itmmvumt

!'MS

2

BR 75 .B7 1862 v. Bunyan, John, 1628-1688. The entire works of John Bunyan

vox/.ii.

^oar

jEtaert

C(f)apt(,

jEfcmifffiinati,

THE

EN TIKE

WORKS
PILGRIM.' S PROGRESS.

JOHN BUNYAN,
AUTHOR OF "THE

EDITED,
WITH ORIGINAL INTRODUCTIONS, NOTES,
AND
MEMOIR OF

THE AUTHOR,

BY HENKY STEBBLNG,
RECTOR OF
ST.

D.D., F.E.S.,
LOND01T.

MARY SOMERSET WITH

ST.

MARY MOUNTHAW, UPPER THAMES STREET,

Illustrated

toitft

€npijmp

an

BM

Rttir

WLwih.

IN FOUR VOLUMES.

VOL.

II.

LONDON:
JAMES
S.

VIRTUE, CITY ROAD
1863.

AND IVY LANE.

:

CONTENTS OF VOLUME

II.

The Pilgrim's Progress, erom this World to that which is to Come. Delivered under the similitude of a Dream, Part
I.

Seasonable Counsel;

or,

Advice to Sufferers.

.

270

A
is

Discourse upon the Pharisee and the Publican
wherein several weighty things are handled
:

:

Wherein

discovered the

setting out, his

manner of dangerous journey, and

as,
;

the
to-

his

nature of prayer, and of obedience to the law
safe

arrival at the desired country
II.

....

gether with the

9

way and method

of God's free grace

in pardoning penitent sinners, by imputing Christ's

Wherein

is

set

forth the

setting out of Christian's
their dangerous journey,

manner of the Wife and Children,
and
safe arrival at

righteousness to them

316

The Strait Gate
Heaven.

;

or,

great Difficulty of going' to

the desired country

75

Plainly proving, by the Scriptures, that

not only the rude and profane, but

many

great pro. .

Saved by Grace
showing,
I.

;

or,

a Discourse of the Grace of

God

:

fessors, will

come short

of that

kingdom

371

What

it is it is

to be saved. to be saved

A
by
grace.

II.

What

III.

IV.

Who How
What

they are that are saved by grace.
it

Treatise on the Fear of God. Showing what it is, and how distinguished from that which is not so also, whence it comes, who has it, what are the
effects,

and what the privileges of those that have

it

appears that they are saved by grace.

in their hearts

101

V.

should be the reason that

God should
136

choose to save sinners by grace rather than by

any other means

The Jerusalem Sinner Saved; the vilest of Men: being a
souls.

or,

Good News

for

help for despairing

Showing, that Jesus Christ would have
in the first place offered to the biggest sinners.
is

Christian Behaviour
tianity.

:

being the Fruits of true Chrischil-

mercy

Teaching husbands, wives, parents,

To which
for the

added an answer to those grand objec-

dren, masters, servants,

please God.
sliders.
.

&c, how to walk so as to With a word of direction to all back162
.'

tions that lie in the

way

of

them that would

believe,

comfort of those that fear they have sinned

against the

Holy Ghost
or,

151
what Hope
and 189

Come, and Welcome, to Jesus Christ; or, a plain and profitable Discourse on John vi. 37. Showing the cause, truth, and manner of the coming of a sinner to Jesus Christ; with his happy reception
and blessed entertainment 187

Israel's

Hope Encouraged;

is,

how

distinguished from Faith.

ments for a hoping people

.......
How
a

With encourage-

Oe the Trinity and a Christian.

young cr

The Barren Fig-tree
grace

;

or,

the

Doom

and Downfall of

the Fruitless Professor.

may be

past with

Showing that the day of him long before his life is
215

shaken Christian should demean himself under the weighty thoughts of the doctrine of the Trinity, or
plurality of persons in the eternal

Godhead

.

.

533

ended; the signs also by which such miserable
mortals

may be known

Oe the Law and a Christian

.

535

.

we should possess a vast library of experimental. To determine properly must necessarily enter into this species of inquiry. for ages to | It will engage the attention of the same class of men come. and observation was forced upon them. the purpose. will be accounted. A third class of critics. to exhibit nomena of genius. not unfavourable to the intellectual progress of men of his rank. n. from the practical journalism of hope and fear. The origin of this remarkable book has given rise to much curious inquiry. into notice. Popular education began with the the dramatic-writers. strictly so called. and snatches of history. We think this view of Bunyan's mental state highly erroneous. but of the ordinary measure of knowledge and literaThe age in which he lived was ture. and as having in its own creative power the only source which it needs for the nourishment of invention. The When once fairly brought Pilgrim's Progress is no subject for surprise. Minds that could be impressed ot roused into action. will equally avoid attributing an independence to genius which the human mind in no case can possess or so tracing its productions to pre-existing works as to deprive them of that most coveted — . more prudent than either of the former. which show how beautiful may be the results of simple suggestion closely followed up. often conveying more truth in the fragment than by the Many particulars . Applying such considerations to the case of Bunyan. B . that an education of inquiry. like the commentators on Dante. worthy . received ideas and caught information. original talent as sufficient for itself. It was carried on by the help of the poets of popular traditions. the unwritten comments on The Pilgrims Progress. and yet not be identical with them. the language of which is generally of the most simple. Minds of the ordinary class have been too deeply interested in his creations not to produce another kind of commentaries commentaries founded upon feelings and experiences. much has been said and written on so famous a book as. Most of the writers who have treated of his life and character. though not very varied divinity. and how very like they may look to the fruits of creative fancy. that either the power or the influence of Bunyan's genius is best discovered. we are met with a difficulty at the very beginning of the inquiry. HAT . or North American Review. but showing how practically well adapted the book itself is to make men If we could add to the notes and think of the things for the illustration of which it was composed. Some future Edinburgh. full of life and reality.PREFATORY REMARKS THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. VOL. But it is not in the variety of that higher species of criticism of which we are here 'speaking. more palpable. to certain existing sources. But neither was there any lack of books. expositions published. . It is the natural tendency of one school of criticism to trace every literary production which has gained enduring fame. speak of him as destitute not only of learning. This effected its end independent of books. the next generation will find a new stream of beautiful light poured upon the pages of the venerable classic. Through channels made fresh for will analyse it with renewed ingenuity. there should be an intimate acquaintance with the means of knowledge actually open to them with the general character of their intellectual habits and especially with those nice distinctions of thought. sermon-like character. They were born in the midst of events so remarkable and stimulating. thought. the retailers reign of Elizabeth. equally determined and pronounced. the discovery of which may explain away most of the miracles and pheAnother school has the wish. the several degrees of originality to which authors may lay claim. it could not fail to interest the critic as well as the devout and practical theologian. . Something unexpected His more hidden thoughts and allusions will will be discovered in him. of signal reverence. come out in bolder relief and they who render the meaning of the vision. portion of fame —the praise of originality.

lives and considerable enlightenment that the Press no desire in the other. . that is. as music is learnt and played again by " mysteries " had not gone out of fashion. thJeads of argument of his energy. The circle of its influence was cution could not lessen the force of a literature the nation. sufficient proof that he read and loved verse at an early period in supposing whoever they might be. as the personages of a history. Rut for this general inte hgence the were well informed on the most important public the one party. in figurative events— in battles. which needed no other truth to instruct and ment with the operations It of his own soul. but in the play.form. adapted to excite a thirst for knowledge. listened with deep interest to what slill remembered. There is no great improbability mingling mythology and that he may have read some of the masques of Ben Jonson— so ideal. obeying the direction actual romance at a later period. whichever side hey took. taken -by It seems probable therefore that. with pregnant more would remain ignorant oi and there can be no good reason for supposing that Bunyan popularity allegorical mode of storyThe English. Archbishop Laud's patronage of such entertainments was Men of high standing. and pilgrimages. frivolous to try his skill in song. so ardent and ready a mind. It is in times only of faction therefore. with Bunyan's rhymes are a allegories. The another of very different aim and character. entangled power and dignity of then.language. can create an interest. mingled be to soon was there fa" from inoperative Every system or set of opinions proved a further means of general intelligence. as that of our own Elizabeth's time were still at the height ot Queen of writers The thought. came into the increasing in activity. scattered were without number n. Many a little volume mass The printing-press was daily Ballads passed round a circle of friends and neighbours and circumstances. and It would have excited no jealousy of the press would have been disregarded.n 2 PREFATORY REMARKS. They taught him little. Persethe of sense a minds ordinary its tone which gave even perpetual y thus created. and popular idealism— dreams and visions were still invested with a Neither poem nor story. . to the same abstract. \\ ith a mental conbut subject to storms of passion which were as terrible to passing the world to remain indifferent to what was stitution like this.liberty questions. : . youth and he had scarcely attained had a quick ear and eve. " The Vice" of the old drama might tell them. must have a literature will be woven in^mong the facts.' phraseology employed there was a sofemnrty modern times may shrink from the heavy. unless the reader be predisposed to as the love of This disposition has long ceased but in Bunyan's age it was as common possibilities. they were just as proper to become the actors in a thus and men of minds in the existence form and prevalence.the Fairy Queen it would be enough for him. This supplied many deficiencies in his at habits. of his literary career. a book to become a master himself in the school of dreams and The poets. forms both of tbpugnt and of its own. religious and learned. himself as to others. From the same cause— the species of reality themselves. types : . stimulant the from courage intellectual his work will gain fresh were wonderfully of Charles I Saiyof the books published by the Puritans in the reign . sense and intelligence of his When Milton wrote his plea for its liberty. Curious written by an author fitted for and the readers of some fierce polemical tract. and that it is. . he appealed to the good the magnificence of its style are an evidence countrymen at large and both the fact of the appeal and and. Religious listeners of good memorv. classes widening In the times of the Commonwealth. once there was open to him the entire range of a fresh and And it . readily became the of believe in unearthly abstractions as dream. He recovered his power of reading^ and to manhood when a great change took place in his increasing literature— a literature. his times were remarkable. were his first book-teachers. perhaps. Bunyan himself could not have been a stranger to such things. so rhyme. in class that of work other any or Queen. in the nation that Bunyan felt was when influences of this kind had been long working eccentricity. the privilege of readnotion of this mode of thinking and inventing. and yet so rich in simple. some strong passion. metaphysics' in grotesque combination. Zl7o7a^m exSon wi 1 Llodyit New hence arise. They treated of great subjects. day. Spectators of Bunyan's class would listen with an earnestness heightened bv awe and superstition. indeed. tempting conveyed and about. he was one of the last men in harvest of various knowledge lor winch around him or to fail of gathering up some portion of the he However much he had neglected the ordinary means of education. of a poem or romance. acqui-re a general was not necessary that Bunyan should collect a library around him in order to If he possessed. to master such in". of their capacity for grand thoughts and arguments. or could obtain. more earnest not so varied. his earliest reading would consist of authors dealing delight him but some agreetriumphs. the popular taste. founded on an allegory or a other realities. moderate in rioTof peopk the notions of rhythm and romance. but rumJestEarner With these elements of a literature. all . visible being. however he taste of m m . His mind was vigorous and active not free from the early stirrings of intellectual life. In his age. but far more exciting. Fairy Spenser's Virtues and vices had not ceased to have a personal telling was adapted to the taste of the times. or so lively and agreeable. daring and startling images. harmonious the best passages were carried to and fro by quick Shakspere's plays were performed in barns untaught musicians. equally dreaded by tyranny and breathes with the spirit of a nation.

are proofs of study . But originality is itself a subject for question. as a being of another class. tion of character. is not to be confounded with the habitual and mechanical use which an imitator makes of his known resources. as it flashes into life. But as there are certain mysterious stages in mathematical or numerical sequences. but merely in this that it floats upon the water. met with in the pages of another writer. in use. they must have been important aids to the workings and efforts of his imagination. but acute and delicate. or vessel of any kind. when commanding expression. some man forms the idea of building a ship. He constructs a canoe. will afford the best proof of its originality. The accidental influence of a grand idea. With genius of a high order. necessity of his intellectual nature. or those which originate with himself. blance of object this will have no more to do with the originality of Bunyan than the simple thought of trying whether a hollowed-out trunk of a tree would float on the water has to do with the planning of the first steam. the richer and more abundant are its fruits. He lives in an age when no one has yet conceived the possibility of building a raft. Intellects less creative. he Bunyan felt likely to look was not likely to shut up these books from him nor was with indifference upon treasures so calculated to supply the now most deeply. He must have read much and diligently. or whatever the variety of books a man may study. accomplished most distinguished from each other. are : .frigate. However original the genius. or Professor Wilken. that the waters may be traversed as well as the land. and is the first man to breast the tide in a floating home. so it is in the progress of art and literature. The original thoughts of this secondary class of minds have neither the worth nor the power of those which are remembered and in the struggle for utterance this is confessed. or beautiful incident. Both read largely both become intimately acquainted with the words. in mode of management. or the greater force. and the mere clever. that the better it is cultivated by study. Gifford had studied science from necessity his social position was such as to make him world. Every man. and when rafts of every size and shape have been constructed. Discovering in Bunyan an : aptitude and great capacity for learning. cherish. When we apply such considerations as these to the review of Bunyan. His conversion would imply no necessity for his dispersing these books. the creations of other minds but in the one instance the main benefit is seen in the general cultivation . the beautiful offspring of knowledge and meditation. The ship has no likeness to the raft. while he was still . Let M. Nor should it be forgotten. stands distinct. after this. the thoughts. minute discrimina: but he had no wish to borrow either thoughts or incidents. have the foremost place. and the treasured recollection. might furnish similar illustrations literature has its own. His mind was quick with a fruitmlness of its own. in passages of which he could find sweet and cheering illustrations of the sentiments now controlling him by a higher authority. 3 dark and reprohate but when he awoke up to a consciousness of intellectual existence. : instruct us it be seen how much may be found in ancient Itineraries suggestive how early that word "pilgrimage" began to be adopted by : or let 'us be even able to trace in Bernard's Isle of Man. earnestness for a perception of objects as if light from heaven was upon . acquainted with the current literature of the day. a distant resem. his nice. and in the occasional stimulant of a It is in the several applications of man of talent. minds. the result is soon obtained. To continue our comparison after the lapse of ages. Michaud. or other ancient works. is wisely allowed that place in the page which would have been much less nobly occupied by thoughts tame and indefinite. who builds only a raft or canoe is merely an imitator. with the love of a fond foster-mother. and yet both were essentially original writers. . it depends upon the constitution of his mind whether the thoughts which he thus acquires. of whom a predecessor in the same line of composition could be discovered. from whatever memory can produce'. with a long train of graceful attendants. The distinction here made has no relation to the various effects which study produces in different . We look in genius for simplicity. Though caring little for any in comparison with the Bible. common sense and universal experience show. this would not affect his claim to originality. that his first religious instructor was a man who had lived long in the Mr. he might still love those. A careful perusal of The Pilgrim's Progress .of the intellect. His arrangement of arguments. Even could it be shown that there are close correspondences between some points in his allegories and passages in earlier authors. considered in the way of discipline. Neither Sophocles nor Shakspere originated the drama of their age or nation. Let us imagine a man standing on the sea-shore. In every other respect it is novel in shape. He could not be destitute of books. to bear him over the waves. Bunyan's originality has been often questioned and so has that of every other great writer. Music. from the first stringing of the empty-shell found on the sea-shore to the perfection of orchestral harmony.PREFATORY REMARKS. though original. Here again is originality and so may it be found through the whole history of ship-building. This is originality. when carried on to great length. knowledge that the man of genius. of the uses of pilgrimages let authors for spiritual purposes. each idea. But whatever the amount of his reading. particular suggestion in the other the material is looked for much more than the cultivation or strengthening of thought. : — — . Suddenly the idea arises in his mind.

4

PREFATORY REMARKS.
;

The idea which he worked out was eminently primitive. It All this we find in Bunyan. them. was such a one as we may suppose some early Christian might have easily conceived but which none but a master-mind could have developed into all its details and consequences, colouring each The " den" in which the dreamer lay was unfolding truth with its own deep, warm, distinctive tint. But it is a characteristic of genius to make the actual circumstances of doubtless his prison-chamber. The real starting-point of the life either minister to sentiment or assist in the creation of imagery. It may explain some of the occasional failures in the narrative is not the same as that of the dream. structure of the story, if we remember that the writer had thus, from the first, involved himself in a difficulty. He was, in one position, as a dreamer; in another, as the narrator of supposed facts. Whenever he remembered that a den, or cave, surrounded him with its shadows that the spell of a mysterious sleep was over him as he looked upon the path of the Pilgrim ; his language ran like, a Frequently, however, bright stream with the morning mist about it a reality, but not looking as one. he seems to have forgotten that he was relating what was seen in sleep and he tells a pot;tion of his story as the chronicler of events beheld in open day. This is a great defect in the structure of the narrative, considered as a work of literary art but we question whether it may not have accidentally aided both its popularity and its usefulness. An ordinary reader may feel, for a time, pleasantly soothed by the mystery of a vision but he cannot be long sustained in this state of mind and his curiosity and interest will be greatly increased when, suddenly awakened by the rougher language of apparent facts, he begins to think that the whole may be a reality. Among these preliminary considerations respecting the general plan of the work, there is one which raises the question of its proper and direct aim. It is very evident that a man passing from the first stage of conversion to the full accomplishment of his salvation, must, in the course of that eventful progress, have numberless trials to encounter and burdens to bear, which will not be all of one nature, or arise from one source. In particular states of mind everything which would otherwise practically affect us will be made subordinate to one great internal anxiety. To remove that anxiety, or satisfy the desire in which it has arisen, the entire power of the understanding will be so engaged that the world and its concerns will vanish into oblivion. But this forgetfulness of the various complicated objects and purposes of life, in the pursuit of one design, will either prove that the design itself is faulty, or that, if it be in every respect worthy of admiration, there is some error in the mode adopted for effecting it. No doubt can exist that if a sublime idea has been realized, but at the expense of objects which claimed a corresponding regard, the realization of that same idea with no such loss, but with the additional fulfilment of numberless gracious purposes, will be incomparably more worthy of imitation. The principle is illustrated by the different manner in which the design of Christianity itself has been followed out by men of various characters. In some cases, a fervent devotion has rendered penitents and believers hermits, ascetics in others, the most active of all the benefactors of mankind. The most superficial view of Bunyan's intention in The Pilgrim's Progress obliges the reader to consider how far it practically represents the ordinary trials of a christian life. In one respect every inquiry of this kind tends to increase our admiration of its truthfulness. The better the'rilemory is stored with lessons of experience, the more ardent the desire of the soul for spiritual liberty and perfection, the more readily do we discover a correspondence between the knowledge thus acquired and
;

;

;

;

;

;

the several steps in Christian's progress.

But however complete the representation of the spiritual burdens and struggles of a believer, it must be felt by many readers anxious to follow the example of Christian, that, though his burden is their burden, and his hope their hope, his case does not wholly describe their own. Christian is represented as bearing no other burden but that of sin as leaving behind him all care except that of his own mind and thoughts. But there are burdens on every human heart besides the burden of sin; and the common duties and business of life create a multitude of cares which cannot be treated as an internal sorrow or anxiety, but must be met by a bold, vigorous activity. Of these things no adequate image is given in the progress of Bunyan's Pilgrim. Having warned his family of their danger, and set out on his journey, he travels on without giving us any reason to suppose that the ties of home and natural affection entered, as an element, into the struggles of his life. The salvation of his own soul is the one prominent exclusive object. Still more, the helps and obstacles to that salvation are not represented as they may be seen through the medium of actual life. St. Anthony, St. Nilus, or any other of the anchorets of the Thcbais, may be supposed to have had the same conflicts, and to have looked, though
;

same guidance. No man in the real daily walk of christian life can have^my one grace in his heart which will not be materially modified in its action by outward circumstances. To represent him as under the trials of faith, with nothing to render them severe after the first is over but his own passions or weaknesses, is to frame an imaginary case life is a battle as well as a pilgrimage. The enemies of faith may be the believer's own household. It is an error to describe him as able to escape from such ties by one act of desperation. They will be upon him in his actual progress every step he sets; and if he triumph, it must be over them, as well as over the enemy in his heart.
uncertainly, for the
;

PREFATORY REMARKS.

5

might he written so as to embrace many beautiful and edifying lessons. But Bunyan seems to have proposed to show how a man with all his natural affections, as Well as sins and infirmities about him, may traverse the path of life. Supposing that such was his design, there is,
history of the soul

A simple

an appearance of defective example. man is represented as contending successfully with every obstacle to his salvation. He passes through various scenes, some dark and terrible, others as bright and cheering but in the whole of his long course he meets with no occasion for the common and we see him at the gate of heaven, having reached it by a path exercise of domestic or social love singularly free from all the usual appeals to human sympathies. Most men must feel, at whatever stage of their pilgrimage they be, that they are surrounded by objects, oppressed by cares, tried by temptations, which render the side-ways of their course much more difficult to pass than those which were seen in Bunyan's dream. The readiest answer to such suggestions is this. Bunyan's actual intention may have been to trace the course of a believer in conflict only with spiritual enemies, and triumphing mainly by the isolation of his affections from every other consideration. Or it may readily be supposed, and probably with a nearer approach to the fact, that without any plan artificially laid, he felt that could he image a penitent upon the path of life, and follow him, step by step, till he reached the goal of his pilgrimage, it might be fairly inferred that the poor wayfarer, steadily and triumphantly accomplishing his course, had left no debt by the way unpaid had passed no wounded stranger untended had not coldly forgotten the friends of his childhood, or the present inmates of his home. The deep conviction which he undoubtedly had of the vital activity of a true faith would readily lead him to such a conclusion and hence he may have thought that enough was done when he had fairly set his pilgrim forward, under the guidance of Evangelist, to the strait gate, and the foot of the cross. But while even this might suffice-to explain away the appearance of defect in the representation of human life as it really is, it ought especially to be noticed, that the christian graces become prominent actors in the scene as soon as the Pilgrim reaches the palace called Beautiful. Piety and Charity discourse with him on all the points of holy duty. It is they who show him the Delectable Mountains in the distant horizon; and they accompany him, wuth Discretion and Prudence, into the Valley of Humiliation. Their lessons ever after furnished the Pilgrim with practical wisdom. He carried from the palace, made beautiful by their presence, the sweet influences of love, holiness, and all the
at least,
;
;

A

;

;

;

gentler virtues becoming his profession.
these graces might have exhibited their

We have
life

not the outward forms, or circumstances, in which
;

but they were in his heart, and he was as well prepared to prove them, when occasion served, as to battle, in the strength of faith, with the terrible Apollyon. Still it may be answered, that there is no want of incident where the sterner virtues are concerned ; or where difficulties and clangers oppose themselves to the Pilgrim's course and that it would have been as easy to create some scene in which Charity might appear as the chief actor, as those in which Diffidence and Despair are personified, and become so visible to the dreamer's eye. If this be allowed, we can only reply, that Bunyan's own impressions of the conflicts and dangers of a christian life were of a deeper, stronger character, than those made by its enjoyments. He felt both powerfully but as he looked back upon the path along which divine grace had led him, he could not
;
;

and power

think so

of the mercy which had made his heart gentle, as of the mighty power of the Spirit which had given him the victory over despair and death. He had visited the palace Beautiful he had been refreshed on the Delectable Mountains and walked by the sweet waters of comfort. These were the delight of his memory. They entered readily into the dreams of his soul. He never forgot the soft low music of the words which Charity and her sisters had breathed into his ear. But the ideas thus created had never the intense distinctness, or overpowering presence in his mind, so characteristic of those which attended his early conflict. His was the experience of a man in whose nature sin and death were strong. The events of the battle by which they lost their prey had too much of awe and solemnity in them not to cast a shadow over all others. Having given this general view of what may be questionable in Bunyan's plan, we will consider somewhat more particularly how it represents the stages of a spiritual pilgrimage. This is a subject of momentous interest. No admiration of an author, however renowned either for piety or genius, or for both combined, ought to tempt us into forcing the reality to answer the dream, instead of trying the fiction by the reality. Adopting this caution, we begin with the first incident in the history of the Pilgrim. He is awakened to a sense of his danger, and of that by which all who surround him are threatened. They are warned in vain by his outcries. His own family prove alike insensible to his entreaties. He escapes alone. The clamours of those whom he loves cause the first pang in his changed heart. They reprove his flight entreat him to return to his old ways. He weeps bitter tears to think he must separate himself from them but he persists, and pursues his solitary path. Unhappily, this part of the story represents a very common case. The head of a family discovers that he has been living without God among people strangers, like him, to heaven. He takes the course which religion and wisdom prescribe, and, whatever others may do, resolves to seek salvation. But though, in a multitude of instances, the husband and father only thus enters upon the path of life, and is obliged to suffer the grief of leaving those whom he most tenderly loves in the midst of danger,
;

much

;

;

;


6
there are so

;

PEEFATORY REMARKS.
many
cases of an opposite character, that

it would be a great injury to the humble, trembling penitent, meditating the cost of turning from the world to God, if he supposed that, like Bunyan's Pilgrim, he must necessarily go on his way without the companionship of a single sympaIt is more encouraging, more favourable to the interests of holiness, to exhibit thizing, loving heart. the early stages of divine life with as much of light and beauty upon them as any degree of truthful hope may permit, The believer may find himself alone, but he may have many to rejoice with him. There will probably be at least some one among those whom he has cherished sufficiently assured of the wisdom and the love trusted in other things, to trust it in this the most important of all. The next incident in the narrative may be similarly questioned. Christian has no sooner com-, menced his journey than he falls into the Slough of Despond. This is, doubtless, a circumstance in the experience of many converts but it would scarcely be prudent for a teacher of the gospel,
;

necessarily following

dear and gracious Author, to insist upon it as a trial against which they are to be warned but it is, at least, as consistent with the general representations of divine truth, to encourage the It is an penitent with the hope of a sufficient grace even from the commencement of his course. interesting circumstance in the story, that Faithful passed over the Slough of Despond, but without
inviting

men

to

enter into

covenant- with
It
is

its

upon conversion.

a danger

may be found, in which there is this useful intimation of a varied was that which Bunyan, in his own heart, felt to be the most probable. He had fled from threatened destruction, but had long to struggle in agony and darkness before he could indulge any hope of safety. A lesson rich in meaning is conveyed by the minor incidents introduced between the meeting with The very wide field, beyond which a keen eye Evangelist, and the deliverance effected by the cross. might discern the narrow wicket -gate the glimmering light visible, after an earnest gaze, even to the Pilgrim the gate reached, and opened by the man with such kindly gravity in his looks and words and then the Interpreter's house, with its chambers of imagery, are just such productions of Fancy as we may look for from her when she is contented to be the quiet handmaid of wisdom. If the But incidents of a very different character are employed to illustrate the narrative. author, by the use of some delightful pictures, proved his possession of an active and agreeable fancy, he gave equal evidence, in another way, of his knowledge of human nature, and of his power and skill Pliable and Obstinate, with a very slight change of name, would have been as a keen satirist. admirable subjects for the humour of Addison; Mr. Legality, with his son, young Mr. Civility, and Mr. Worldly Wiseman, might have sat for their portraits to Swift.
any mishap.
experience.

Other incidents

Christian's case

;

;

;

The great event of the pilgrimage is skilfully placed at such a stage of the journey as allowed for important introductory descriptions, without anticipating the account of Christian's pardon and justification. Two points were to be considered. The invention of incidents adapted to excite an interest in the story and such an arrangement of those incidents that there might be no violation of theological propriety. In the former case, Bunyan has shown a happy skill in creating a sufficient degree of curiosity and sympathy to make us anxious for the Pilgrim's triumph. His courage and simplicity are admirably contrasted with the folly or baseness of those whom he encounters on the way.- »We feel that it will give us pleasure to find such a humble, honest, kindly heart as his relieved of its burden
;

and

distress.

It is much easier to determine the degree of praise due to this inventive excellence, than to speak with confidence of the theological exactness displayed in the structure of the narrative. severe and suspicious critic might ask, how it is, that so little notice is given of the presence, or work, of the Divine Spirit in the progress of the Pilgrim ? And how he could find the way to the cross of Christ, or rather attain to such a justifying faith in his sufferings, without an expressed reference to the illumination of the great guide into all truth ? Such a critic might object, that even Evangelist and the Interpreter had themselves stood in need of this guide and that it is strange they made no allusion

A

;

to his

an exquisite beauty in the picture of the Pilgrim, on his'lonely way, arriving at the foot of the bare, desolate hill ascending it sorely weary with his travel, and the burden which oppressed him contemplating, with a mingling of mysterious astonishment, awe, and love, the cross, rising from the rock against the wide, tempestuous sky, and the grave at its foot, to all appearance fathomless, and extending into the unseen, outer darkness and then, as he thought of the sufferer on that cross, and the victor over that grave, feeling a new power in his heart, the birth of a faith, such as he never had before, and, in the strength of the grand convictions thus created, shaking off the burden which had so long both terrified and debased him. < have the key to all this in the author's well known theological system. He had no
or office.
is
; ;
;

name

There

We

intention of representing a penitent as simply looking at the cross, and that with no sacrifice and by this one act of faith and adoration obtaining deliverance from the pressure of guilt.

upon

it,

Though

expressed but as an after-thought
" Blest
crn?<5, hlest

sepulchre, West rather be

The Man

that there was put to death for

me;"

PREFATORY REMARKS.
the
crucified

7

Saviour, and not the cross only, was the object of contemplation. So also, though merely a word here and there is all that we have in reference to the Holy Spirit, Bunyan's experience
.

too profound to allow us to suspect, for a moment, that he did not proper place in his application of the gospel. But though acquaintance with his own history and doctrines may suffice, as far as it goes, to prevent any mistake on this subject, it cannot be denied, that, to a person knowing nothing of his views, except through The Pilgrim's Progress, he may seem to have been less occupied in meditating on the work of the Spirit, than in contemplating the atoning sufferings of Christ. reader versed in the writings of Howe or Owen will feel assured that, if either of those great men had undertaken to trace, whether in allegory or otherwise, the history of a christian from his new-birth to his consummation in holiness, he would have allowed an incomparably more prominent place to the agency of the Spirit would have spoken of Him in fuller, plainer terms would have given Him more to do ; represented Him more visibly to our apprehension ascribed Him praise in terms more definite and audible. There is practically the more serious consideration, whether a person ignorant of the christian system might not suffer some harm if he should take The Pilgrim's Progress as affording an adequate representation of fundamental truths. The observations here made will hold good both of the literary and doctrinal character of the rest of the book. Genius only, in its highest mood of solemn thought, could have described the Valley of the Shadow of Death in words of such terrible significancy. And when we see the light breaking in from the rising sun, like the fair dawn in the chamber of peace, it falls upon the heart like one of those sweet ideal realities which some few rare books are especially given to transmit. large portion of just, but bitter satire is intermixed. with these glories of the work. Vanity Fair has formed the groundwork of a far more polished ridicule; and the classes of men, represented by those who followed Christian and Hopeful out of the city, have been described with more effect, because a little more ingeniously masked but, in these, as in the earlier cases, there is genuine English humour. Hogarth brought Vanity Fair within the compass of a picture-frame and Fielding and Smollet, without either religious or moral intention, show how the men with whom Christian disputed perform their part in the world. In all this there is a wonderful variety. Bunyan's power of invention was as great as the truthfulness of his pictures. Doubting Castle and Giant Despair, with the beautiful little rural sketch of the river-side, planted with trees, green and fruitful, and the meadow covered with lilies, remind us of Spenser, or of Washington Irving's descriptions of those sweet English home -scenes which inspired the happiest parts of the " Sketch Book." Such excellences as those above noted are apparent to most readers. There is another of great value, but not, perhaps, quite so obvious. However close the correspondence between the experience of one Christian and that of another, in the essential acts and passages of divine life, the varieties of individual temper, and the difference in outward circumstances, must tend to bring believers acquainted with very opposite classes of companions, and very different scenes. Bunyan's study of human nature had enabled him to detect the nicest distinctions of religious character. These he has skilfully exhibited, sometimes in dialogue, at others in brief narratives. The account of Little-faith is an admirable specimen of.the latter the conversation with Ignorance of the former. Both Hopeful and Faithful are types of large classes of believers distinguished from each other by differences not broadly displayed, but very important important esjDecially to those who would be greatly discouraged were divine grace visible under only one or two conspicuous forms. There is some danger, alluded to already, in the exclusive contemplation of a course like that of the chief character in the book. Christian's sufferings and deliverances represent with great exactness those of many converts. But there is as large a number to be saved whose progress, in some of its stages, will have very little resemblance to his, though occasionally brought close together not only walking on the same path, but tenderly conversing with each other, and sharing the same season of repose. An attentive reader will observe this, and feel increasing reverence for Bunyan's talent and truthfulness the more carefully he examines his minuter delineations of spiritual character. Viewed in respect to these considerations, the second part of the work has both a merit and a value not always sufficiently appreciated. It suggests the idea that Bunyan himself had an afterthought of the inadequacy of his own, or of Christian's single experience, to stand as a symbol of the great and common pilgrimage. The subordinate characters, in the first part, were ingeniously contrived to give a more general air to the narrative. They convey instruction which forcibly appeals to the conscience, as soon as it has learnt to trace the outlines so warily drawn but, as lessons of experience, they are less calculated to awaken self-inquiry than to furnish a not yet humbled mind with sharppointed weapons to attack the ordinary follies and vices of the world. In this, they only share the fate of satire generally. The likeness to objects passing to and fro before the eyes can be discovered without any trouble and when discovered affords a keen delight, and increases the feeling of selfsuperiority. But it is always more or less a painful exercise to look inward and the smart which satire creates, even when fairly applied, does not commonly humble so much as it irritates.

of His operations was far
assign

them

their

A

;

;

;

A

;

;

:

:

;

;

;

;

!

8

PREFATORY REMARKS.

It required, therefore, somewhat more than the introduction of characters slightly sketched, and then dismissed, to enforce the grand design of the lesson on different minds and tempers. The history They are someof Christiana and Mercy is an admirable supplement to that of the earlier pilgrims. feel for them as for gentle, earnest women, whom thing far more than ingenious personifications. The we have met on the actual path of life, striving against real difficulties with a real fortitude. account given of their passage across the Slough of Despond affords that example of another kind of

We

experience, which most readers will wish for after contemplating the melancholy case of Pliable and Christian. Equally interesting is the description given of their cautious walk down the Hill of The entire account of the latter is full of instruction. It is Difficulty into the Valley of Humiliation.

hardly equalled by any other part of the narrative. How sweet is the idea of Mercy finding herself How cleverly is Mr. Fearing more than usually content and joyous in that low, tranquil valley
!

introduced under the guidance of Mr. Great-heart, the latter telling us, that troublesome as that poor pilgrim was at almost all other times, he showed himself teachable and cheerful in the Valley of Humiliation Even the Valley of the Shadow of Death has its special objects both of terror and conThe phantoms which haunt their path are many and various but solation for these new travellers. they have daylight with them and Mr. Great-heart is close at their side. Christiana, amid all her
!

;

;

alarms, contrasts the passage through the gloomy valley, made under such circumstances, with her husband's journey along the same path. " Poor man " she exclaims, " he went here all alone in the night he had night almost quite through the way." How sweet and womanly is this
!

:

As
Some

the narrative advances, so the plot of the story thickens, and the
It
is

number

of characters

is

increased. of

not in
are

all

cases that either taste or
;

judgment

is

displayed in the selection of incidents.
related,

them

absurdly trivial

some of them, gravely
fail

must make even a
the

serious

countenance relax into a smile.
exquisite delineations of
simplicity of the concluding scene
to

We
is

fear that with ordinary readers
to

impression

left

by the

which we have spoken, cannot

not without touches of pathos.

be weakened by these puerilities. The But words and images, proper only

an actual dying, are intruded into the allegory where it ought to have been most strictly preserved. is great beauty in the picture of the country and city where the pilgrims met in company, and awaited their summons from the King. Another kind of merit belongs to the short, instructive speeches with which the principal personages take their departure. The practised dramatist could not have succeeded better in preserving consistency of character in these last expressions of sentiment. The inferences to be drawn from these remarks may be briefly stated. However varying the standard by which genius is judged, no rule or definition at present known can deny that quality to the author of The Pilgrims Progress. The power and vivacity with which he describes character, and presents a continual succession of grave or sparkling incidents the interchange of pathos and satire ; the unobtrusive beauty of his landscapes, and the firm grasp of the moral purpose felt throughout, are so many marks of that peculiar creative talent to which every other kind of ability owes obeisance. But though inventive and original, his fancy only rarely takes a lofty flight. His appeals to sympathy are often exquisitely tender but his pathos is never profound. In the view which his own experience and circumstances led him to take of divine truth, he dwells with a singular and rapturous delight on the doctrines to which he was indebted for the first dawn of peace upon his soul ; but he does not afford so distinct a representation of others. No human composition makes any approach to perfection. The productions to which the world rightly attributes the highest praise, are full of faults. Bunyan has many ; but none which can remove him from the ranks of those most favoured of men on whom the light of heaven has shone with a

There

;

;

sanctifying and fruitful influence.

