P. 1
Brand Equity Measurement: Happydent

Brand Equity Measurement: Happydent

1.0

|Views: 1,614|Likes:
Published by gm.kayal
Brand Loyalty, Adhesion, gravity
Brand Loyalty, Adhesion, gravity

More info:

Published by: gm.kayal on Oct 18, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/22/2013

pdf

text

original

  Brand Equity Measurement of  Happydent 

   
                                          ANTON BABU (U108009)  AYAN DASGUPTA (U108014)  GAURAV KAYAL (U108019)  ISHITA GOEL (U108020)       

CONTENTS 
  Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................. 3  Brand Equity Measurement .................................................................................................................... 5  Brand Equity Model ............................................................................................................................ 6  Three Pillar Model ............................................................................................................................... 7  Stochastic Share .................................................................................................................................. 8  Analysis ................................................................................................................................................... 9  Brand Loyalty (An off shoot of the Preference‐Behaviour Model and Measures) .............................. 9  Brand Adhesion ................................................................................................................................. 11  Price Sensitivity ................................................................................................................................. 14  Stochastic Share ................................................................................................................................ 16  Brand Gravity and Brand Focus......................................................................................................... 21  Brand Elasticity  ................................................................................................................................. 23  . Conclusion ................................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.  References ............................................................................................................................................ 26   

 
                        Brand Equity Measurement   

 
Page 2 

Executive Summary 
  In the Phase – I of our project, we measured the brand image of the brand Happydent, in the candy  mouth freshener category, using a combination of the BAV model and laddering method.  Our last  finding indicated that Happydent was a leader in its category, beating off competition from the rival  brands.    In Phase – II, we work towards measuring the ‘equity’ of brand Happydent using a model which is a  modification to existing models available for calculating brand equity. We use a “Three Pillar” model  factoring  in  the  components  –  Price  Premium,  Brand  Loyalty  and  Market  Share  –  to  arrive  at  a  definitive measure of brand equity.    While  evaluating  the  Brand  Loyalty  component,  the  results  showed  that  in  the  case  of  Happydent  (and the category in general), the customer attitude could be best described as belonging to the low  involvement  hierarchy  (act feel think).  The  study  reflected  the  brand’s  reliance  on  highly  loyal  customers to drive its fortunes.    To  determine  the  Market  Share  we  based  our  findings  on  a  combination  of  ‘Stochastic  share’  and  ‘operational share’ to arrive at a suggestive figure. We determined the stochastic share to figure out  the probability of the brand being selected on  the  next  purchase decision. Being a determinant of  the ‘mind‐share’, the stochastic preference share of the different brands was a clear pointer to the  fact that Happydent had the highest share of the consumer’s mind.    We also calculated the ‘Operational share’ of the different brands, an indicator of the market share  of  these  products  in  the  candy  mouth  freshener  category.  Happydent  yet  again  scored  over  its  competitors like Chloromint and Mentos.    Price  Premium  being  very  important  to  measuring  the  brand  equity,  we  relied  on  the  Price  and  quality matrix which will check the premium that the brand can charge from its consumers for the  quality that they provide. Through this model we inferred that a significant number of respondents  viewed Happydent as good or superior quality, while a similar percentage of respondents considered  the price to be not a barrier or at best a minor barrier; implying that for a superior or good quality  product  (even  for  a  low  involvement  product  category  as  this)  the  customer  was  willing  to  pay  a  higher price.    We  also  tried  to  figure  out  the  “brand  gravity”  and  “brand  focus”  of  Happydent  with  the  results  implying  that  the  brand  has  a  huge  potential  market  waiting  to  be  tapped  and  increasing  its  marketing  efforts  would  be  worthwhile.  The  results  also  confirmed  an  earlier  inference  that  Happydent relied heavily on sales to its loyal customers. 

