of a student’s regular high school schedule. Students advance through 90-540 hours of sequenced curriculum and earn high school graduation credits and/or college units. Students can earn Certificates of Proficiency upon successful completion of the class. ADVANTAGES OF ROP: Students can use ROP courses to gain employment skills, explore a career field, get a head start on their college major, or “try out” a career choice through internships available in many classes. Many students use their newly acquired skills to work part-time after graduation to help pay college expenses. To Enroll: On campus ROP class: Off campus ROP class: Indicate the course on your schedule for next year Indicate the course on your schedule for next year and call the ROP office at (925) 942-3437

ROP classes at COLLEGE PARK HIGH SCHOOL Advanced Photography* Introduction to Law* Art & Animation* Multimedia* Emergency Medical Careers Video Productions* *Check with your counselor to see if this class is a UC/CSU approved course. ROP OFF-CAMPUS CLASSES The following classes are offered in the Mt. Diablo Unified School District.
Art & Communication Art & Animation Commercial Art Creative Writing Journalism Multimedia Photography Radio Communications Video Productions Business Accounting (Computerized) Computer Programming Introduction to Law Health & Human Services Careers in Teaching CNA (Certified Nurse Assistant) Cosmetology/Manicuring/ Esthetician Emergency Medical Careers Sports Medicine 7356 4430 6300 0770 9104 7735 7810 6164 6010 6260 3692 6990 2565 9410 2572 8500 Hospitality Baking/Patisserie Culinary Careers Hotel Careers 8370 8270 9430

Industrial/Engineering Technology Auto Technology 7010 Cabinetmaking 7950 Construction Technology 7980 Science & Biotechnology Analytical Science Biotechnology Environmental Science 7300 2250 2360

For more information and school location: Pick up a ROP brochure at Student Services, your College Career Center, or call the ROP Office (925) 942-3437. 83

ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS Necessary Small High Schools
Located at several locations in the district, these alternative schools provide consistent instructional supervision and monitoring for 9-12 grade students who thrive in a small, close environment. For more information, contact the Student Services Coordinator at the student’s school of residence.

Olympic High School
Olympic High School is an alternative to the regular high school program providing opportunities to students needing credits to graduate, a flexible schedule in order to work or more individualized instructional program. The academic classes required for graduation are the same as other high schools in the district.

Partnership Academies
The Partnership Academies located at four high schools provide a sequence of classes in the sophomore, junior and senior years designed for students desiring careers in fields that require technical training. Each provides technical training and academic support for a variety of future careers. For more information see your Student Services Coordinator.

Regional Occupation Program (ROP)
ROP offers job skill training for careers in business, education, communications, fine arts, medical, engineering, restaurant, hotel, automotive electronics, construction and industrial operations at high school campuses and business locations throughout Contra Costa County. Students who are 16 years or older may receive elective credit for ROP as part of the regular high school program. For more information see you Student Services Coordinator or call the ROP office at 9423436.

Crossroads
Crossroads is an alternative school program for pregnant or parenting teens living within the school district. The curriculum is based on the needs and interest of the parent and full school credit is given. Contact your Student Services Coordinator for more information and enrollment procedures, or you may contact the program directly. (689-6852)

Summer Intervention
Mt. Diablo Unified School District offers a free, six-week summer program for high school students. The primary focus of the summer program is to provide opportunities for students who have failed one or more of the California High School Exit Exams or who wish to make up credit for courses which the student has failed during the school years. Students may also enroll in summer classes to improve a grade in a class, which they have completed but have not received a grade, which is satisfactory to their goals. Students will not receive double credit for the class, but the higher grade will be reported on the high school transcript. A limited number of enrichment courses are also offered for high school students. Course offering and registration materials are available in the spring.

California High School Proficiency Examination
Students who pass the CHSPE will earn the legal equivalent of a high school diploma and may not be required to attend high school if they have parent approval. Students must be 16 or older or enrolled in the second semester of the 10th grade to take the exam. See your Student Service Coordinator for an application.

GED (General Educational Development Test)
The Adult Schools administer the GED. It consists of 5 tests: writing, social studies, literature/arts and math. Students must be within 6 months of their 18th birthday. Student receives a certificate that is the equivalent to a high school diploma. Phone 685-7340

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COURSE INFORMATION
The table below outlines the courses offered at CPHS, listed alphabetically, along with the grade level at which each course may be taken, its prerequisites, as well as college requirements met by taking the class.
Course Course Number 0672 0845 Grades Semester/ Year Y Y Prerequisites UC CSU Page Ref. 46 71

Academic Literacy Advanced Film Study

9-10 11-12

Aerobics, Level I AIMS I AIMS II Algebra Concepts and Skills

8970 1301 1302 1056

10-12 9-12 9-12 11-12

Y Y Y Y

Teacher recommendation Intro to Film, Video Production I or II; or teacher permission Completion of 9th grade PE Recommended concurrent with Intro to Algebra Recommended concurrent with Intro to Algebra Algebra I (recommended for students who did not perform well in Algebra) Assessment test or teacher recommendation Successful completion of Geometry Successful completion of Geometry Successful completion of Art I and II, equivalent courses, or instructor approval. Minimum age 16 and in the 11th or 12th grade None None 3 Dimensional or equivalent experience with instructor approval None Successful completion of Art I or equivalent experience with instructor approval. Art I and instructor approval