The Pilgrims Progress

will

remain, to the end of time, one of
II. S.

the choicest of the

many

treasures secured to us in the living language of England.

;

:

; :

;

THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS
FKOM

THIS

WORLD TO THAT WHICH

IS

TO COME,

DELIVERED UNDER THE SIMILITUDE OF A DREAM.

WHEREIN IS DISCOVERED, THE MANNER OE HIS SETTING OUT, HIS DANGEROUS JOURNEY, AND SAFE ARRIVAL AT THE DESIRED COUNTRY.
used similitudes.'''

— Hos.

xii. 10.

THE AUTHOR'S APOLOGY FOR HIS BOOK.
When
Thus
pen in hand, understand That I at all should make a little book In such a mode nay, I had undertook To make another which, when almost done, Before I was aware, I this begun.
at the first I took

my

They would condemn them,

or
;

them

justify

;

for to write, I did not

And some
Some Some
said,

said,

Let them

live
;

some, Let them die;
:

:

said, It

John, print it others said, Not so might do good ; others said, No.
in a strait,

;

Now

was I

and did not see
:

And thus it was I, writing of the way And race of saints in this our gospel-day,
:

Which was the best thing to be done by me At last I thought. Since you are thus divided,
I print
it

wiU

;

and so the case decided.
I,

Fell suddenly into an allegory

About their journey, and the way to glory, In more than twenty things, which I set down This done, I twenty more had in my crown
;

For, thought
:

some I see would have

it
:

done,

they again began to multiply, Like sparks that from the coals of fire do fly. Nay then, thought I, if that you breed so fast, I'll put you by yourselves, lest you at last Should prove ad infinitum, and eat out

And

Though others in that channel do not run To prove, then, who advised for the best, Thus I thought fit to put it to the test.
I further thought, if

now
it

Those that would have
I did not

I did deny thus to gratify,

The book

that I already

am

about.

To show

but yet I did not think world my pen and ink In such a mode I only thought to make I knew not what nor did I undertake Thereby to please my neighbour no, not I
Well, so I did
;

know but hinder them I might Of that which would to them be great delight For those which were not for its coming forth, I said to them, Offend you I am loth ;
Yet, since your brethren pleased with it be, Forbear to judge, till you do further see.
If that thou wilt not read, let
it

to all the
;

;

;

-

alone

;

I did

it

mine own

self to gratify.

Neither did I but vacant seasons spend

some love to pick the bone Yea, that I might them better palliate, I did too with them thus expostulate

Some

love the meat,

In this my scribble nor did I intend But to divert myself, in doing this, From worser thoughts which make me do amiss.
;

May I not write in such a style as this ? In such a method too, and yet not miss My end, thy good ? Why may it not be done

?

.Dark clouds bring waters, when the bright bring pen to paper with delight, none. And quickly had my thoughts in black and white. Yea, dark or bright, if they their silver drops For having now my method by the end, Cause to descend, the earth, by yielding crops, and so I penn'd Still as I pull'd, it came Gives praise to both, and carpeth not at either, until at last it came to be, It down For length and breadth, the bigness which you But treasures up the fruit they yield together Yea, so commixes both, that in their fruit see. None can distinguish this from that they suit Her well when hungry, but, if she be full, Well, when I had thus put my ends together, She spews out both, and makes their blessing null. I show'd them others, that I might see whether

Thus I

set

;

;

;

;

:

:

;

!

Ill

THE AUTHOR'S APOLOGY.
;

You see the ways the fisherman doth take To catch the fish what engines doth he make.
Behold how he engageth all his wits Also his snares, lines, angles, hooks, and nets Yet fish there be, that neither hook nor line,
!

The To set
That

prophets used
forth truth
;

much by metaphors
whoso considers

yea,

;

Christ, his apostles too, shall plainly see
:

truths to this

day

in such mantles be.

Nor snare, nor net, nor engine, can make thine They must he groped for, and be tickled too, Or they will not be catch'd, whate'er you do. How does the fowler seek to catch his game By divers means, all which one cannot name
'?
:

Am
Which
(Dark

I afraid to say, that holy writ,
for its style

and phrase puts down
of all these things
*

all

wit,

Is everywhere so

full

figures, allegories) ? yet there springs

From
Of

that same book, that lustre, and those rays

His guns,

his nets, his lime-twigs, light,

and

bell;
tell

light, that

turn our darkest nights to days.

He

creeps, he goes, he stands, yea,

who can

Of all his postures ? Yet there's none of these Will make him master of what fowls he please. Yea, he must pipe and whistle to catch this ; Yet, if he does so, that bird he will miss.
If that a pearl

Come, let my carper to his life now look, And find there darker lines than in my book He findeth any yea, and let him know,
;

That

in his best things there are

worse

lines too.

may

in a toad's

head dwell,

May we
To

be found too in an oyster shell If things that promise nothing do contain What better is than gold, who will disdain,

And may

his poor

but stand before impartial men, one I dare adventure ten,

That have an inkling of it, there to look, That they may find it ? Now, my little book (Though void of all these paintings that may make
It with this or the other

man

to take)

Is not without those things that do excel

That they will take my meaning in these lines Far better than his lies in silver shrines Come, truth, although in swaddling-clouts I find, Informs the judgment, rectifies the mind Pleases the understanding, makes the will Submit the memory to it doth fill With what doth our imagination please
; ;

What

do in brave but empty notions dwell.

Likewise

it

tends our troubles to appease.
is to
;

Well, yet

I am

not fully satisfied
will stand

Sound words, I know, Timothy
tried.

use,

That

this

your book

when soundly
It is

And

old wives' fables he

is to

refuse

Why,
'

what's the matter ?
?

dark
I

!

What The

though

But

it is

feigned.

What

of that ?

trow

Some men, by feigned words, as dark as mine, Make truth to spangle, and its rays to shine
!

But yet grave Paul him nowhere did forbid use of parables, in which lay hid That gold, those pearls, and precious stones that were Worth digging for, and that with greatest care.
Let me add one word more man of God Art thou offended ? Dost thou wish I had Put forth my matter in another dress ? Or that I had in things been more express
:

But

they want solidness.
the

They drown

Speak, man, thy mind! weak ; metaphors make us blind.

Solidity, indeed,

becomes the pen
.

'?

Of him that writeth things divine to men But must I needs want solidness, because

To

those that are
let

my

betters, as is

fit,
:

Three things
1.

me

propound, then I submit

By metaphors

not God's laws His gospel laws, in olden time held forth By shadows, types, and metaphors ? Yet loth

I speak ?

Were

I find not that I

Of

this

my

am denied the use method, so I no abuse

Will any sober man be to find fault With them, lest he be found for to assault The Highest Wisdom No, he rather stoops,
!

And

what by pins and loops, By calves and sheep, by heifers and by rams, By birds and herbs, and by the blood of lambs, God speaketh to him and happy is he That finds the light and grace that in them be.
seeks to find out
;

that I am rude All things solid in show, not solid be All things in parable despise not we, Lest things most hurtful lightly we receive,
:

Be not too forward, That I want solidness,

therefore, to conclude

Put on the words, things, readers, or be rude In handling figure or similitude, In application but all that I may Seek the advance of truth, this or that way. Denied, did I say ? Nay I have leave, (Examples too, and that from them that have God better pleased, by their words or ways, Than any man that breatheth now-a-days.) Thus to express my mind, thus to declare Things unto thee that excellentest are.
;

2.

I find that
;

men

as

high
if

as trees will write

Dialogue -wise

yet no
:

man doth them

slight

And

My
The

things that good are, of our souls bereave dark and cloudy words, they do but hold
truth, as cabinets enclose the gold.

they abuse Truth, cursed be they, and the craft they use To that intent but yet let truth be free To make her sallies upon thee and me,
so
;

For writing

indeed,

:

;

!

:

THE AUTHOR'S APOLOGY.
Which way
it

11
the slothful active be
;

pleases

us first to plough, To guide our minds and pens for his design ? And he makes hase things usher in divine.
Better than he
3.

God who taught

;

for

who knows how,

Yea,

it

will

make

The

blind also delightful things to see:
for

Art thou Art thou

something rare and profitable
see a truth within a fable ?

?

Or wouldst thou
I find that holy writ, in
this

many

places,

forgetful ?

Wouldest thou remember
;

method, where the cases Do call for one thing to set forth another Use it I may then, and yet nothing smother

Hath semblance with

From New-year's day to the last of December ? Then read my fancies they will stick like burs, And may be to the helpless comforters.
This book
is

Truth's golden beams

:

nay,

by

this

method may
writ in such a dialect
listless

Make

it

cast forth its rays as light as day.

As may
now, before I do put up my pen, and then I'll show the profit of my book Commit both me and it unto that Hand That pulls the strong down, and makes weak ones

the minds of

men

affect

And

;

seems a novelty, and yet contains Nothing but sound and honest gospel
It

strains.

stand.

This book

it

chalketh out before thine eyes
:

The man
It

that seeks the everlasting prize

shows you whence he comes, whither he goes "What he leaves undone also what he does It also shows you how he runs and runs, Till he unto the Gate of Glory comes.
;
:

shows too who set out for life amain, the lasting crown they would obtain. Here also you may see the reason why They lose their labour, and like fools do die.
It

Wouldst thou divert thyself from melancholy ? Wouldst thou be pleasant, yet be far from folly Wouldst thou read riddles and their explanation, Or else be drowned in thy contemplation ? Dost thou love picking meat ? Or wouldst thou see A man i' the clouds, and hear him speak to thee ? Wouldst thou be in a dream, and yet not sleep ? Or wouldst thou in a moment laugh and weep ? Wouldest thou lose thyself and catch no harm, And find thyself again without a charm ? Wouldst read thyself, and read thou know'st not
'?

As

if

what,

And
By

yet

know whether thou
the

art blest or not,
'?

reading
hither
lay

same

lines

Oh,

then,

come

If

This book will make a traveller of thee, by its counsel thou wilt ruled be. It will direct thee to the Holy Land, If thou wilt its direction understand
;

And

my

book, thy head, and heart together.

John Bunyan.

;

"
:

THE PILGEIM'S PEOGEESS FROM THIS WOULD TO THAT WHICH IS TO COME.
PART
As
I

I.

walked

through the wilderness

of

this

world, I lighted on a certain place where was The Jail. a den, and laid me down in that

dreamed a dream. saw a man clothed with rags standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand, and a great burden upon his back. (Isa. lxiv. 5. Luke xiv. 33. Hab. ii. 2.) I looked, and Ps. xxxviii. 4. saw him open the book, and read therein and, as he read, he wept and trembled and, not being
place to sleep
;

and

as I slept, I

I dreamed, and, behold, I

;

;

able longer to contain, he brake out with a lamentable cry, saying, " What shall I do ? " (Acts
ii.

37.)

In

this

plight, therefore,

he went home, and

restrained himself as long as he could, that his

wife and children should not perceive his distress

;

but he could not be silent long, because that his trouble increased. Wherefore, at length, he brake his mind to his wife and children and thus he began to talk to them Oh, my dear wife, said he, and you the children of my bowels, I, your dear friend, am in myself undone by reason of a burden that lieth hard upon me moreover, I am This world. certainly informed that this our city will be burnt with fire from heaven in which fearful overthrow, both myself, with thee my wife, and you my sweet babes, shall miserably come
;
:

he would also walk solitarily in the sometimes reading, and sometimes praying and thus for some days he spent his time. Now I saw, upon a time, when he was walking in the fields, that he was (as he was wont) reading in his book, and greatly distressed in his mind and as he read, he burst out, as he had done before, crying, " What shall I do to be saved ? (Acts xvi. 30, 31.) I saw also that he looked this way, and that way, as if he would run yet he stood still, because (as I perceived) he could not tell which way to go. I looked then, and saw a man named Evangelist coming to him, and asked, Wherefore dost thou cry ? He answered, Sir, I perceive, by the book in my hand, that I am condemned to die, and after and I find that I am that to come to judgment not willing to do the first, nor able to do the second. (Heb. ix. 27. Job xvi. 21, 22. Ezek.
;

own misery

fields,

;

;

;

xxii. 14.)

Then
since this

said Evangelist,
fife is

Why not

willing to die,

attended with so

many evils ? The

;

;

tlie wnicn ( Jet 1 see some way of escape can be found, whereby we may be delivered. At this his relations were sore amazed not for that they believed that what he had said to them was true, but because they thought that some frenzy distemper had got into his head therefore, it drawing towards night, and they hoping that sleep might settle his brains, with all haste they got him to bed. But the night was as troublesome to him as the day wherefore, instead of sleeping, he spent it in sighs and tears. So, when the morning was come, they would know how he did. He told them, Worse and worse. He also set to talking to them again but they began to

He knows no
to

to ruill > exce lDt

answered, Because I fear that this burden upon my back will sink me lower than the grave, and I shall fall into Tophet. (Isa. xxx. 33.) And, Sir, if I be not fit to go to prison, I -am not fit to go to judgment, and from thence to execution and the thoughts of these things make me
that
is
:

man

way

escape
'

not)

cry.

asjet

Then said Evangelist, If this be thy condition, why standest thou still ? He answered, Because Then Conviction of I know not whither to go.
he gave him a parchment roll and the necessity of fleel "S-, there was written within, " Fly from the wrath to come." (Matt. iii. 7.) The man therefore read it, and looking upon Evangelist very carefully, said, Whither must I
;

;

;

fly ?

Then

said

Evangelist, pointing with
field,

his

finger over a very wide

Do you

see

yonder

;

be hardened.

thought to drive away Carnal physic his distemper by harsh and surly for a sick soul, carriage to him: sometimes they would deride, sometimes they would chide, and sometimes they would quite neglect him. Wherefore he began to retire himself to his chamber, to pray for and pity them, and also to condole his
also

They

wicket-gate? (Matt. vii. 13, 14.) The man said, No. Then said the other, Do you Christ, and the wa *> *»m, . see yonder shining light ? (Ps. -j cannot be found int o -r. x i n \ tt He said, cxix. 105. 2 Pet. i. 19.) without fhe word, I think I do. Then said Evangeeye, and go up list, Keep that light in your at directly thereto, so shalt thou see the gate which, when thou knockest, it shall be told thee what thou shalt do. So I saw in my dream, that the man becran to run. Now he had not run far
>'
• •

;

;

THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.
from
liis

13
xix.

own
it)

door,

when

his wife

and children
to return,

life

!

So he looked not behind him, (Gen.

(perceiving

began

to cry after

him
!

17,) but fled towards the middle of the plain.

(Luke

xiv.

his ears,

26 ;) hut the man put and ran on, crying, Life

his fingers in
life
!

The neighbours
and, as he ran,

eternal

also came out to see him run some mocked, others threatened,

WW
and some cried
that fly from the wrath to come, are a gazing-stock to D the world.

after

him

to return
so,

;

and among

I

am

They

those that did
t ] lat
,

there were two
.

will

were

res olved to fetch

by

force.

„. I he name

of

the one

,.

him back was

as to

seeking to enjoy, (2 Cor. iv. 18 ;) and if you go along with me, and hold it, you shall fare I myself; for there, where I go, is enough and Come away, and prove spare. (Luke xv. 17.)

Obstinate, and the

name

of the other

my

words.

t

Obst. What are the things you seek, since you by this time the man was got a good distance from them but, however, they were re- leave all the world to find them ? Chr. I seek an inheritance incorruptible, undesolved to pursue him which they did, and in a little time they overtook him. Then said the man, Neigh- filed, and that fadeth not away and it is laid up bours, wherefore are you come ? They said, To in heaven, (1 Pet. i. 4 G. Heb. xi. 6, 16,) and safe persuade you to go back with us. But he said, That there, to be bestowed, at the time appointed, on can by no means be. You dwell, said he, in the city them that diligently seek it. Read it so, if you will, in my book. of Destruction the place also where I was born Obst. Tush, said Obstinate, away with your I see it to be so, and, dying there, sooner or later, you will sink lower than the grave, into a place book will you go back with us, or no ? that burns with fire and brimstone be content, Chr. No, not I, said the other, because I have good neighbours, and go along with me. laid my hand to the plough. (Luke ix. 62.) Obst. Come, then, neighbour Pliable, let us turn Obst. What, said Obstinate, and leave our friends there is a comagain, and go home without him and our comforts behind us ? Chr. Yes, said Christian, (for that was his name,) pany of these crazy -headed coxcombs, that, when because that all which you shall forsake is not they take a fancy by the end, are wiser in their worthy to be compared with a little of that that own eyes than seven men that can render a reason

Pliable.

Now

;

;

;

;

:

;

:

:

;

14
Pli.

THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS
Then
said Pliable, Don't revile
is
:

;

if

what

Pli. This

the good Christian says
after are better

true, the things

than ours

my

he looks heart inclines to go
!

and what else ? is very pleasant Chr. There shall be no more crying, nor sor; ;

row
all

for

He

that

is

owner

of the place will

wipe
16,

with

my

neighbour.

tears

from our eyes.

(Isa.

xxv.

8.

Rev.

vii.

Obst.

What more
!

fools still

Be

ruled

by me,

17;

xxi. 4.)

fellow will lead

and go back who knows whither such a brain-sick you ? Go back, go back, and be wise. Chr. Nay, but do thou come with thy neigh;

Christian and Obstinate pull
for Pliable's soul.

bour Pliable there are sucn tMn S s to be had which I spoke of, and
5

shall we have there? with seraphims and cherubims, creatures that will dazzle your eyes to look on them. (Isa. vi. 2. 1 Thess. iv. 16, 17.) There also you shall meet with thousands and ten thou-

Pli.

And what company
we
shall be

Chr. There

many mQre

glorieg begides#
;

If

you

believe not me, read here in this book

and, for

of

sands that have gone before us to that place none, them are hurtful, but loving and holy ; every
;

what is expressed therein, behold, all confirmed by the blood of Him that made it. (Heb. ix. 17—22.) Pli. Well, neighbour Obstinate, said Pliable, g' to come to a oint J intend P Pliable consent- 1 he eth to go with to go along with this good man, and Christian. tQ cagt j n my lot hj my good companion, do you know the way to this
the truth of
is

m

J

^^

m

.

^

desired place ?

Chr. I
before us,

am

directed

by

a
to

man whose name
a
little

is is

Evangelist, to speed

me

gate that

where we

shall receive instruction

about

the way.
Pli. Come then, good neighbour, Then they went both together.
Obstinate goes railing back.
let

us be going.
to

Obst.

And

I will

go back
:

my

no companion of such misled, fantastical fellows. Now I saw in my dream, that when Obstinate was gone back, Christian and PliTalk between Christian and able went talking over the plain and thus they began their discourse. Chr. Come, neighbour Pliable, how do you do ? I am glad you are persuaded to go along with me. Had even Obstinate himself but felt what I have felt of the powers and terrors of what is yet unseen, he would not thus lightly have given us the
pi ace? Ba

y

Obstinate

I will be

one walking in the sight of God, and standing in his presence with acceptance for ever. In a word, there we shall see the elders with their golden crowns, (Rev. iv. 4 ;) there we shall see the holy virgins with their golden harps, (Rev. xiv. 1—5 ;) there we shall see men that by the world were cut in pieces, burnt in flames, eaten of beasts, drowned in the seas, for the love they bare to the Lord of the place, all well, and clothed with immortality as with a garment. (John xii. 25. 2 Cor. v. 2 4.) Pli. The hearing of this is enough to ravish one's heart. But are these things to be enjoyed ? How shall we get to be sharers thereof ? Chr. The Lord, the governor of the country, hath recorded that in this book, the substance of which is, If we be truly willing to have it, he will bestow it upon us freely. (Isa. Iv. 1 8. John vi. 37; vii. 37. Rev. xxi. 6, 7; xxii. 17.) Pli. Well, my good companion, glad am I to hear of these things come on, let us mend our

:

;

pace.

back.
Pli. Come, neighbour Christian, since there are none but us two here, tell me now farther, what the things are, and how to be enjoyed, whither we

are going.

them with my mind, than speak of them with my tongue but yet, since you are desirous to know, I will read of them in my book. Pli. And do you think that the words of your book are certainly true ?
Chr. I can better conceive of
God's things unspeakable,
:

Chr. I cannot go so fast as I would, by reason is on my back. Now I saw in my dream, that just as they had ended this talk, they drew nigh to a very miry slough, that was in the midst of the plain and they being heedless, did both fall suddenly' ihto the bog. The name of the slough was The Slough of Despond, Despond. Here, therefore, they wallowed for a time, being grievously bedaubed with the dirt and Christian, because of the burden that was on his back, began to sink in the mire. Pli. Then said Pliable, Ah, neighbour Chrisof this burden that
; ;

tian,

where

are

you now

?

Chr. Yes, verily for cannot lie. (Tit. i. 2.)
;

it

was made by him that

what things are they ? an endless kingdom to be inhabited, and everlasting life to be given us, that we
said
is
;
^

Pli.

Well

Chr. There

may

kingdom for ever. (Isa. lxv. 17. 27—29.) Pit. Well said and what else ? Chr. There are crowns of glory to be given us and garments that will make us shine like the sun in the firmament of heaven. (2 Tim. iv. 8. Rev.

inhabit that
x.

John

;

Chr. Truly, said Christian, I do not know. Pli. At this Pliable began to be offended, and angrily said to his fellow, Is this the happiness you have told me all this while of? If we have such ill speed at our first setting out, what may we expect between this and our journey's end ? May I get out again with my life, you it s not enough t0 be pliable, shall possess the brave country alone And with that he gave a desperate strugfor me. gle or tw o, and got out of the mire on that sfde of so the slough which was next to his own house away he went, and Christian saw him no more.
i T
:

Wherefore Christian was
:

left to

xxii. 5.

Matt.

xiii.

43.)

tumble in the Slough of Despond alone but stiU he endeavoured to struggle to that side of the slough

Christian, in trouble, seeks

^hev from his" own house.

And this is the reason of the badness of this ground. - employed about perhaps it might have yea. 8. that I might escape the wrath come.) but .) Then I stepped to him that plucked him out. (1 Sam. This miry slough is such a place as cannot be mended it is the descent whither the scum and filth that attends conviction What makes the for siu doth continually run. And as I was going thither. called the still. came to him. said been swallowed up at least twenty years hundred this patch of : ground. and bid out him go on his way. (Ps. that from his own house. But why did not you look Majesty's surveyors. but at such time as this forgiveness and place doth much spew out its filth. men. and settle in this place. certain good and substantial steps. and he drew him out.. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. if been mended he. xl. and next to the which he did. 2. Then said he. . the ground is good when they are once got in at the gate. (Isa. say. xxxv. through the dizziness of their heads. been for above these sixteen for the steps ? Chr. yea. there are. these steps are hardly seen or if they be. who directed me also to to yonder gate. True. I was bid to go this way by a man called Evangelist. by the direction of his The Help. here have thousand cart- : wholesome instructions. xii. they are the best materials to make good ground of the place. place should remain so bad. many slough. notwithstanding the steps be there. millions of at all seasons have Slough of Despond. but could not get out because of the burden that was upon his back. and to my knowledge. Sir. Help. 4. 2ife by faith in Christ. 21 .) if so be it might have been mended but it is the Slough of Despond still.) His labourers also have. (and they that can tell. said Christian. and so will be when they have done what they can. that a man was farthest | the Wicket-gate . Sir. whose name was Help. It is not the pleasure of the King that this here. as it doth against change of weather. since over this place is the way from the city of Destruction to yonder gate. and fell in. is it. wherefore. his and doubts. and said. placed even through the very midst of this The promise of loads. and set Help lifts him him upon sound ground. by the direction of the Lawgiver. What he did there ? Chr. But I beheld in my dream. 3. that been brought from all places of the King's dominions. that I fled the next way. step beside and then they are bemired to purpose. that this plat is not mended. which all of them get together. therefore it is . that poor travellers might go thither with more security ? And he said unto me. Give me thy hand so he gave him his hand. and discouraging apprehensions. and asked him. I fell in promises. . Slough of in D eBpond his fears for as the sinner is arise awakened about soul lost condition. and . Fear followed me so hard.

for I stand in need Besides. I will .. hunger. city of Why. I am . seeing so many dangers attend it ? especially since (hadst thou but patience to hear me) I could direct thee to the obtaining of what thou desirest. and g hig neighbours came to visit him ° . . is Evangelist. . much safety. as thine I perceive have done thee.) World. gentleman whose name is Legality. I thought so thee as to other weak men. by beholding his laborious going. ! for hazarding himself with Christian : others again World. thou art like to meet with. Worldly Wiseman meets him was Mr. Now Christian hath directed thee. manner ? Chr. should be serious « . if as for- (1 Cor. and began to deride poor Christian behind Pliable. in yonder village (the village is named Morality) there dwells a He prefevs Mo _ gtowed U p Qn tliee tm aen< Chr. who. Why. lions. began thus to enter into some talk with Chris- — which you have mentioned: nay. I know what I would obtain it is ease my heavy burden. Yes but I am so laden with this burden. World. that has skill to help men off with such burdens as thine is from their shoulders yea. World. darkness. if so be I cau young Christian. as I told you. do sud. that. meeting with Christian. . and World. Wilt thou hearken to me. A burdened manner indeed. dragons. . and that thou shalt find. sir. The frame of methinks I care not what I meet the heart of a with in the way. man for coming back. Hast thou a wife and children ? Chr. as I informed. for I see the dirt of the I perceive. . a true. having some guess of him. he hath skill to - . as I said. and a man of a very good name. then. and the like. so carelessly cast away himself. Talk between r World. Surely. That is that which I seek for. to obtain they know not what. since you began to venture. that I may be rid of my ^ : . even to be rid of this heavy burden but get it off myself I cannot nor is there any man in our country that can take it off my shoulders therefore am I going this way. . By reading this book in my hand. and. - . counsel ? it I give thee Chr. thou mavst . he espied one afar off. Lome. perils. and also hard-by from whence Christian came. instead of those dangers. that by this time was got home to his house. and then they all turned their : not a more dangerous and troublesome way in the world than is that into which he M^ Worldly tales. lie clwelt in th e town of Carnal Policy. his back. sir. and having some inkling of him. to : am Chr. I pray open this secret to me World. as his counsel.in reading the Bible. that I cannot take that. I beshrew him for his counsel there is did mock at his cowardliness. got more confidence. wearisomeness. Worldly Wiseman. nakedness. already Slough of Despond is upon thee bnt that slough is the beginning of the sorrows that do attend .. pleasure in merly vii. I shall be put into a way to be rid of my heavy burden. . man men. wMther a after this ^rdened Christian. as I great and honourable person A : remember. meddling with things too high for them. . as ever I think poor creature had And whereas you ask me. If be good. which distractions do not only un. Thou hast met with something.. . : 16 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. These things are certainly been confirmed by many testimonies. but also it began to be the town-talk in some other places. man that appeared to me to be a very his name. Worldly Wiseman with Christian. I would not have been so base as to have given out for a few difficulties so But at last he Pliable sat sneaking among them. this burden upon than are all my these Destruction was in the much noised not only more terrible to me things town where he dwelt. he hath done a great deal of good this way ay. World. This man then. I am going Wi s'ema°n and ! ld W How now. visited by his and some of them called him wise neighbours. friendship. to my knowledge. burden. The gentleman's name that met Mr. World. and besides. Whither away ? I tell you. also meet with deliverance from my burden. by giving back is heed to a stranger ? (for Christian's setting forth from the abroad. saying. and what not. How earnest thou by thy burden at first? tian. Sir. if thou wilt be ruled by gelist's counsel. . good fellow.He does not like th "t men denly fall into thy distractions . . rality before the str t "S ate 'V a very judicious man. but they run them upon desperate ventures. and some called him fool saw is in my Pliable got Pliable . death. of good counsel. : ESfiKt those that go on in that way. without the dangers that thou in this way wilt run Yea. . Who bid thee go this way to be rid of thy burden ? Chr. having should And man Chr. yonder Wicket-gate before me for there.) Mr. I would advise thee. And as thus much concerning was walking solitarily by himself. painfulness. . -. But why wilt thou seek for ease this way. sword. and the remedy is at hand. Now I dream. 29. thou shalt meet with content. by observing his sighs and groans. . To him. thyself into. and it is happened unto World. therefore. older than thou : Hear me . : methinks I am as if I them had none. in a word. in the way which thou goest. come crossing over and their hap was to meet the field to meet him just as they were crossing the way of each other. from ' Chr. cure those that are somewhat crazed in their wits with their burdens. that thou with all speed get thyself rid of thy burden for thou wilt never be settled in thy mind till then Worldly Wise. I will add. to Christian. a very great town.nor canst tnou enj°y the benefits of man's counsel the blessings which God hath be- Chr.

that thou art so quickly turned aside ? For thou art now out of the way. may show thee the words of £ varige ij st CO nGod. xii. Then said Evangelist. He asked me if I had a family and I told But. wotted not what to do. £^£2" Christian. that can do (to speak on) as well as the old gentleman himself there. wherefore at pre. and got me at last to yield so I came hither but when I beheld this hill. Chr Yes. : Now a stand was Christian somewhat 5 at but Presently he conthis eluded. and talked much to me. find a hill? man that could take off my burden. His liouse is not quite and if he should not be at home son. very well. tleman's house that hath skill to take off these ^g^mm to venture and turned out of that way into this. countenance. for fear. . So he stood trembling. said he. Also his burden now seemed heavier to him than while he was in his way. there he stood still. xix. go. I met with a gentleman so soon as I had got over the Slough of Despond. man that I found crying without the walls of the city of Destruction ? Christian snared by Sf words. not so attended with difficulties as the way. and thus began to reason with .: THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and burdens : so I believed him. There came also flashes of fire out of the hill.sons afresh with Christian. in the village before me. : at . sir. Did not I direct thee the way to the little Wicket-gate ? Chr. Do you see yonder high Mount Sinai. in credit and good fashion. dear sir. Evan. of danger : to do. and the first house you come at is his. and be helped presently. xii. that I cannot take pleasure .) - . dear sir. How is it. I am the man. at the sight also of whom he began to blush for shame. Chr. lest it should fall on my head. World By that hill you must go. Evan. What was he V Chr. 21 . Worldly Wiseman's counsel and with that he his : on and beheld things as they are. where there are houses now stand empty. now he began to be sorry that he had taken Mr. So Christian turned out of his way to go to Mr. Evan. it seemed so iiiii when it . : saw Evangelist coming to meet him. Christian afraid Legality's house for help that Mount he was got Sinai would fall no ^' on his head. .) thou mayst send for thy wife and children to thee to this village. Yes. to be sure there thou shalt live by honest neighbours. and short. (as indeed I would not wish thee. Then said Evangelist farther." (Heb. And what said he then ? Chr. but. den that is on my back. Evan. as but I now know not what I said. in them as formerly. I am so loaden with the burhim. said Christian. said I. which is my way to this honest man's house ? World. he asked me whither I was going and I told him. if we turn away from Him He that speaketh from heaven. by the hill. and how it hangs over the way. Christian ? said he which words Christian knew not Evangelist reawhat to answer. He bid me with speed get rid of my burden and I told him it was ease that I sought. Stand still a little. that made Christian afraid that he should be burnt. " See that ye refuse not Him that speaketh for if they escaped not who refused him that spake on earth. to receive farther direction how I may get to the place of deliverance. who persuaded me that I might. that I . and quake for fear. What dost thou here. 17 a mile from this place . I stopped. (Exod. my wisest course is to take his advice and with that he thus farther spake. that you set me in which way. thou mayst be eased of thy burden and if thou art not minded to go back to thy former habitation. So he said that he would show me a better way. he hath a pretty is young man to his it whose name Civility. . Art not thou the Evan. And. if haply I might be soon eased of my burden. and also that side of that did hang so much over. one of which thou mayst have at a reasonable rate provision is there also cheap and good and that which will make thy life the more happy is. himself. Chr. then.) here And therefore he did sweat. I say. If this be true which gentleman hath said. Then vinces him of hls error said Evangelist. will direct you to a gen. that Christian was next the way-side was afraid Evan. much more shall not we escape. sent he stood speechless before him. I am therefore going to yonder gate. He looked like a gentleman. further. But when I came to this place. said I. . Heb. lest the hill should fall head wherefore. c . Chr. bei j now hard high. 16—18. Yes. I suddenly made a stand. What said that gentleman to you ? Chr. Evan. Evan. Sir. 25. . And what said he then ? Chr. So Evangelist drew nearer and nearer Evangelist findand coming up to him he looked upon him with a severe and dreadful Sinai. Why.

even almost to the Thirdly. The words were thus pronounced " As many as are of the works of the law are under the curse for it is written. for by it thou hast committed two evils . Legality is a cheat and for his son Civility. wicked man turned thee. there is nothing in all this noise that thou hast heard of these sottish men. (Gal. how canst thou expect by them to be made free ? This Legality. 2. 5. without which.he seeketh to pervert my ways." " for strait is the the gate to which I send thee gate that leadeth unto life. notwithstanding his simpering looks. only. Evangelist called aloud to the heavens for confirmation of what he had said and with that there came words and fire out of the mountain under which poor Christian stood. : my soul shall have no thou must abhor. " lest thou . for he has good.. thou hast forsaken the way that is good. Worldly e Bcr ibedbf' and rightly is he so called partly because he savoureth only of the . saying. Then I will earnest heed to the things that I shall Evangelist proceeded. in the Thou must hate way that leadeth to the also thy feet ministration of death. Now the just shall live by faith . . 26. . Then said Evangelist to him. and few there be that Lord hearkening to his counsel. leadeth unto the administration of death. therefore.) and is. is the son of the bondwoman which now is.Evangelist comforts him will for men . but if any man draw back. — — 18 said. and sisters. 25. is not able to set thee free from thy burden. And be forgiven ? yea. for it saveth him best from the cross. Yet will the man at the gate receive thee. Thou must abhor his labouring to render the cross odious unto thee for thou art to prefer the Wicket-gate ? before the treasures of Egypt. The man still calling himself a thousand fools for . and thine own consenting thereto began to cry out lamentably even cursing the because this is to reject the counsel of God for the time in which he met with Mr. therefore. iii. he is but a hypocrite. and the way yea. said he. should have the prevalency with him so far as to cause him to forsake this little wicket-gate. moreover. . to the bringing : of thee almost to destruction hate. his setting of He also did thus pleasure in him. nor ever is like to be. " All manner of sin and blasphemies " Be not faithless. he Evan. and mother. is there any hope back. vii. W Mr. therefore. Christian fell down at his feet as dead. Give more tell thee of.) Besides. Sir. Evangelist. and go up to Christian ine ? Secondly.) (therefore doctrine of this world. to tread in forbidden paths. No man was as yet ever rid of his burden by him no. he applied himself again to Evangelist in words and sense as follows : the right way. 27. hearkening to him. he always goes to the town of Morality to church . 14. that made the hair of his flesh stand up. His turning thee out of the way. and to draw back thy foot from the way of peace." (Heb. His labouring to render the cross odious to thee. 21 27 . Now there are three things in this man's counsel that thou must utterly abhor. the King of glory hath told thee. vi. and abhor thyself for Chr. therefore. I now go what think you. hazarding of thy perdition. Worldly Wisesake of the counsel of a Worldly Wiseman. and wife. and brethren. Then did Christian again a as at first. which thou hast feared will fall on thy head. Luke xiv. Matt. He also was greatly arguments. Mark 34. before Evangelist. .) apply them Thou art the man that art running into this misery. x. and who it was also to whom he sent thee. Believe me. First. (Gal." but believing. the heed that thou turn not aside again. 1. thou hast begun to reject the counsel of the Most High. and is in bondage with her children. xi. though right.) I to labour to persuade thee that that shall be thy death. 38. (Heb. . iv. 36". but a design to beguile thee of thy salvation. hath this and from the way thereto. (1 John iv. and his own cannot be viii. eay. 2G. thou must consider to whom he sent how unable that person was to deliver thee from thy burden. 13. After this. take - 39.) and partly because he loveth that doctrine best. and children. turning thee out of the way. 10. for man John xii. this Mount Sinai. and sent back from thence ashamed ? I am sorry I have hearkened to this man's counsel but may my sin : he that comes after him. . and — . thou canst not have eternal this doctrine life. Worldly Wiseman is and Mr. He to whom thou wast sent for ease* being by name Legality. TMy sin is very great. 37 — life also. Ye cannot be justified by the works of the law for by the deeds of the law no man living can be rid for this And thee. and cannot help thee. 25. May ." revive. shall be forgiven unto men. his This done. and hates not his father. saying. for I am undone At the sight of which Evangelist caught him by the right hand.) From flowing only from the flesh. The man that met thee is one Worldly Wiseman. little and stood up trembling. " THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. 24. x." (Luke xiii. abandoned for this. says. my disciple. truth hath said. " Strive to enter in at the strait gate. : . (Gal." of his burden : an alien. 12 :) and because he is of this carnal temper. ! Woe is me. (Matt. 3. And his setting thy feet in that way that therefore Mr. Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them. now show thee who it was that deluded thee.) Thou must abhor his turning thee out of Now Christian looked for nothing but death. it Shall I not be ^jjf Je Happy. in a mystery. Now if she with her children are in bondage. Then crying. by turning thee from the way in which I had set thee. ashamed to think that this gentleman's find it. that he that will save his life shall lose it.