 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 3 

In terms of brand adhesion Happydent is perceived less as a commodity as compared to the "mouth  freshener  category".  There  are  strong  loyalists  to  the  brand,  despite  the  category  being  a  low  involvement  one.  Consumers  have  strong  attitudes  towards  the  brand  "Happydent"  and  they  can  identify with it.  To  sum  it  up,  the  brand  Happydent  scored  high  on  all  three  parameters  –  price  premium,  brand  loyalty,  and  market  share  (the  market  share  was  determined  as  a  function  of  the  ‘operational  share’).  However  we  also  found  out  that  most  of  its  sales  were  derived  from  its  (highly)  loyal  customers, and efforts were needed to be directed  towards increasing its customer base since there  was a potential market to be tapped. The overall Brand Equity of Happydent was on the higher side. 

 

 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 4 

Brand Equity Measurement  
The concept of Brand Equity began to be widely used in the 1980’s by advertising practitioners and  was  then  popularised  by  Aaker  through  his  bestselling  book  on  the  subject.  Advertising  agencies  such as Leo  Burnett, DDB Needham and Young &  Rubicam have continued  to champion  the  cause  and developed their own definitions and measurement systems.     Traditionally  marketers  have  emphasized  short‐term  measures  such  as  current  sales,  profitability,  and  market  share.  However,  these  measures  don’t  always  reflect  the  real  success  of  marketing,  which is to secure the long‐term preferences of consumers, generate future cash flow, and maximize  returns for shareholders.    There should indeed be a balance between short‐term and long‐term performance measurement. A  brand  manager  who  cuts  advertising  to  meet  this  year’s  profit  target  may  also  end  up  reducing  brand  equity  (and  the  likelihood  of  future  purchases)  because  of  lower  awareness  levels  and  weakening brand attitudes. This may not show up in this year’s short‐term performance measures,  such as sales, but may start to impact them next year. By measuring brand equity in addition to the  year’s sales, the long‐term damage to the brand will be evident.    So what is brand equity? It consists of the outcomes that accrue to a need/want satisfier when the  brand  name  is  added  on.  In  case  of  a commercial  brand,  these  outcomes  include  the  capability  to  charge a premium, capability to increase sales, capability to get a discount, capability to withstand  attacks  like  price  cuts,  sales  promo  schemes,  margin  attacks  etc.  Sales  is  not  a  good  measure  of  these  outcomes  because  it  is  not  the  best  indicator  of  the  future  as  it  ignores  the  impact  of  the  increased  competition,  and  sales  could  be  ‘bought’  by  using  short‐term  measures  like  sales  promotion.  Key  steps  to  measuring  brand  equity  include  ‐  determining  which  relationships  are  important, identifying the major factors that determine the strength of each relationship, developing  reliable indicators of each relationship, and testing the measures to identify those that matter most  and track them regularly.  Thus emphasis should be on brand equity as a key performance priority so that management can be  focussed on the immediate as well as long‐term impacts of their action plans. 
 

 
 

 
 

 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 5 

Brand Equity Model 
 
Aaker originally outlined five components of brand equity   • Brand loyalty  • Brand awareness  • Perceived quality  • Brand associations in addition to perceived quality  • Intellectual properties such as trademarks etc.     In the model that we have developed for calculating brand equity, we have concentrated on specific  aspects of the brand like availability, functional use, price sensitivity, trust that one associates with  the  brand,  and  whether  it  is  worth  recommending  to  others;  besides  the  perceived  quality.  These  will encompass all of the components of Brand Equity as defined by Aaker.    For example, brand loyalty is a function of two factors ‐ beliefs and behaviour. Price sensitivity (or  value  for  money  as  defined  in  the  questionnaire)  constitutes  the  ‘belief’  which  is  what  drives  the  loyal customer to choose one brand over the other. Similarly purchase frequency ‐ number of times  the brand was preferred when purchase was made for the category – is an indicator of ‘behaviour’  because one cannot be loyal to a brand unless it is bought frequently.    We also sought to test the brand’s leveragability, on whether it can be extended to other related, or  unrelated, product categories. Leveragability is the capability of the brand to straddle other need or  want satisfiers.     In  order  to  test  the  consumer  attitude  towards  the  brand,  we  tried  to  analyse  the  attitude  shown  while  purchasing  the  brand  in  terms  of  the  different  ‘hierarchies’  possible  ‐  the  learning  hierarchy  (think feel act),  the  emotional  hierarchy  (feel act think),  and  the  low  involvement  hierarchy  (act feel think).    This  gives  further  insight  into  the  brand  associations,  which  is  an  important  component of brand equity. Brand Personality is also tested, as also how differentiated the brand is  with respect to other products in the category. 