X

X

59 57 57 54

Algebra I Algebra II Algebra II/Trigonometry

1310 1330 1340 4120

9-12 10-12 10-12 11-12

Y Y Y Y

X X X X

X X X X

55 55 56 75

Art Advanced 7356 Art and Animation with Computers (ROP) Art Design A/B Art Design 3 Dimensional 4241 4242 4240 4246 9-12 9-12 10-12 Y Y Y 11-12 Y

X X X X

X X X X

41 75 75 76

Art Design Advanced 3D Art I Art II

4130 4140

9-12 10-12

Y Y

X X

X X

74 74

Art II Drawing & Painting

4150

10-12

Y

X

X

74

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COURSE INFORMATION
Band, Concert - Instrumental Music II 4690 9-12 Y Instrumental Music I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation Instrumental Music I or II, or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation. Instrumental Music II or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation Instrumental Music I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation Instrumental Music I and II or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation Biology and Chemistry None 1 year Biology with grade of "C" or better. One (1) year of Chemistry recommended. Completion of 9th grade PE Completion of Level I "B" or better in Pre-Calculus None Successful completion of Ceramics I, or demonstrated ability with instructor approval Ceramics I, II or demonstrated ability with instructor approval
Completion of PCM I/Algebra I with a "C" or better or concurrent enrollment in Geometry, and current math/science teacher recommendation/test evaluation.

X

X

79

Band, Jazz - Instrumental Music III

4700

9-12

Y

X

X

80

Band Orchestra - Instrumental Music II

4980

9-12

Y

X

X

80

Band, Symphonic Instrumental Music III Band, Wind Ensemble Instrumental Music III

4720

9-12

Y

X

X

80

4810

9-12

Y

X

X

80

Biology AP Biology I Biotechnology AP

2044 2110 2250

11-12 9-12 11-12

Y Y Y

X X X

X X X

62 61 62

Bowling I Bowling II Calculus AB Honors Ceramics I Ceramics II

8650 8900 1360 4250 4260

10-12 10-12 12 9-12 10-12

Y Y Y Y Y

59 X X X X X X 59 57 76 76

Ceramics, Advanced

4270

11-12

Y

X

X

76

Chemistry I

2270

10-12

Y

X

X

63

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COURSE INFORMATION
Chemistry I (Honors) 2280 11-12 Y Completion of Geometry with a "B" or better, or concurrent enrollment in Alg II/Trig and current math/science teacher recommendation/test evaluation None Minimum age 16 and in the 11th or 12th grade None None None Drama I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation Drama I, or II, or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation Algebra I with a "C" or better, 1 letter of recommendation from another teacher, interview selection process. Concurrent enrollment in Algebra , or C or better in 8th grade science One year of any science, completion of PCM I/Algebra I with a grade of "C" or better None US History completion with a grade of "B" or better and teacher recommendation Placement by ELD Assessment Placement by ELD Assessment None Eight (8th) grade English Eight (8th) grade English English I X X 63

Citizen Law Computer Multi Media (ROP) Creative Writing Dance I Drama I Drama II

3690 9104 0650 0943 0900 0910

9-12 11-12 9-12 9-12 9-12 9-12

Y Y Y Y Y Y

X X X X X

X X X X X

69 41 46 77 77 78

Drama III

0920

9-12

Y

X

X

78

e-Virtual Enterprise

6164

10-12

Y

42

Earth Science I

2380

9

Y

X

X

64

Earth Science II

2390

11-12

Y

X

X

64

Economics Economics AP (Macro/Micro)

3150 3141

12 12

S S

X X

X X

68 68

ELD Academic Language

0250 0249

9-12 9-12 11-12 9 9 10

Y Y Y Y Y Y

X

X

45 45

ELD English Language Development EMT Emergency Medical Technician ROP English I English I (Pre-Honors) English II

2572 0010 0012 0060

X X X X

X X X X

65 43 43 43

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COURSE INFORMATION
English II Pre-honors English II/World Perspectives English III English III Honors 0065 0060 0130 0125 10 10 11 11 Y Y Y Y English I English I English II English II and successful completion of application procedures English II/concurrent enrollment w/American Thread US History English III English III Biology I or concurrently enrolled, completion of Algebra I with grade "B" or better None None None French I or consent of instructor French II or consent of instructor French III or consent of instructor French IV or consent of instructor None None Successful completion of Algebra I None German I or consent of instructor German II or consent of instructor German III or consent of instructor None None Assessment test and/or teacher recommendation None X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 44 44 44 45