. and could by no means think himself safe till again he was got into the way which he had left to follow Mr. saying. means that ? The other told him. and Evangelist. there ? and and what he would have ? whence he came Chr.) Then did Christian address himself to go back . the captain at those that them tha( are ^. perish from the way. ii. What T Good.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. nor. and bid him God speed." (Ps. He went like one that was all the while treading on forbidden ground. an<^ tremble. to persuade you to go back ? Chr. there is A . a grave person named Good-will. May Open I now to Will he within sorry me. know if you are willing to let me in. So when Christian w as stepping in. c 2 . gave him one smile. me come . I and he tell Talk between Goodwill and Christian. And then was my neigh- We y^ may joy die before they can enter in. Obstinate went railing back. So when he was got at the gate bour Pliable discouraged. he told me I should possess the brave country • A man mav have company when he sets out for heaven> and yet go thither alone. vii. more than once or twice. Yes. and calling after me to return but I put my fingers in my ears. until we Chr. of which Beelzebub : . I would. who asked who was to the gate. Evangelist bid sir. .. and so came on my way. and would not adventure farther. Did any of them know of your coming ? Chr. neither spake he to any man by the any man asked him. came to the Slough of Despond.t. and I came Obstinate. Worldly Wiseman's counsel. after he had kissed him. sinners. But why did he not come through ? indeed came both together. Then said Christian. if of time Christian got up to the gate. I am willing with all my said he. I come '? At last there came. into the which we also suddenly fell. Christian enters Then in. The gate will be Good. : little way. Wherefore. since I am informed that by this gate is the way thither. But did none of them follow you. said Christian.) Chr. what must do. from thence both he. sir.. Now I begin to reap the benefit of my An Not undeserving rebel? fail to Then shall I hazards. 19 when . though I have been enter here ? man Good. and it shall be opened unto you. sing his lasting praise on high. " Knock. So in process way . gate erected a strong is castle. therefore. opened the gate. the man asked him alone for him : so who directed him thither ? mine : he after he went his way." (Matt. my wife and children saw me at the first. Now. I rejoice widVembling. An open door is set before thee. therefore. and called after me to turn again also some of my neighbours stood crying.^ come up to this gate. ] getting out again on the side next to his own house. would me He knocked. both Obstinate and Pliable but when they saw that they could not prevail. and ghoot arrowg if haply they Good. Good. his wrath is kindled but a little. said. from the city of Destruction. Because none of my neighbours saw their danger as I saw mine. and with that he brokenhearted teart. but Mount Zion.little dis- tance from this Satan envies those that enter the strait gate. Chr. would he vouchsafe them an answer. 12. But how is it that you came alone ? Chr. Yes. Here is a poor burdened sinner. the other gave him a pull. as I did that you. and no can shut it. Good. over the gate there was written. • . and I to this gate. So he went on with haste. but Pliable came with me a : . that I may am going to be delivered from the wrath to come. 8. hither and knock.

slighting and despising the things that are present for the love that he hath to his Master's service.) Good. but I also turned aside to go into the way of death. Yes. more fit in. . room. and asked who Was to the house of the Interpreter. Then said the Interpreter. It is true. I am a man that am Good.) and may lose his way ? nurse them himself when they are born. had not Evangelist happily met that. and this wT as the fashion of brave picture. little the celestial glory of so it that he counteth poor man esteem with him. and they are crooked and wide but thus thou may est distinguish the right from the wrong. prophets. for else I had never come hither. . only man whom the Lord the of the place whither . I will show thee that which deed for death by that mountain. Sir. 19. There is no deHe told him. The fashion of tn * P icture with me. Oh.! ! 20 Good.. It behind its back. he would come at the house of the Interpreter. this to me. such a one as I am. as far as I durst. (1 Cor. The man whose picture this is. came to Christian. you would show me excellent me again as I was musing in the midst of my things. and he would show him excellent things. 37. Then Christian took his leave of his friend. and will be the death of many more it is come from the city of Destruction. come of me there. iv. said Christian. than thus to stand will be profitable to thee. said Christian. there are this. But Inter. I do not know what had be. even as also . who. contest to the place of deliverance . Then said Christian. the right only being straight and narrow.-15. And therefore. wherefore there was I forced to stop. did he light upon you ? What. to sinners. Good. the best of books in his hand. bid betwixt him and myself. and asked him what he would have. was cast up by the patriarchs. is THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Christian weary of his burden. 14. that yet I am admitted entrance here Christian follow him so he had him into a private Good. Sir. he is sure in the world that comes next to have glory for his reward.that stands at the gate at the head of this way. and he again his loins. where he knocked christian over and over. Then he went on. said the Interpreter. Alas. Legality they are both of them a very cheat. i^Ztlnlt ^° the gate. man whose picture this is. But oh what a favour is man to light the candle. for as yet he had not got rid thereof. truly. As to thy J burden. and bid his man open a door the which. : ! : . untU thou burden of sin. *ay all the truth of myself. vii. He is entertained. me again. Then Christian began to gird up himself to his journey. and his apostles.) the wall. hverance from i ' . I went to find out Chr. nor could he by any means get it off without help. he went back to his own house. said Christian. there ? But did you take his counsel ? Chr. now I am come. and a crown of gold did Jiang over its head. I have said the Christian accus. That mountain has been the death of many. that. if I called here. and the law of truth writ on his lips it is to Meaning of the : dream. till he came at the house of conie8 the Interpreter. and it is as straight as a rule can Chr. Mr. by which a stranger a thousand . the law must go. if he pleaded with men and whereas thou seest the world as cast behind him. he can beget children. ' thee this picture first. But. e d tt done before they come hither. and bid Illumination. Worldly Wiseman. Yes. such as would be helpful to me on my dumps but it was God's mercy that he came to journey. Why. for there ^ will fall from thy back of itself.truth of Pliable and if I should . that his work and unfold dark things thou seest him stand as is to know picture. So he called for the master of the house. are there no turnings nor windings. (Matt. Look before thee dost thou see this of truth was written upon its lips. not worth running the hazard it to address of a few difficulties to obtain ? Chr. it stood as if it pleaded with men. (Gal. Christian saw the picture of a e aS and£. Chr. T iv. What meaneth this ? make it this is the way thou must go. Christian is notwithstanding all that they have when he had done. that by that he was gone some distance from the gate. that Christian asked if he could not help ff with his burden that wag upon his back. carnal ! the door. to the Mount Zion and I was told by the man Chr. at whose door he should knock. Christ. here is a traveller. to At last one came argument of one Mr. I have showed Why he showed : show thee. they very grave person hang up against christian 8eea a on his way. And many ways butt down whereas thou seest him with his eyes lift up to : upon heaven. until I thought that the mountain by his house would have fallen upon after a little time. and am going well you escaped being by it dashed in pieces. my head. the guilt and be con tent to bear it. because the him is this picture first> zn/btiT Christ. being persuaded thereto by the him God speed. and I will teach thee about the way thou the best of books in his hand. We make no objections against any. come a little way it it had eyes lifted up to heaven. (John vi. and that a crown hangs over his head that is to show thee.Come in. Truly. Then I saw in my him him further. is one of that stands : . Then said Good-will. l i : - . Legality.) travail in birth w ith children. he would have had you seek for ease at the hands of Mr. the world was narrow way ? that is the way thou must go. Now. . it will appear there is no betterment and So the other told him. So he commanded his talking with my Lord. Inter. who wT as bid by an acquaintance of the goodman of this house to call here for my profit I would therefore speak with the master of the house. : Christian afraid of losing his Chr. in no wise are cast out. good Christian.

20 vii. now and consequently fit for the King of glory to inActs xv. its working) doth revive. Nay.) I saw moreover in my dream. 56. when he began to for a man to sweep. and he had lavished all away. This paiiour is the heart of a man that was never sanctified by the dust is his orithe sweet grace of the gospel ginal sin. it it crease forbid . The name of the eldest was Passion. very quiet. Chr. Rom. and led him but rags. this year. thou art going hath authorized to he thy guide in all difficult places thou mayest meet with in the way. Patience is for waiting. These two lads are figures. ^ > j That proverb. . Inter. the dust did so fly about. at his feet the . and did is the law Now. to But Pa- nothing but rags. "A bird in The worldly man hand is worth two in the bush. Now Patience had best wisdom. 21 : down which he took up. 26. then. Passion seemed to be much discontented. and inward corruptions that have defiled He that began to sweep at first the whole man. Passion hath _ tV\Tatience to scorn. for their portion of : . that he had quickly lavished all away. Then Christian asked. . Passion of the men of this world. is of more than are all the divine testimonies of the good But as thou sawest of the world to come. Then he took him by . But T I beheld his desire. Expound this matter more fully to me. of What The is the Chr. will have the glory of his.) Again as thou sawest the damsel sprinkle the room with water. Eph. . v. the dust began so abundantly to fly about. is willing to wait. Bring hither water. So he said. even as it doth discover and for it doth not give power to subdue. that when the pleasure gospel comes in the sweet and precious influences . reason of the discontent of Passion ? preter answered. it was swept and cleansed with pleasure. xvi. so are the : men that the of this world things is. xv. but that thou wast almost choked therewith this is to show thee. . THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Then said Christian. Chr. the glory of the next world will never wear out .. that the . Passion will have it Inter- I see that Patience has the best wis. 26. upon which it was cleansed with this is to show thee.tte The governor have nim sta y for them would dom. habit. into a very large parlour. to wit. and inin the soul.. 21—23. thereof to the heart. law. and quickly but a while. put strength into. the Interpreter called Now. sawest that so soon as the first began to sweep. and the name of the other Patience. that the room by him could not be cleansed. And also because he stays for the best things. 25. in this world . and bear well in thy mind what thou hast seen lest in thy journey thou meet with some that pretend to lead thee right. that is to say. but Patience was they must have all their good they cannot stay till the next year. xv." for a bird in the authority with them. and had presently left him nothing but rags. through the faith of it. The Interpreter answered. v. after he had reviewed it a little while. but she that brought water. until the next world. Then said the Interpreter to a damsel that stood by. What means this? Inter. where tience. till the beginning of the next year Because he 2. that the Interthe nand and He showed him P reter t0 °k nim Passion and Pa.. so is sin vanquished and subdued. saw that one came brought him a bag of treasure I Then Passion and it and poured . and Patience of the men of that which is to come for as here thou seest Passion will have all now. instead of cleansing the heart (by from sin. • world. but Therefore Passion had these are suddenly gone. Then said Christian. and had nothing left him awrt y.had him into a little room. even as thou sawest the damsel lay the dust by sprinkling the floor with water. you may add another. 1 Cor. 7—11. gat two jj tt e c hi](i renj eacn one j n his chair. whereas thou sprinkle it. is the gospel. and sprinkle the room the which when she had done. so will it be with all such men at the end of this good. and the soul made clean. Wherefore take good heed to what I have showed thee. and withal laughed „ e.. 1. : . but their way goes . when the other has accounts. I say. (Rom. Then said Christian to the Interpreter. (John xiv. . the hand. . because never swept the which. down to death. and rejoiced therein. Inter. 3. sweep. that was full of dust. 9. that Christian had almost therewith been choked. and that upon many his best things now. ^ ut ne tience W A1 have all now.

This fire is of grace that is ? the work wrought in the heart . and am shut up in it. . and was clothed with such garments said. not at all discouraged. at the door stood a great company of men. continued between the second. Dives. as desirous to go in. who laid upon him with deadly force but the man. but what art thou now ? Man. stay. for the things that are The first seen are temporal. (Luke viii. that the man stood behind the wall to maintain the fire this is to teach thee. is the devil but in that thou seest the fire. thou shalt also see the reason of that. where was delighted . I w as once Chr. and that distance so Eternal glory thou shalt win. therefore. must needs have a time to spend but he that hath his portion last. in. ±1 ± because last must have his time to . where Despair like an ilon cagethere sat a man in an iron cage. yet are hut temporal - since things present and our fleshly appetite are such near neighbours one to another. I left off to watch and be sober I laid the reins upon the neck of my lusts I sinned against the light of the word. both in in the eyes of others for the celestial city. and led him up hold. . to the man that sat there The * valiant - now he tormented. said the Interpreter. At last.) Chr. . he cut his way through them all. built a stately palace. good but things. I saw also that the Interpreter took him again by the hand. that it is hard for the tempted to see how this work of grace is maintained in the soul. at a table -side. . . iv. and he has left me I have so hardened my heart. I am now a man of despair. fair can do. And in that thou sawest. to take the names of them that should enter therein he saw also that in the door-way stood many men in armour to keep it. would break his heart. where he saw a man with a vessel of oil in his hand. when every man started back for fear of the armed men. and again. and led him into a pleasant place. and the goodness of God I have grieved the Spirit. that the Interpreter took Christian by the hand. therefore it is that the first of these is draw his sword. You things say truth. Then said Christian. May we go in thither ? Then the Interpreter took him. seemed very sad he sat with his eyes looking down on the ground. because he had his best things i ast for fi rst must g j ve p ] ace to last. . even of those that walked upon the top of the palace. that I cannot repent. the souls of his people prove gracious still. fire it. as at Pasp at i ence wj]] have to laugh ° sion. Now. "What means this The Interpreter answered. let think where was a standing by quench it : burning against a wall. he that casts water upon it to extinguish and put it out. • come but last gives place to nothing. Nay. The man said. who were clothed all in gold. and after that thou shalt go on thy way. '"In thy life-time thou re- toward the door of the palace and behold. at the sight of he saw also and had then even joy at the thoughts that I should get thither. of the which he : hence. notwithstanding what the devil . Then said Christian. that hath . till Now. his hands folded together and he sighed as if he Then said Christian. Then I perceive it is not best to covet things that are now. as in this iron cage. I am what I w as not once. fell to cutting and hacking most fiercely. So he had him about to the back side of the wall. and rush tow ard the door upon the armed men. and led him into a place So he went as they. is and likewise Lazarus comforted. 22 not so THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. into the Then said Christian to the man. Set down my name. with the oil of his grace. being resolved to do to the men that would enter what hurt and mischief they could. J 1. into amity. But how earnest thou into this condition ? Man." (Luke xiv. but the things that are not seen are eternal. and one always casting much water upon it to yet did the fire burn higher and hotter. T a fair and floureyes. . ishing professor. Then I saw in my dream. his portion it. saying. and put a helmet upon his head. I cannot get out oh. who continually. at which there was a pleasant voice heard from those that were within. What means this ? At which the Interpreter bid him talk with the man. and he is come to me I have provoked God to anger. Inter. and know the meaning of this. with a book and his ink-horn before him. but to wait for things to — to write. now I cannot Chr. must have it : therefore it is said of Dives had his lastingly good things first. .) Chr. Christian saw a man of a very stout countenance . I once was. the man. he saw the man come. to look on. mine own and also the work already begun in the heart by the means of which. much reason to laugh at Patience. because Things that are nrst must give place hut things that are last are lasting. Well. I verily I Then Christian smiled. and led him into a very dark room. . because things to come and carnal sense are such strangers one to another so suddenly fall . . did also continually cast (but secretly) fire. come in . said Christian. 18. He. .) But though this be so. This is Christ. first. have showed thee a little more. So he took him by the hand again. man the which r when he had done. ceivedst thy evil things . he had his good things first. and thou art come up Sir . saying. 13. Come in. . maintains What wast thou once ? Man. as I thought. "What means this ? The Interpreter answered. 19 31. So after he had received and given many wounds to those that attempted to keep him out. burn higher and hotter. me go I : .! : . (2 Cor. for there is not another to succeed. Now was Christian somewhat in amaze. . but durst not. notwithstanding. beautiful to be- which Christian was greatly upon the top thereof certain persons walking. What art thou ? The man answered. and he is gone I tempted the devil. 7 Then said Christian. and pressed forward into the palace. There also sat a man at a little distance from the door. .

2-Thess. which shall devour me as an adversary. For what did you bring yourself into this condition ? Man. of . smoke and It was also said coals of fire. Jude 14. and saw the clouds rack at an unusual rate upon which I heard a great sound of a trumpet. saying. — . : . So he took Christian by the hand again. vii. xv. and profits of this So he began. attended with the thousands . pitiful. (John v. and come to judgment. : ! ! Inter. myself afresh . his person I (Luke mises. 2. Mai. lusts. 1 3. xix. to x. 4—6. Chr. as I was in I dreamed. pleasures.) also proclaimed to them that attended on the Man that sat on the cloud. God hath denied me repentance. and saw also a Man my sleep. So I looked up in my dream. he shook and trembled.) Some of them were exceeding glad. him tell to Christian the reason of therefore I have shut myself out of the pro- and there now remains me nothing but threatenings. 51—68. ye dead. crucified him . world in the enjoyment of which I did then promise myself much delight but now every one of those things also bite me. Yet there was. " Arise. 29. (Dan. Why doth thi3 man thus tremble The Interx . Why.) Then I saw the Man that sat upon the cloud open the book. just whereabout I stood. No. said Christian. and gnaw me like a burning worm. out of the mouth of which there came. and cast them into the burning lake . 22. thee. 11—15. 15. 7— 10.! THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and led him into a chamber. xxvi. vi. also the I heard then heavens were on a burning flame. and behold the heavens grew exceeding black also it thundered and lightened in most fearful wise." and with that the rocks rent. Isa. is it not time for me to go on my way now ? Inter. But canst thou not now repent and turn V Man. none at all. dreadful threatenings. of certain judgment and fiery indignation. O eternity eternity how shall I grapple with the misery that I must meet with in eternity : sitting upon a : cloud. 16. Tarry till I shall show thee one thing more. I have have despised . '? heaven they were all in flaming fire. Mic. Let this man's misery be remembered by and be an everlasting caution to thee. 9. 1 Cor. Then said Christian. a convenient distance betwixt him and them. and to pray that I may shun the cause of this man's misery. as betwixt the judge and the prisoners at the I heard it bar. For the . and the dead that were therein came forth. Then said Christian to the Interpreter. Chr. and then thou shalt go on thy way. by reason of a fierce flame that issued out and came from before him. Well. Then said the Interpreter to Christian. and bid the world draw near. xx. i. This night. that it put me into an agony. vii. where there was one rising out of bed and as he put on his raiment. 20. 23 But is Chr. I have despised his righteousness I have counted his blood an unholy thing . the graves opened. hi. in an abundant manner.:) preter then bid his so doing. 1. the chaff. the Son of the Blessed is there no hope for such a said the Interpreter. Is there no hope. all 28." and with that the bottomless pit opened. he himself hath shut me up in this iron cage nor can all the men in the world let me out. Chr. (Ps. ! Chr. a voice. I have done despite to the Spirit of grace. but you must be kept in the iron cage of despair ? Man. " Gather together the tares. and looked and some sought to hide themselves upward under the mountains. with hideous noises. this is fearful God help me to watch and be sober. 28. His word gives me no encouragement to believe yea. Rev. and stubble. 10. to Man. faithful threatenings. Heb. man very as this ? Ask him. and said. 29. 21. 14. Sir. 3. 17. Then said Christian.

and Christian went on his way. a Sepulchre. with fetters upon their heels. on the left hand of the narrow way and they made up apace to him. You are like them that sleep on the top of a mast. stable In what I have begun to take in hand Then let me think on them. . saying profitable. third Presumption. afflicted me his . and I saw . things to make me . and cried. lightsome." 2. good Christian. " Thy sins be forgiven thee. whence came Christian talks with them you. for the Man he stood looking and weeping. both by awakening of them. Now. The name of the one was Simple. 1. him joy in his heart iii. went to them. and began to tumble. and began to reply in this sort Simple said. did burdened Christian run. and whither do you go ? were born in the land of Form. who SwTJreal" those that leap for joy. Why came you not in at the gate which . keep all things so in thy mind. and. I see no danger. xxiii. Christian then seeing them lie in this case. Gentlemen." 10. Shining Ones came to him. and left me behind. t0 He till lookedj therefore. 8. ii. and proffering to And as he was help them off with their irons. So. 13. * Chr. Then ne sto °d st iH awhile. "When God releases us of our and life by his death. i. And Presumption in : . and to address Then said the Interpreter. 15. the Judge had always eye upon me. that men in that danger should so little esteem the kindness of him that so freely offered to help them. for it was very surprising Yet he was troubled to think. and that he should give it in at the Celestial Gate so they went their way. showing indignation in his countenance.) as behold. to prick thee forward in the way thou must go. my up. and that wall was called Salvation. Luke iii. v. xii. and saluted him with. but I could not. to. himself to his journey. and so continued to do. also the pit of hell opened her mouth just where I stood my con: science. and went on singing - : several. Every iat must stand upon its openeth not the )' ' e es own bottom. that the highway up which Christian was to go. guide thee in the way that leads to the So Christian went on his way.) the Second stripped him of his rags. in the bottom. And wheat into the xviii. Hast I Blest Cross ! blest Sepulchre ! blest rather be The Man that there was put to shame for me thou considered all these things ? Chr. (Rom. . " Gather (Mai. 34. 14.) iv. : saw then my said. Yes. you will certainly become a prey to his With that they looked upon teeth.) which he bid him look on as he ran.) Up this way. good Interpreter. and gave him a Goa'doth give roll with a seal upon it. (Zech. Well.ld Resumption.) him. xxvi. Inter. he espied two men come tumbling over the wall. and with a mei-ry He hath given me by his sorrow. (Isa. thus entered with them into discourse. the Third also set a mark sing. as I said. and are going for praise to Mount - We Zion. to thee. Nor could aught ease the grief that I was in. So I saw in my dream. a gulf that hath no bottom awake. look and wonder. and that I was not ready for it but this frighted me most. and I will help you off with your irons. Why. " Peace be to thee :" so the First said to him. another Sloth. was fenced on either side with a wall. But what was of this sight ? it that made you so afraid Man. they drew up unto him. (1 Thess. and my conscience did accuse me on every side. (1 Pet. and a little below. and carried away into the clouds. dreadful. sent the waters down his cheeks. and Hyp. 17. but not without great difficulty. and understand Wherefore they showed me were and let me be Thankful. Eph. garner. 13 18. that he went on thus. troubled thereabout. a. The Comforter be always with thee. counselling of them. Then was said rest Christian glad and heart. I thought that the day of judgment was come. And so they laid down to sleep again. even until he came at a bottom. Then Christian began to gird up his loins. too. same persons. Sloth said. that just as Christian came up with the Cross. because of the load on his back. sought to hide myself. The name of the one was Formalist. three — kept his eye upon mind. though on his forehead. Upon this I awakened from my sleep. I saw in my dream. also I iv. his burden loosed from off his shoulders. ! ! THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. (Prov. and fell from off his back. as I thought. a little out of the way. He also told them. and the Simple. Then Christian gave three leaps for joy. came hither What a place is this Must here be the beginning of my bliss? Must here the burden fall from off my back? Must here the strings that bound it to me crack ? Till I ! Then said the Interpreter to Christian. and come away be willing also. He ran thus till he came at a place somewhat ascending and upon that place stood a Cross. till it came to the mouth of the Sepulchre. iii. and they put me in hope and fear. Chr. it no more. if peradventure he might awake them. therefore. Here I have seen things rare and Things pleasant. 12 with that I saw many catched Matt. that the angels gathered up : (Mark ii.) for the Lead Sea is under you. and the name of the other Hypocrisy. where it fell in.— 24 to the — Now. Sloth. to city. Yet a There is no persuasion will little more sleep. where he saw. and clothed him with change of ^ christian can raiment. even the springs that and looked were in his head (Zech. Vain-glory.) but I was left behind. that they may be as a goad in thy sides. If he that goeth about like a roaring lion comes by. therefore. him that the si S ht of the Cross should thus ease him of his burden. three men fast asleep. again. 4. . Thus far did I come loaden with my sin. dream. 5 .) that sat me : my upon the cloud sins also came still into my Chr. 30.

about the midway to the top of the for good. So the one The danger of Chr. are in. as to laws and ordinances. because of the steepness of the place. if say something matter [ 3 ft hi c h in vindication of . I will tell you. which one of my Lord's most intimate ^ktndS my associates fixed there in the fell off day that burden my shoulders. moreover. save that these two men told Christian. the right way to go. the other side of the hill. which was. 10 12 .) and then he began to go up the hill. only they looked upon each other. To this they made him but little answer only Better. ned I looked then after Christian. By laws and ordinances you will not be the other Destruction. and that some.the : wherein now is thy condition better than ours ? . I covet to ascend men at the end of the way. though easy. where the end is woe. as they had done. . where I perceived he fell from running to besides. He is comforted not that it is written. and Hyp. times sighingly. Surely. I walk by the rule of my Master you walk by the rude working of your fancies. at the get into the that they can they. and from going to clambering upon his hands I go. without much The other two also came to the foot of the hill conference one with another. say culty. saved. being of so long standing as above a thousand years. to hide the resolved to go in those ways. who had no more talk Christian has but with himself. now be adThev that come "into the mitted as a thing legal by an imy by Form. ' Chr.high. to see him go up ha d nothing but rags before. tiously do them as he. tlce - get in ? thou art but in the way. made by the Lord of bottom of which was a hill Difficulty. are in . to comfort reading as I go on the way I was also bid to give it in at the celestial gate in token of my certain going in after it all which things I doubt you want. i a. of which perhaps you have taken no notice. let's neither faint nor fear. That as for that. would doubtless. . but climbeth up some other way. for I and rose no more. I beheld then. and that. and want them because you came not in at the gate.) since you came not in by the took the way which is called Dan. You are counted thieves already by the Lord of the saying. (Gal. since I have his coat on my back a coat that he gave me freely in the day that he hill was a pleasant arbour. . where he stumbled and fell. and sometimes comfortably also he would be often reading in the roll that one of the Shining Ones gave him. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. ii. that " he that cometh not in by the door. d's coat on his back. and the name of shame of thy nakedness.turning out of the way< door. testimony that would witness it. . And besides. though difficult. and drank fhereof to refresh himself. And as for this coat that is on my back.If we way. think I. : — . They told him.talk with himself. though high. that came tumbling over the wall ceive. besides that which came straight from the gate one turned to the left hand. Chr. that. if need were. that custom. . — . : spring.) Form. 16. 1h ere wi!n the hill. on see not wherein thou differest from us. said Christian. at the bottom of the hill but the narrow way lay right up the hill. And. the name of one of those ways was Danger. Come. as we per- w way we we came in at the gate and we also way. But. Therefore. for more than a thousand years. the same is a thief and a robber ?" (John x. when I come to the gate of the city. Than wrong. and that there were two other ways to go. And I take it of dark mountains. pluck up heart. a mark in my forehead. Now. . every man in his way. but when they saw that the hill was steep and they doubted not but that they should as conscien. moreover. To these things they gave him no answer. and the name of the going up the side of the hill is called Difficulty. he needed not to trouble his head thereabout. 1. and to climb over the wall. full r a h m y nakedness with. what . Christian now went to the spring. are in their own piac. thus to violate his revealed will ? Form. : refreshed. what they did they had custom for. will you stand a trial for at law ? it told him. it ger. But will against the it not be Lord of the city whither counted a trespass we are bound. Then I saw that they went all on. but by the therefore they were coat that is on thy back. as a token of kindness to me. as you say. thus I comfort myself as going. and the other to the right. There were : . — . (Isa. therefore. which led him into a great was given me by the Lord of the place whither I wood and the other took directly up the way to go and that. to cover Destruction. said they. that to go to the gate for entrance was by all their countrymen counted too far about . I have. their usual way was to make a short cut of it. They me a roll sealed. save that Christian kept before. roll. they bid him look to himself.. by which he was that I had then given me by : . Chr. . as we trow. given thee by some of thy neighbours. that they all went on till they to came to the foot of the hill Diffi- He comes the The 'doo"-Sn k P^^! we J«dge. we and supposing also that these two ways might meet again with that up which Christian went. which led him into a wide field. You come in by The difficulty will not me offend yourselves without his direction. way therefore I doubt you will not be found true The hill. Then I saw that they went on. and could produce. and Hyp. They said. also in the same place two other ways. Now. and Hyp. and shall go out For I perceive the way to life lies here by yourselves without his mercy. and laughed. gc!t Ss Lo. the Lord thereof will know me and his knees. xlix. etandeth at the beginning of the 25 way ? Know ye stripped me of my rags. who.

and read therein he also now began afresh to take to his comfort a review of the coat or garment that was given pnlled his roll him i night ls a loser it was almost and in his sleep his roll fell out of his hand. and went apace till he came to the top of the hill. and we could not think. the farther go. said Mistrust. : a : nothing but death that difficult place but. for the refreshment of weary travellers. thou consider her ways. A word of grace. And up. .which detained He that sleeps to out of his bosom. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.2G the hill. in that place until . I am sure to be in safety there I must venture. Now. sat where he . and of the other Mistrust to whom Christian said. You make me afraid but whither shall I fly to be safe ? If I go back to mine own country. and sped him on with that. and Christian«went on his way. beyond it I will Christian shakes off fear. That they were going to the city of Zion. within reach. and life everlasting . what's the matter? you run the wrong way. for just before us lie a couple of lions in the way. ' . Now. and hls ro11 wherein knew not what to do for he wanted comforted. that he might read therein and be comforted but he felt. he at last fell into a slumber. that is prepared for fire and . Christian suddenly started his way. when he was got up to the top of the hill. So Mistrust and Timorous ran down the hill. there came one to him. Then said Christian. To go back is . yet go forward. therefore. and thence into a fast sleep. " Go to the ant." (Prov. . Thus pleasing himself a while. saying. and found it not. Christian meets there came two men running amain. he felt in his bosom for his roll. Christian got. as he was sleeping. Timorous answered.) and awaked him. said he. Then christian misses was Christian in great distress. . also Thither. the more danger we meet with wherefore : . we we turned. down to rest him : then he him as he stood by the Cross. with Mistrust the name of the one was Timorous. 6. Yes. But thinking again of what he had heard from the men. and are going back again. and had got up ' nnc brimstone. whether sleeping or waking we know not . - '&nnH39& ^m sluggard vi. and be wise. . but they would presently pull us in pieces. and I shall certainly perish there if I can get to the Celestial City. Sirs. Chr. if we came to go forward is fear of death.

! that I should sleep in the midst of difficulty ease to that I should so indulge the flesh. and came without my it sleep to the . came of the race of will persuade Japheth. because of my sinful sleep ! Now also he he bethought himself that he had slept in the He is perplexed arbour that is on the side of the for his roll. the sun went down upon Christian and this made him again recall the vanity of his sleeping to his remembrance and thus he again began to condole with himself Thus it . 8. But who can tell how joyful this man was when he had gotten his roll again For this roll was the assurance of his life. Now. had it not been for this sinful sleep. ii. ! shall : come unto thee. Therefore he laid it up in his bosom. much At last tures. saying. that I had not slept Now. and are placed there for trial of faith where it is. and thought the chains. . wretched man that I am the day-time (1 Thess. he lift up his eyes. But all the way he went back. (The lions were chained. but he saw not Then he was afraid. God forgiveness for that foolish and then went back to look for his roll. ! rp^ ! t } iere fore) he now Oh. relieve him. sometimes he wept. he heard them roar. and whither he was going ? Chr. and if they should meet with me in the dark. but they did him no harm. carefully looking on this side and on that. What is your name is ? Chr. I had been here sooner. before he had gone far. he asked fact.) Christian.) went on. 5. trembling for fear of the lions but taking good heed to the directions of the Porter. man Chr. which I needed not yea. Rev. hi]} and. Port. bewailing his sinful sleep. all the way as he went. how they were frighted with the sight of the lions. been here much sooner. Oh. Then I saw that he went on. he went back. Sir. by this time he was come to the arbour again. that he made haste. his and that which the to Celestial pass into feet. for the day is almost spent. (Gen. wretched that I am I slept in the arbour that stands Nay. Thus. But while he was bewailing his unhappy miscarriage. but because the sun is now set. 4. This house was > ^^ by the Lord of the hill.but a \ last (f s Providence would eth his roll have it. the Porter was. Then he clapped his hands. > lions in the wails his foolish afresh. that if possible he might get lodging there. now also I am like to to have trod but once be benighted. The Porter also asked w hence he was. so ! late ? the . and oftentimes he chid himself for being so foolish to fall asleep in that place which was erected only for a little refreshment for his weariness. out the sun. the name of which was Beautiful. perceiving that Christian made a halt as if he would go back.) Fear not the lions. as to use that rest for my flesh. his evil of sleeping into his sleeping. I had. I am come from the city of Destruction.) also himself to go back after them. notwithstanding on the hill-side ! ! thou sinful sleep how for thy sake am I like to be benighted in my journey I must walk with! ! Oh that. where for a while he sat down and wept Christian find. to lodge here to7 night. and he built it for the and security of pilgrims. he entered into a very narrow passage. ix. and knew not what to do. who can sufficiently set Sometimes forth the sorrow of Christian's heart he sighed. and acceptance at the desired haven.) looking sorrowfully down where he lost it. saying. that City. which the Lord of the relief of the hill hath erected only for the pilgrims ! spirits of ! Now. falling down upon his knees. but that in I lost my evidence. Then is said Christian to the Porter. 40. My name now 27. . and with joy and tears betook himself again to his journey. remembered the story that Mistrust and Timorous told him of. m nd> . He went thus till he came again within sight of the arbour where he but that sight renewed his sorrow sat and slept tne more b y bringing again. if happily he might find his roll. gave thanks to God for directing his eye to the place where it lay. he began be perplexed. darkness must cover the path of my and I must hear the noise of the doleful crea- therefore-. the which he with trembling and haste catched up. what house this ? and may I lodge here to-night ? built relief The Porter answered. and went on till he came and stood before the gate where . how nimbly did he go up the rest of the hill Yet before he got up. 27 should which used to have been Here. Then said Cbristian to himself again. But oh. v. under th(J tWe he egpied hig roll. but that. he espied two . How far might I have been on my way by this time I am made to tread those steps thrice over. I desire. But how doth it happen that you come sun is set. for they are chained. even Christian be! These beasts range in the night for their prey. So I saw in my dream. . and for discovery of those that have none keep in the midst of the path. if I may. which was about a and looking very furlong off of the Porter's lodge narrowly before him as he went. whose name is Watchful. and no hurt : How many steps have I taken in vain happened to Israel for their sin they were sent back again by the way of the Red Sea and I am made to tread those steps with sorrow. cried unto him. that had been his comfort so many times in his journey. But the Porter at the lodge.! . but I my name at the first was Graceless. which I might have trod with delight. that I should sleep in 7. and it stood by the highwayside. dangers that Mistrust and Timorous Were driven back by. therefore. Is thy strength so small ? (Mark iv. whom God to dwell in the tents of Shem. and went forward. I see the way. and put into his bosom. and am going to Mount Zion. ! Port. for he thought nothing but death was before him. and behold there was a very stately palace before him. : THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. how should I shift them ? how should I escape being by them torn in pieces ? Thus he went on his way. thought he.

if she likes your talk. according to the I found it. bring back to the place where I slept my sleep where you in to the rest of the family. Discretion. and now I am come. at the sound of which came out of the door of the house a grave and beautiful damsel. This man is on a journey from the city of Destruction to Mount Zion but being weary and benighted. he asked me if he • . and not Port. named . and asked why she was called ? | The Porter answered. brow finding and then feeling for it. rules of the house. So Watchful the Porter rang of the hill it. a bell. Well. who will. I will call out one of the virgins of was forced with sorrow of heart to go this place.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. . I .