 
 

 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 6 

Three Pillar Model 

Price  Premium

Brand  Loyalty

Market  Share
 

Price Premium  One way to measure brand equity is to determine the price premium that a brand commands over a  generic product. If consumers are willing to shell out a few rupees more for a branded product over  the same unbranded product, then this premium provides important information about the value of  the  brand.  However  expenses  such  as  promotional  costs  must  be  taken  into  account  when  using  price premium to measure brand equity.    Brand Loyalty  This represents what portion of a brand’s sales is driven by loyal choice behaviour and what portion  is driven by differently motivated choice behaviour. This metric, called “loyalty contribution” makes  it  easier  to  compare  brands.  It  not  only  provides  insights  about  the  ‘true’  equity  component  of  a  brand’s share, but it is also possible to relate it, to the brand’s overall performance.    Market Share  Yet another metric for calculating brand equity is to find out the effective market share i.e. the sum  of weighted market shares in each market segment that one operates in. However, even if a brand  enjoys the highest market share, another brand may have the highest chunk of loyal customers. This  helps us in understanding the underlying consumer behaviour patterns. The  behaviour of the core  group i.e. “loyal” more closely reflects the true equity of the brand, and we know that brands can  benefit from having the core group representing a large share of their total franchise. This illustrates  why market share alone is an inadequate metric for quantifying the quality of brand equity within  the work‐place. 

 
Why the Three‐Pillar model?  The  “three‐pillar”  model  is  a  modification  to  the  Aaker’s  model  that  is  generally  suggested  for  calculating  brand  equity.  It  takes  into  account  the  fact  that  Happydent  is  a  high  impulse,  low  involvement product and thus factors like price premium and brand loyalty contribute heavily  to the  brand equity (as does market share, obviously) compared to other components of Brand Equity as  outlined by David Aaker. Strong brand equity based on these, simplifies the decision process for low‐ cost and non‐essential products (like Happydent) and insures that the product is considered by most  buyers.   

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 7 

Stochastic Share  
Stochastic  share  in  the  simplest  of  terms  can  be  defined  as  a  “mind  share”  that  reflects  the  probability of a brand being selected on the next purchase decision. It’s a probability market share of  the brand based on attitude, and is calculated from   • • The  proportion  of  Insisters  and  Preferrers  (the  two  categories  of  consumers  out  of  the  brand disposition ladder)   The sizes of the preferred sets 

It is therefore a true measure of brand strength, since it reflects expressed preferences independent  of behaviour. The stochastic share can be used to interpret the following‐  • • • Share of mind of the brand amongst the consumers  A measure of the efficacy of the strategic inputs by the company  A reflection of what the consumers would like to do 

The  “Operational  Share”  of  a  brand  is  the  representation  of  the  Market  share  of  the  brand  when  appropriate  market  data  is  not  available.  The  Operational  share  data  is  usually  used  to  determine  the success of the selling efforts and reflects what the consumers are persuaded to do apart from  reflecting the market shares of the brands.  The stochastic share generated is always compared with the “Market share” or “Operational Share”  of the brand to determine the following‐  • • Failure or Success in maximizing the market potential of the brand  Whether the existing brand franchise is vulnerable or not 

 

 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 8 

Ana alysis 
Bran nd Loyalty Stoch hastic Shar re Majo or Attribut tes Bra and Elasticity