English III/American Threads

3070

11

Y

X

X

44

English IV English IV AP

0190 0216 2361

12 12 10-12

Y Y Y

X X X

X X X

45 45 63

Environmental Science AP Exploring Art/Exploring Music Foods I/Foods II French I French II French III French IV-AP French V-AP General Physical Science Geography Geometry German I German II German III German IV-AP Healthy Living Individual/Dual Activities I Intro to Algebra I Intro to Biology 4020 4670 8300 8310 5050 5060 5070 5080 5090 2500 3610 1320 5280 5290 5300 5310 2907 8740 1300 2010 9-12 9-12 9-12 9-12 10-12 10-12 11-12 11-12 9-12 9-12 9-12 9-12 10-12 11-12 9 10-12 9-10 9-12 Y S Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y S Y Y Y

X

X

73/79 52 49 50 50 50 50 64 69 55 51 51 51 52 65 58 54 61

X X X X X X

X X X X X X

88

COURSE INFORMATION
Introduction to Film Study Intro to Law ROP Journalism I Journalism II Journalism III Journalism IV 0840 3692 0770 0780 0783 0784 9210 10-12 11-12 9-12 10-12 11-12 11-12 9-12 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y None None None Journalism I Journalism II Journalism III Required for elected or appointed student body or class officers Biology / and concurrent enrollment in Zoology Minimum age 16 and in the 11th or 12th grade Successful application and signing of Code of Conduct contract and administrative approval Completion of 9th grade PE None Successful completion of Photo I or approval of instructor Successful completion of Photography Arts II or approval of instructor None Completion of 9th grade PE Completion of Algebra I and Geometry Completion of Geometry with a "B" or better and permission of instructor Biology "B" or better and teacher recommendation in Trigonometry and Advanced Topics None None Successful application None None X X X X X X X X X X X X 70 69 46 46 47 47 81

Leadership 2200 Marine Biology 9122 Multimedia I (ROP) 9500 11-12 Y 11-12 Y 11-12 S

X X

X X

62 77 81

Office Aide Personal Fitness I Photography Arts I Photography Arts II

8930 4420 7750

10-12 9-12 10-12

Y Y Y

X X

X X

59 72 72

Photography Arts Advanced (ROP)

7755

11-12

Y

X

X

72

Physical Education Grade 9 Physical Education Physics Physics (Honors)

8520 8740 2720 2725

9 10-12 10-12 10-12

Y Y Y Y

58 58 64 65

X X

X X

Physiology Pre-Calculus (Honors)

2840 1405

10-12 11-12

Y Y

X X

X X

61 57

Public Speaking I Psychology Psychology AP Senior Math Sociology

0860 3770 3774 1920 3870

9-12 11-12 11-12 11-12 10-12

Y Y Y Y Y

X X X X

X X X X

47 69 70 55 70

89

COURSE INFORMATION
Spanish I Spanish II Spanish III Spanish IV-AP Spanish V-AP Statistics-AP Systems Application I Systems Application II 5700 5710 5720 5730 5740 1530 6012 6013 9090 9-12 9-12 9-12 10-12 11-12 11-12 9-12 9-12 11-12 Y Y Y Y Y Y S S Y None Spanish I or consent of instructor Spanish II or consent of instructor Spanish III or consent of instructor Spanish IV or consent of instructor PCM III or Algebra II None None instructor permission, administrative approval and signing of Code of Conduct contract Approval of Valley View supervising personnel and CPHS administration Completion of 9th grade PE Satisfactory completion of Algebra II and teacher recommendation None US History with a grade of "B" or better and teacher recommendation. None None World History completion with a grade of "B" or better or teacher recommendation World History completion with a grade of "B" or better or teacher recommendation/application None None Vocal Music I or equivalent experience with teacher recommendation None Video Production I X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 48 48 48 49 50 56 41 41 81

Teacher Aide 9550 Teacher Aide / Valley View Middle Team Sports, Level I Trigonometry and Advanced AlgebraTopics 11-12 y

81

8870 1350

10-12 11-12

Y Y

58 56

U.S. Government U.S Government & Politics AP

3280 3262

12 12

S S

X X

X X

68 68

U.S. History U.S. History / American Threads U.S. History AP

3530 33530 3531

11 11 11

Y Y Y

X X X

X X X

67 66 67

U.S. History Honors

3532

11

Y

X

X

67

Vocal Music I Mixed Chorus Vocal Music II Treble Choir Vocal Music II Concert Choir

4890 4880 4910

9-12 9-12 9-12

Y Y Y

X X X

X X X

78 78 79

Video Production I Video Production II

9102 9103

9-12 11-12

Y Y

X X

X X

71 71

90

COURSE INFORMATION
Weight Training I Weight Training II Work Experience Education World History World History AP 8890 8480 9400 3490 3540 10-12 10-12 Age 16 10 10 Y Y Y Y Y Completion of 9th grade PE Completion of Level I Min. age 16 and must have a job None English I completion with a grade of "B" or better and teacher recommendation None None Biology / and concurrent enrollment in Marine Biology 60 60 42 X X X X 66 66

World History /World Perspectives Yearbook

3490 0810 2290

10 9-12 11-12

Y Y S

X X

X X

66 47 68

Zoology

91

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