.

.

lie asleep. that stands at the gate. . but yet I am glad I heard it. truly.) Piety. to go. farther to go. and gave me this broidered coat which you see and the third set of . And what saw you else in the way ? Lord the hill. Piety. might lodge here to-night so I told him I would call for thee. . Piety. Yes. I saw three men. : the mark which you this sealed roll. did you hear him tell his dream ? Chr. questions. him that thought was come. if I had been mindful of that country from Chr. after discourse had with him. a little out of the way. she said. It is Christian she asked his name ? and I have so much the more a desire to lodge here to-night. and so set me into the way that hath led me directly to this house. namely. whose name is Evangelist. him a few dig . and he directed me to the Wicket-gate. maintains his work of grace in the much shame and detestation . but with christian's thoughts of his Dalive countr ?- . And at last So he said. they gave him something to drink. who. Was this all you saw at the house of the Interpreter ? place was built by the Lord of the hill for the and security of pilgrims. . It was as God would have it How he got into was under the fears of destruction. my heart. and how the people were clad in gold that were in it and how there came a venturous man. who. how the man had law of the house. and also the dream of . and consented together that. With a very good will that you are so well disposed. this to the . I do not know but that. and called of the family. Piety. in his sleep the day of judgment Why. as I thought in my mind. good Christian. Then she asked him whence he was. as they prebut they were quickly lost. since Piety discourses with him. But you saw . One . I went but a little farther.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. I will call forth two or three more So she ran to the door. Chr. and whither he was going ? and he told her. and followed them into So when he was come in and sat down. . it made my heart ache as he was telling of it. to Zion as I myself did tell them. The things that I have told you were the yet some other matters I saw. as I was trembling and weeping. Come. had him into the family and many of them meeting him at the relief . course with him Piety. in that place where I was. talk with you of all things that have happened to you in your pilgrimage and I am glad Chr. if perhaps we may better ourselves thereby. mayest do as seemeth thee good. . in my forehead. and gave it me (and with that he plucked out of his bosom. after a little more discourse with him. more than this. the house. the remembrance of which will stick by me as long as rehearsal of I J ive what he saw in wit. truly. Sloth. to ask Then Prudence thought good Pru. by what I perceive. until supper was ready. in despite of Satan.) three Shining Ones came to me. Yes. but and after a little the water stood in her eyes pause. up this hill. (for then I could not forbear looking. see.the Lord of on purpose to entertain such pilgrims in. and a dreadful one it was. a pilgrim's life ? Chr. Prudence. because. even tended. and while I stood looking up. . above all. but they would not beBut. threshold of the house. : Chr. and I saw One. and Presumption. I was driven out of my Chr. said. But did you not come by the house of . house was built by. the Interpreter ? Do you not think sometimes Prudence Chr. Saw ? Why. man the Porter. as I came. But how did it happen that you came out of your country this way ? for when I Chr. as. . of the country from whence you courses with came ? w A J especially three things . It was a strange thing to me. She asked him also. some of them should have some particular discourse with Christian for the best improvement of time and they appointed Piety. . for I never saw such a thing before yea. and I thank : you for receiving of me. I found it hard work to get lieve. out Prudence. and as hard to come by the lions' mouths and. and how he was bid to come in. and had me where he showed me a stately palace. if I abode country. and win Methought those things did ravish eternal glory. even to me. : them testified that my sins were forgiven me another stripped me of my rags. let us. and desired his answer to them. and did see such things there. hang bleeding upon a tree and the very sight of him made my burden fall off my back for I groaned under a very heavy burden. if it had not been for the good . No he took me. Then she asked him what he had seen and met with in the way ? and he told her. which else I should never have found. with but do you think I could irons upon their heels awake them ? I also saw Formality and Hypocrisy eome tumbling over the wall. how he got into the way ? and he told her. Piety. but that I knew I had . and Charity. and Charity to disand thus they began. that unavoidable of his own destruction did attend me. to how Christ. What moved you at first to betake your. I might have gone back again but I thank God I am here. this Then he bowed his head. Piety. and cut his way through the armed men that stood in the door to keep him out. we have been so loving to you to receive you into our house this night. I thought. . but then it fell down from off me. after all. the way. the way of Zion. of the Come in. thou blessed Piety. Piety. I would have stayed at that good man's house a twelvemonth. Yes. Simple. did you not? best self to native country by a dreadful sound that was in How Christian was driven out mine ears to wit. even according : 29 heart sinned himself quite out of hopes of God's mercy . So she smiled. j fa& no t know whither to go but by chance there came a man.

I love him. about what he had done. xxv. and over. : 30 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.. his Cha. and . Why. espe- Christian dis- %m ™ C0S ! - coun- were grief delighted .i my trembling under the apprehen. But did you : not. my wife was afraid of losing this world. I was very wary of giving them occasion. an heavenly. and his Christian clear . that will do it and when I look into the roll that I . Cha. Nay. but to his wife and they were all of them utterly averse J J children. They might also see my fears in my coun. and that I deSind children. Charity dis. by what they said. Cain hated his brother. for this Pru. me to wander in this manner : quished Chr. and said. sion of the judgment . Oh how Christian's love willingly would I have done it. that which is worst is with me. brother's righteous. to tell you the truth. and why he had builded Their talk at su PP er time that house and. Cross. and with the company that shall continually cry. But did you tell them of your own sorrow. and that with much affection. Yes. things. Indeed. And did you pray to God that he would your counsel to them ? Chr. Why. if - courses with him. holy. damp all that you. Yet. Do you not yet bear away with you some of the things that then you were conversant withal ? whence came out. and also in ' might be read in i . Pru. and my children were given The cause why to the foolish delights of what by one another. I might have had opportunity but now I desire a better country. to make them averse to going on pilgrimage. by any unseemly action. I have a wife and four small children. of staying behind. there I hope to see Him alive that did hang dead on the cross .) Pru. . because own works were evil. and when I to against his corruptions. Du t they are to me golden hours in which such things happen to me. Cha. they sat down to meat. left youth so. For. my thoughts it wax warm that bosom. and with wine that was well refined and all their tftlk at the table was about the Lord of the hill as. Cha. they would tell me Christian's good precise. and wherefore he did what he did. But you should have talked to them. (Heb. that if what they saw in me did "hinder them. 14. used by way bring them away with you ? of per- am Chr. xix.) Now ready. that will do it about whither know man by his conversation may am going. So I did and told them also what God had shown to me of the destruction of our city.his verycountebless . xxi. Cha. Holy. namely. do it and when I look upon my broidered coat. there they gay there nQ death> (Isa.tations. 15. but I seemed to them as one that mocked. I think I may say. they believed me not. ? Cha. Yes. Indeed. for their sakes. that will do ? soon overthrow what. that thus they sat talking together until supper was what Christian So when they had made had to his sup- ready. it was my great tenderness in sinning against God.) was furnished with fat things. nied myself of things. to my going on pilgrimage. vii. 10. holy. and there I hope to Why Christian ^ e Vl ^ °^ au< t^i08e things that to this would be at day are in me an annoyance to ig me Mount Zion. they alone. (1 John iii. And what is go to Mount Zion makes you so desirous Chr. xi. thing. over. .Christian's fear of perishing tenance.- . 8. Rev. this I can say. i . the table I saw in my dream. to have returned Chr. because I was by him eased and I am weary of my inward of my burden sickness. or of doing any wrong to my neighI was too ^ >' bour.) Pru. and over. I would fain be where I shall die no more. Have you a family ? are you a married man ? Chr. and slain him that had the power . . Yea. (Gen.) of their blood. I . they thereby show themselves to be implacable to good and thou hast delivered thy soul from their blood.but that is but seldom Christian's golden hours. Then said Charity to Christian. I perceived that he had been a great warrior. that a carry in my it. Then Christian wept. : (Ezek. with which all my nal cogitations. Yes when I think what I saw at the . Cha. which at other times are your perplexity ? Chr. JfcfiffL and what by go with him. I cannot commend my life. . (Rom. and have endeavoured to have shown them the danger ! . Now pen n . Yes. he doth labour to fasten upon others for their good. that will How Christian pJwT/L. 21. Do you not find sometimes as if those things were vanquished. very thing. - : . Chr. over our heads but all was not sufficient to prevail with them to come with me. I also. in which they saw no evil. Yes. 12. but now all those things are my and might I but choose mine own I would choose never to think of those things more but when I would be a doing of that which is best. that did hang nance. 16. with your vain life. for I conscious to myself of many failings therein.) and there I shall dwell with such company as I like best. trymen> as we ll a s myself. for you must think that my wife and poor children were very dear to me. but greatly against my will rnal cia ? inWard and tasted with car. But what could they say for themselves why they came not ? Chr. Can you remember by what means you find your annoyances at times as if they were vanChristian's choice. in my tears. that is. iii. and fear of destruction? for I suppose that de* struction was visible enough to you. the P erish and if thy wife and children have been offended with thee for this. Chr. 4. And why did not you bring them along with you ? Chr. and had fought with. suasion to by words. by argument or persuasion.

they said. said they. with springs and fountains. all-prayer. the Lord had provided for pilgrims. said ChrisBut tian. for the men that pilgrims are. show you the Delecto flight the . ii. ! And dwell already the next door to heaven . that could neither by length of days. . as there be stars in the heaven for multitude. was. The next day they took him. stopped the mouths of lions. table Mountains Christian had where they showed him records of would yet farther add to his comfort. willing their Lord was to receive into his favour came there. They also showed him some of the engines with which some of his servants had done christian is wonderful things. that he is such a lover of poor pilgrims. and as I believed. they told him that he should not depart till they had showed him the rarities of Christian which. and. that he would They not dwell in the mountain of Zion alone. that he might do this for the poor . chamber. after some more discourse. 33. -with which Gideon put ' . Then I saw in my dream. was the Son of the Ancient of days. of all which Christian had a view as of things both ancient and modern. ^anVwhKe' the g reatest antiquity in which. Thus to provide that I should be forgiven. shield. together with prophecies and predictions of things that have their certain accomplishment. as because they were nearer the desaw there. I remember my dream. xi. Here also was more the top of the house. at a great distance. fruits of habitations. said they. they showed sired haven than the place where at present he him the pedigree of the Lord of the hill. Then they read to him some of the worthy acts that some of his servants had done as how they . where they showed Christian had him all manner of furniture. And first they had him into the study. This done. that on the morrow he got up to go forwards. escaped the edge of the gate of the Celestial City. they had been and spoke with him since he did die on the cross and they have attested that they had it from his own lips. there were some of them of the household that said.) forward. fully recorded the acts that he had done. and the names of many hundreds that he had taken into 16. and bid him look south so he. thou comest there. but they desired him to stay till the next day also and then.) he saw a most pleasant mountainous his service and how he had placed them in such country. if the day be clear. For. he had stripped himself of his glory. all sorts. that he was so he consented.did. besides. helmet. and turned to flight the and they were willing he should. which made me love him the more. armies of Midian. moreover.) but not without great danger to himself. and. tains. They showed him besides many excellent things. 17. though by nature they were Christ makes princes of beg. that place. be dissolved. which into the armoury. breast-plate. : . and came by When the morning was up. to and for all the pilgrims.) Thus they discoursed together till late at night. Christian sets armies of the aliens.beggars born. vineyards. - were several other histories of many other famous things. said. >' - . 34. (1 Sam. with which Christian was much delighted. and the comfort and solace of pilgrims. and had him into the armoury. said they. They. It was Im- and it is as common. (Heb. and shoes that would not wear out. live there will make appear. very delectable to behold. that the like is not to be found from the east to the west. he should meet with assaults in the . where he slept till break of day. where it was shown how into the armoury. out of weakness were made strong. even any. beautified -with woods. they went to their rest again. waxed valiant in fight. xxxiii. he did it with the loss of much. as the shepherds that the sword. and then he awoke and sang . though they in time past had with what was of proof. Now he bethought himself of setting forward. also . lest perhaps christian sent awil aimed offered great affronts to his person and proceedings. both to the dread and amazement of enemies. behold. : : Where am I now ? Is this the love and care Of Jesus. any. ii. They showed him also the jawbone with which Samson did such mighty feats they showed him moreover the sling and stone with which David slew Goliah of Gath and the sword also with which the Lord will kill the man of sin. Then they showed him the ox's goad wherewith Shamgar slew six hundred men. (Isa. after they had committed themselves to their Lord for protection. So in the morning they all got up and. that which put the glory of grace into all he did. Here as sword. and stayed. And when obtained promises. 8. let us go again So they did and when he records of the house. ! : THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. from thence thou mayest see to quenched the violence of fire. as they said. flowers also. name of the country. this hill is. we will. they betook themselves to rest the pilgrim they laid in a large upper whose window opened Christian's bed. moreover. wrought righteousness. that he did it out of pure love to his country. blood. ^1%™-" : . trumpets. nor decays of nature. towards the sun -rising the name of the chamber was Peace. They showed made see anhim Moses's rod the hammer and cient thing8 nail with which Jael slew Sisera. Then they read again in another part of the But first. 31 14. and that they heard him say and affirm. And there was here enough of this to harness out as many men for the service of their Lord. gave an instance of what they affirmed. as manuel's Land had subdued kingdoms. . in the day that he shall rise up to the prey. and their original had S ars been the dunghill. the pitchers.— of death. they harnessed him from head to foot. they had him to that eternal generation. And. and lamps too.chamber. (Heb. that he had made many pilgrims P rinc es. and that was. : Then he asked the They said.

Lord be with thee. . But now. yet he caught a slip or two. it is dangerous going down. Sp he began to go down. and Prudence would accompany him down to the foot of the hill. Yes. He is got by this time below the hill. said Christian. Oh. and to cast in this . and to catch no slip by the way therefore. Then he began to go forward but Discretion. Charity. As it was of The Valley . till they came to go down the hill. good Porter. but very warily. Humiliation. Piety. when Christian was got down to the bottom of the hill. ground. that he had no . Their golden mouths make him sufficient mends For all his griefs and when they let him go. kindness that thou hast showed tome. and a cluster of raisins . so far as I can see. and he told me Faithful. said Prudence. Yes. Well. ^ it waa j I Chr. lor the greet at parting. are come out to accompany thee down the hill. i way. so it is for it is a hard matter for a man to go down into the Valley of Humiliation. Then did Christian begin to be afraid. difficult coming up. gave him a loaf of bread. think he may be before ? How he comes from far do you Por. and there he asked the Porter. Chr. the tj nu of r. to go back or to stand his But he considered again. he is my townsman. So they went on together. before he espied a foul fiend coming over the field to meet him his name is Apollyon. as thou art now. that these good companions. said Christian. my near neighbour. reiterating their former discourses. : in his mind whether . I asked his name. Then said Chris> . For. walked out with his friends to the gate. Whilst Christian is among his godly friends. Pray. if he saw any pilgrim pass by ? Then the Porter answered. Chr. He's clad with northern steel from top to toe. said they. He being therefore thus accoutred. a bottle of wine. and add to all Christian How and the Porter thy blessings much increase. did you know him ? said he. I know him . Then I saw in my dream. so. the place where I was born.32 THE PILGEIM'S PROGRESS. Valley of Humiliation poor Christian -was hard put to it for he had gone but a little way. we tian. and then he went on his way.

How many of them have been put to shameful deaths And besides. to speak truth. servants. and to pardon also what I did as to my compliance with thee and besides. have I delivered. All this is true. perhaps I might mend myself. was hideous to behold he was clothed with scales like a fish. AP° l Whence came you. for I am highway. By this I perceive that thou art one of my subjects . thou countest his service better than mine . his wages. Thou . and I have groaned under them. (Rom. because they are transgressors ! . to dis-" suade Chrispart.. Thou wast almost persuaded to go back at the sight of the lions and when thou talkest of thy journey. feet like a bear. his laws. whereas. and ready to forgive. . I hate his person. and country. saying. Then Apollyon broke out into a grievous rage. even to to years. tian from perin his s i s ti n °- . Thou hast done in this according to the " changed a bad for a worse " but it is ordinary for those that have professed themselves his Apollyon unChrist's services. thou art inwardly desirous of vain -glory in all that thou sayest . the King of princes ? . though taken by them and against me and my ! . in the King's fore take Chr. for the most tians. and not be hanged as a traitor ? Apol. Then Apollyon straddled quite over the VOL. and I am the prince and god of it. . and then they shall have it. I am come out on purpose to withstand thee. Thou didst sinfully sleep. O thou destroying Apol. and thus began to question him. Consider again. „ r wrong J ° ways Apollvon pleads be rid ot thy burden. . But. faithful to him ? Apol. Apol. whereas thou Christian's infirmities against shouldst have stayed till thy Prince had taken it off. Apol. his company. vi. lyon. which is the place of all evil. then. for present deliverance. Chr. I count that the Prince under whose banner now I stand is able to absolve me yea. and Apollyon met him. to Christian has 33 and therefore thought that turn the back t0 him mi » ht S ive greater advantage. these infirmities possessed me in thy country. or doest. I did if look out wages of Chr. So he went on. . His forbearing at present to deliver them on purpose to try their love. when . Apol. and Apollyon in people. besides. falls upon Christian.but since thou complainest of thy teiTservice and wages. and the glory of the is . it would be the best ground. I have given him my faith. to deliver any that served him out of their hands but as for me. therefore he resolved him with ]lig dart8 venture and stand his for. and they are his pride he had wings like a dragon. he never yet came from the place where he is. Wherein. as all the world very well knows. and yet I am willing to pass by all. and how can I with fairness go back with thee Apol. and sworn my allegiance to him how then can I go back from this.thee. I do here promise to give. and am going to the city of Zion. II. when I was come the monster : government. When he was come up to Christian. : Chr. and go back. the way of holiness there. How is it. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS armour for his back. after a while to give him too. be content to go back what our country will afford. and Discourse between Christian whither are you bound ? and Apollyon. and of what thou hast heard and seen. Chr. thought he. with pierce to his servants. way to stand. that thou hast run away from thy king ? Were it not that I hope thou mayest do me more service. th e s r ie ™ u 8 f Thou knowest that. -. hast already been unfaithful in thy dost thou think to receive . I was indeed born in your dominions. . besides. and I will foUow him. Apollyon. What I promised thee was in my nonage and. for all that country is mine. how many times. the slip. him and how him ? Apollyon. no armour for his back. I like his service. that is most glorious in their account for. angels. and have obtained pardon of my Prince. heed to yourself. . all and shall return again to me. he beheld him with a disdainful countenance. Apol. they do not much expect it for they stay for their glory. better than thine and therefore leave off to persuade me further I am his servant. ^ ^ wayways. beware what you do.) therefore. and your wages such as a man could not live on for the wages of sin is death. from him and his. service to as other considerate persons do. when thou art in cool blood. whether they will cleave to him to the end and as for the ill end thou sayest they come to. and much more which thou hast left out but the Prince whom I serve and honour is merciful. I am an enemy to this Prince . and his mouth was as the mouth of a lion. and out of his belly came fire and smoke. . rage. neither will I as yet lose thee Apollyon's flat. But I have let myself to another. had I no more in mine eye than the saving of my life. Do thou so and be well. Apol. I would strike thee now at one blow to the ground. : . Chr. Chr. what thou art like to meet Apollyon pleads with in the way that thou goest. when their Prince comes in his own. Now. : thou wast almost choked in the gulf of Despond. and lose thy choice things. There is no prince that will thus lightly lose his subjects. being sorry for them. if now thou wilt yet turn again. Thou didst attempt to . 23 . either by power or fraud. have I been un- Thou didst faint at first setting out. —'Chr. his servants come to an ill his . proverb. Apol. : so will I deliver thee. j am CQme from dty of Destruction. those that have faithfully served me. but your service was hard. . Thou didst the same by me. end. him tQ ease . : . for there I sucked them in.

for you must know In this combat no man can imagine. him. by reason of his wounds. and so prevented the danger of that. he addressed himself to his journey with his sword drawn in his christian goes hand ' for he said. he did smile and look upward But it was the . till he perceived he had wounded : . Rejoice not against it. and with that dreadful I never saw him all the while give so much as one g. Nay.) and with that gave Christian s vic .thereby to make a full end of this good man. in all these j. journey. I am void of Apollyon. saying. whole breadth of the way. gave him a what sighs and groans burst from Christian's heart. I shall arise Then did Christian draw. yelling and hideous roaring Apol. the which Christian took and applied to the wounds that he had received in He also the battle. 37. so that Christian saw combat lasted for above half a day. through Him faith! and con.him no more. what A brief re i at on grow weaker and weaker. Now. with that. viii. ! leaves of the tree of dreadfullest sight that ever I saw.This made Christian give a little versation. And. mine enemy when I fall.i things we are more than conquerors. began lyon made all the time of the fight b ^ the 8P ectator spake like a dragon and. while Apollyon was fetching his last blow. as I did. tian had a shield in his hand. tian's sword flew out of his hand. with which he caught Christian nimbly reached out his hand for. drawn in his : . as God would I swear by my infernal den that thon shalt go no tian began to despair of life. And with that have it. farther here will I spill thy soul. . tian was almost quite spent . back Apollyon. by the him a deadly thrust. 8 . M . the way to the Celestial City lay the Then there came to him a Hand with some of the through the midst of it. me ^ fo Him he ^^ : he j p against Apollyon. being refreshed. 39. I am sure of thee now : and with that Prepare thyself to die for he had almost pressed him to death. on the other side. because The y alle of - . D ™ th Shadow - of . his deliverance. James iv. and to drink of the bottle that was given him a little before so. that. . so that Chrisfear in this matter. called and Christian the Valley of the Shadow of Death must needs go through it. Then said pleasant look. as one that had Christian. made at him again. with rage That hellish was. Design'd my ruin therefore to this end He sent him hatness'd out and he. did fiercely me engage But blessed Michael helped me.of the combat Then Apollyon. So when the Christian gives -*- battle was over. and was healed immediately. !* aud But he met with no other affront from Apollyon quite through this valley. ' !| > : j - : . saying Great Beelzebub. But. This sore wings. Now. vii. And so did. his sword. And thank and bless his holy name always. God tlmnks for nere gi ve thanks to Him that hath delivered me out of the mouth wu^ life. sat down in that place to eat bread. at the end of this valley was another. . time to bestir him and Apollyon as fast made at (Mic. of ^ . saying. ! . throwing darts as thick as hail. therefore. unless he that Christian. and said. By dint of sword. and I. Christian wo ndedi h s in nis heaa uis hand. and Christian again took courage. Apollyon spread forth his dragon and resisted as manfully as he could. with his sword . . for he saw it was me. Apollyon casteth to S ather up dose to Christian. 7. espying his opportunity. did quickly make him fly Therefore to Him let me give lasting praise. and sped him away. and caught it. some other enemy may be at hand. Christian said. indeed. and foot. Qy Apollyon with his two-edged sword then. I know not but on {». perceiving to avoid it.) his work amain. (Rom. which made tory over Apolyon which. to the ground. followed that loved us.: — ! 34 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. . even till Chris. the captain of this fiend. he threw a flaming dart at his breast but Chris. must needs had seen and heard. and he Christian down wrestling with him. notwithstanding all that Christian could do him give back. . Apollyon wounded him received his mortal wound.

into which if even a good man right is it . 19 almost in the Valley of . 11. xliv. and I heard him here sigh bitterly for besides the danger mentioned above. Back back and we would have you do so too. my soul. a land before we came to it. Whither are you going Men. peace is Chr. satyrs. and betake himself to another weapon. he should set it next. what's the matter ? said Christian. this valley is a 35 us. here his shall see. he would be ready to fall into the ditch. Again." (Ps.) but that by Thus he went on a great while. as did Apollyon before. and went as far as Now. Men. still and Christian went with his sword drawn in his hand. 6. Be ours. they that : Matter ! said what. thought we durst . Chris- my hearing. here also exceeding Christian Men. and have both there miserably perished. and where no man it dwelt. 5 x. (Ps. Why. Chr. being utterly without order. had not He that is able plucked him out. and saw the danger of deserts and of pits. tian spake as follows. the pathway was here so dark. lxix.) In a word. on the left hand there was a very dangerous quag. it : Jeremiah thus describes the The prophet good hap we looked before "A wilderness. without great carefulness . the valley itself. and of Shadow of Death. as of people under a unutterable misery. the Why. making haste to go back to whom Chrisof tnere of . 14. (Numb. I beseech thee. ii. that when Christian was got to the borders of the Shadow of Death. (Ps. we will not choose it for So they parted on his way. Then said Christian. cxvi. Eph. we had not been here to bring the news t would come out in such abundance. into falls. or upon escape the mire. called All-prayer so he cried : to thee. there was on the J|jy || I !j| hand a very deep ditch that ditch which the blind have led the blind in all ages. and rushings to and fro. and it stood also hard by wayside. with sparks and hideous noises. vi. and had. it thy way . it is every whit dreadful. behold. ? Chr. he was ready to tip the mire on the other also when he . deed. " Lord. a land of drought. but . Christian was worse put to fight with Apollyon . and. (Job iii. he knew not where. I saw then in my The Children back xiii. and dragons of the pit we heard also in that valley a continual howling and yelling. he finds no bottom : for his foot to stand on into that quag King David once did fall.) Now. coming back for had we gone a little further. who there sat bound in affliction and irons and over that valley hang the discouraging clouds of confusion Death also doth always spread his wings over it. in ? said Chr. But what have you met with tian. 4. Thus he went on. I do ? the the going. that ofttimes. therein been smothered.) that he was forced to put up his sword. They said. by what you have said. Seen why. Chr. 22. so that d 2 .THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.) deliver Men. we were going About the midst of this valley I perceived way as you are mouth of hell to be. which is as dark as pitch we also saw there the hobgoblins. But what have you seen ? said Christian. than in as by the sequel you dream. but that this is my way to ! : : : : . past we were almost . for fear lest he should be assaulted. (things that cared not for Christian's sword. so far as this valley reached. a land that no man (but a Christian) passeth through." (Jer. children them that brought up an evil report of the good land. very solitary place. no doubt. if ! ! and therefore good was the more put to it for sought in the dark to shun on the one hand. when he lifted up his foot to set forward. yet still the flames would be reaching towards him: also he heard doleful voices.) - the Spies go met mm two men.) The pathway was narrow. I saw then in my dream. we were Shadow of Death. : when he the ditch over into sought to either life or prized by you. in- And what shall ever and anon the flame and smoke Christian. the desired haven. Men. I perceive not yet.

" He discof ereth deep things out of darkness. And about this time the sun was rising. as going before him. . Pope and Pagan. though he feared them much before. ' : . and these dreadful noises were heard by him. by whose power and tyranny the men." (Job xxix. Because he gathered from thence. But by this . xxiii. that he can now do little more than sit in his cave's mouth. You will never mend till more of you be burnt. had he had a thousand souls. : that I would not let slip I took notice. and came no further.) Thirdly. just now the sun was rising. even of pilgrims that had gone this way formerly and while I was musing what should be the reason. For that he hoped. : . and dragons of the pit. which he verily thought had proceeded from his own mind. ashes. And by and Christian glad by the day broke then said Chrisat break of day. 8. yet. . be stopped. bones. - other. he cried out with a most vehement voice.) In this light. and mangled bodies of men." (Ps. from the place where he now stood. blood. perceive it ? (Job ix. and shelvings-down there. and of death into the morning. . O That world of wonders (I can say no less.) I should be preserved in that distress ! . dwelt in old times. deep holes. that at the end of the valley lay blood. when it _ T was Satan that ot the burning pit. and began to muse what Christian put to a stand for a he had best to do. thought he.of this valley ver dan S* r0U8 ? eras for. . saying. . I will fear no ill. saying. Then sang Christian . lay there. Then was he as himself. yet he saw them more clearly now. gins. grown so crazy and stiff in his joints. he looked back. for several miles together and coming to a place where he thought he heard a company of fiends coming forward to meet him. because the light of the day made them conspicuous to him. but. and also of the many shrewd brushes that he met with in his younger days. He hath " turned the shadow . (could he overtake them. - > . 11. the fiends seemed to come nearer and nearer . yet this second part. ashes. that. was. off: for after . whose bones. . : late condition had travelled in this disconsosome considerable time. : One thing now . Christian made just when believe that he and thus I perceived it spake blasphe. though the first part of the valley of the Shadow of Death was dangerous. he could not tell what to think. far more danger. poor Christian was so confounded. and bringeth out to light the shadow of death. which dangers. though in that dark and dismal state and why not. — 3G THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. had it now been dark.) morning being come. dark so he saw more perfectly the ditch that was on the one hand. but to see by the light of the day what hazards he had gone through in the Now and so went by. . according to that which is written. " His candle shine th on my head. though he be yet alive. &c. before So he went on. . when they were come even almost at him. though he could not go after him. "Though I walk through the Valley of the Shadow of Death. even to the end of the valley. even to think that he should now blaspheme him that he loved so much before yet if he could have helped it. that Pagan has been dead many a day and as for the other. for thou Christian art When with me. not out of desire to return. grinning at pilgrims as they go by. which he was yet to The second part go. and catched set a good face on it no hurt. and whisperingly suggested many grievous blasphemies to him. God was with them. 3.) Now was Christian much affected with this deliverance from all the dangers of his solitary way. . where two giants. I espied a little before me a cave. by reason of age. he thought he heard the voice of a man.j^ wag come over against the mouth ° mies. pitfalls. First. Then said he. as I said. by reason of the impediment that attends this place." (Job xii. therefore. if possible.) and that for these reasons. For that he perceived : . ^m. one of the wicked 1 0neS g0t behind him alld ste PP ed ^oMsmind" up softly to him. whereat I somewhat wondered but I have learned since. 4.. But he held his peace. for that he also thought himself to be alone. - . afar also way was which led now he saw the hob- . . This or trodden down like mire in the streets.. he is. that some who feared God were in this valley as well glad. I cannot Secondly. traps. but all break of day they came not nigh yet they were discovered to him. Now I saw in my dream. Sometimes he wMle had half a thought to go back then again he thought he might be half way through he remembered also how he had the valley already vanquished many a danger and that the danger of going back might be much more than So he resolved to go on yet for to go forward. and so full of pits. : . espe- cially because he spoke to him. 22. and by his light I go through darkness. : at the sight of the old man that sat at the mouth of the cave." (Amos v. with me though. and nets here. he came to the end of the valley. and called to him that was but he knew not what to answer. also how narrow : the betwixt them both goblins. frightful sight was seen. So I saw that Christian went on his way. and satyrs. he would not have done it but he had not the discretion either to stop his ears. or to know from whence those blasphemies came. the way was all along set so full of snares." so they gave back. as it was when he came the first part of the way.) to have company by and by. This put Christian more to it than anything that he met with before. " I will walk in the strength of the Lord God. were cruelly put to death. and the quag that was on the : sometimes he thought he should be torn in pieces. and this was another mercy to Christian for you must note that. and biting his nails because he cannot come at them.place Christian went without much danger. they had in reason been cast away but. that he did not know his own voice _.

N v ^ .

.