Beh havioral Attitudinal
  Brand  Loyalty  (An  off  shoot  o the  Preference f of  P e‐Behavio our  Mode and  el  Measu ures) 
Behavio oural  Measu –  The  m ure  main  indicat of  behavioural  mea tor  asure  is  rep peat  purchases.  The  advantages  of  the  behavioural  measure  include  the  focus  on  t the  most  re elevant  crite erion  for  managers—purchase,  the  avoid dance  of  situ uational  effe ects  by  mea asuring  over  time  across several  s  incident ts, and the re elatively straightforward nature of th he data.   The  maj limitation  of  behavioural  measu jor  ures  is  the  failure  to  id f dentify  motiv and  the  resulting  ve  confusio on between  brand loyalt ty and other  forms of repeat buying. .  For examp ple, repeat purchases  may  res sult  from  ei ither  low  in nvolvement  or  distribut tion  limits.    Two  consu umers  may  regularly  purchase Happydent from a par rticular bakery.  One doe es so becaus se he loves H Happydent; h he would  drive across town to o get them.  T The other bu uys them because he cat tches the bus outside the e bakery.   Although he likes Ha appydent, he e actually pr refers other  brands to Happydent, ju ust not enou ugh to go  out of his way to buy y them.    Purchase behaviour r alone is ins sufficient.  The major dis sadvantage t to behaviour‐based mea asures of  loyalty is the inabilit ty to identify y the strengt th or qualitat tive nature o of the consumer’s relatio onship to  the bran nd.  Multiple e purchases  may reflect  a weak pref ference base ed on limited d knowledge e.  Or, no  preferen nce but mere e habit.  Or, no preferenc ce but limite ed availability y of better‐liked alternat tives.  Attitudinal measure e‐ The major r alternative e operational definition i is based on  consumer a attitudes,  preferen nces,  and  pu urchase  inte entions.    The following  chart  shows  the  break‐u of  most  preferred  e  c up  p brand in n the mouth freshener ca ategory. 

Brand E Equity Measurement   

Page 9 

Centre Fr resh 14% Ment tos 14% %

Happydent 32% 3

Orb bit 20% %

Chlo oromint 20% 2

 

5 Responden nts  Base: 35 The adv vantages of a attitudinal m measures may y include ide entification o of the reasons underlyin ng loyalty  and grea ater protection against t the effects o of temporary y conditions, , such as sto ock‐outs or s short‐run  competi itive promotions.   In  case  of  Happydent  and  the  c category  in  g general  we  find  the  customer  attitu to  be  of the  low  f ude  f  involvem ment  hierarc that  is,  First  Act  (be chy  ehaviour)  th feel  (em hen  motion)  and  finally  think (belief).  k  When  a asked  to  def fine  what  H Happydent  st tands  for  th hem  the  ma aximum  num mber  of  resp pondents  respond with  “Re ded  ejuvenating  and  refresh hing”  followed  by  “Whi teeth”  w ite  which  indicat their  tes  positive  attitude tow wards the br rand. We als so see that it is in the pr referred set  for 33 out o of the 35  dents which a again indicat tes the high p preference g given to the b brand  respond Thus,  th two  imp he  portant  para ameters  of  the  model  reflect  a  b brand’s  reliance  on  high loyal  hly  custome and  its  s ers  success  in  a attracting  brand  switche   The  firs group  are those  who have  a  ers.  st  e  o  positive attitude tow ward the brand (prefer it) and who buy it.  The se econd group are those who buy it  on a given purchase e but who may prefer an nother brand d. Happydent t scores high h with the fir rst group  while it scores low w with the seco ond group. 

 
 

 

Brand E Equity Measurement   

Page 10 

Brand Adhesion 
Brand  Adhesion  measures  the  attitude  of  the  consumers  towards  a  product.  It  categorizes  the  customers in four categories:  Loyalists – Consumers who think that there is a real difference between brands and always buy the  same brand  Habitualists ‐ Consumers who think that there is NO real difference between brands BUT always buy  the same brands  Discriminators  ‐  Consumers  who  think  that  there  is  a  real  difference  between  brands  but  DON’T  always buy the same brands  Commodity  Buyers  ‐  Consumers  who  think  that  there  is  NO  real  difference  between  brands  and  DON’T always buy the same brands    A category adhesion is measured when the respondents choose for the products in general for that  category. Following which, adhesion for Happydent is measured.  Following are the questions used to measure adhesion: 

     

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 11 

 

 

Implica ations 
• 16 customer rs go for a pa articular brand in the mo outh freshen ner category, , out of these e only 11  are  brand  l loyal  to  Hap ppydent.  That  is,  there  is  68.75%  of  the  consumers  are  loyal  to  Happydent  out of the total consum mers who buy y a particula ar brand in  t mouth freshener  the  hus, it can be inferred th hat consume ers have stro ong attitude es towards th he brand  category. Th "Happydent t" and they id dentify with it.  4 consumers go for a pa articular brand in the ca ategory out o of habit; how wever the nu umber in  s can be attr ributed to th he fact that  there are still strong  case of Happydent is more (5). This loyalists to t the brand, d despite the c category bein ng a low involvement on ne. Thus the e number  of habitualis sts increases.  Page 12 

Brand E Equity Measurement   

Happydent is perceived less as a commodity as compared to the "mouth freshener category"  as  a  whole  as  the  number  of  consumers  in  the  Commodity  Buyer  grid  falls  for  the  brand  Happydent  as  compared  to  the  category.  Thus  Happydent  is  more  of  a  brand  than  a  commodity.    

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 13 

Price Sensitivity 
The belief that drive behaviour across most categories are “price” and “quality” after considering the  distribution of price sensitivities in the marketplace. These two situations represent scenarios where  consumers  make  a  decision  based  on  either  quality/price.  At  the  other  end  of  the  price‐sensitivity  spectrum  are  consumers  for  whom  price,  at  least  in  this  category,  is  never  a  barrier;  once  they  decide to purchase in the category, only the best will do. Also, loyal customers think their brand is  superior  for  some  reason,  and  this  superiority  has  the  effect  of  minimizing  their  price  sensitivity.  Non‐loyal  or  occasional  users  have  differing  quality  perceptions  that  result  in  greater  price  sensitivity.  The following questions were asked to measure the relation between Price and quality 

  Happydent  Price not a barrier  Price minor barrier  Price  significant  barrier  Price absolute barrier  Total    Orbit  Price not a barrier  Price minor barrier  "Superior  28.57%  20.00%  0.00%  "Good  14.29%  5.71%  8.57%    28.57%  "Acceptable  11.43%  5.71%  2.86%    20.00%  "Poor"  2.86%  0.00%  0.00%    2.86%  Brand  Total  57.14%  31.43%  11.43%  0.00%  100.00%

48.57% 

"Superior  "Good  28.57%  22.86%  11.43%  2.86%  8.57%     22.86% 

"Acceptable  8.57%  5.71%  2.86%  2.86%  20.00% 

"Poor”  0.00%  0.00%  5.71%     5.71% 

 Brand  Total  48.57%  31.43%  17.14%  2.86%  100.00%  Page 14 

Price  significant  0.00%  barrier  Price absolute barrier     Total  51.43% 

Brand Equity Measurement   

  Chloromint  Price not a barrier  Price  minor  barrier  Price  significant  barrier  Price  absolute  barrier  Total  "Superior  34.29%  20.00%  0.00%     54.29%  "Good  17.14%  5.71%  2.86%     25.71%  "Acceptable  8.57%  5.71%  2.86%     17.14%  "Poor”  2.86%  0.00%  0.00%     2.86%  Brand  Total  62.86%  31.43%  5.71%  0.00%  100.00% 

 
Centre Fresh  Price not a barrier  Price  minor  barrier  Price  significant  barrier  Price  absolute  barrier  Total  "Superior  22.86%  20.00%  2.86%     45.71%  "Good  14.29%  5.71%  8.57%  5.71%  34.29%  "Acceptable  5.71%  2.86%  5.71%  2.86%  17.14%  "Poor”  2.86%  0.00%  0.00%     2.86%  Brand  Total  45.71%  28.57%  17.14%  8.57%  100.00% 

 
Mentos  Price not a barrier  Price  minor  barrier  Price  significant  barrier  Price  absolute  barrier  Total    "Superior  42.86%  14.29%  2.86%     60.00%  "Good  20.00%  5.71%  2.86%  0.00%  28.57%  "Acceptable  5.71%  2.86%  2.86%  0.00%  11.43%  "Poor”  0.00%  0.00%  0.00%     0.00%  Brand  Total  68.57%  22.86%  8.57%  0.00%  100.00% 

Implications 
Analysing, the above 4 belief grids of the 4 brands we can see that 42.86% of the respondents view  Happydent as good or superior quality, while the figure for the other brands stands at Orbit – 40%  Chloromint  –  51.43%,  Centre  fresh  –  37.15%  and  Mentos‐62.86%.  This  is  backed  up  by  a  large  majority  of  people  for  whom  price  is  not  a  barrier  or  a  minor  barrier  –  Happydent‐48.57%,  Orbit 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 15 

(51.43%), Chloromint – 54.29%, Centre fresh (42.86%) and Mentos (57.15) Thus, we can see that for  a superior or good quality product consumers are willing to pay a higher price. 