Till I could stay no longer „ .) . 14. and the avenger of blood is behind me. : ! . and make him a proverb. Faith. came out leered of ? Faith. that be for- At this Christian was somewhat moved." (2 Pet.. ii. and talk of things that more immediately concern ourselves. in a short time. he suddenly stumbled and fell. she did not promise you tbe content some of them deridingly speak of you and of your desperate journey. You know that I mean all carnal and fleshly content. the country from for there was a great talk presently whence they after you were gone out.. honoured and well-beloved brother . Oh.. " The dog is turned to his vomit again. but you did get the start of me wherefore I was forced to come thus much of the way alone. I . because he had gotten the start of his brother but not taking good heed to his feet. be burned down to the ground. Chr. been had greatly in derision. that had like to ed b y Wanton. they say. that worthless silly I Might have been catch'd. lie saw Faithful before him upon his journey. Chr. and got up to the gate without that danger only I met with one whose Faithful assaultname was Wanton. Thank God you bave escaped her " the abhorred of the Lord shall fall into the ditch. and I will be as Christian : Now. since they also despise the sook ? Faith. . as I said. soundly bedabbled with that kind of dirt. since bis going back. and traps. Did you bear deliver'd me no talk of neighbour and sin. I am upon my life. promising : . What did your neighbours talk so ? ! Faith. . what a flattering tongue she had she lay at me hard to turn aside wdth her.. How long did you stay in the city of Destruction. That I have met with here That hand that from it hath . These are my fears of him too . and did also overrun him. or else pilgrimage ? Faith. things. they went very. snares. Chr. 22. to have had your company quite from our town. But Faithful answered. It was well you escaped her net Joseph was hard put to it by her. Had you no talk with him before you coat ! . Chr. ! 37 Oh 1 Chr. he came to a little ascent. and thus Ghristian began. let Jesus wear the crown. Faith. until Faithful came up to help him. . . and cast down But since I live. xxii. 18. Nay. I beard that be followed you till he came to the Slough of Despond. thereabout. I escaped the Slough that I perceived . . am glad that I have overtaken you. hell. and that God has so tempered our spirits. as some said. . At that Faithful looked behind him to whom Christian cried again. good conscience. and pits. I heard me of a all manner of content. because he hath forsaken the way. did no more of them but you come out to escape the danger ? Faith. which was cast up on purpose that pilgrims might see before them up there. . Though there was. Chr. .Dangers in darkness. where. but who can hinder that which will be ? Chr. and he escaped her as you did but it had like to have cost him his life. and despise him. Well. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Ho. No. that the end of our city will be with fire and brimstone from above . he fell in but he would not be known to have so done but I am sure be was . — . some do mock . He hath. therefore.. You cannot think. and had sweet my makes Faithful discourse and he go lovingly together. (Gen. : n . at my first setting out I had hopes of that man . Faith. xxix. way . Faith. but that you know something. Chr. and the sow that has. in the heat of the discourse. xxxix." : (Prov. and scarce will any sorts of people x . . . My of all things that had happened to them in their pilgrimage. Well. putall he quickly got up witll Faithful. For it has happened to him according to the true proverb. said Christian. Yes . I met him once in the streets.-. and nets did devils'. Tell me now Avhat you have met with in the way as you came for I it know you have met with some may be WTit for a wonder. you -fell into. Stay. yet I do not think they did firmly believe it . . dear friend. : Then I saw in Christian's fall dream. . Then said Christian aloud. °f got ! ! your companion. Yes. 11 13. him on work. . Hang him he is a turnhe was not true to his profession I think God has stirred up even his enemies to hiss at him.. and that all among How Pliable was ac coun ted . that we can walk as companions in this so pleasant a path. Christian.. Their talk about » . lovingly on together. and do still. (for so they called this your pilgrimage. a great talk Chr. for. it was for awhile in everybody's mouth. when he home. till I come up to you. ! What and have done me a mischief. Did compass me while I this vale was in Yea. that our „. entangled. . and. Christian went and looking forward. And what said the neighbours to him ? Faith. He is now seven times worse than if he had never gone out of the city. let us leave him. but now I fear he The dog and sow will perish in the overthrow of the city. 19. I had thought. Chr. fire city would. . but he away on the other side. and could not rise again. neighbour Faithful. so the last was first. ting to his strength. washed to her wallowing in the mire. Christian overtakes Faithful. (Jer. Pliable ? lie My path about. and therefore I have made my escape. as one ashamed what he had done so I spake not to him. Then did Christian vain -gloriously smile.) But I did believe.) Chr. Chr. But why should they be so set against set him.) But what did she do to you ? Faith. before you set out after me on your Faithful.) - Faith. Chr. went on his way. ho so-ho stay. with from heaven. stay.

you was Moses. So when I came to myself again. and beat' me down backward so I lay at his foot as dead as before. me such a deadly twitch back. Why. So I bid him forbear to talk. Who was that that bid him forbear ? but as he Faith.) I asked him then what was his work. So I turned to go away from him but just as I turned myself to go thence. as long as he delights . and that told me he would burn my house over my . It was he that came to me when I dwelt securely at home. Chr. that should make my way bitter to my soul. and give Faith. iv. because of my secret inclining to Adam you came Faith. Nay. (for. Did you meet with no other . I know not how to show mercy. and where he dwelt. would be very much offended if I made such a fool of myself as to wade through this valley. — came at . that he saw you go by but I wish that you had called at the house. but being overcome with sleep. I I came to the foot of the hill called met with a very aged man. Chr. who He was assault. and with that he struck me another deadly blow on the breast. I passed by the Porter. Then I asked. But.) and that I should marry them if I would. But when I was a little come to myself again. vii. Yes. on the side of which Moses met you it : ? Faith. and the Pride of Life. Well. not to defile myself. I looked behind me. neither knoweth he how to show mercy to those : : . Job xxxi. desires. 22. I know it very well it was not the first time that he has met with me. Chr. I felt him take hold of my flesh. v. " the Lust of the Flesh. who would willingly have persuaded me to go back again with him his reason was. Why.saulted by Disfor it . 1. and that he dwelt in the town of Deceit. Then it and. did you meet nobody in the valley of Humility ? Faith. that you would scarce have forgot them to the day of your death. the place where the settle stands. Well. because I had so was about noon much of the day before me. But pray tell me. . 24. that transgress his law. for they would have showed you so many rarities." (1 John ii. his was Adam the First. Faith. that there to go friends. No. at last ? at first I found myself for I somewhat go with the man. So I went up the hill. Just there. I cried him mercy but he said. with others. Yes.assault as : lost this roll my bosom. Then I asked how many children he had ? He said. He told me. that he had but three daughters. that his house was maintained with all the dainties of the world. which said. " Put off the old man with his deeds. I there out of Faith. — we? e asleep — : it i out honour. as Pride. Difficulty. content. and saw one coming after me. but. that I thought he : had pulled part of me after himself this made me (Rom. Then he reviled me. Chr. whatever he said. wretched man went on iny way up the hill. and told me. so he overtook me just about escape her or no. And how then ? came burning hot into my mind. and what conclusion came the old man and you to Faith. (Eph. .) So I cry. before I lived himself. because I would not be bewitched with her looks then she railed on me. they were Faithful's ar- my relations according to the flesh swer . and I went my way. Now. Thou lookest like an honest . that I should be I further asked him. That man that overtook The temper of Moses. indeed. he was but a word and a blow.) So I shut mine eyes. know not whether I did wholly to her swift as the wind . that his work was him name many and his wages. and what the wages that he would give ? He told me. did I to rest sit down me . Self-conceit. I THE PILGEIM'S PROGRESS. and however he flattered. when I had got about half way up. but that one came by. said the old man." (Prov. and that his servants were those of his own begetting. st " wilt thou be content to dwell with me. for the lions. how long time he would have me live with him ? And he told me. and that rightly. He told me. when he got me home to his house he would sell me for a slave. I did not know him at first went by. Chr. moreover. I saw there written. for down he knocked me." Chr. and the lions too. the Lust of the Eyes. 5. Oh. and laid me for dead. indeed. that although all these that he named might claim a kindred of me. head if I stayed there. inclinable to . said Christian. He said. for p a hfu as _ that the valley was altogether with. for I would not come near the door of his house. and bid him forbear. I told him. and with that he knocked me down again. and how did you answer him ? Faith. I asked him wherefore he served me so? Faith. who he knew. : — So good brother. for the wages that I shall give thee ? his Then I asked name. " her steps take hold of hell. ! — was the way to disobey all my Arrogancy. I perceived the holes in his hands and in his side then I concluded that he was our Lord. thought he spoke very fair but looking in his forehead as I talked with him. He spareth none. ? the First. and what other servants he had ? So he told me. But did you not see the house that stood there on the top of the hill. Chr. as he sa^d. that he would send such a one after me. He had doubtless made an end of me. Worldlyglory. 16 . what house he kept. hear me out soon as the man overtook me. for I remembered an old writing that I had seen. I trow you did not consent Chr. and came clown the hill. — He said. I met with one Discontent. Chr. I think they : Chr. his heir at last.asked me wnat I was and whither ed by Adam the bound ? I told him that I am a > When Then fellow pilgrim going to the Celestial City.S3 Faith.) H^ scon ' .

kingdom of heaven and that the poor richer than the man that loveth Christ is greatest man in the world that hates enemy to him Shame. 15. were ever of my opinion nor any of them neither. a and is not this. indeed is best. the same religious fraternity he. him attempt to do as he does for. but this boldfaced Shame would never have done. notwithstanding . : mind religion. God prefers his religion seeing . that as to this valley. iii. he would be haunting of "me. and a shame to come sighing and groaning home that it was a shame to ask my neighbour forgiveness . that would have us to be valiant his bravadoes. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. I had rather go through this valley to the honour that was so accounted by the wisest. because of : he and none else. and come again afresh That now. that that which is highly esteemed among men is had in abomination with God. moreover. after a argumentation and somewhat else. sneaking busiitself ! Lord ? how then shall I look him in the face at coming ? Should I now be ashamed of his ways and servants. Say ? I could not him ? what that Faith. and continually whispering me in the ear with some one or other of the infirmities that attend religion. my sword flew out sure of of my hand nay. 18. and suited to the flesh. 26 iii. and want of understanding in all natural science.) He moreover objected the base and low times.) But. and to be of a voluntary fondness to venture the loss of all for nobody knows what. and cast away. he would never . : one. Met you with nothing else in that valley ? Faith. as thou sayest. said Chr. overcome. not I to say at rest of the . he did hold me to it at estate . but it tells me nothing what God. vigilant. Phil. many more things than here I relate as. brother.) And I thought again. this Shame tells me what men are. so as to tie up himself from that hectoring liberty that the brave spirits of the times accustom themselves unto. bears the wrong little name. Why. 'Therefore. Yes. low. as if he would have crushed me to . far otherwise with me. and to attempt to put us to shame before all men that is. The other would be said nay. And when to sing I had shaken him off. . Are manifold. the hectoring spirits of the world. of all. Yea. 'Twas well for you I am sure it fared I had for a long season. 1 Cor. he told me he was me . . He said also. moreover. and the Shadow of Death. . I met with Shame but of all the He is assaulted men that I met with on my pilgrim. or sometime else. I told him. which he called by finer names . I think we must cry to Him for help against Shame. indeed. before they were persuaded to be fools. for as : he threw me. if he was not himself audacious. but according to the wisdom and law of the Highest. what did he say to you ? Faith. No. he had quite misrepresented the thing for " before honour is humility. a g 6. way through that. that a and tender conscience was an unmanly thing that for a man to watch over his words and ways. man vain to attempt further in this business for those things that he disdained. had sunshine also all the Yea. that at the day of doom we shall not be doomed to death or life according to Valley of Chr. for he is so bold as to follow us in the streets. a dreadful combat with that foul fiend Apollyon yea. What why he objected against religion he said it was a pitiful. that men in the world are against it. . . seeing they that are make themselves wisest ." and " a haughty spirit before a fall. what God says is best. I am glad. And what did you say to tell Faith. . me so to it. 35. But to make us ashamed of that which is good. thou art an my salvasovereign our affections. yet since I became a pilgrim they have disowned :jo me. He objected also. — ! . and had almost beat me quite off. " The wise " but shame shall inherit glory. Chr. and made him own and respect the base.. fool. I think he has the wrong name . And come. that thou didst withstand this villain so bravely for. : but all let us still resist promoteth the for petty faults. and crushed me under him. my. thought I. or to make restitution where I have taken from any. (Luke xvi. God prefers a tender conscience fools for the . for truth upon the earth. h e> j think. And I thought." said Solomon shall be the promotion of fools. that rate also about a great . i. Chr.) Faith. I thought verily he would have killed me. 38. iii. That are obedient to the heavenly call. for a to . Oh Be let the pilgrims. depart. especially when he got me down. that it was a shame to sit whining and mourning under a sermon. and therefore they were to me now no more than if they had never been of my lineage. then. let the pilgrims then. tion : shall I entertain thee against my by Shame. He -said. first. and condition of those that were chiefly the pilgrims of the times in which they lived also their ignorance. or wise. he put . said I. (John vii." Therefore. as soon almost as I entered into that valley. You say true but did you meet nobody for I shame ? else in that valley ? Chr. then I began The but few of the mighty. through the pieces . that religion made a man grow strange to the great because of a few vices." (Prov. . than choose that which he esteemed most worthy of . in those did I see most glory and so at last I got past this importunate . would make him the ridicule of the ness. that trials that those men do meet withal. is. though all the Seeing. But at last I told him that it was but in his . this Shame was a bold villain I could scarcely shake him out of my company yea. 48. or the word of God. rich. and I also have rejected them. and come. how can I expect the blessing ? (Mark viii. and quit themselves like men — . we by them may Be taken. my blood came up in my face even this Shame fetched it But at last up. Chr. 7 9. I began to consider.

Friend. indeed. let Come things that are wonderful. at a distance than at hand. tall for them all to walk. For instance man go together. and something more comely course. saw a man whose name is Talkative. that. Then I entered into the Vallow of the Shadow of Death. and profitable. talk of the things of that is. for . a thing to be lamented what things so worthy of the use of the tongue and mouth of men on earth. is corded so delightful. on. I saw in my dream. walking at a distance beside them. to are but few who care thus 'to speak the truth.like of bad vels. or with any other and I am glad that I have met with those that incline Holy Scripture ? . and the sun rose. With a very good will. and he heard me. Faith. ? Are you going heavenly country ? am going to the same place. there spend Talkative'a disdis- their time as they are in their tra. but I cried to God.. for. as to Faith. doth delight to talk of the history or the mystery of things or if a man doth love to talk of miracles. or signs where shall he find things re. To this man Faithful addressed himself in this manner. Faith. That is well then I hope we shall have your good company. as are the things of the God of heaven ? Talk. That's true but to be profited by such . to me . wonders. and delivered me out of all my troubles. was room enough Talkative described. To talk of things that are good. will I be your Faith. whither away to the Talk.: 40 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. He was a man. . with you. as in the very acceptable. I should have been killed there over and over but at last day brake. Talk. as he chanced to look on one side. and had no light for almost half the way through it. companion ? pleasant? if a God man ? What things if'a so hath any delight in : Faithful and Talkative enter into iscourse. and let us us spend our time in discoursing of things that are Faith. then. and what so profitable. as they on. I thought *^0W went Moreover. for your sayings are full of conviction and I will add. Faithful. and so sweetly penned. for in this place there to so good a work . . I : That is. what thing is so pleasant. I like you wonderfully well. a trouble to me. and I went through that which was behind with far more ease and quiet. but choose much rather to be speaking of things to no profit and this hath been . Talk.

things . as the gift of God no man . or things circumstantial." His poor family find it so he is such a churl. But I am ready to think you do but jest. only I consider that our town is large. that they neither know how to do for. and modestly This man. xxiii. At sm il e d. or that I should accuse any falsely. Now did Faithful begin to wonder and stepping to Christian. said Faithful. Faith. true . of repentance. and overreach them. ii. I will give you a further discovery of so few understand the need of faith. by which a man can by no means obtain the kingdom of heaven. not in word.all this atlve ! religion. What you will : I will talk of things heavenly. things things the truth. nor sign of repentance for yea. or things earth- I have been in his family. and do Talkative talks. he man may learn the new birth. will beguile tongue of his.) he said to him. all he hath lieth' . Chr. the more of these things he hath in his mouth. for he is best abroad near home he is ugly enough. Well. of faith. the insufficiency of our works. then. Thus say the The proverb that common people that know him.) It can hardly have a good word in all that end of the town where he dwells. to them that have not a thorough acquaintance with him. telling Faithful who he was. Talk. Talk. in order to eternal life . His name is Talkative our town. the need of Christ's righteousness. egg is of savour. for to talk of such is it that I' said most profitable for by so doing a man Talkative's fine may get knowledge of many things he dwell . Faith. in Prating -row and he is known to all that are . whom . "A at . Talk. I could give you a hundred scriptures for the confirmation of this. His house is as sacred. should be that which we de- Faith. He is the son of one Say -well. he seems to be a very pretty man. He is the very stain. 1 Cor. Chr. by this a the ignorant. Men shun to say. &c. essential. or things at home . THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. All that I know very well : greatly deceived. this Christian said. such a railer at. and of the new birth. and glad is am I to hear these things from you. or things profane things past. that he is is . but a sorry fellow. but more particularly. aS. of Prating -row and. only to talk of them. discourse. Remember the proverb. Thus in general: acquainted with him by the name of Talkative. " there neither prayer. Say you ! so ? Then am I in this man Oh cept brave Talkative it ! . industry. also a or the like to his by man may what are the great promises and consolations of the gospel. twentv of then ? them that know Jam ! not. but very near. Faith. and shame of religion to all that know him. ex- be given him from heaven all is of grace. whose pictures show best at a distance . brings to my mind what I have observed in the work of the painter. talk but ignorantly live in the works of the law.) He talketh of prayer. things moral. and have observed him both at home and abroad and I know what I say of him is His house is emp. . Religion hath no place in his heart. the brute. All this is own comfort. through him. what is that one thing that we shall at this time found our dis- Chr. •himself. not:" but the kingdom of God is but does not. and also to instruct Faith. or to speak Men that have any dealings with him to him. heavenly knowledge of these is This man is for any company. . in his kind. : Faith. to vindicate the truth. God forbid that I should jest (though I smiled) in this matter. Besides. by your leave. Christian makes a discovery of Talkative. than with him. That is Chr. iv. notwithstanding his fine tongue. home. . him. Know him Yes. . to believe. but he knows but course upon ? Oh. (for he walked Faithful beall . by this a necessity of the the vanity of earthly things. Your saying. or things evangelical. up his sons to follow his steps and any of them a foolish timorousness. Deceived you may be sure of it. Faith. . Alas! the want of this the cause that because you smiled. defraud. but in power. That is. he brings beguile. or things to religion as the white of an is empty of ty of religion. Whose ? he ? and whereabout doth sign. " They say. attaineth to talk of in his tongue. to suffer. he dwelt . a very excellent pilgrim. but softly. . to pray. and for any he talketh now with you. so will he talk when he is on the ale -bench. or house. ly. Faith. But. 23. Bethis by this a man may learn what it learn is to : repent. There come more that . serves God far better than he. What a brave comSurely this man will make panion have we got guiled by Talk. This Talkative (if it be possible) will go beyond them. man may learn to refute false opinions. for a man can receive nothing. and the more drink he hath in his crown.) he . a pretty man. tilings in 41 son is our talk. Further. 24. and his religion is to make a noise them by human them. or only by the therewith. (Rom. It is better to deal with a Turk and a devil Faith. provided be done to our profit. I wonder that you should be a stranger to him . goes of him. w ith this you are so taken. Do you know him Chr. (Matt. with . brave Talkative! Talk. better than he knows is he ? he dwelleth in Chr. He is a stain to sin . and so unreasonable with his servants.. Well. sides. or conversation. while by himself.. for fairer dealings deal with they shall have at their hands. 3. things foreign. not of works. f and the benefit of things above. saint abroad. Faith. 20. more unpleasing. and the necessity of a work of grace in their soul. reproach. Pray what him. Chr. if (for so he finds in he calls the first appearance of a tender conscience.

that at the day of doom. Talkative like „ lieve you. and those great talkers. who si S u of S ra(:e - yet can abide it well she enough in the heart. 22 This. — . my mind that of Moses. badness of Talk. many to stumble and fall and will be. and you shall find that he will soon be sick of your company too. it is a very discover itself good question. what cheer you. Faithful stepped forward again. in his heart. and I ing to answer you . Besides. Faith. (Gen. by his wicked life. and since you left it with me to state the question. . but vet vinced of the ^ . ask What would you have me to do ? Why.. once. two things.) power of religion (when he has approved of whether this thing be set up . 23. have coma loud voice. knowledge.The hare cheweth the cud. . men shall be judged according to . . even as the mother cries — . inclining the soul to abhor It* shows it- and you know. and hereafter I better observe Chr. not only because you say you know him. this distinction. but because it is even them in another place. . and cheweth the cud not that parteth the hoof only. The soul of religion is the practical part fore : him that he will. is this. let it be this How doth the saving grace of God : when it is in the heart of man ? Talk. to visit the fatherand widows in their affliction. or speak to their com. had I received this report at never be placed in the kingdom of heaven among their hands only that are enemies to religion. Hearing is but as the sowing of the seed talking is not sufficient to prove that fruit is indeed in the heart and life. Come. be as if it were the tongue or that often falls from bad men's mouths upon good voice of an angel. well . and therefore he is unclean. house. Well. I am of of sinners but. my brother. is but a dead carcase also. perhaps.another thing Paul calleth some _. good men are ashamed of him they can neither call him brother nor friend the very naming of him among them makes them blush. giving so as you say. Faith. 7. them fools and blockheads.videth not the hoof. and a great many more as bad. men at harvest by its sin. but she would willingly. have thought of him as at the of the gospel and. as he expounds speak these things of ill-will. caused of a dog or bear. for aught I know. and for it.) that hearing and saying will make a good Christian and thus he deceiveth his own soul. mitted uncleanness with him. notwithstanding that. Joseph's mistress cried out with had been very holy . to be rid of him ? Chr. I those that are the children of life though their should have thought it had been a slander. house. if God preChr. as if and conversation. and are as The carcase of diverse as are the soul and the body. then. forj as ^q |j 0(jy without the soul is but a dead carcase. . . the hoof. Well. Take my advice.. of policy j. What shall will . . the ruin of many more. Did you believe ? but. serious discourse about the Chr. T T. „ t . but he diemploy them in much. difference is Why. I see that saying and doing are shall Faith. self let us consider of one at The end fruit. we do Faith. go to him. he retaineth the foot opinion. He parteth not with the way mendation before others. man may cry out but he cannot abhor it but by virtue of a erodly antipathy m To cry out -j. so saying.) Some cry out against sin. it Faith. Faithful con. consequently.— . ! Oh a great deal. if they know him. religion. like a Christian. and said to Talkative. A against sin." (James i. or that cheweth the cud only. I perceive. . (Matt. we will fall to it now. by their talk. and to keep himself unspotted from the world.ls unclean. except God shall touch his heart and turn it. I can prove him guilty of. I out life that is. He is . if you will. ii such an one that parteth the hoof. : .) It will not be said then. he cheweth the cud. and enter into some plainly. things without life. Had I known him no more than you. I am bound to be. a lot sound. but I am as sick of it now. You have spoken. . without the true faith and grace might. that our talk must be about the power of things. because he parteth not ative. xiii.xxxix.) Chr. For my part. he thinks 27. a great outcry against sin. he seeketh • •• Deut. and abhorring of sin ? Talk. This brings to by which he (Lev. ? how is it "Pure religion and undefiled be- Thank I thought now ? we should less God and the Father. Talkative is not aware of. Were you doers or talkers only ? and accordingly shall they be judged. things that shall first you did yea. xiii. They are two things indeed. 1 Things with3 xiv. xiv. For I cannot think that you cymbals that is. Not that . the vents not. describeth the beast that is clean. that he has. — . of the world is compared to our harvest regard nothing but I think you should rather say..) out against sin in the pulpit. . . two things that but also because. the grace of God is in the heart. and do as I bid you. And this truly rcsembleth Talkative . against it. men's names and professions. and by no means knowledge he cheweth upon the word. you make your too. Faith. causeth there Secondly. And let us assure ourselves. what that day. 11 15. not of faith insignificant any thing can be accepted that is but I speak this to show you how the profession of Talkative will be at there between crying out against. Nay. — 42 calls THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.Ta lkative's false * - their fruit. hold. shall answer in brief. Then Talk. But all these things. sound. 1 nave heard many cry against si* no Faith. or conversation. have had a great deal of talk by this time. xi. Well. without reports of men. (1 Cor. . sounding brass and tinkling sound. I was not so fond of his company yea. Well. and take my discovery of a W0lk of « race thus First/where : be will. as the hare. men. yea. Well. °. of my own at first. if it be alone. true gospel sense of these texts and I will add Faith.

si S n of S . for the sake of and to appeal to him for justification of what is which he is sure to be damned. to conscience. 2. : or to standers-by. xxxi. for m hungerings. so is his love to holiness. iii. i. then give propound to you a second question. . . Talkative not p-aUMul's^question. and yet be no Christian not true. &c. and the sin of unbelief. To him that hath thus It gives him con- viction of sin. or last. (1 Cor. xiii. in secret to suppress it in his family." that knoweth : his master's will. knowledge. and himself for that. Faith. and yet no work of grace in the soul.) This sight and sense of things worketh in him sorrow and shame for sin he findeth. moreover. ^ to aught to object. if you please. Faith. but in the doing of them. (if . and not in deed and truth ? Pray. family -holiness. nature. give an answer to such questions. Sir. But though. is - and doth your life Or. xxi. first began to blush : . I say. therefore your sign of Indeed. eth hungerings and thirstings after him . and so. This sign should have been first first : but. like and it A man may know an angel. Another good. according to the strength or weakness of his faith in his Saviour. and to promote holiness in the world not by talk only. THE PILGEIM'S PROGRESS. Not I for I see if we shall Faith. Jer. of grace discovereth where it is. 6. to my : hear : let part is not now to object. Gal. . 6. if ne findeth net mercy at God's hand. so are his desires to know him more. revealed in him the Saviour of the world. Rom. itself. to say I am thus and thus. Nay. which in the general teacheth him inwardly to abhor his sin. 10. I shall keep thy law yea. he added. for without that There is. ye do them. if you have Ezek. 23. No. (Mark xvi. son may do. Faith. Phil. this is not for edification. before he can with steadiness conclude that this is a work of grace. Matt. have your second this .) John xiv. yet it is but seldom that he is able to conclude that this is a work of grace because his corruptions now. and then falls to hugshe calls it. thus he replied come now to experience. knowthe heart is naught. but whom the Lord commendeth. 8. Then Talkative at but. therefore." He doth not an experimental confession of his in Christ. 16. 15. therefore. Talk. when slut and naughty girl. 9. You may use your liberty. : When Christ and the said. right. But. You lie at the catch again . ledge and knowledge: knowledge that resteth in the bare speculation of things.) and by conversation-holiness in the world. them. disciples had answered.) Yea. you give me leave to do it ? Talk. cxix. at the which he findOne good sign of grace. make his mind to misjudge in this matter therefore in him that hath this work there is required a very sound judgment. to did not expect This kind of discourse I nor am I disposed . 8. Yes. will not agree. " Do ye know all these things ?" To faith others it is thus discovered.ace if you incline to answer me in this. a life of holiness . you will not. by faith in Jesus Christ. . to which ging and kissing Talk. so is his joy and peace. xx. spoken. question. x. the true Chris" Give me understanding. .) Now. is that pleaseth talkers and boasters Not that the heart can which pleaseth God. Well. great wickedness. 12. propound another itself sign how this work . and his abused reason. Faith. if First. 9. 19. 17—20. 43. I perceive. & man upon doing eyen w j U of God from the heart the first of these will serve the talker but without the other. object if not. me leave Talk. it 43 out against her child in her lap. v. .. to but by a practical subjection in faith (Ps. and knowledS e that is accompanied with the True knowledge attended with grace of faith and love. Talk. Rev. it is also false . he hath a family. John xvi. You lie at the catch. the promise is made. standeth the same ? ? : A work of grace in the soul discovereth that hath it. 16. I am only for setting things whereby you would prove a discovery of a work of grace in the But what is the second thing heart ? Talk. say no more than you know the God above will say Amen to and also nothing but what your conscience can justify you in " for not he that commendeth himself is approved. heart- there is : a knowledge that is not attended with doing doeth is " it He not. for that confession to wit. "Blessed are ye. especially of the defilement of his recovering himself." Besides. as to this brief description of the work of grace. to know is a thing that but to do. (Ps. v. as an hypocrite or talkative perholiness. which puts endeavours. By Knowledge and lay the blessing in the knowing of knowledge. and tian is not content. Faith. either to him it. yet I may refuse to make you my judge. By a life answerable to .) And now. Great knowledge of gospel mysteries. part of the description of Talk. be good without knowledge. Acts iv. because I count not myself bound thereto. and also the discovery of it. 24. vii. 34. and the absolute necessity of closing with him for life . It is : Do you it experience this first ." (Ps. Rom. if a man have all knowledge. it discovereth itself thus unto him. I shall observe it with my whole heart. 18. unless you take upon you to be a catechizer and though you should so do. I pray. Well. and You God . and conversation testify your religion in word or tongue. when my conversation and all my neighbours tell me I lie. will you tell me why you ask me such questions ? . 1. and love the power of the word. but me. Matt. y S teries of the gospel. be no child of God. 44. Secondly. and also to serve him in this world. great Great knowledge knowledge. 15. he may yet be nothing. not I. may be obtained in the no sign of grace. consequently. xxxviii.

notwithstanding many weaknesses. What have you met with. they had arrived to parting ? ." they are " deceitful above all things.) The crown . and after they have gone far for it. like the moon full. It is my good friend Evangelist. my friends." that is." you have let no man take Cor. Since you are so ready to take up reorts and to J lld S e s0 rashl y as y 0U Talkative flings P away from do. if ye faint not. Chr. welcome. adieu. Then said Evangelist. I cannot but conclude you are Faithful. and so made that would otherwise. You are not yet out of the gun-shot of the devil resisted unto blood. They say you are a and that s ot amon S Christians Faithful's plain P ' ' chanced to cast his eye back. and how have you behaved yourselves ? Then Christian and Faithful told him of all things that had happened to them in the way and how. : Evan. Then Christian Thus they went do thank on. and for that you have. . rejoice together Gal. the Apostle says. that you stink so in the nostrils of many as it doth : for may this obtain Some there be that set out for they are these talkative fools. and that I have sowed. do puzzle the world. and espied one coming after them. 36. Peace be with you. no doubt. 9. if you hold out is ^ " for in due time ye shall reap. Welcome. therefore. and grieve the sincere. and uncleanness. and covetous . ! . tell you all the truth. my good Evangelist : . And he that heart-work knows. power in heaven and earth on your thanked Th . Chr. I say. not fit to be discoursed with and so. since the time of our last Faith. before you. Now was Evangelist come up unto them. it was he that set me in the way to the Gate. I have heard of you. Rev. and nothing that : believe steadfastly concerning the things that are invisible : let is on this side the all. Chr. not you have met with trials. and said. &c." (John iv. who comes yonder ? Then Christian looked. drive down all before him ! But so soon perately wicked. that (1 your crown. ix. striving against "you have not sin :" let the kingdom be always before you. and The reason why because I knew not that you had quite out of BesideS t0 SmVhatqts" an S ht els<3 but notion tion. Chr. the loss . I wish that all men would deal with such as you have done then should they either be made more conformable to religion. my And good Faithful . said Evangelist. and swearing. Now. " hold* another comes in and takes it from them . . that some un g 0(Hy conversation have already stumbled at your wicked ways. > ' go. that they would have him speak further to them for their help the rest of the way." Faith." so are you a shame to all professors. : u THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. - — . and the rather for that they well . and that your conversation gives this your mouth-profession the lie. you have reaped and the day is coming. have been tedious to them : for now they went through a wilderness. Then came up Christian. whose religion is only in word. what they had way easy which him for his exhortation but told him for his exh °'-tations. that you are a man whose religion lies in talk. . He had rather leave your company than reform his life ness. Ay. and said to his brother. I told you how it would happen your words and his lusts could not agree. but lle is that place. above look own hearts and to the lusts thereof. will stand together. when " both he that sowed and they that reaped shall . dearly beloved and peace be to your helpers. but His exhortation t0 them. Right glad am I. . how desirable it is to us poor pilgrims Evan. " From such withdraw A good riddance. and my — ! . he would have been but a blot in our company besides. > the sight of thy countenance brings to They are glad at remembrance thy ancient the sight of him. said Faithful. it is vi. to wit. that : thyself. You did well to talk so plainly to him as yon did there is but little of this faithful dealing with men now-a-days. and so am clear of his blood if he perisheth. dealing with Talkative. Then did Faithful . gome peevish or melancholic man.) — . and that makes religion to . talking of eeen by the way. S one aS X Said 1 f t him is no man's but his OAvn. religion fareth the worse for your good friend too. kindness and unwearied labours for my eternal good. that " she is a shame to all women . or the company of saints would be too hot for them. that you have been victors. continued in the way to this very day. iii. and lying. a thousand times welcome. and thus saluted them Evan. Because I saw you forward to talk. 24 27. said thy company. Talk. Oh said Faithful to his brother. and vain company-keeping." " so run. How hath it fared with you. and that more are in danger of being destroyed thereby your religion and an ale-house. him withal. and he knew him. sweet Evangelist. him. when they were got almost this wilderness. Faithful Faith. and an incorruptible one it. that being so much admitted into the fellowship of the godly. crown. sayHow How To As Talkative at first lifts up his plumes bravely doth he speak How he presumes ! ! other world get within you well to your for and. into the wane he goes so will all but you have side. . fast. and for mine own sake and yours.. But I course with of it am glad we had this little dishim it may happen that he will think again however I have dealt plainly with . 11. He has saved us the trouble of going from him for he continuing (as I suppose he will do) as he is. and with what difficulty. The proverb is true of you which is said of a whore. and desSet your faces like a flint all That's past the Faithful talks of heart-work. right glad am I of this thing. blemish Christianity. and are debauched and vain in their conversation. for Evangelist overtake's them.

knew that he was a prophet. to steadfastness. bawds. 2. is vanity. you are almost out of this wilderness. although his death will whose lot it be unnatural. this fair are Therefore. plea- and delights of as whores. pre- ferments. silver. 8. they contrived here to set up a fair a fair wherein should be sold all sorts of vanity and that it should last honest persons are . Evan. will be there to g rea t. and the name of that town is Vanity and at the town there is a fair kept. perhaps. So Evan. will have n . there were pil- and streets under their proper names where such wares are vended so here. you have heard in the words of fore you will soon come into a town that you will and in that town you the truth of the gospel. knaves." : again. countries. He He that shall die there. Creator. likewise. r n ± i the better of his of his fellow. It is kept all the year long it beareth the name of Vanity Fair. and could of things that An go long on your pilgrimage without them. But when you are come to the all the year long. sures . - . pearls. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and the King will give you a crown of life. perceiving by the path that the pilgrims made. but because he will escape many miseries that the other will meet with in the rest • i 1 'ill- two and Beelzebub. . dream. but a thing of ancient standit. who will strain SaftfouS mustthroughmany tribulations enter will be hardly beset And hard but they will kill you and be you sure that thev shall meet into the kingdom of heaven. xi. apes. and quit yourand commit the keeping of your selves like men souls to your God in well-doing. at such merchandise Themerchandise of this fair - sold. too. titles. because the town where it is kept is lighter than vanity. trades. and his pain. gold. rows. w be arrived at the Celestial City soonest.more will immediately follow for now. honours. as houses. not only because he brother. as these of his journey. 17. servants. Here are to be seen. kingdoms. 17. To truth of these testimonies upon you already. antiquity of this fa. and shall find fulfilled what I have here related. Apollyon. as unto a faithful . and also because all that is there sold." wives. bodies. ing : I will show you the original of five Almost thousand years ago. As is the saying of the wise. the French-row. he will yet have the better suffer. And. cheats. My sons. and rogues. then remember your friend. called Vanity Fair. masters.) The This fair is no new-erected business. murders. with their companions. children. i. several rows . you have the proper places. (viz. husbands. and also sort or other. that " in every city bonds and courageth them afflictions abide you " and therefore y FaiVan?en- . all sorts. which you hold.. false-swearers. with blood but " be you faithful unto death. or that cometh thither. and what not. fools. xl. places. and that of every kind. You have found something of the how they might resist and overcome them. and that to of a blood-red colour. as in other fairs of less moment. in some tell them might happen unto them. that their way to the city lay through this town of Vanity. " All that cometh is vanity.r. : be seen jugglings. and theregelist began as followeth. yQU cannot expect that you should one or both of you must seal the testimony. And. all town. lusts. and Legion.) where the The streets of the fair wares of this fair are soonest to be Here is the Britain-row. and that for nothing. moreover. precious stones. thefts. at this fair there is at all times . countries and kingdoms. lands. souls. 11. streets." (Eccles. they presently saw a town before them. adulteries. that when they were got out of the wilderness. lives." . 14 I Then saw in my blood. there are ii. games. as you see. Isa. " that you by and by see before you : : with enemies. plays. found. and which request Faithful also consented. : grims walking to the Celestial City.