Stochastic Share 
A  separate  questionnaire  for  stochastic  share  was  used  and  a  sample  size  of  95  customers  responded to the questions. Two question were asked to the respondents‐   1. The  first  question  asked  the  respondents  to  list  down  the  brands  in  the  branded  mouth  freshener category that they intend and/or would prefer to purchase. From this we got the  preferred sets of each of the brands. 

  2. Due  to  unavailability  of  Market  Share  data  in  the  branded  mouth  freshener  category,  the  Operational Share of each of the brands was found out. The question asked for this asked  the respondent the brand of mouth freshener purchased by him/her at the time of the last  purchase. 

 

 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 16 

Stochastic Share Analysis 
1. The preferred set size for each Brand Preferrers was calculated – i.e. Average preferred set  size.  This  indicated  how  many  brands  were  being  preferred  on  an  average  among  the  Happydent preferrers, among Chloromint preferrers and so on.  2. The  size  of  each  brand  preferrers  was  calculated  next.  It  indicated  the  proportion  of  Happydent preferrers in the sample proportion of Chloromint preferrers and so on.  3. Then  the  size  of  the  preferrers  was  divided  by  the  preferred  set  size  for  the  respective  brands and the ratio for each brand determined.  4. Summated all the ratios of all the brands  5. The stochastic share of each brand was determined finally, by extrapolating the summated  ratio to 100 and consequently the ratios of each brand also. 

Implications 
The “Stochastic preference share” of the different brands was calculated. The findings are as follows‐  Stochastic Share Market  Happydent  Chloromint  Mentos  Orbit  Centre Fresh    It can be clearly seen that the stochastic share of Happydent is the highest, followed by Chloromint,  Orbit,  Mentos  and  Centre  Fresh.  It  thus  indicates  that  Happydent  has  the  highest  share  of  mind  amongst  the  consumers.  The  strategic  inputs  of  the  company  have  been  very  effective.  In  other  words, Happydent has the highest share of the consumer’s mind which can be attributed to all the  marketing activities undertaken by the company till date. Thus the consumer’s would like to buy the  brand Happydent more, or conversely, every one out of three consumers on an average would want  to buy a Happydent mouth freshener.  30.327  20.819  12.232  16.845  19.777 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 17 

Stochastic Share
Centrefres h 20% Happydent 30%

Orbit 17% Mentos 12% Chloromint 21%

 

 

 

Out of the 95 consumers who responded, 24 consumers had bought a Happydent mouth freshener  at their last purchase. Similarly, 22 consumers had bought a Chloromint mouth freshener at their last  purchase, and so on.    Happydent  Total  24  respondents  %  25.26  respondents    The Operational Share represented below, can be taken as a proxy for the Market share of brands in  the branded mouth freshener category. It can be seen that Happydent has the highest market share  (25%),  closely  followed  by  Chloromint  (23%)  and  Mentos  (19%).  Thus  it  can  be  predicted  that  the  selling  efforts  of  the  brand  “Happydent”  and  “Chloromint”  have  paid  off,  as  can  be  seen  by  operational shares of more than 20% in a highly cluttered category. An interesting thing to note is,  that  the  others  category  (including  brands  like  Pass  Pass,  Big  Babol,  etc.)  occupies  an  operational  share of 10%.  Chloromint  Mentos  Orbit  22  18  14  23.16  18.95  14.74  Centre Fresh  8  8.42  Others  9  9.47 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 18 