(Heb. and to let them in their journey. But they that were appointed to examine them did not They are not believed. We buy the truth. they said they would buy the truth. the t] iat for therefore they lay for men of the fair. Now was word presently brought to the Italian-row. and did harm one to another. and were . 5—7. so the ware of Rome and her merchandise is greatly promoted in this fair only our English nation. 13 16 . they were outlandish men. The pilgrims were clothed with such kind of raiment. the way to the Celestial City through this town where this lusty fair is kept and he that will go to the city. the chief lord of this fair. xi. and kindness for injuries done. they would . lies just . have taken . would have made him lord of his vanities the fair. thereThe first cause f° re °f the fair made a great gazing of the hubbub. signifying that their trade and traffic was in heaven. „. after divers words had passed on both sides. fQre j e t t|ie t0WIlj without laying out so much as one farthing upon these vanities. The Prince down. and great stir in the fair. and a very great fair. and therefair.^hen^they came. whither they went. and if by all their wares they cared no t so much as to look upon them they called upon them to buy. is an ancient thing. about whom town : own country. done by them to the men they therefore. nor yet to the merchandisers. of the men. and yet not g° through this town. where several sorts of vanities are to be sold. to say unto them. moved. 4G THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Thirdly. would he but have done him reverence as he went through the town yea. than were the men that they had abused. Now. . and should be made . 9. and what the fair . as it took them. upon them some said they were fools (1 Cor. But that which did not a light little amuse the merchandisers was. let fly at them again. the great one of the fair. or malice. some one commodity is the chief of all the fair. behold. these pilgrims. insomuch that all order was confounded. as in other fairs. and that They tell of the world in a bible. things came to an hubbub to smite them. and pillory too. allure little time. thus to abuse them. and cry. : put their fingers in their ears. for The others replied. So the men were brought to examination and they They are examined. mockingly. iv. looking gravely upon him. all the people in the fair were itself.. and for. or else such as came to put all things into a confusion in the fair. 19) some. " Turn away mine eyes from beholding vanity. that invited him to buy of yea. . even as they enthat blessed Christ bought some °*" : |> they were going to their own coun. Their behaviour . who quickly came g out of the world. and the town . they were bedlams and some. as I think. yea. it was Beelzebub. therefore. that sate upon them asked them whence they came. with some others. that they might be made a spectacle to all were. m a hubbub about several reasons : them. in angry manner. 37.) and that they had given no occasion to the men of the town. counting them as bad as the men in the cage. and intended nobody any harm. fully. . and. other. the Spanish-row. and then put them into the cage. to his when here.» . and be. iv. in tne ca S e but contrariwise blessing. Beelzebub had him from street to street. the men being patient. some taunting. that these pilgrims set very Third cause of the hubbub. . some speaking reproachThey are mocked. and that . There some time. did but. Thus. Then were these two poor men brought before their examiners again. The people. But. Fourth cause of the hubbub. 8.) This fair.) and look upwards. so they The pilgrims through this fair. that he might. . as I said. and giving good words for bad. One chanced. that befel them. men into examination. - and not rendering railing for railing. Secondly. and some calling upon others At last. began to check and blame the baser sort for their continual abuses . and that there were many that traded in their fair that were more worthy to be put into the cage. said. venge all the objects of any man's sport. or rethe great one of the fair laughing* still at . (Matt. And as they wondered at their apparel. Luke iv. and were made First. except it was for that. beholding the carriage aught they could see. 28. as I said. believe them to be any other than bedlams and mad.) they fell to some blows among themselves. xxiii. some mocking. if pos- One to cheapen and buy n ^ s vaiut i es but he had no nothing in this mind to the merchandise. as was diverse from the raiment of any that traded in that fair." (Ps. tered into the fair. What will ye buy ? But they. some men in the fair that were more observing and less prejudiced than the rest. t i16 y that kept the fair were the men of this world so that from one end of the fair to the other they seemed barbarians each to the > : . that they were pilgrims strangers in The and who the world. that. The second cause spoke the language of Canaan but of the hubbub. and showed him all the kingdoms of princes himself. when one asked them what they would buy. But. Now. (the men behaving themselves all the while very wisely and soberly before them. a dislike thereat. try. the Germanrow. cxix. and telling them that they seemed confederates.They are put in the cagesmeared them with dirt. and deputed some of to take those his most trusty friends went through this upon a fair-day too yea. was almost overturned. the men were quiet and sober. of long standing. Therefore they — . partakers of their misfortunes. which was the heavenly Jerusalem.) At that there was an occasion taken to despise the men the more. so they did likewise at their speech for few They naturally could understand what they said. and beat them. must needs go Well. 9. ' The fair in a hubbub about them. enter the city. : they did there in such an unusual garb ? men told them. (Prov. because he was such a person of honour. must needs Christ went through this fair.

in contempt of the law of their prince.. that it won (though but few in comparison of the rest) several of the fair. U p 0n them. and were the more confirmed in their way and sufferings by what he told them would happen to them. charged as being guilty of the late hubbub that had been in the fair. insomuch that they concluded the death of these two men. but that they should die for the abuse fair. When the time was come. Then a convenient time being appointed. J beat They are made . comforted each other. Superstition. . They lot it . ries resolve to kili them - they had done.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. -. that even he should have the best on't that he therefore each man secretly : wished might have that preferment but com- mitting themselves to the all-wise disposal of Him that ruleth all things. And as to the king you talk of. So they put them their feet fast in. they called again to mind what they had heard from their faithful friend Evangelist. 47 to their side meekness and patience. and they are only turned from the worse to the better. until they should be otherwise disposed of. men m Somemenof (he fair the won over - to . and hanged irons tins disturbance. So they rp. motions and divisions in the town. wards brought to trial. . So there came in Envy. though somewhat varying in form the contents whereof were these " That they were enemies to.. in order to their condemnation. f° r r t0 should s P eak in tneir be ^alf. they were brought before their enemies and arraigned. since he is Beelzebub. Then proclamation was made. that neither casre nor m. lest any fair in chains. But Christian and Faithful behaved themselves yet more wisely. being myself a man of peace the parties that were won to us. should forthwith appear. and received the ignominy and shame that was cast upon them with so much . had aught and give that they that to say for their lord the king.. : : : .. also now whose was to suffer. were won by beholding our truth and innocence. and . or others join themselves unto them.. said he. the enemy of our Lord. in the Here. and disturbers of. that he had only set himself against that which Faithful answers had set itself against Him that is for himself. And.brought them forth to their trial." Then Faithful began to answer. three witnesses. and led them in chains They are led up up and down the fa r for an ex _ r and down the ample and terror to others. B I heir adversa' • . ' them This put the other party yet into a greater rage. I defy him and all . and had Avon a party to their own most dangerous opinions.Their indiet™ent. to wit. The judge's name was Lord Hategood and the same in : their in- dictment was one substance. I make none. J^ are again into the until further orders should be taken with them. the trade that they had made com. the authors of them pitifully. in their evidence. and made stocks. lrons should serve their turn. and for deluding the men of the Then were they remanded They to the cage again. against the prisoner at the bar. Wherefore they threatened. as for disturbance. they his angels. also. higher than the highest. with much content they abode in the condition in which they were.

i. that he is Judge. there is not one of these noblemen should have any longer a being in this town. servant to our prince.) There was also an act made in the days of Nebuchadnezzar the great. hast thou heard what these honest gentlemen have witnessed against thee ? Faith.. my lord. that. to wit. I will enlarge my testi- So he was bid stand by. as that I am said to rail. give him his oath. with many other such-like vilifying terms. in Envy hath aught but laws. in Judge. lest those of a contrary religion should multiply and grow too strong for him. or spoken. their males should be thrown into the river. an d bid hi m i 00 k upon the prisoner they also asked. and he knew in behalf of their lord the the prisoner at the bar. that whoever would not iii. another see this * . but doth all that he can to possess all men with certain of his disloyal notions. to say. My lord. . Pickthank. By which saying. 1. Hast thou any more to say ? Envy. your lordship very well knows what against him. mony were flat against God. in this necessarily thence will follow. who are now appointed to be his judge. with which he hath bespattered most of the gentry of our town. you speech to" the . that we still do worship in vain. (avoiding terms. There was an act made in the days of Pharaoh the great. or save his life but yet I think meet to instruct you in our law. to what Mr. this. Pickthank's testimony. 2. Pickthank hath said. and you gentle fellow I have known : and have heard him speak things that ought not to be spoken for he hath railed on our noble prince Beelzebub. (Exod. I have no great acquaintance with this man. I heard him once myself affirm. I say. and I am ready here before you to make my recantation. to wit. is he neither saying. this Envy begins." And. that what Faithful's defence of himself. are diametrically opposite to Christianity. if pos: of a long time. bid say what king. and his charge against me. notwithstanding his plausible . and As the like. Then they called Superstition. be profitable to eternal life. hast to Vanity were diametrically opposite. against Pick.) Gentlemen of the jury. whose names are the Lord Old Man. if they knew what they had to say for their lord the king against him ? Then stood forth Envy. . Then did the judge say to him. but to be slain immediately yet. word . but us in the doing of them. that is not agreeable to divine revelation. and hath spoken contemptibly of his honourable friends. There was . Superstition follows. his attendants. he hath not been afraid to rail on you. sirrah. and will attest upon my oath before this honourable bench. : . Which saying of his. that upon the place .) fall down also and worship his golden image. and traitor. (who all this while stood by to hear and obThe iud^e's serve. much more. I have known this man a sible. I heard him say that our religion was naught. Sirrah. that if all men were of his mind. If I have said amiss in this. of his servants. Thou runagate. my old Lord Lechery. My lord. what thou. Therefore. so he began Super. you have also heard what these worthy gentlemen have witnessed against him also you have heard his reply and confession it lieth now in your breast to hang him. I said only this. with all the rest of our nobility and he hath said. are yet in our sins. Christianity and the customs of our town of men may see our gentleness towards vile runagate. They were then asked. I could say thee.— : ! THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Faith. Yet. the Lord Desire of Vain Glory. So they sware him. heretic. one of the vilest men in our country regardeth prince nor people. nor do I desire to have further knowledge of him however. this I know. should be thrown into a fiery furnace. from some discourse that the other day I had with him in this town for then. and long time. which faith will not 3. My lord. and finally shall be damned and this is that which I have : are more fit for being in hell than town and country and so the Lord have mercy upon me Then the judge called to the jury. only I the would not be tedious to the court. As to the second. what he could say for their lord the king against him ? Then they sware him . the Lord ones Luxurious. May I speak a few words defence ? longer. or to what Mr. Jury man about whom so great an uproar hath been made in this town. whatever is thrust into the worship of God custom. talking with him. Mr. My lord. When this Pickthank had told his tale. moreover. my lord. let us hear say. if need be. (Dan. which he in the general calls name. that all in- my own " principles of faith and holiness. calling you an ungodly villain. when the other gentlemen have given in their evidence. My lord. that he is a very pestilent fellow. by this gentle- man named. Besides. of or people. and such by which a man could by no means please God. man. : . he doth at once not only condemn all our laudable doings. my lord. the judge directed his speech to the prisoner at the bar. Then he said. Superstition. I say. Then was Pickthank sworn. I answer never said rule.) that the prince of this town. Judge." with all the rabblement. that in the worship of God there is required a divine faith but there can be no divine faith without a divine revelation of the will of God. and could not be reconciled. rather than any thing shall be wanting that will dispatch him. the Sins are all lords. then. thou deservest to live no particular. Hold. cannot be done but by a human faith. this m en all. convince me of my error. law nor custom. and said to this effect the prisoner at the bar. Sir Having Greedy. and great Lord Carnal Delight.

not only in thought. I see clearly that this that would take their time. Then said Mr. But He that overrules all things. that many more of the men in the Fair to bring first him in guilty before the judge. said Mr. Then said Mr. that quickly of the after man. Malice. man is a heretic. Liar. Nor I. Love -lust. the nearest way to the Celestial Gate. By. Faithful. No-good. whose names were Mr. and follow after. Now. said By-ends. then they lanced his flesh with knives after that they stoned him with stones. And as he went. said Mr. went not was one whose name was Hopeful. to prevent mischief. When faithless ones. and Mr. entering into a brotherly covenant.) By. 49 had from the place where he was. the substance of these laws this rebel hath broken. said Christian. My heart riseth against him. Malice. and afterwards unanimously concluded the jury out. But as for Christian. way was Well. Blindman. Chr. xxvi. High-mind. no crime being yet apparent but here is a crime apparent.) Now. For that of Pharaoh. said Mr. Sir. but told them not his name. Mr. with all their vain delights. having the power of their rage in His own hand. . . sing. Mr. Highmind. This town of Fair-speech. if They conclude forthwith to bring him in death. Liar. that Christian for that time escaped them. their words and behaviour in their I in Now saw . of Faithful. the foresaid. Cruelty. No-good. Enmity. . I must tel1 ms name. what may I call you ? said countryman. saying . his law was made upon a supposition. Then said Mr. He is a rogue. And bring him in guilty of so they did therefore . they scourged him. that whoso for some time called upon any god but him. so soon as his adversaries had dispatched him. Sing. . said Mr. Cruelty. whose name was By- ends: so they said to him. said Mr. . Live-loose. he sang. Away with such a fellow from the earth Ay. and there to be put to the most cruel death that could be invented. Hang him. What and how far go you this way ? He told them that he came from the town of Fairspeech. and he was going to the Celestial City. and straightcarried up through the clouds. I could not be reconciled to him therefore let us ! ! ! before them. name survive ! thou art yet alive. (being so made by the be. Fair. he deserveth to die the death. Mr. Thus . So I saw. A sorry scrub said Mr. hang him said Mr. they overtook one that they were got out was going They overtake By-ends. Heady. Heady. forth alone for there . Implacable. was taken up into it. Hate -light. Mr. I am a stranger to you. Mr. told him that he would be his companion. he had christian is still a prisoner. Mr. From Fair-speech said Christian is there any good that lives there ? (Prov. for he would always be condemning my way. which must therefore needs be intolerable. They therefore brought him out. Might I have all the world given me. so wrought it about. grimage. and let thy kill'd thee. and. Mr. and went his way. . Mr.) but also in word and deed. . Implacable who every one gave in his private verdict against him among themselves. Love-lust. that Christian . Thus one died to sufferings at the fair. I shall be By-ends loth to glad of your company if not. . Hanging is too good for him. with whom thou shalt be blest. Liveloose.) bear witness to the truth. Then went who joined himself unto him. an act made in the days of Darius. and you to me you be going this way. vi. holding of Christian and Faithful in another compamon. Enmity. I saw that there stood behind the multitude a chariot and a couple of horses waiting for Faithful. Sir ? ! : Christian. I could never endure him. (which is not to be borne. there were This Hopeful also told Christian. For the second and third. Chr. Faithful.of the men of the panion with Christian in his p ii_ Fair will follow. to the place from whence he came. 25. Let us dispatch him out of the way. Yes. to do with him according to their law and first The cruel death . Hate-light. Pray. thou hast faithfully profess'd Unto thy Lord. should be cast into the lions' den. Mr. and was remanded back to prison so he there remained for a space. gui ty o eat . Mr. I hope. and another There are more rises out of his ashes to be a com.— THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Mr. with sound of trumpet. Are crying out under For though they their hellish plights. And among themselves.„. some respite. said Mr. : j^ wag p resen ti v condemned to be be content. my dream. who. came Faithful to his end. (Dan. then they buffeted him. Blindman. you see he disputeth against our religion and for the treason that he hath already confessed. for I hate the very looks of him. then pricked him with their swords and last of all they burned him to ashes at the stake.

and love so much their own notions. . that tell man that I heard of. you talk as if you knew something more than all the world doth and. let me count them a blessing but let not the malicious load me. even to prince and peasant. Facing-both-ways. CO THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. that we might have had their good company ? for they. I am become a gentleman of good quality. kept such a school themselves. . and is arrived to such a pitch of * ne Chr. Not a step farther. um p . . . were. or by putting on a guise of religion and these four gentlemen had attained much of the art of their master. cozenage. Then Christian in all these parts. indeed. Chr. Sir. it I have heard of. Sir. from whose ancesters that town first took its name also Mr. a schoolmaster in Love-gain.. and said. I deem I have half a guess of you is not your name Mr.. By-ends and behold. which is a market-town in the county of Coveting. Money. Gripe-man. most zealous when Religion goes in his silver slippers. By-ends. so that they could each of them have . and Mr. stepped a little aside to his fellow Hopeful. my Lord Fair-speech. in the north. methinks he should not be ashamed of his name. Then said Hopeful. Mr. and. looking one way and rowing another. . but indeed it is a nickname that is given me by some that cannot abide me. they thrust him others. saw three men following Mr. We are so. and The wife and " my wife is woman. n my judgment with the prej sent way of the times. daughter of a virtuous woman kindred of By. I will assure you that it is. therefore she came of a very honourable family. as I said. we have as very a knave in our company as dwelleth . That's bad : but we read of some that are righteous over-much . Money -love. when bound in irons. By-ends. looking back. . and I have very many rich kindred there. Smooth-man. . was my mother's own brother by father's side and. after their mode. Mr. By-ends's character of the reproach. Alas! why did they not stay. You must not impose. Chr. until will - be glad of . Are yoxt a married man? a very virtuous By. lying. Save. So Christian came up with him again. that Christian and Hopeful forsook him. Now I saw in my dream. if I take not my mark amiss. Yes. pilgrimage. The men's names companions. name belongs to you more properly than you are walling we should think it doth. we somewhere By-ends what differ in religion from those of otners'ln'religion. By. of Fair-speech and if it be he. saying. of Fair-speech ? By. as well as when he walketh the streets with applause. Money-love said to Mr. as other good before me. either by violence. but the men before us of are so rigid. to tell you the truth. to you were the you what I think. and we. This is not my name. I hope. flattery. if you will thus imagine. as they came up with him. so lightly esteem and do also the opinions be never so godly. Mr. I shall never desert my old principles. and. therefore. since they are harmless and profitable. and kept their distance before him but one of them. a couple of far l . if a man may be so bold? By. This schoolmaster taught them the art of getting. and let me go with help - . : been acquainted with. that she knows how to carry it to all. and my chance was to get thereby: but if things are thus cast upon me. Mr. By-ends had formerly myself. great-grandfather was but a waterman. indeed . let a man quite out of their company. Yes. I fear this By. Two -tongues. too. . that I had always the luck to got his name. yet if he jumps not with them in all things. Mr. my Lord Time-server. in particular. that. Chr. we love much to walk with him in the street. and I must be content to bear it as a . whatever it was..she was my Lady Feigning's daughen 3 ter. Ask him . we are always First. . and you. men have borne theirs Chr. Well. But did you never give an occasion to men to call you by this name? By. Hold-the -world. are all going on . reproach. Who tian are they upon the road before us ? and Hopeful were yet within view. that. thus saluted each other. Pray who are your kindred there. Save-all. They * are . Never. he made them a very low congee and they also gave him a He has new compliment. Well. and were taught by one Mr. : Lord Turn-about. Then said By-ends. him. I cannot it. when they had. unless you will do in I propound as we. and such men's rigidness prevails with them to judge and condemn all but . Almost the whole town and. It is true. are going on pilgrimage. and I got most of my estate by the same occupation. never The worst that ever I did to give them an occasion to give me this name How By-ends was. my : . By. and the people applaud we never strive Secondly. yet my you. if the sun shines. Chr. for Chris- Bit. nor lord it over my faith leave me to my liberty. you shall find nm a fair He desires to company-keeper. Anything and the parson of our parish. : By. as well as when in his silver slippers and stand by him. If I may not go with you. as I remember. I thought. SOrt > : Y et *> ut in two small points against wind and tide. if you will still keep company with Christian admit me your associate. the J P art some overtake me that my company. It runs in my mind that this is one By-ends. Mr. you must go against wind and tide the which. men that Mr. * rilgrims. with ! c countrymen. even go by Bv-ends and what breeding. If you will go with us. I must do as I did before you overtook me. they say is a wealthy place. the stric test . I perceive* is against your opinion. You must also own Religion in his' rags. for in their minority they were schoolfellows.

. which concerns the tradesman you mentioned suppose such an one to have but a poor employ in the world. with these gentlemen's good leave. of God's . what. Suppose a minister. nor . and I am for waiting for wind and tide. God sends sometimes rain. good Mr. (and you see we have both on our side. but old Mr. is a good and profitable design.) that . first. : : some of his prinno reason why a man may not do this. My brethren. and how many. Hold-tlie-world. : — : that gets these by becoming which is good. or more shop. then. having the liberty to keep what he has. this argueth. I see this cannot be contradicted. function. I see no reason but this may be lawfully done. some of his the he is of a selfdenying temper . and hold you there still.) so more fit for the ministerial principles. But I pray. because as they overtook them So they they had opposed Mr. should propound the question to them . they jointly agreed to assault them with the question as soon and the rather.) of a sweet and winning deportment and (3. in the sunshine. and with applause. that a good man " shall lay up gold as dust. yet so as by . be that religion best that will stand with the security good blessings unto us for who can is ruled by his reason. called after them. which is according to mind of God. and. or more Save. 3. if they be as you have described them. I think that we are all matter. yet so as that he can by no means come by them. a worthy man. so then here is a good wife. no man was able to contradict it. To become religious is a means soever a man becomes so. and the opportunity put into his hand to do good. makes him better improve his parts. a more zealous preacher. by becoming good himself. there needs no more words about this matter. And now to the second part of the question. Besides. They are for holding their notions. Hold-the -world. except. which is good therefore. to become religious to get all these. . I conclude. that it was most wholesome and advantageous. to speak to your question. that not Mr.. and more a great deal besides. but* that he would have us keep them for his sake ? Abraham and Solomon grew rich in religion and Job says. should have an advantage lie before him to get the good blessings of this life. and all these by becoming religious. a minister. 51 being more studious. he may mend and his market. I like clap . by preaching more frequently and zealously. Now. as you see. or a tradesman. after their headstrong manner. and. indeed for he that believes neither Scripture nor reason.) neither knows his own liberty. should not. as till they came up to them they went. and bestirs her only when she can have profit with pleasure. we are. ay. . . because. and yet be a right honest man ? Money. They. : . and therefore there needs no agreed in this more words customers to his shop. Ay. but. since : it is set before him by Providence so then he may get it if he can. custom my seeks his own safety. for our better diversion from things that are bad. virtue. since God has bestowed upon us the good things of this life. that. By-ends' question. gets that By. I will endeavour to shape you an answer. And. yea. And because. were the things wherein you differed ? By. 2. I see the bottom of your question . since he is improved in his parts and industry thereby. his desire after that benefice makes him more studious. conclude. For my part. Besides. by deserting. Money. and because Christian and Hopeful were yet within call. For why ? 1. possessed but of a very small benefice. more fat and plump by far he has also now an opportunity of getting it. provided he has a call. going all on pilgrimage and. and good customers. upon the whole. themselves. 2. ? about it. making no question for conscience' sake. their answer to e 2 3. 4." But he must not be such as the men before us. I can count him but a fool. By-ends before. by becoming religious. be counted as one that pursues his call. as they thought. by altering of for my part. thus made by Mr. and good gain. religious. and so makes him a better man. perhaps get a rich wife. for my part. give me leave to propound unto you this question Suppose a man. shall be so unwise as to lose it. are for hazarding all for God at a and I am for taking all advantages to secure my life and estate. Money-love to Mr. imagine. (1. the man : . by what Nor to is it unlawful to get a rich wife. though all other men he against them but I am for religion in what. . and so far as. His desire of a greater benefice is lawful people requires ciples : it. of them that are good. . &c. he becomes extraordinary zealous in some points of religion that he meddled not with before . yet let us be content to take fair weather along with us. in appearance at least. was highly applauded by them all wherefore they concluded. and sometimes sunshine if they be such fools to go through the first. because the temper of the They . By-ends for. For my part. to serve them. for so doing. and has in his eye a greater. as it concerneth a minister himself. No. that judged as covetous but rather. (2. and yet be an honest man. as they supposed. far better For why 1. as for his complying with the temper of his people. that it is their duty to rush on their journey all weathers. &c. They are for Religion when in rags and contempt but I am for him when he walks in his silver slippers. the times and my safety will bear it. Let us be wise as serpents it is best to make hay while the sun shines you see how the bee lieth still in winter.: THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. that a minister that changes a small for a great. and they stopped and stood still but they concluded. This answer. may he not use this means to attain his end. By-ends.

20 24. such answer.) 3. Then they stood staring one upon another. from Peter's mouth was according. cast away. that Christian and Hopeful might swer . and the very son of perdition. as they are circumcised. as it is. will throw for so surely as Judas cised. and witches. Read the whole story.) they say to 5. (Luke had not wherewith to answer Christian. 4. The hypocritical Pharisees were also of this hypocritical. — . (Acts viii. away religion for the world and their suhstance. as authentic. therefore. and their religion the same. To answer the question. Hold-the -world propounded and enjoy the world heathens. shall not their cattle. 46. outgo them. : . that . John vi. and devilish religion long prayers were their pretence but to according to your works. hypocrites. at their parting a little before. how much more abominable is it to make of him and religion a stalking-horse to get may answer : had a mind to the daughter and cattle of Jacob. Then said Christian to his fellow. Gen. be unlawful to follow Christ for loaves.man that takes up religion for the world. but that that at them. and bid than are of this opinion. that the question to Christian and his fellow. ! For if it ten thousand such questions. is both heathenish. what will they do with the sentence of God ? And if they are mute when dealt with by vessels of these . Simon the wizard was of this religion too for he would have had the Holy Ghost. as I perceive you have done. and greater Hopeful damnation was from God their judgment. So they came up to each other. but get widows' houses was their intent. affirmastalking-horse they made use of to come at them. if they could. . the remainder of that heat him would be without that was kindled betwixt Mr. and every beast of theirs. also also of this religion : approved of the soundness of Christian's an. devils. " If every male of us be circum. By-ends and his company also staggered and kept behind. and after a Nor do we find any other Mr. . for when Hamor and Shechem 1. xxxiv.52 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. so surely Their daughters and their cattle were that did he also sell religion and his Master for the ours ?' which they sought to obtain. and your reward will be 2. but by being circumcised their companions. 26. and saw that there was no way for them to come 18—23. By-ends and them. Judas the devil was he was he might be possessed of what was put therein but he was lost. them to answer it. that he might have got money therewith and his sentence religious for the bag. tively. Neither will it out of my mind. Heathens Then said Christian. xx. Even a babe in religion short salutation. and to accept of. 47. be designed the world in becoming religious. If men cannot stand before the sentence of men. : so there was a great silence among them Mr.

At last Hopeful espied. of the in What thing so deserving as to turn us out it way to see Demas. called Lucre. thou art an enemy to the eth up Demas. xxvii.) AsKing. I know you : Gehazi was your greatgrandfather. and they at the first beck went over to Demas. Chr. or . : thee? Demas. brother. Hope. " RememSo he read it to his fellow after ber Lot's wife. Let us keep on our way. a spectacle for those that shall after to behold.— THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. written above. or whether they went down By ! turn aside Either. if he hath the same invitation as we. been made like come woman. . they stood the shape of a pillar. (2* Tim. over the brink thereof. 10 . (Gen. Then said Christian. by one of his Majesty's judges. side of that plain was a little hill. at the farther were quickly got over it. : : . Lucre-hill. 14. had turned but going too near the brim of the aside to see pit. „ 00 stood call „ H °P to Demas (gentleman-like) to passengers to come and see . Christian and who ™ 6 l0W ' said to Christian and his fel- him will H° ? time By-ends and his companions were come again within sight. Ah. sure thyself. being deceitful under tbem.o „ + ® fire ? J the flames of a devouring I he ease that ^ pilgrims have is Then Christian and Hopeful but li^le in this outwent them again. is it a snare to monument hard by the highway. but turn in thither to see. A sharer in his lucre silver Demas both agree the other runs. i (. and. therefore. the pilgrims came of to a place where stood an They strange see a tiaU 0l S h £ him besides. to go. for treasure you will come. will Demas. that will tell when we come to the him of this thy behaviour. if we at turn aside.By-ends goes ther they fell into the pit by looking ov er to Demas. of these things I am not certain but this I observed. and you have trod in their steps. Then Christian called to Demas. Chr. all were both concerned. plain. at the Then little off Lucre. saying. so they Now. and as thou wast inclined to do.many have there been slam . Then Christian roundly answered. and went till they came at a delicate plain. whe. and a hundred one but he dies there. Hopeful. and after a little laying of the letters together. looking and looking upon it. xxvi. and could not to their dying day be their . Yes. broke. . and in that hill a silver mine. because of the strangeness of the form thereof. and Judas your father. went their this way. Take up in this world. spake. a clay. Here it is . and how .xix.) Which sudden and amazing sight gave them occasion for this discourse. but could not for a time tell what they should make thereof. and will there put us to shame. Now. : ! sight it . aud I a thing. but Chris. 20—27.) and why seekest thou to bring us into the like condemnation ? Besides. . but he. dangerous hill. desired us. that just on the other side of this . we Thus they and they were slain some also had been maimed there. Let us go see. because of the rarity of it. own men Demas hill again. said Christian I have heard of place before now. and some digging if whether they were smothered in the bottom by the damps that commonly arise. a writing in an unusual hand. Matt. he also himself would walk with them. as he the hill Lucre Chr. he found the same to be this. of my name is Demas . Now old side I saw. . But you not come over and see ? Chr. 15 . Demas cried again. . and hast already been condemned for thine own turning aside. Not very dangerous. Christian round. was one of their and that if they would tarry a little. "What is thy name ? fraternity . . a silver mine. No doubt thereof. that a the road. that he also Is it not the same by the which I have called . I will warrant you. being no scholar. for her looking back with a covetous heart. (2 Kings : v. for aught I know. It is but a devilish prank that thou usest thy father was hanged for a traitor. this TT 1 ' Hopeful tempted 1 . tnat treasure those that seek it. for hindereth at the sight which they them in their pilgrimage. right ways f the Lord of this way. iv. when she was . he will said Christian to still Then not stir a step. One calls. dream. the ground. Is not ?. for it seemed to them as if it had been a woman transformed into Here.Demas. and no further go. and thou deservest no better reward. called to Christian (for he was learned) to see if he could pick out the meaning so he came. the place dangerous in their pilgrimage ? hath it not hindered many that are careless. saying. when By-ends comes up. for his principles lead to him that way. where they went with much concalled Ease tent but that plain was but narrow. our Lord the king will certainly hear thereof. I am the son Abraham. over against the I saw in my silver mine. . what will they do when they shall be rebuked by t>. that he may be so these do . Chr. this my we had. where we would stand with boldness before him. 3—5. Chr. Hope. Not I. my brother this is a seasonable came opportunely to us after the invitation which Demas gave us to come over to view and had we gone over. except to those But withal he blushed as he Chr. show you Chr. Demas. saying. . 26. . that they never were seen again in the way. with a little By-ends and pains you may richly provide for yourselves. Then sang Christian to dig. Then Demas called again. which some of them that had formerly gone that way." which they both concluded that that was the pillar of salt into which Lot's wife was turned. monu meD ' going from Sodom for safety. upon the head thereof. Then said Hopeful.

that we should shun her even such as these are. xiii. sin or a sign of what judgment will overtake such yea. Be: his . as to jealousy. I saw then that they went on their way to a we read not that she stepped one foot out of the way. and the leaves they ate to prevent surfeits and other diseases ^^ e fni j t an(j sides. On also either river was a meadow. True. to . But. " they were It is said of the men of Sodom. and am wonder that I am not now as Lot's wife for wherein was the difference betwixt her sin and mine ? She only looked back. Hope. which David the king called " the A river. (Numb. that sinners exceedingly. 1. and let me be ashamed that ever such a thing should be in mine : heart. that neither thou." that is. what a mercy is it.54 Hope. therefore. and notwithstanding the kindnesses that he had showed them for the land of Sodom was : that are incident to those that heat their blood side of the leaves of the trees - by travels. 10. on Trees by the river were green trees with all manner of fruit. Chr. : . And we see she is turned into a pillar of salt.) : lift up their eyes." but John. Ezek. and example caution. xlvi. as to them that pick pockets in the pre- sence of the judge. and she may be to us both caution it is most rationally to be concluded. to so fitly. and that too in despite of such examples that as shall not be prevented by this caution so Korah. 4. I muse at one thing. which tereth occasion to us to thank God. which was compare them pleasant and enlivening to their weary spirits. for she fell not by the destruction 10. am not made myself this example confidently yonder to look for that treasure. 13. one judgment. Hope." (Ps. that such. river of the water of life. and Abiram. come this woman escaped now like the garden of Eden heretofore. and always to remember Lot's wife. and it argueth that their hearts are grown desperate in the case . to fear before this woman but for looking behind her after. (for him. and I cannot tell who to bank of this river here. that shall sin in the sight. xxii. provoked him the more of Sodom. and I had a desire go see let grace be adored. Chr. since the judgment which overtook her did make river of God . I to THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. therefore.' I ! . her an example within sight of where they are Now. above all.) This mihisto wit. yet she was destroyed by another. and made their plague as hot as the fire of the Lord out of heaven could make it. curiously . did also become judgments. their way lay just upon the for they cannot choose but see her. but especially xxvi.) was turned into a pillar of salt especially pleasant river. 9. must be partakers of severest fifty men that perished in their sin. It is a thing to be wondered at. did they but Rev. made am sorry that I was so foolish. Doubtless thou hast said the truth but a sign or example to others to beware. ." because they on the banks of this river.) This. how Demas and his fellows can stand so I. (Gen. either side. with the two hundred and to the contrary. in his eyesight. " the for our help for time to : : . Christian and companion walked with great delight they drank also of the water of the river. or that will cut purses under the gallows. are set continually before them to caution them Dathan. - were sinners " before the Lord. Let us take notice of what we see here. xlvii.

) was so dark. let me go first. Isa. • in lie year crtl J it was green all In this meadow they J lay down and slept. and behold a path lay cause by my means we -are both gone out of the another. good for your mind being troubled. looking walking as they did. only they heard a groaning. I am sorry I have brought thee out of thee the way. if this the way again. fall. they they were gone found it very easy for their feet before them. espied a bim whither that way led. went after him over When . Then Then was his said Hopeful. good brother. and walking up and down in his fields. . of an evil intent. Hope. : pray." (Jer. than going in when we are Yet they adventured to go back. that they had not journeyed far. (for they were not as yet at their journey's end. called Doubting -castle. let us go Then he went to the there be any danger. . and he went before them. nine or ten times. and asked man : ^ they heard the voice of one saying. which they 65 in pieces with A . So they followed. Neither could they. forgive it me . but there was none to answer. Chr. leaves. too. a castle. in a most dreadful manner. leading his brot her out of the my do brother. That Look. 16. Hope. they. if this meadow lieth along by our way-side. — Then for their encouragement. n . caught Christian and Hopeful asleep in his grounds. pentanee for into such imminent danger . ai on g by the way on the other side way. . and his name was Vain-Confidence so they called after him. down to sleep. know the matter *£$$£ first. and lighten. fore he getting up in the morning early. i i • i j get again to the last. to catch vain -glorious pit to catch the where they lay. No. (Ps.) But by this time the waters were greatly They are in danger of c xi risen. Now. they gathered again of the fruit of the trees. Will soon sell all. No. said of the fence. to sleep. and thunder. and drank again of the water of the river. and drank. To comfort pilgrims by the highway side. ix. 21. I did not wa y- reason of their travels . (Vain-Confidence b Y name >) not seein S the way bevain-glorious in. Wherefore. xiv. very of going back was (Then I thought. did not I tell you so ? by this you may see we are right. be not offended . m jght n e down safely. meadow. these trees do yield. If Chr. But. Then said Christian to his fellow. being persuaded weak ones out e way ' by the his fellow. Where are we now ? fellow silent. fore him. doth it not go along by the wayside ? tiunsMiiay lead So Hopeful. 'Tis according to my wish. come. fell into a deep pit. little Wherefore They s i eep j at lighting under a shelter. besides their fragrant smell. and it was the owner whereof was Giant Despair Wherein his grounds they now were sleeping. I was afraid therefore gave on't at the very and you that gentle caution. still as they went on. roa(] a meadow. so the souls of the pilgrims were much discouraged because of the way. for here they . xxxi. Yield dainties for them and he who can tell . turn again. I am glad I have with me a merciful brother but we must not stand here . may lead you out of Christian here is the easiest going to . lu & Now. stile that night. yea. but it out.) they ate. that this shall be for our' . behold. way Chr. and departed. and was dashed his loner. by reason of which the way drowning as go back. Be comforted. and the fools withal. Then Hopeful groaned in himself. I may be first therein beOne temptation over into {t makes way for stile to see. the grounds of ldn es P au - • He A therefore that went before. To Ce egtial Gate> Look> gaid Christian. they sat down there till the daybreak. with all the skill they had. over. that I had kept on my so they called to . of the how is path should lead us out way ? ' Chr. xxiii. a little before them. 30. they dangerous. Hopeful. meadow. let us try : go back again. I beheld in my dream. and the water rose amain. not likely. and their feet tender by . Good brother. there was on the left hand of the By-path meadow. He said. " Let thine heart be towards the highway even the way that thou wentest. the night came on. and the flood was so high. Who could have thought that this path should have led us out of the way ? What pleasant fruit. Hope. good. you shall not go first . But. stile. . and then lay down again Thus they did several days and nights. but being weary they fell Now. So when they were disposed to go on. Then with a . I Would have spoke plainer. (Numb.— beautified with lilies " ! THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. . if you please. and that meadow is called By-path 4. let me go before. said the other. christian's re. as mistrusting that he had led him out of the way and now it began to rain.) which was on purpose there made by the Prince of those grounds. said Hopeful. . and withal. and it grew very dark so that they that went behind lost the sight of him that went before.) Then they sang Behold ye how these crystal streams do glide. (Isa. but the river and the way for a time yet parted. at which they were not a little sorry they durst not go out of the way. and a stile to go over into it. too suddenly to fall in with strangers. that. and were got into the path. The meadows green. not far from the place asleep. and let us go over. that it is easier going out of the way when we are in. xxi. Christian and his fellow heard him fall . But. Reasoning besaying. Chr. When they awoke. the way from the river was rough. Now. for I forgive and believe. but that you are older than I. Hope.) thee Hope. that in their going back they had like to have been drowned. and that I have put l •" . there was. that he may buy this field. Now. my brother. Oh. they wished for a better way.