Others 10% centrefresh 8% Orbit 15%

Operational share
Happydent 25%

Mentos 19%

Chloromint 23%
 

On comparison of the stochastic share and operational share obtained, there are three possibilities  that can exist‐  1. If Operational Share > Stochastic Share, the brand is performing above potential  2. If Operational Share < Stochastic Share, the brand is performing below potential  3. If Operational Share = Stochastic Share, the brand is performing as per potential  For  example,  if  the  operational  share  of  a  brand  is  above  the  stochastic  share,  the  short  term  vulnerability  of  the  brand  is  high,  and  the  operational  share  is  likely  to  fall  over  time  or  can  be  artificially  maintained  by  marketing  activities.  However,  if  the  operational  share  of  the  brand  is  below the stochastic share, the long term prospects of the brand are very positive, and it is a matter  of time, till the operational share catches on with the stochastic share.  Brand  Stochastic  Share  Happydent  30  Chloromint  21  Mentos  12  Orbit  17  Centre  20  Fresh  Operational  Share  25  23  19  15  8 

  The  performance  of  the  brands  can  be  seen  from  the  table  given  above,  and  inferences  made  as  mentioned before‐  • • Happydent ‐ The Operational Share < Stochastic Share, therefore the brand has potential to  perform better  Chloromint  ‐  The  Operational  Share  >  Stochastic  Share,  therefore  the  brand  is  performing  above potential.  

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 19 

• • •

Mentos ‐ The Operational Share > Stochastic Share, therefore the brand is performing above  potential.   Orbit ‐ The Operational Share < Stochastic Share, therefore the brand is performing below  potential.   Centre Fresh ‐ The Operational Share < Stochastic Share, therefore the brand is performing  below potential.  

             

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 20 

Brand Gravity and Brand Focus 
Brand Gravity: It is the power of the brand to maintain consumers who prefer it. It is measured as  sales (last purchase) divided by the number of people who had Happydent in their preferred set. A  high gravity ratio, however, indicates that consumers regard the brand as desirable, available, and a  good value, a brand that is relatively resistant to competitive prices or promotions.  Brand Focus represents the proportion of sales that come from consumers who identify the brand as  most  preferred  the  brand.  It  is  measured  as  the  ratio  between  sales  (last  purchase)  and  the  most  preferred brand. A brand with high focus gets sales mostly from consumers who prefer it.  Brands  with  low  focus  “steal”  customers  from  other  brands.  Firms  can  succeed  with  either  high  or  low  focus.   

The Model Used 
   Last Purchase  Happydent  Orbit  Centre Fresh  Chloromint  Mentos    Preferred Brand  Happydent Orbit  X     Y           X           Centre  Fresh        X        Chloromint  Mentos           X                 X 

X:  Hard core loyalist who bought the brand they preferred the most  Y:  Switcher    Following is the question that has been used to measure brand focus and brand gravity: 

 
   

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 21 

  Responses: Brand Focus     Last Purchase  Happydent  Orbit  Centre Fresh  Chloromint  Mentos  Brand Focus    Base: 35 Respondents  Brand Gravity  All the 35 respondents had Happydent in their preferred set. However 13 of them actually bought  Happydent.   Thus the Brand Gravity of Happydent: 13/35 = 0.371  The Brand Focus score for Happydent = 0.8182  Most Preferred Brand  Happydent Orbit  Centre  Fresh  9  2  1     3  1  1  1  2     1     1     1  81.82%  42.86%  40.00% 

Chloromint  Mentos  1  1     5     71.43%     1     1  3  60.00% 

Implications 
According  to  the  Preference‐Behaviour  Model  Gravity  can  be  thought  of  as  a  measure  of  general  marketing  efficiency.  Here  Happydent  has  a  score  of  0.37  which  means  that  it  has  a  very  huge  potential market waiting to be captured and increasing its marketing efforts would be worthwhile.  This could also mean that there is a wide preference for Happydent as witnesses here and hence the  gravity ratio is low.  The high Focus score of Happydent indicates a firm that is relying on sales to customers who prefer  it. It results from a successful targeting strategy that produces a group of loyal consumers who buy  what they most want. 