56 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. in sunshiny weather. when he was gone to bed. (Ps. consider again. whence they came. thou talkest of ease in Hopeful comforts for trespassing on his grounds. and. The next night she.) and the grave more easy for me this dungeon ! Shall we be ruled by the is giant ? : Hope. for part. But. and by the wounds they received When he beat . in beats Lis pri- them ever that should come to pass again. -life. that he fell grim and surly voice he bid them awake. mind of his brother. he told them. he may forget to lock us in may in a short time have another of his fits before others. drove them before him. and yet have escaped out of his hands." " My soul chooseth strangling rather than vii. ^ ^^ (Job than 15. (for fits. and asked them whence they were. . them. had doubtless made an end of them himself.. Then said the giant. and told them that. at some time or that he or other. Well. him - my brother.tnem i nto his castle. who made the world. and leaves them there to condole their misery. for . my brother. make away with themselves. in their sad and doleful condition. and to mourn under their distress : so all that day they spent their time in nothing but sighs and bitter lamentations. am resolved to pluck up the heart of a man. fearfully. seeing it is attended with so much bitterness ? But they desired him to let them go. i nave this night trespassed on me. and what they did in his grounds. . to consider what to do. had he now. for I And if my part. So when he arose. body and . because he was stronger than they. Then she counselled him. without one bit of bread. however. And let us . . This done he withdraws. . because it was through his unadvised counsel that they were brought into this distress. and there first falls to rating of them as if they were dogs. rushing to them. for want of bread and water. may cause that Giant Despair may die. And moreover. 8. forbidden to take kills . them to . and put The grievous. soul at once. Brother. he getteth him a grievous crab-tree cudgel. " Thou shalt do no murder . seeing they had disobeyed his counsel. have been taken by him as well as we. Then did the prisoners consult between themselyes whether it was best to take his counsel. and understanding that they were yet alive. At this they trembled greatly. to gpirits of twQ men> Here then they lay from Wednesday morning till Saturday night. to see if . that of Giant Despair : all the law is not in the hand told her. as before." &c. it For my they knew themselves in a fault. let us be patient..) he sometimes. here in evil case. « and thus they began to discourse Chr. and were far from friends and acquaintance. I know not whether is best . did advise him to On Friday Giant Despair counsels _ _. into one of his fell fits. truly. he told his wife what he had done . The giant. and may lose the use of his limbs ? ' such sort that they were not able to help themselves. lxxxviii. alive was all. They told him they were pilHe finds them grims. towards evening the giant goes down into did moderate the the dungeon again. They also had but little to . when morning was come. a -. talking with her husband further about them. and whither they were bound into his dungeon the grave but hast thou forgotten Then he asked ther to them? and he the hell whither for certain the murderers go ? for " no murderer hath eternal life. or any to ask how they did they were. and that they had lost their in his grounds. or poison for why. another can but commit mur- der upon his body but. . With these words Hopeful at present . said he. that he had taken a couple of prisoners. to me than but yet let us consider Now in this place Christian had double sorrow. Who knows but that God." no. what shall we do ? hands. so they continued together in the dark that day. or drop of drink. and goes down into the dungeon to them. and her name was Diffidence so. and endure a while the time may come that may give us a happy release but let us not be our own murderers. So they were forced to go. So. With that he looked ugly upon them. he found them alive at which he fell into a grievous rage. his Besides he that to kill counsel to lull ourselves.) say.dark dungeon. and perceiving counsel .. therefore.. and beats when he ^m : can understand. should you choose to live. what reason of them. _. not to another man's person much more then are we . or light. their only way would be forthwith to make an end of themselves. so far as I . fitsWherefore he withdrew. therefore. and lost for The Giant a time the use of his sometimes has into . and left : The life that we now live is miserable. nasty and stinking prisonment. or no . it should be worse with them than if they had never been born. is. Indeed our present condition and death would be far more welcome thus for ever to abide the : dreadful. . them to kill themselves. for one to kill himself. and therefore you must go along with me. or to die out of hand is Christian crushed. either with knife. and. us. and I think that . to live thus. halter. t>y trampling in and lying on my grounds. that arose in the morning he should beat them without mercy. and cast them : Lord of the country to which we are going hath said.. into a very ness of their im. said Christian. and to try my utmost to get from under his hand. that since they were never like to come out of that place. or that. I say. to wit. manner as before. Giant Despair had a wife. although they never a wor d °f distaste £ ave Th d Giant Despair then he falls upon them. I was a fool that I did not try to do it before but. but to : taken his counsel found them alive : but when he came there. You way< and carries them . Now. her also what he had best do furSo she asked what they were. . his prisoners them be very sore with the stripes that he had given them the day before. or turn to them upon the floor. they could do little but breathe. to Doubting Castle. he goes to them in a surly .

) Now. ere a week comes thou wilt tear them in pieces. good Christian. " Over this ' . or that they have picklocks about them. to pursue his prisoners. : Then Christian pulled it out of his bosom. when I may as in Doubting Castle. or feel in the Valley of the Shadow of Death. and with thee I mourn without the light. and when Mrs. And with that his wife replied. and came to the King's highway. My brother. and amazement. or no. also this giant hath wounded me as well as thee. and continued in prayer till almost break of day. nor could all that thou didst hear. therefore. and show them the bones and skulls of those thou hast already dispatched. felt his their discourse of their prisoners . Then they thrust open the gate to make their escape with speed but that gate as it opened made such a creaking. So they consented to erect there a A pillar erecte d by Christian pillar. well walk at liberty I have a key in my bosom. . -r i . who. and the giant and his wife being in bed. am I. terror. and to engrave upon the side and his fellow thereof this sentence. Diffidence and her husband the giant were got to bed. quoth he. as thou hast done their fellows before them. as before. but Hopeful made his second reply as followeth Hope. they began to renew again. that it waked Giant Despair. They are sturdy rogues. — ! ber us exercise a little more patience rememthou playedst the man at Vanity Fair. for that must be opened too. and so safe. she asked him concerning they had taken his counsel: to which he replied. Get you down to your den again and with that he beat them all the way thither. (at least to avoid the shame that becomes not a Christian to be found in. These Sfdd he were P% rims as On Saturday you are. good brother. thus to lie in a called Promise. once. . but that lock went damnable hard yet the key did open it. called Promise. because they were out of his juris- diction. Then he went to the outward door that leads into the castle-yard. So when the morning has come. I am persuaded. They lay. Now. and Christian and Hopeful both came out. and with his key opened After. bnt. they began to pray. I fear. tian's bosom. Now Christian again seemed for doing it. I will therefore search them in the morning. Then said Hopeful. Then. That's good news. my dear*? said the giant . about midnight. that will. > > > . and try. open any lock in Doubting Castle. the giant goes yard. or see. nor But let : how yet of bloody death : wherefore let us. the limbs to for his fits took him again. and wast neither afraid of the chain or cage. to prevent those that shall come after from falling into the hand of Giant Despair. night being come the prisoners. Well. said she. they renewed their discourse about the giant's counsel and whether they had best : 57 it Now a little before : was day. so that he old giant wondered that he could neither by his blows nor counsel bring them to an end. and began to try at the dungeon door. and the door flew open with ease. again. -. gave back. opens any lock stinking dungeon. he went to the iron gate. all day on Saturday in a lamentable case. hast thou already gene through. And sayest thou so. when they were gone over the stile. what hardship. they began to contrive with themselves what they should do at that stile. and. and if bear up with patience as well as we can. I tore them in pieces. Now. brake out into this A key in Chrispassionate speech What a fool. -r -. and art thou now nothing but fears ? Thou seest that I am in the dungeon with thee. and hath also cut off the bread and water from my mouth.: THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. as you have shortly he n would pull them and when I thought fat. when night was come. rememberest thou not how valiant Apolformer things to thou hast been heretofore ? remembrance. Christian fell into a swoon . they choose rather to bear all hardships than to make away with themselves. by means of which they hope to escape. m pieces and so within ten days I will do you. that they live in hopes that some will come to relieve them. said he. Take them into the castle-yard to-morrow. a far weaker man by nature than thou art . that door also. make them believe. Jy 0n cou l cj no t crush thee. coming a little to himself again. hastily rising fail. take it. and to an end. said she. Hopeful comfoits him one half amazed. withal. them . and they trespassed the Giant threatened that done j n m y or ro xinds. . went were could by no means go after them. and shows " to and takes them into the castlethem as his wife had bidden him. Then they on. pluck it out of thy bosom. as he turned the key. whose bolt. on Saturday.

ii. meadow. How got you into the way ? and. and cast into Doubting Castle. Then said the Shepherds.) as concerning They the faith of the resurrection of the body ? answered Yes. several men walking up and down among the tombs that were there and they perceived that the men were blind.. and the name of Mount Caution. as they thought. they perceived. Watchful. whose names were Knowledge. and because they could not get out from among them. they chose to go out of it into that meadow. You are just in your way. and they stood by the highway side. for trespassing. and washed themselves. as in other places. where also they drank. therefore. and bid them look afar off. took them by the hand. there were on the tops of these mountains Shepherds feeding their flocks. (to which they made answer." (Hos. w ]ieil they stand to talk with any by the way. even till they came to that same stile. and made them partake of that which was ready at present. which mountains belong to the Lord of that hill of which we have spoken before so they went up to the Thev are re. on the that. These mountains are Emmanuel's Land. he at last did put out their eyes. show these pilgrims some wonders ? So when they had concluded to do it they had stile is the way to Doubting Castle. "He that wandereth out of the way of understanding shall remain in . Is this the way to the Celestial City ? Shep.) as. the vineyards. 11. Yes. Whose castle's Doubting. The names of the Shepherds. What means this ? The Shepherds then answered. where." (Heb. Then said the Shepherds. Too far for any but those that shall get thither indeed. I say.) . Welcome to the Delectable Mountains The Shepherds. they looked very lovingly upon them. Those that you see lie dashed in pieces at the bottom cf this mountain are they and they have continued to this day unburied. * that night. By what means have you so persevered therein ? for but few of them that begin to come hither do show The Shepherds their face on these mountains. w ]ien th e Shepherds heard their answers. which when they did. So Christian and Hopeful looked down. saw also in my dream when the Shep- herds perceived that they were wayfaring men. and these men (pointing to them among the tombs) came once on pilgrimage. and there were taken by Giant Despair. Whose Delectable Mountains are these ? and whose be the sheep that feed . And because the right way was rough in that place. Then . pilgrims. Then I saw in my dream. Chr. They said. therefore.) therefore the good of that are the place I is and bid them look down to the bottom. moreover. From a little before you. that followed after. Delectable till they came to Mountains. below these mountains." This done they sang as follows Out : of the way we went. : said Christian. called The Mountain of Error. .) Chr. 17. that the saying of the wise man might be fulfilled. Now. and had them to their tents.! — . who despiseth the King of the Celestial Country. upon them ? Shep. Doubting Castle. being pleased therewith. The Lord of these mountains hath given us a charge. and fountains of water. went to them. What meaneth this ? herds answered. Is the way safe or dangerous ? to be safe " but transgressors shall fall therein. Is there in this place any relief for pilgrims it Shep. to be acquainted with us. his pris'ners are. 9. Shall we xhey are shown wonders. and escaped the danger. a stile that led into a They left hand of this way ? answered. 18. went forth with them. that in the morning the Shepherds called up Christian and hopeful to So they walk with them upon the mountains. read what was written. because it was very late. for an example to others to take heed how they clamber too high.) they asked. by hearkening to Hymeneus and Philetus. The Shepsaid Christian. Chr. xiv. where he has left them to wander to this very day. 15. Then they told them that they were And so they went to their rest content to stay. The Delectable They went then the Mountains. xiii. and did freely eat of the vineyards. Talk with the (as is common with weary pilgrims Shepherds. that is Caution. and they are within sight of his city and the sheep also are his. and Sincere.mountains. How far is it thither ? Shep. and walked awhile. 58 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. as you see. and then we found What 'twas to tread upon forbidden ground And let them that come after have a care Lest heedlessness makes them as we to fare Lest they. because they stumbled sometimes upon the tombs. and saw at the bottom several men dashed all to Then pieces by a fall that they nad from the top. Whence came that stile there goes a path that leads directly to you ? and. and seeks to destroy his holy Many. Safe for those for whom is weary and faint in the way ? Shep. Then I saw that they had them to the top of another mountain. (John x. which was very steep on the farthest side. (2 Tim. which is kept by Giant Despair. Chr. Shepherds one to another. as you do now. having Then said the a pleasant prospect on every side. Have you not heard of them that were made to err. and yet more to solace yourselves with the good of these Delectable Mountains. 2 . and leaning upon their staves. and said. But welcome them. Experience. We would that you should stay here awhile. which is kept by Giant Despair. and whose name's Despair. and led them among those tombs. The pilgrims. Error. " not to be forgetful to entertain strangers. or how they come too near the brink of this mountain. them first to the top of a hill. to behold the gardens and freshed in the orchards. Did you not see. they also put questions to them. after they had awhile been kept in the dungeon. and he laid down his life for them.

.

i .

1 .

.

and also some of the glory of the place. with Ananias. Which from all other men are kept conceal' J . They looked in. Another of them bid them way. and saw that within it was very dark and smoky. xxi. I was born in the country that lieth off have look through our per- spective-glass. By this time the pilgrims had a desire to go for. and have left my country Chr. thus miserably cast away ? Shep. but yet said nothing to the 59 Shepherds. a show of pilgrimage. and you will have need to use it We when you have it too. with Judas such as blaspheme the gospel.n f il out Tof which came ' ' Ig- dream. . not. Ay. robber. if you would see Things deep. The Shepherds' perspectiveglass- us nere skill to snow tne pilgrims the if gates of the Celestial City. even every one. notwithstanding. and I am going motion so they had them to the top of a high hill. called Clear. and some not so far as these mountains.— THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. I perceive that these had on them. therefore. Ignor. hand. their hands shake. . Gentlemen. the congregation of the dead. When A they were about to depart. So Christian asked him from what parts he came. a door in the side of a hill and bid them look where was and they opened the in." (Prov. Then said the -^ et" Shepherds one to another. with Esau such as sell their Master. said he. Then they tried to look. had them door. But what have you to show at that gate. Here. but the remembrance The fruits of of that last thing that the Shepservile fear. in a bottom. they Ignor. with Alexander and that lie and dissemble. Come to the Shepherds. ye be utter strangers to me. as of fire. to the Celestial City. things hid. such as sell their birthright. they met christjan ajld with a very brisk lad that came Ignorance have some talk< out of that country. and have been a good liver I pay every man his The grounds of own I pray. were therefore. I know my Lord's will. Then they went away. : The pilgrims lovingly accepted the there a little on the left hand. the left . 16. and held it a long time too. namely. as we have now had they not ? Shep. from which country there comes into the way in which the pilgrims walked. What means A by-way to this ? The Shepherds told them. This is a by-way to hell. . that the Shepherds . Conceit. Some further. The country of a little below these mountains. . herds had shown them made . and that mysterious be. heth the country of norance. thou earnest in and therehither through that same crooked lane fore I fear. . Chr. Then said -the pilgrims one to the other. however thou mayest think of thyself. city. As other good people do. Then said Christian. Now. whither I am going. and Sapphira his wife. a way that hypocrites go in at. by means of which impediment they could not look steadily through the glass yet they thought they saw something like the gate. to another place. ' Thus by the Shepherds secrets are reveal'd. on l°. But thou earnest not in at the Wicket-gate that is at the head of this way . then. and the Shepherds a desire they should so they walked together towards the end of the mountains. beware of the flatterer. had need to cry to the Strong for strength. and a cry of some tormented and that they smelt the scent of brimstone. Shep. wards. Hell. How far might they go on in pilgrimage in their days since they. and gave them the glass to look. one of the two-fold cau. fast. with tears gushing out. Yes.) Then Christian and Hopeful looked upon one another. . that the gate should be opened to you ? Ignor. Then said Hopeful to the Shepherds. and his name was Ignorance. and whither he was going. when the reckoning-day shall come.and saw the same two pilgrims going down the mountains along the highway towards the city. thou wilt have laid to thy charge that thou art a thief and a for .Shepherds gave them a note of the tion. be content to follow the religion of . . instead of getting admittance into the I know ye Ignor. The third bid them take heed that they slept not upon enchanted ground and the fourth bid them God speed. But gate ? . a little crooked lane. So I awoke from my dream. and sang this song : how do you think to get in at the For you may find some difficulties there. Hope. Sir. pay tithes. I Then saw in my And I slept. they also thought that they heard there a rnmbling noise. and Ignorance's ope give alms. Hope. Chr. and dreamed again.

talk to him anon. and had neither power to fight nor fly. Hopeful many a hungry belly the most part of the rest of that is found.„ telleth though they missed it not through He kept not his his companion me. 45. It might have been great comfort to him. Deliver thy purse: " but he making no haste to do it. let you will. the good lost not his best U1 ° s with seven strong cords. Nov/ I call to admittance at the Celestial Gate ? that which was told Chr. Little-Faith.1. them he ignorant of what's the chiefest gain. At this. that left this dwells in the town of Good-Confidence. good man to He and further added. With that. It is a wonder but they got not that. Now. (1 Pet. 22. !f^ . . also he had a little odd money left. I cannot think that any in all our parts doth so much as know the to it . with a great club that . Then Little-Faith robbed by said Faint-heart. But as I was told. and let him not refuse Good counsel to embrace. xxvi. So they came up all to him. - T : . (if I was not misinformed. but scarce yet as the devils led away the enough to bring him to his journey's end. made shift to scramble on his way. remembrance r. beg and do what he his journey's enl1 tit -i see his face. There is more hope of a fool than of him. with But being gone past. that dwelt in the town of himself alive. . they betook themselves to their heels.) he was' lie thought it might be one Turnforced to beg as he went. and Guilt. as you see. 14. Prov. xii. 9. 18. all way man way the world knows that it is a great our country. he was his i loth to lose his trust ran * -I up to him. pulled thence a rhe y % et awa y his silver. ^^im God Hope. whisperingly. i. the next way into the way. All this while the thieves stood by. his companion man. and Guilt. and kn Then said Hopeful Let Ignorance a little while now muse On what is said. even us pass him by. (Matt. by which he was to receive his Then said Christian to his fellow. and grimage. good That which they got not (as I said) were jewels bill. where they met a man whom seven devils had bound still. 12 . y-ifo ki mj or ou tg and so leave him to think of what he hath heard already. and shift for himself. as we say. he w ent. and was getting up to go on his journey. came galloping Now. to keep The destruction L tt i e _F aith of one Turnaway. will your country.upon him.) What shall we talk further to a fool.— 60 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and Ignorance he came Now. " When he that is a fool walketh by the way.) Nay. " Wanton professor. saith. will not save. It all is not good. the good man was just up with speed. ian<r' of the murders that are commonly that they got not this jewel from him. But at last.u Christian . j . No the place where his jewels were. when they had passed him a little after.) Misand thrusting out i- his rr . way. and he saith to every one that he is a fool. if as he is " able to bear it. But it must needs be a comfort to him. : — > : . _ . and sleep now there happened at that time to come down the lane from Broadway-gate. three sturdy rogues. ii. we do now. Then he cried out. to himself.) Dea 8 Dea <inian's-lane so called because Hope. 3. and spied on his back a paper the way. Hope. This was the story. looked after him. and then stop again for him afterwards. his wisdom faileth him. T . for he did hang his head like a thief could. those that no understanding have. Little -Faith looked as white as a clout. he said to Hopeful. . a fine pleasant green lane that comes down from our country. awakened from his sleep. The thing was this at the entering in thing so it was more by good providence than at this P assa g e there comes down by his endeavour that they missed of that good Broadway-gate. a lane called thing. But did they take from him all that ever he had ? Chr. and so did Hopeful. thieves!" mi. Although he made them." So they both went on. of the man was Little -Faith cunning^ but being dismayed with their coming a good man. (for C illlltn69. and were a-cariying him man was much afflicted for his loss. and he dwelt in the town of Sin. as : . from Broadway-gate. v.) and said. I think. for his jewels he might forced to beg to awa yApostasy. hi m at present. and see if by degrees we can do any good to him ? ! " with threatening language bid him stand. ot a thing that happened to a by a story of g 00(j man hereabout The name any good cunning of his. moreover. How to carry it x. "Thieves. back to the door that they saw on the side of the for the thieves got most of his spending -mpney. for he. Christian looked to see if he knew him . since we have. they entered into a very dark lane. chanced to sit down there. . and Hope. fearing lest it should be one Great-Grace. be °« . 2 Pet. and I follow the religion of all He telleth every is mme - I no P e will be well. and getting up. with this inscription.1T Mistrust. and with that blow felled him flat to the ground where he lay bleeding as one that would bleed to death. pocket. nor need they matter whether they do off of or no. ' . Christian began to tremble. hand into -j x bag ot silver. lest he remain Still was in his hand. When his Christian saw that the man was wise in own conceit. money. done there. they never ransacked so those he kept Little-Faith came . struck Little-Faith on the head. three brothers ing Little-Faith where he was. and this Little-Faith going on pilChr." (Eccl. and Guilt." (Pro v. and they spyMistrust.. and their names were Faint-heart. But he did not perfectly not sell but. they hearing that some were upon the road. (2 Tim. But is it not a wonder they got not from damnable apostate. Little-Faith to say so to him at once . And." him his certificate. had neither power nor skill to hide any cere. one he but a as for the gate that you talk of.) Now. and iv. . after a while.

.. they are but journeyman they serve under the king of the bottomless pit. though but a little of it. (Heb. not so much if. Esau never had fai th- . faith. his jewels were not accounted of. my brother. . a grief indeed. and all shall be well betwixt thee and me. he forgot it a great part of the rest of his journey and besides. my brother? Esau sold his birthright. is thy mistake. saving faith. and that for a mess of pottage. Little-Faith's did not so. will come to their aid thieves ." by Hope. or sell what they have. and so do many besides. thou art but for a . methinks. 24 when their minds are set upon their lusts.) and that birthright was his greatest jewel and if he. 32. Esau did sell his birthright indeed. 'between the turtle-dove and . and his soul and all. I did but compare thee to some of the birds that are of the brisker sort. where he was robbed. was bv his little faith But consider again.) to will this birthright do me?" (Gen. yet they that have faith.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Esau's birthright was typical. . . who will ran to and fro in untrodden' paths with the shell upon But pass by that. But. Why art thou so tart. and by so doing exclude themA discourse se lves from the chief blessing. up all. I acknowledge it . but Little-Faith's belly was not so. my brother. Here. and these thoughts would swallow 61 had he used it as . a great heart. therefore. there isjmt and I perLittle -Faith had none ceive by thee. Christian. (had there been any that would have bought them. think you. beth his fellow what should he for unadvisedly to should one upon whose head' is very day. what good xxv. as he was ? It was a wonder he did not die with grief. matter under debate. whatever they cost. Hope. since this is the height of thy stomach now they We have more coura S e vh en : are at a distance from us. had we been used as he. and he began to be comforted therewith. Why. poor heart I was told that he scattered almost all the rest of the way with nothing but doleful and bitter complaints telling also to all that overtook him. when at any time it came into his mind. But it is a wonder that his necessity did not put him upon selling or pawning some of his jewels. 16 . Chr. by his lusts. Esau's want lay in his fleshly appetite. ! ( Jer. . . to be robbed and wounded too. Besides. (said he. . at the noise Why did of one that was coming on the road ? not Little-Faith pluck up a greater heart? He might. - thoughts. " who in . he should but they that told me the story said. and his voice is as the roaring of a lion. as also : brush and then to yield. and that because of the dismay that he had in their taking away his money. mortgage. bixt yet your severe had almost made me angry. as they did. these three fellows. Alas. cannot do so. Grief! ay. _.) if he sells his birthright. why might not Little-Faith do so too ? Chr. but Little -Faith's jewels Esau's belly was his Esau was ruled were not so. and consider the their heads. Would it not have been so to any of us. should we are out. Thou talkest like -the shell to this . For whom pawn them or he sell them? where he was . himself. verily. if need be. And ' . for God where As for of trial. ass. He is pitied both. kept from such extravagances. poor man this could n ot but be a great grief to him. : J£ things that were spiritual and from above there- fore. Hope. and that in a strange place. ii.) and Little -Faith. had his jewels been missing at the gate of the Celestial City. and that to the that devil of hell. he had (and that he knew well enough) been excluded from an inheritance there and that would have been worse to him than the appearance and villany of ten thousand thieves. therefore no marvel. and that he hardly escaped with life. many have said. where the flesh only bears sway. Christian stub. that he might have wherewith to relieve ! : But temper.. Little-Faith Little -Faith was of another his his livelihood mind was on things was upon «£»* tage. . and what he had lost how he was wounded. go d. pawn. That they are cowards. though it was his lot have but a little faith. have stood one brush with them. . xii. divine . and how . but few have found it so in the time „ £ No great heart i o * . are but a Hopeful swag£ ers company of cowards would they have run else. that he made but little use of it all the rest of the way. I am persuaded in my heart. and made to see and prize his jewels more than to sell them as Esau did his birthright. Chr. : : Hope. they will have them. no. as aoout Esau and also that caitiff did but you must Little-Faith. nor did relief which could from thence be administered to him.) to fill his mind with empty things ? Will a man give a penny to fill his belly with hay? or can you persuade the turtle-dove like to live upon carrion. Indeed. Esau could •see no further than to the fulfilling of his lusts " For I am at the point to die. than they appear to thee as they did to wne n we are in him. they might put thee to second ' . You read not anywhere that Esau had as a little . and themselves outright to boot. who. who they were that did it. o ? In he want that all that country robbed. then would fresh thoughts of his loss come again upon him. (as it will in man where no faith is to resist. Hope. and have yielded when there had been no rereflection - : medy ? Chr. the crow ? Though faithless ones can.) for it is with such as it is with the her occasions cannot be turned away.._. But Little-Faith. Chr. . to what end should he that is of such a temper sell his jewels. hadst thou been the man concerned. or that he overtook in the way as he went. for carnal lusts. Besides. . or himself in his journey. betwixt their estates.t. put a difference betwixt Esau and .

Lsa.terrible thing. that shall easily give demonstration of what I say. he. This made David when in the Valley of the Shadow of Death and Moses was rather for dying "where he stood. for Chr. sling-stones are : . for . .. were : ! when we hear of others that nor be tickled at the thoughts of our own manhood. he fears us not at all. 62 (1 Pet. 15. as his vain mind prompted him to say. the dart. have been engaged as this and I found it a ." (Job xxxix. . g00 d to forced to bestir them when by these assaulted they had their coats soundly brushed by them. now : . yet I cannot Glad shall I be. that he who laid so lustily at Leviathan could not make him yield for. xxvii. once I heard that he should say.. with no more such brunts though I fear we are not got beyond all danger. and has. but they ran. for he is the King's The King's champion.. and yet. in this ence se t U p n me. and the shoutings. . and I beginning like a Christian to resist. and is not affrighted. yet if they get within him. have been . " Above all. mettle that is in . Mistrust. they gave but a I would. — x. All the King's subjects are not his champions nor can they. I was clothed with armour of proof. yea. rejoice have a convoy. and to be sure to take a shield with us for it was for want of that. do such Is it meet to think that a little feats of war as he. nor the habergeon is Besides. . " The Leviathan's sturdiness." (Eph. or the other. Witness Peter. you see. . he Job s horse goeth on to meet the armed men he mdcketh at fear. for such commonly come by the worst when tried. : : : . 26 29. and brass as rotten wood the arrow cannot Little-Faith was . you know. These three villains bis own experi. that they made him at last and yet. when Great-Grace hath appeared an(l n0 marvel. two things become us to do First. Avail.) What can a man do in this case ? It is true. and Hezekiah too. it shall go hard but they will throw up his heels and when a man is down. it had been Great-Grace.) Oh. than to go one step without his God. 19 25.) " We despaired even of life. have been in the fray before and though." (Job xli. upon a time.. notwithstanding. what can he do? Whoso looks well upon Great-Grace's face. I am. could do better. and in came their master saying is.t be wanting. take the shield of faith. so long as he keeps them at sword's point.-„ Christian tells . if a man could at every turn have Job's horse. he esteemeth iron as straw. and roar Yea. 1 3. do better and stand more for his Master than all men but who so foiled and run down by those villains as he ? When. I trow. if he will but go along with us. : my part. Heman. he might have had his hands full for I must tell you. at their whistle . would go try what he could do but though some do say of him that he is the prince of the apostles. they have often fled. If it had been he. even Faint-heart.. through the goodness of Him that is best. and can. fly. . neither believeth he that it is the sound of the trumpet. as God would have it. both they and their master. and rejoiceth in his strength. Ay. : we . if possible. — : . I I. I would their sakes. and had skill and courage to ride him. they handled him so. . have given my life for a penny but that. Hope. will see those scars and cuts there. some have little this man was one of the weak. when tried.) afraid of a sorry girl. neither turneth he back from the sword the quiver rattleth against him.) It is good also that we desire of the King a conit is voy. himself. (Ps. the thunder of the captains. when they did but suppose that one Great-Grace was in the way. Peter. and therefore he went to the child should handle Goliath as . 8.) „ I myself THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Yea. foiled . of whom I made mention before he would swagger. : . comes in to help them and of him it is said. champion but. the glittering spear and the shield he swalloweth the ground with fierceness and rage. the proud helpers fall under the slain. v. some are weak some have great faith. Hope. if tlv. what need we be afraid of ten thousand that shall set themselves against us ? But without him. (and that when he was in the combat. that. my brother. the glory of his nostrils is The excellent terrible he paweth in the valley. He saith among the trumpets. However. Therefore he that had skill hath said. „. but he that hath been in the battle • make him . : turned with him into stubble darts are counted as stubble he laugheth at the shaking of a spear.: : . as the call. . he is never out of hearing and if at any time they be put to the worst. to go out harnessed. . wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked.) But. do well enough with them. alive. sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold the spear. you will put some difference between Little -Faith and the King's champion. if I meet boast of any manhood. Chr. he might do notable things for " his neck is clothed with thunder he will not be afraid as a grasshopper. indeed. ay. though I was so harnessed. therefore. (Exod. though champions in their days. nor vaunt as - ' : : : ! — if or David did that there should be the strength of an ox in a wren ? Some are strong. since the lion and the bear have not as yet devoured me. Ha. vi. ha and he smelleth the battle afar off. that he will go with us himself. we hear that such robberies are done on the King's highway." How did these sturdy rogues and their fellows make David groan. mourn. he would he would. 6 . let us never desire to meet with an enemy. 16. 4. I found it hard work to quit myself no man can tell what in that combat like a man attends us. though GreatGrace is excellent good at his weapons.. for su^h footmen as thee and I are. xxxiii. True. Well. ill. their king . as you see.

follow him.) Chr. xvi. if they had not of the Shepherds a note of direction for the way ? They answered. and have not kept ourselves from the " paths of the destroyer. and yet you are like to have nothing but your travel for your pains. He asked. and asked them why they stood there ? They answered. but covered with a very light robe. 14. Yes . and repent. and at last came up to them. . that he commanded down which when they Th are whi did. xi. them then. bid us beware of the Flatterer ? i s the saying of the wise man. Then said Christian to his fellow. that they were poor pilgrims going to Zion. . Poor Little-Faith ! Then sang hast been may among the Wast And robb'd? Remember this. But by and by. fine -spoken Deceivers fine spoken. k ut now came m £ the roa d. . 18. . Then said he with the whip. I see him let us take heed to ourselves now. singing Come See hither. " Concerning the works of men. I rebuke and chasten be zealous. So they thanked him for all his kindness. the destroyer. therefore. Then he asked them. — . moreover." . they rescued were but yet. which by degrees turned. • As we 'Cause they good counsel lightly did forget: 'Tis true. but were led out of their way by a black man clothed in white. in the world to come. They also gave us a note of directions about the way. and turned them so far from the way. " Follow me. you see. said he. to take upon you so tedious a journey . Why. said. Then Chr. smau cor ds in his hand. all along the highway. a Thus they lay bewailing themselves in the net. Yes. behold a the City that they desired to go to. iii. how the pilgrims fare that go astray They catched are in an entangled net. after a while they perceived. he led them both within in a net. pluck out and read your note ? They answered. to teach ped." said the man. Chr. So he drew nearer and meets them. in mine own heard as you now affirm. 19. afar off. if the Shepherds did not bid them beware of the you man black of flesh. xvii. . and he is coming to meet us. way. way. one have found xxix. said they. They went then till they came at a place where they A way and a saw a way put itself into their way. Chr.The Atheist terer also. He asked them. Flatterer ? They answered. His name nearer. great laughter. Follow me. But did you not. but therein we have also forgotten to read. vi. 5." Here David was wiser than we for. and went softly along the right (Rev. to- we shall not be received ? there all this Ath. from the next uncirChristian thieves ? 03 Then set said he to them. man. No. whoso believes. and seemed withal to lie as straight and here they as the way which they should go knew not which of the two to take. Atheist into very He A . before they They are taken were aware. and he asked them whither they was Atheist were going ? . : : should walk. the compass of a net. They bewail their condition.) it " A man that flattereth his neighbour. he said. saith he." (Ps. : THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. So [t is thither that X am g oin g'" Christian and " his fellow dethey followed him in the way that luded. he bids them go on and take good heed to the other directions of the Shepherds. (Rom. I was at home. coming softly.come to the place where they were. . let the When Dan. that I : cumcised Philistine. 17. Chr. We are going to fell Mount Zion. came to them. for he was going f Shining One comes to them with a whip in _. Hope. they were going to the Celestial City. and from that I . I laugh to see what ignorant persons you are. Yonder is a man with his back towards Zion. Received not such a place as you thither too. Wherefore there they lay crying some time. _ At they espied a Shining One ^ L x.nid He asked """jjjjjj^ **" Delectable Mountains. So they went on.) and as he chastised them. : in your way again so he led them back to the way which they had left to follow the Flatterer. .) their way. xi. 32.) them in my dream. It is Flatterer. (2 Chron. but knew not which of these ways to take. when you were at a stand. of in world. " As many as I love. When he was . in which they were both so entangled that they knew not what to do and with that the white robe fell off the black man's back then they saw where they were. for our more sure finding thereof.) So he rent the net and men country. What is the meaning of your laughter ? Ath. " a false apostle. laughs at them. he asked them whence they came." (Prov. With the Shepherds upon the amined . and what they did there ? They told him. but that we did not imagine. and alone. Where did you lie the last night ? They „. so this day. then shall you victors be get more faith Over ten thousand else scarce over three." (2 Cor. you that walk along the way. to meet them. But there is himself into an angel of light. Now. by the word of thy lips I have kept me from the paths of . said they. ! do you think is They reason gether. -. This done. Then said Christian to his fellow. them with coming towards a whip last . this man had been he. 4. saying. for they could not get themselves out. - that in a little : time their faces were turned away from it yet they followed him. he chastised them sore. who bid us. 27. Why? They said they forgot. lest he should prove a Flat. that hath transformed dream Ath. for hoth seemed therefore here they stood straight before them And as they were thinking about still to consider.— hope God will also deliver us — out.. 15. Hope. and Ignorance followed. They're scourged to boot: let this your caution be. spreadeth a net for his feet. Now do Did not the Shepherds I see myself in an error. and sent on their way them the good way wherein they Then I saw to lie .