 

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 22 

Brand Elasticity 
Brand elasticity measures the ability of the brand to be extended to a different product category. A  brand  can  be  extended  to  a  different  category  if  it  is  strong  on  certain  attributes  which  are  characteristic of the other category. For instance, a shoes brand A can be extended to apparels if it is  strong on the attribute of styling.  For  the  brand  under  consideration,  Happydent,  a  possibility  of  a  brand  extension  was  checked  for  different product categories. The premise for doing a brand elasticity check is that if a brand can be  leveraged in some other category, it contributes to a higher brand equity although vice versa is not  true. Example Coca Cola  The following is the question that was asked from the respondents for checking the brand elasticity: 

  The following is the result: 

Happydent Orbit Mentos Centre Fresh Chloromint

Toothpaste Cigarettes Soaps Toffees Toothbrush Pan Masala 30 13 10 10 8 14 23 8 4 10 12 5 5 5 8 22 5 0 17 0 9 8 10 5 8 7 0 18 10 14  

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 23 

Happy ydent
Pan  Masala, 14 Toothpaste, 30 3

Toothbru ush , 8

To offees, 10 0

Soaps, 10 0

Cig garettes,  13

 

Base: 35 5 Responden nts, more tha an one exten nsion for eac ch product a allowed  A  qualit tative  analys was  carr sis  ried  out  to  identify  the reasons  th consume ascribe  to  brand  e  he  ers  t extensio of  in  such  a  category A  clear  in on  y.  ndication  fro the  abov is  that  fo the  two  products,  om  ve  or  p Happyde ent and Orbi it which claim m whitening g of teeth, co onsumer can associate with cleaning property  and thus s see a possibility of them m as toothpa aste brands.  Another  key  fact  w which  emerged  from  the above  was that  it  is  b e  s  believed  in  g general  that  chewing  re not good f for teeth, but the percep ption is differ rent for Happydent beca ause of the w whitening  gums ar and  clea aning  prope erties  associated  with  it Therefore smokers  a t.  e,  also  believe that,  if  Ha e  appydent  extends  it to cigaret ttes, then it  is possible th hat it will ha ave less harm mful effects t than usual cigarettes  freshing.  and will be more ref

 

 

Brand E Equity Measurement   

Page 24 

Recommendations 
As we have seen that the brand Happydent is leader in the market and also have the highest brand  equity  so  we  can  say  that  the  recommendation  for  the  brand.  The  recommendations  are  not  anything drastic because the brand is pretty much in the right path now.  So the recommendations for the brand Happydent are:  From Stochastic Analysis we found that Operational Share < Stochastic Share, therefore the  brand has potential to perform better. This finding was further re‐strengthened by the fact  that  the  Brand  gravity  score  was  0.371  which  suggests  that  greater  marketing  will  be  succeed in attracting a large number of customers.  Even though it is a low involvement product there is more functional attitude towards it and  also the high brand focus score suggests that the targeting has been very successful and also  that the positioning and advertising are in the right direction.  The loyalists are found to be very strongly attached to the brand and maybe free sampling  will attract more customers and eventually loyalists for the brand   Explore  the  opportunity  of  doing  a  line  extension  into  categories  like  toothpaste  and  toothbrush because it can leverage on its identity as a freshener with dental care.

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 25 

References 
[1] http://books.google.co.in/books?id=FP3‐ lKskU5YC&pg=PA537&lpg=PA537&dq=stochastic+share++‐ +market+research&source=bl&ots=dSNjJ5gIRo&sig=13JDDJdEPeEsZXiZT5FZnBCLNSg&hl=en &ei=laybSqmQBpbbjQeCgb3ABQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5#v=onepage& q=stochastic%20share%20%20‐%20market%20research&f=false  [2] http://books.google.co.in/books?id=9KYOAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA258&lpg=PA258&dq=stochastic +share+analysis+‐ +market+research&source=bl&ots=YKuPCvDrtL&sig=Nz8BHRSr1SSEbkG39_fxv_Ogx6c&hl=e n&ei=‐ qqbSrO9NZ27jAfCvbG8BQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4#v=onepage&q=&f=f alse  [3] http://smib.vuw.ac.nz:8081/www/Styles.pdf  [4] Brand  Gravity  and  Brand  Focus  Model  has  been  taken  from  Carl  Obermiller  Brand 

Loyalty Measurement     

Brand Equity Measurement   

Page 26 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->