They begin at the beginning of I will ask you a question. he is one of the Flatterers Hopeful's gra. when at home.) do I rejoice in hope of God. but find no more of a fruit of the honesty of thy heart. have both heard. that one of the Shepherds bid us beware of the Enchanted Ground ? He meant by that. but to prove thee.-ajid. Had not I. and that in spite of hell. and have been seeking myself. we never wake more. I do to now begin : I can hold open mine eyes let us lie down here. a fruit of an As for this man. Where God began with us but do you begin. but let us watch. Chr. 15. it than I did the first day I set out.remember what it cost us once cious answer. x. their conversion. and let us believe to the saving £f™JjiSrt me When saints do sleepy grow. into a certain naturally drowsy. You should have taught . lest the Remembrance man with the wlli P overtake US of former chas. which I will round " Cease. keep ope their drowsy slumb'ring eyes. Is it true proveth his brother. if you please. my brother.r . and be sober. Thus to "jj""" S of the soid. Now glory . if country whose air tended to make one he came a stranger into begins And here hopeful Hopeful began to be very dull t0 be drowsy. I know that he is honest heart.) I say. Where shall we begin ? Hope. went his way. cease to hear him. 37. xvii. knowing that we have belief of the truth and " no lie is j I : of the truth. there is . this found. 6. wh j cll th j s man hath ga . said the othor. (Eccl.) Hitherto hath thy company been my mercy and thou shalt have a good reward for thy labour. . said Christian. I did not put the question to Then Christian began. : than one. are we not now to walk gate of the City ? by faith ? (2 Cor. I acknowledge myself in fault been here alone. it. and to fetch from thee twenty years. ." (1 John ii. The Atheist content^ world. I had by sleepHe ing run the danger of death. 9. and said.) Let thee and me go on. v. Chr. Hope. for I have gone to seek farthel ' it than again. J They come to dream. that they went the Enchanted Ground. xix. Hope. on until they came of the Hope. I had not come thus far to seek but finding none. m y gQn to kg^. Chr. d ? Mope. £1. the other lest. t^ e j ns ruc tion that causeth to err from the words of knowledge. sleepso grow drowsy. came you to think at first of doing How thee for that I doubted of the truth of your belief what you do now ? . I then saw in my -. hear let present tempta- : them come hither. What no Mount Zion ? Did we not see from the Delectable Mountains the Also.again. and will seek ? m (1 Thess. ! Hope. v. Why. Then said Christian to Christian Hopeful his companion. how these two pilgrims talk together them learn of them in any wise . . said unto Christian. you in the ears withal tion. My brother. Chr. 15. and heavy to sleep wherefore he ." (Eccl. and take one nap.. Good disoot)rse preventeth to prevent drowsiness in this place. laughing at them.— 64 hearing went out to this city these THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS." as do others . Jer. " Two are better . 39. my brother ? sleep sweet to the labouring man we may be refreshed. Keeps them awake. ™ . . . Do you not remember. drowsiness. ^ (." (Prov. said christian keeps him awake. ing. x. Chr. already for our hearkening to such kind of fellows. Heb. that scarcely . We Chr.) Let us go on. 7. believed. By no means. I will sing you first this song : that lesson. that we should beware of sleeping " wherefore let us not sleep. (and yet I should. Saints' fellowship. let And Yea. I see. So they turned away from the man and he. Take heed. g ^^ had true that the wise man saith.) >) l am % o{n % back to refresh my- self with the things that I then cast away for hopes of that which I now see is not. had there been such a place to be Chr. let us fall into good discourse. Ath. . I see I it is . blinded by the god of this world. that such a place to be found. if we take a is nap. and believe. if it be managed well. iv. Now. With all my heart. then.

death for his faith and good living in Vanity Fair. it ^. at last. what was it that brought your sins to book uncrossed. speak—23. I continued a great while in the delight of those things which were seen and sold at our . their 2. Luke xvii. of a sinner. ii. that I could not bear. Another thing that hath troubled me ever since my late amendments. mine head did begin to ache or. The causes were— 1. worse than I was before. if I did but think of Also I delighted much in rioting. ' We all are unprofit- at first begins the conversion (Isa. Hope. since you were now reformed ? Hope. Hope. if his old debt stands him. And did you presently fall under the did I. too much here to relate. 21 duties. I am sure to be damned. is. I never Reasons of his thought that by J awakenings ° for sin. Yes. 6. . of my conscience and then. uncleanness. or." " When ye — n ^od „ have done able. as of your trouble ? it seems. thought no longer shake off ^ uilt ^ things that are divine. when my mind shaken with the word. with ease. when by any of these ways tion and destruction. Hope. But what was the cause of your carrying of it thus to the first workings of God's blessed Spirit upon you ? Hope. . by hearing and considering of vourto mendmylife. that if I look . Why. 7. revelling. Chr. tell and I was how Sin was yet very sweet to my it. Eph.) From whence I began 16. and after that shall pay for all that he shall {^w troubled : fetch . (though my mind was turned against it. with many others. And could you at any time. and that over the "against the 8.) it would be double torment to me. Why. Hope. I thought I must endea. or. These things Chr. before conm-. The hours in which convictions were upon me. But how shall I be freed from that damnation that I brought myself in danger of by my former transgressions ? very good application but pray go on. for a while but at Then he Hopeful at first the evil of sin. that was put to Chr. which indeed I heard of I. . must quickly come to judgment. drink. Chr. 65 . If I thought of dying myself. not so much as the remembrance of them upon my heart. Yes. to shut mine eyes against the light thereof. Ixiv. that I . not I for then they got faster hold Hope. How came that about. Chr. were such troublesome and such heart-affrighting hours."— " By the works of hel ?' and why man shall be justified . ." (Rom. man ' . then it is but a I farther folly to think of heaven by the law. Chr. under all my score present amendments. but " for these things' sake. nay. power of this conviction ? Chr. you. yet. as praying. neck of all my reformations. what 1." all these things. Yes. lost his sense of sin. Chr. and what not. and how did yon apply this to still in the mind again Hope. And how did you do then ? Blon that tended to destroy the soul. Chr. No I was not willing presently to know Hope. toll If I heard the bell . verily but it would come into my mind again. lying. and that my now reforming will not pay off that therefore I should think still. flesh. And did you endeavour to then he endeavours to mend. I continued in them still. we are yet unprofitable. ° resisting the light. with myself thus . it . thought thus If a man runs a hundred pounds His being a into the shopkeeper's debt. What things were they ? Hope.or else. with many more such like. Do you mean. the shopkeeper may sue him for it. &c. Hope. 10 . weeping for sin. And did you think yourself well then ? Hope. no. fair things which I believe now would have. . say. the wrath of God cometh sinful company too. were 5. If I were told that some of my neighbours If sick .sabbath-breaking. have heard any read r. and betook me to religious upon the children of disobedience. There were several things brought it upon me. Well. light. v.When he C0(lld But I found. and cast him into prison till he shall pay the debt. at first began to be but endeavoured.get off the guilt of sin. Chr. and then I should be as bad. vi. All the treasures and riches of the world.) ing truth to my neighbours. I was ignorant that this was the work of God upon me. that is my meaning. ' ' ^ . as. "When he had ? yourself ? Many things .THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.going back to sin. If I did but meet a good j n fa streets or ' . A : . especially such sayings as Reformation at these : " All our righteousnesses are last could not - as filthy rags the law no . nor the damnation the last my trouble came tumbling thought himself 8 8 tnat upon follows the commission of upon me again. how I came at first to look after the good of my soul ? But especially when I thought of myself. men(j 9 that " the end of these things is death . Then. drowned me in perdi. 3. No. I could not to part with mine old companions. I thought thus with myself: I have by my sins run a great way into God's book. m fa £ible 3. Hopeful's life in °> swearing. 6. Gal. If I heard that sudden death happened to others : 6. had Chr. Chr. 1* I . sometimes you got rid law no man can be justified and if. when we have done all. by the deeds presence and actions were so desirable unto me. Yes and fled from not only my sins. brought again. as also of beloved Faithful. 4. sinful courses. 4. it came upon you ? Chr. . Hope. reading. ." and that Hope. : loth to leave to reason If my righteousof the nesses are as filthy rags if . for some that were dead or.

I have committed sin enough in one day to send me to hell.. moreover.. Go. no. to whom his doings. xv. Chr. " If it tarry.) Then he gave me a book of Jesus's inditing. mine own infirmity. and Thy Son Jesus Christ should be : Chr. more nor fourth. 30. 16. £u rj conv i c ti n about it. that thou art willing to bestow him upon such a poor sinner as I am. new sin.. I made my objections He doubts of acceptation. that there was such a man to be found. should be imputed. even by trusting to what he hath done by been told me. Heb.) But I sinner : replied. and the sin which cleaves to my best performance. and see. and he told me it was the Lord Hope. xxv. for nothing but hell. structed. 35. forced to conclude. And withal this came leave off praytold me he was the mighty God. I still see sin. but for it. when at first he sugit to you. . and He prays.. Yes. and how. and died the death also. But did you think. and magnify Thy grace in the salvation of my soul. : showed me his Son. 13. x. and a hundred times He thought to *. am . take therefore this opportunity. 22. troubled him. the Father to reveal him to me. and thou him upon a mercy-seat. Lev. Hope. for that I thought he was not willing to save me. . N 0j for j wa8 i nv ited to come.) and thus it was :— one day Christ is revealed I was very sad. but with the eyes of mine understanding. to give pardon and forgiveness to them supplications to shalt find that come. that without the righteous himself in the days of his flesh. over. though my former life had been faultless. I had neither. (and I am a sinner indeed :) Lord. I must entreat upon my knees. could save me. very great and he answered. Do I could not tell what to do. I did not see him with my bodily eyes. over. And what did you do then ? Hope. of whom it might justly be said. that. (Ps. And did you ask him what man this was. that he never committed sin ? Hope. i. Lord. and the everlasting damnation of my soul. Hi hand of the Most h and tllU8 Chr. I think sadder than to him. how that man's righteousness could be of that I die. wait in ^' and did. If I leave off. xxix.with myself. . because it will surely come. that dwelleth on the right twice told. 2 Pet. 31. I am a great. iv. (Matt. Chr. Yes. i. 12. Lord. : > : * for me. that I knew not what to say when I came. Hope.Jesus. And what was the reason you did not ? g oMh™'To be saved. (Matt. Chr. and the worthiness of them. iv. it was presumption. And did you do as you were bidden ? Hope. xcv. What why I could not tell what to do. what I must do when I came ? And he told me. Jer. And did the Father reveal the Son to you? but.Y mind to This made him l break his miud he and I were well acquainted and . how I must make my narrowly into the best of what I do now. thought I. nor have heard that the righteousness of the world. nor at the sixth time started at talk and company with him. leave off prayA more partk-u. until broke Faithful for . i n g. suddenly. xi. and saying. as I thought. " My grace is sufficient . Not at the first. (Exod." (Hab. 10. He bid me go to him. 19 . (Eph. and suffered when ness of this Christ all the world could not save me he did hang on the tree. I believed that it was true which had him. to justify another before God ? And he of grace. Dan. Had he told me so when I was pleased and satisfied with mine own amendments. after a little ! . And how was he revealed unto you ? Hope. Yes. ii.) Then I asked him. that every jot and tittle thereof stood firmer than heaven and earth.) where he sits alb the year long. I had called him fool for his pains but now. I saw the Lord Jesus look down from heaven upon me. 6. I must confess the words at first sounded gested strangely . and will not At which he Chr. and I can but die at the throne He durstnot efficacy. 2. w „ THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. mixing itself with . since I see . nor third. hast ordained that am utterly cast away. and over." Chr. " Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ. I told him. me a sinner. „ .) with all my heart and soul.) So I continued praying. present.said. 28. And did you think he spake true ? Hope." and " . xxiv. until against my believing. his Jho^told him the lie way to be unless * could obtain the righteousness of a man that never told tliat jla[ i me righteousness had not been. Chr. or I have riot faith in saved. all s i nne(j j neither mine own. so that now bad things In the best of that I do : his best. the Saviour of the world and. not for himself. Thou art a merciful God. And as I was then looking the Father . And what said Faithful to you then ? Hope. Chr. I have been forced to be of his opinion. at any one time in my life and this sadness was through a fresh sight of the greatness and vileness of my sins. ' him ? And he said. What did you do then ? Chr. if I believed on him. i. 3. And what did you do then ? Hope. Had you not thoughts of leaving off Col. 18. Then I He is better in. tarry. I I I see. and did what he into my mind.) praying ? Hope. Chr. and thou shalt be saved. nor fifth. you must be justified by Hope. Chr. and therefore. and how you must be justified by him ? (Rom. xi. I asked him. Amen. nor second. said he. through Thy Son Jesus Christ. Then I asked him further. Heb." (Acts xvi. He said. to wit. further. make me for know and that if : believe in Jesus Christ that righteousness. ! say to this effect ful to he bid me —" And God be merci- He to is bid to P ra y- m . j withstanding my former fond conceits of myself and duties. to encourage me the more freely to come and he said. not. concerning that book.

back. that Hopeful looked and saw Ignorance. xiii. I could spill it all for the sake of the Lord Jesus. But I trow it would not have hurt him." thinketh otherwise. Chr.) but. before now. his The wise man heart says. Why I think of God and heaven. however. That I doubt for to leave all is a very hard matter yea. vii. said he. What good motions Pray tell us. and the I not tell > into my mind to comfort me ? as I S round of it- came a thought into my heart. had he kept pace with us hitherto. Lord. must for thee. I said. for I am alIgnorarce g ways full of good motions. and for satisfaction for my sins by his blood. " He that cometh to me shall never hunger. But. That I think he doth us tarry for him. My heart is tells me so. but for him that will accept it for his sal- and be thankful. That is true but I'll warrant you he . 26. and leave all for Christian.) Then I said. and long to do something for the honour and glory of the name of the Lord Jesus. So do the devils and damned gallons of blood in my body. I thought that. Ignor. that come hope. in Christ. coming after. what is believthen I saw from that saying. I consider of thee in faith my coming to thee. I see him he careth not for our company. . " He that trusteth in own is a is fool. he be just. 15. was not for make 4. I take . But. whom they had behind. and I asked further. he indeed believed Then the water stood in mine eyes. that I must look for righteousness in his person. notwithstanding all the righteousness thereof. and let us talk away the time in this solitary place." (Prov. left saw then. 35. Chr. behind ? why do you stay so rauce comes up Ignor. Rom. Chr. I hope well. Look. however. That (Prov. 37. I Ignor. that what he did in obedience to his Father's law. xxviii. the sense of mine own ignorance with for there never me you he cared not for our company ? But.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. in my dream. Then. it my pany. . Ignor. This was a revelation of Christ to your but tell me particularly what effect soul indeed this had upon your spirit. and in submitting to the penalty thereof. how do you do ? How stands it between God and your soul now ? Ignor. my former and confounded . souls. is in a state of condemnation : . mine eyes full of tears. but Hope. It made me see that all the world." (1 Tim. and there. them. may such a great sinner as I am be indeed accepted by thee. Chr. a harder matter than many are aware of.) From all which I gathered. Ignor. But I think of them. Heb. he said. But how dost thou prove that ? F 2 . that is.Hopeful. But how. " And him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out. that my be placed aright upon thee ? Then he said. how far yonder youngster : loitereth behind. Chr. though. and rose again for our justification he loved us and washed us from our sins in his own blood he he ever liveth to is mediator betwixt God and us to every : : : : intercession for us. (but softly. But why. himself. even more pleasure in walking alone a great deal than in comTheir talk.) Hope. Come. that showed me so the beauty of Jesus Christ it made me love a holy life. come up. Lord. and be saved by thee ? And I heard him say. (So they did. Chr. So do many that are never like to come " The soul of the sluggard desireth. ran out in his heart and affections after salvation by Christ. 4. : Then Did said Christian to. i. yea. it made me see that God the of the Father. and ways of Jesus Christ. Come Young Ignoa S aiu - ing And away." (John vi. let mine a good one. or for what. directing his speech to Ignorance. Hope. Chr. Ay. people. " Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners : may he is the end of the law for righteousness one that believes he died for our sins. man. had I now a thousand : walk. art thou persuaded that thou hast left all for God and heaven ? . Lord. m. But I think of them and desire them. Chr. vation. unless I like the better. and mine affections running over with love to the name. said he to hath nothing. And now was my heart full of joy. ay." (1 John vi.) spoken of an evil heart. Chr. x.) and that that believing and coming was all one he that came. 25." ? 67 Then Then Christian said to him. can justly justify the coming sinner vileness of it made me greatly ashamed life.) Ignor. and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. 24.

Therefore this faith is deceitful. Chr. and when the thoughts of our hearts and ways agree with the judgment which the word giveth of both. when we think that he knows us better than we know ourselves. Even (as I have said concerning ourselves) when our thoughts of God do agree with what the word saith of him and that is. (which Rom. Chr. then hath he good thoughts of his own ways. Ignor. flying for refuge unto Christ's righteousness . My heart tells me so. It comforts me thoughts of now agree with the judgment of the word God. Ignor. thy obedience accepted with God. because agreeing thereto. vi. What be good thoughts respecting ourIgnor. it. then are our thoughts good ones. But let Chr. (Prov.) say. that man's ways are crooked ways. hav- Or thus : Christ makes 'my duties. As the takes justification from the personal righteousness of Christ." It saith also. on. even such as will leave thee under wrath in the day of God Almighty : for true justifying faith puts the soul. what dost thou think in this matter ? Ignor. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and that is a good life that is according to always open unto his eyes also. justifier of This faith maketh not Christ a . I will never believe that merits and so shall I be justified. How ! when thou seest not Think thou must believe in Christ. Chr. ii. upon good way. ways of his —I 17. by virtue of his ing sense thereof. some God. when we think that all our righteousness stinks in his nostrils. f neither seest thy original nor actual infirmities Chr. Ignor. but hast such an opinion of thyself. then. because his — righteousness of his is not an act of grace by which he maketh. Chr. Ignor. Pray. the word of God saith. . How dost thou believe ? for sinners • Ignor. — think so. Such as agree with the word Ignor. But therefore my heart and life agree together my hope is well grounded. so it passeth a judgment upon our ways. gination of man's heart is evil from his youth. which the word passes. Ignor. and of what thou dost. But not a good heart that hath good thoughts ? and is not that a good life that is according to God's commandments ? Chr. That may be through its deceitfulness . of ourselves. " Ask my fellow if I be a thief. Thou Thou believest with a fantastical faith: for Therefore thou never hadst one good thought concerning thyself in thy life. and another thing only to . and some other things. to be short. 5. dost thou say. (Ps." Now. and a life according to God's commandments ? Chr. Why.: . that " Every imathe gination of the heart of man is only evil. How. when a man thus thinketh when he doth sensibly. that they have not known 15. and life Chr. When we pass the same judgment upon ourselves. and that continually. believest with a false faith because it me go word passeth a judgment upon our hearts. and that therefore he cannot abide to see us stand . 1. even in all our best performances. Make out your meaning. but of thy actions and of thy person for thy action's sake. Why. . when we think of his being and attributes as the word hath taught of which I cannot now discourse at large. that I God's commandments but it is one thing indeed to have these.) And again. some Christ. because according to the word of God. " There is none righteous. as plainly renders thee to be one that did never see the necessity of Christ's personal righteousness to justify thee before God. I believe that Christ died and that I shall be justified before God from the curse through his gracious acceptance of The" faith of Ignorance. there is none that doeth good. in doing and suffering for us what that required at . do our thoughts. which is false." (Gen. they are naturally out of the : thy person. cxxv. I believe well enough for all that. and that our heart. 4. Chr. — this faith is 2. is Ignor. when we think thus of ourselves. Ignor. Why. formances ? Chr. Ignor. and with heart-humiliation. for justification. it to thy own. before him in any confidence. hopes of heaven. . Let me give an answer to this confession of faith my heart is thus thy bad. But to speak of him with reference to us then have we right thoughts of God. thy need of him Thou ! selves ? "What are good thoughts. that is a good heart that hath good thoughts. I think I must believe in Christ for justification. To explain myword of God saith of persons in a natural condition. self . other testimony is ! What are good thoughts concerning God ? Chr. hi. Chr. with is it all its depths. would come to God in the best of my per- what count you good thoughts. then. as sensible of its lost condition by the law. 5. . There are good thoughts of divers kinds some respecting ourselves. Ignor. for a man's heart may minister comfort to him in the hopes of that thing.) not good. and can see sin in us when and where we can see none in ourselves . Do you God think that think that I am such a fool as to can see no farther than I ? or. nowhere described in the^word. Yes. my obedience to his laws. thus think. for which he has yet no ground in to hope. acceptable to his Father . but his personal obedience to the law. Now." The ima- Ignor. I believe in Christ ? agree with the word of God? Chr. Who told thee that thy heart and agree together." Thy heart tells thee so Except the word of God beareth witness in this matter. and applies 3. that are reli- gious. of no value. When God. . thoughts. but perverse it saith. when we think he knows our inmost . then are both good.

whole streets. by which the soul layeth hold upon Christ." &c. xi. wilt thou yet foolish be To slight good counsel. break its peace. You ought not so slightly to speak of this matter for this I will boldly affirm. for you are the elder man. But let us return to our matter. that thou Christ in his own person hath done without . How will you describe right fear ? Chr. Chr. and people. now we are by . : ! . convictions of sin and so. Ignorance. Ask him if ever he had Christ revealed to him from heaven. my though I have head so many whimsies Chr. Remember. it is accepted. that they went on apace before. lest they should see. not is as __• mme good : T Y et mine. I do believe. all the rest of you say about that . . great reverence of God. consequently." (Job xxviii. true faith Then fellow : Christian addressed himself thus to his under the skirt of which the soul being shrouded. Ignorance jan.) the working of which faith. So I saw in my dream. What you are a man for revelations Christ. the natural apprehensions of the flesh. " He hath blinded their eyes. grieve the Spirit. " The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom. then see thou art ignorant of. tions for sin. Give me leave to put in a word. faith. 27. know not that such convictions as tend to put them in fear. that fear tends much to men's good. think you. we to are. Then I say. Hope. thou wilt be . and continueth in the soul a his word. how many.) thou shalt be Christ but . I'll warrant thee. The eaid talk broke keep pace with do you go on before I must Are we now almost got Ground ? Enchanted U P- stay awhile behind. and tolerate us to live as we list for what matter how we live. do not fear Good counsel taken well. verily. man.— our hands accepteth . and presumptuously continue to flatter them- God in Christ. Be awakened. is which to bow and win think of such men ? Have they at no time. Nay. think you. 1 Cor. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. (Matt. Now. Ignorant thou art of what justifying righteousness is. Chr. Chr. Ignor. xii. in the place But. : : I believe you have said the past the You go y ou so fast I cannot '. i. Well. 17—19 . and as ignorant how to secure thy soul. and making it afraid to turn from them. to the right hand or to the left. Prov. ' the Father reveals him to him. No. Eph. and therefore they seek to stifle them. cxi. We have not now above two miles farther go thereon. and as thy name is. This „ He speaks reproachfully of your . :) CO this righteousness. what do- you effects of saving faith in this righteousness of over the heart to his word. Ignorance. I perceive and I must walk by ourselves again. Why. 10. Yea. I doubt . and to make jhe good use of fear them right at their beginning to go on pilgrimage. and faith too. the ignorant why ignorant persons stifle convictio11 ' . that their state ! . It pities me for this poor man it will certainly go ill : with him at last. where he was born ? Chr. that he can- not by any be savingly known. Why ? are you weary of this discourse ? Hope. to love his name. Ere long. if we may be justified by Christ's personal righteousness from all. whole families. and ways keeping it tender. Hope. so art thou even this thy answer demonstrateth what I say. from the heavy wrath of God. . covered by three things 1. Ignorance is thy name. (for he himself is God. I perceive. Without all doubt it doth. . sometimes (as I think) they may but they. 2.) must be wrought by the exceeding greatness of his mighty power. By its rise it is caused by saving convic: . It driveth the soul to lay fast hold of Christ It begetteth for salvation. unless is . in time stoop. This conceit would loosen the reins of our lusts. must there be ! . even as my good companion hath done. True or right fear is disEight fear. the word saith. not in as you. and Ignorance he came hobbling after. thou shalt know. but that I would know where Well. : : by the revelation of the Father yea. to any thing that may dishonour God. as you say. come. when we believe it? Chr. are for their good. Ignor. I say. fears is dangerous ? Hope. the evil of thy doing so. 7 ix. through the faith of it.) Hope. saves therefore hear. ourselves. is but the fruit of distracted brains.I do believe that what both you and gles with them. 28. thine own wretchedness. Indeed. i. and by it presented as spotless before God. thou also art ignorant of the true : Then much said Christian to his companion. Alas there are abundance in our town in this condition. if it be right for so says the word. Then they Chr. But if thou yet shalt slight it. God but not. which is the righteousness of God. that no man can know Jesus : Hope. and fly to the Lord Jesus and by his righteousness. or cause the reproachfully. matter. ten times given thee ? And if thou yet refuse it. and that of pilgrims too and if there be so many in our parts. Ps. poor Ignorance. yea. Chr. 3. Iqnor. (if it be right. . 10. man man Christ is so hid in God from selves in the way of their own hearts. Ignor. do you answer that question yourself. — The loser. and not as thou ignorantly imaginest. ! Hope. being naturally ignorant. understand not that such convictions tend to their good and therefore they do desperately seek to stiflethem. Well said truth. and acquitted from condemnation. ways. Hope. What would you have ! us trust to what us ? my good Hopeful. enemy to speak delivered from condemnation. 3. . what he knows as yours.

Hope. that man was much once. He told me once that he was resolved to go on pilgrimage. he would ofttimes come to me. 2. Hope. Hope. sorrow and the . he would be : . fall in with the world again. for the bottom of all is. w and so they 3. awakened. and not to run (for they know . So then fear is it comes when their guilt and from them their fore pitiful old self-holiness. and judgment curbing their like. if his mind was changed. and are safe but because they do. Temporary. I know something of this myself. desires being not at . that also. " The dog is turned to his own vomit again. when once they are rid of their awakenings about the terrors and wrath of God." (Prov. they resist them. it was so with me. a town about two miles off of Where he dwelt. they have slavish fears that do overmaster that they have of they resist them with all their might. 22. Chr. xxix." (2 Pet. And therefore they are but like the felon that standeth before the judge he quakes fly . You are pretty near the business. might make them whither the righteous fly. then. it is not ! Know him yes. we will leave. and seems to repent most heartily but the bottom of all is. and choose such ways as will harden them more and more. lusts. when that terror is a little over. Though the consciences of are therefore. How the apos- even as we see the dog that is sick of what he hath that they may. : Hope. They that directly tend to their overthrow. otherwise. and casts (if it mind. them : men . as because. So I will willingly 1. and so a rogue still. and then he became a stranger to me. his all alienated from his vomit. about ten years Talk about one ago. when all . up Then they for sin. so . bringeth a snare. yet their minds Eeasons why towardly ones g0 ac " : Hope. eaten. their desires for heaven and salvation cool to pass. they return again former course. namely. chills and cools. I say. all fore they naturally turn to their old course again They draw of off their thoughts. he turns him about. Another reason is. poor men that their faith devil. before I knew myself. and licks up all and so it is true which is written. they harden their hearts^ gladly. I am of your mind. bo was a forward man in religion not what) the hazard of losing all." Chr.) though they seem to be hot for heaven so long as the flames of hell are about their ears. 1. cause not that he doth this of a free we may say a dog has a mind. God. and fear of damnation. whereas. Right he dwelt under the same roof with He was towardly him. that which provoked them to be religious ceaseth. he vomits membrance 2. and was not altogether without hope of him but one may see. and of the wages that were due thereto. Guilt. my house not being above three miles from him. they have none at all 3.) Thus. alas for them. and . With all my heart but you shall still : So then. watching. as we go now. awakened once I believe that then he had some sight of his sins. at this time. let us a little inquire into the reason of the sudden backsliding of him and such others. Well. and he will be a thief. Chr. Honesty. Chr. They see that those fears tend to take away ! being hot for heaven. 25. or at least of bringing themselves into unavoidable and unnecessary troubles wise. by virtue only of the sense and fear of the torments of hell as their sense of hell. They they harden their hearts against them. They think that those fears are wrought by the (though indeed they are wrought of so. It may be very profitable but do you . wherethe : when their going back. to comeduties. thereof. that it is good to be begin. presume they ought not to fear. he dwelt in Graceless. death. yet. Lord. . one Temporary in your parts. to their . ii. 4. from the recast off tate goes back. so long as his sickness prevails. and he dwelt next door to one Turnback. therefore when they have lost their sense of hell and the wrath to come. if they loved that sight. : and religion in their eye is low and contemptible . God . as I hinted before. it : my judgment such men are not changed and trembles.) and thinking and so his stomach eased.) but betroubleth his stomach. let but this man have his it is evident liberty. Chr. : every one that cries. for want of a change in their mind and will. and therefore in despite of them wax presumptuously confident. . as things 2. for. and they return to their course again. and therefor gone. and fall upon another profitable question. our neighbour Ignorance by himself. 4. do showed you the reason of you show me the manner : Chr. " Lord. then? Hope. I speak now of the fears " for the fear of man Chr. his sickness is over. and that with many tears. Well. did you know. their desires for heaven and happiness die. . then. they betake themselves to second thoughts. even shun the thoughts of guilt and terror. Hope. since we are talking about him.— 70 — THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. the fear of the halter not that he hath any detestation of the offence. Truly I pitied the man. Well. Now I have power of guilt weareth away. are grievous to : them they like not to see their misery before they come into it though perhaps the sight of it at first. and therefore they are. to meditate terror. But now. also think that these fears tend to the spoiling of when. Now. Well. block in their The shame that attends religion lies also as a way they are proud and haughty. there are in four reasons for 1. Hope. but all of a sudden he grew acquainted with one Save -self. by degrees private as closet prayer. therefore. begin. How do they seek to stifle them ? Chr.

warm 4. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. tants thereof. and their gates opened into the highway. vineyards. they had more rejoicing than in parts more remote from the .. thy salvation cometh Behold. Then they begin to pick holes. 8. night and day wherefore this was beyond the Valley of the Shadow of Death. the I saw in my dream. Hopeful also had It stones. They are the King's. and came yet nearer and nearer. they everlastingly perish in their own deceivings. 3.) whose air was very . Behold. being hardened. that they may more boldly do it through their ex- ample. where were orchards. unless a miracle of grace prevent it. and that devilishly. Whose goodly vineyards and gardens are these ? He answered. behold the gardener stood in the the pilgrims said. and the like. . Song 10-^12. and saw every day the flowers appear in the earth." &c. loud voices. and wanton men. 5. 71 . also the . Wherefore here they lay by it a while. Then they shun Christians. his reward is with him " Here all the inhabitants of the country called them. was builded of pearls and precious streets thereof were paved with gold so that by reason of the natural glory of the city." Here they had no want of corn and wine for in this place they met with abundance of what they had sought for in all their pilgrimage. (Isa. the company of lively and kingdom thereof. carnal. saying. as they walked in this land. they walked on their way. the redeemed of the Lord. " Say ye to the daughter of Zion. and also out of the reach of Giant neither could they from this Despair Here they were so much as see Do\ibting Castle. And then. they solaced themselves there Yea. " If ye see my beloved. Now. 7. sweet and pleasant the way lying directly through it. 9. so doth their God rejoice over them. godly conference. : . Then they begin to adhere to. to which they were bound and drawing near to the City. that they may have a seeming colour to throw religion (for the sake of some infirmities they have espied in them) behind their backs. as we say. After this they begin to play with little sins openly. " as the bridegroom rejoiceth over the bride. being launched again into the gulf of misery. they had yet a more perfect view After that they grow cold to public duty as hearing. 6. because it was upon the borders of heaven. within sight of the City they were going to also here met them some of the inhabi. Christian with desire fell sick. they Thus. crying out because of their pangs." But. in the coats of some of the godly. that by this pilgrims were got over the into the Enchanted Ground. and heard the voice of the turtle in the In this country the sun shineth land. being a little strengthened. loose. was renewed : yea. show themselves as they are. reading. here they heard confor a season. : . and associate themselves with. and the reflection of the sunbeams upon it. and are planted here for his to these places. 4 — 12. Then they give way to carnal and wanton discourses in secret and glad are they if they can see such things in . Now as they came up . and better able to bear their sickness. lxii. for in this land the Shining Ones commonly walked. way to whom own delight. " The holy people. and also for the solace of pilgrims. sought out. and gardens. tell him that I am sick of love. Now time country Sol. the any that are counted honest. ! ! a fit or two of the same disease. and entering of ii. tinually the singing of birds. In this land also the contract between the Bride and the Bridegroom : . Here they heard voices from out of the City. Beulah.

been permitted to tread . the billows go over my head all his waves go over me. but through an instrument made for that purpose. that he was It was also troubled with apparitions of hobgoblins and evil spirits. and then. They then addressed themselves to the water. and men standing by to receive us but Christian would answer. and the enemy was after they were gone Christian therefore presently found ground over. and looked this way world into glory. 72 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. but no way could be Angels help us found by them. Jesus Christ maketh thee whole. said he to Christian. These troubles and distresses that you go through in these waters. he would now arise to help me . " to go down be : Now deep waters. with in the the way . to wit. they will be with thee shall not overflow thee. they had met . I sink in (Deut. what difficulties and dangers. but for my sins he hath brought me into the snare and hath left me. and. You must go through. them in that case for. ! . . ' asleep to speak.sound. and live upon him in your . Also here he in a great said Christian. nor shall until the last distresses. you shall find it both took that as deeper or shallower. crying out to his good friend Hopeful.". « «i • .. Ah. No . that betwixt : Death. I see the gate. which they might Then they asked -. To whom ' ! ..) was so extremely glorious. Then said Hopeful. said they. so that he could not see before him. that he had horror of mind. that At the sight. 2 Cor. 18. my brother I feel the bottom. he said. very deep. they are not troubled as other went with them said. as they went on. But. 2. iii. brother. through death. And with that a great darkness and flict at the hour of death horror fell upon Christian. also their faces shone as the light. you must obtain it by your own faith. the gardener said even to me. observed. all ol a yet they could not help dream. if there was no other way to the gate ? To which they answered. the men if the waters were » depth ? They said. that they went on together till they came in sight of the gate. as I said.christian detian brake out with a loud voice.. that they could not as yet with open face behold it. sometimes he would be quite gone down. remember nor orderly talk of any of those sweet refreshments that he had met with in the way of his pilgrimage. Here also. Christian then and his companion asked the to _ men go along with them : so they told them that they would. Christian began to sink. and heart-fears that he should die in that river. Now I further saw. They also asked them where they had lodged. Hopeful did also endeavour to comfort him. that Christian was in also Hopeful added these words. that path since the foundation of the world. said they. and so it followed that the to courage. their death. Then said the other. The pilgrims then. men. for ever and anon he would intimate so still These men asked the pilgrims whence they came and they told them.) Then they Then I saw in my a muse a while. .. xliii. I and through the rivers. Yes but there hath not any. save two. And so have you. of this river forgot the text. 'Tis you. but their the pilgrims were much stunned. Enoch and Elijah. by not comfortably escape the river. You have but two diffimore to meet with. 21 . so sweetly as to cause the lips of them that are Ah my friend. them and the gate was a river but there was no bridge to go over the river was : Hopeful therefore here had much ado to keep his brother's head above water yea. refresh So the gardener had them into the vineyards. And with that Chris. and it is good. much by words. trumpet shall Death not wel. I see him again and he tells me. whether you will call to mind that which heretofore you have received of his goodness. are no sign that God hath forsaken you but are sent to try you. where it " There are no bands in is said of the wicked. Christian s com . as you believe in the King of the place. xxi. My brother. neither are they plagued like other men. you have quite . So I saw that. " When thou passest through the waters. until ." measure lost his senses. 'tis you they wait for for you have been hopeful ever since I knew you. Then • . The pilgrims then began to inquire. Then said men culties met them. and never obtain entrance in at the gate. where he delighted to and here they tarried and slept. what comforts and pleasures. stand upon. I beheld in my dream. Be of good cheer. he was much in the troublesome thoughts of the sins that he had committed. saying. but the men strength is firm . xxiii. that they talked more in their sleep at this time than ever they did and being in a muse therein all their journey about. they addressed themselves to go up to the City. (said he. as still a stone. . the sorrow of death hath compassed me about I shall not see the land that flows with milk and honey. . especome to nature. as they that stood by perceived. the reflection of the sun upon the City (for the City was pure gold) (Rev. and then you are in the that City. . began to despond pass out of this i n his mind. and. both since and before he began to be a pilgrim. therefore. But. 18." (Isa. and they told them. . so that he could neither So I saw that when they awoke. . But all the words that he spoke tended to discover. there met them two men in raiment that shone like gold. and bid them themselves with the dainties.) he also showed them there the King's walks and harbours. Selah. he would rise up again half dead. ere a while. entering. or you cannot come at sight of the gate.~ . Brother. livered from his fears in death Oh.) surely if I was right. and that . Wherefore musest thou at the matter ? it is the nature of the fruit of the grapes of these vineyards.? though by it we cially Christian. Be of good cheer. So I saw in my dream.

each one walking in his righteousness. There your eyes shall be delighted with seeing. they walked on together. the innumerable company of angels. come with sound of trumpet in the clouds. is " Mount Zion. 7. wherein you shall see the tree of life. There. who Now. they came out without them. slia11 Now. 7 iii. 22 24. you shall have white robes given you. before the bank of the river. they compassed them round on every some went before. 9. and with hearing their melodious notes. that the City stood upon a but the pilgrims went up that hill with ease. some on the left. the heavenly Jerusalem. when they were in the world. r iver. or pen. continually with praise. therefore. being comforted. and enjoy the perpetual sight and vision of the Holy One for " there you shall see him as he is. xix." . These are the men that have loved our Lord. . . and with what gladness they came to meet them. even with joyful sound. upon Wherefore being come there waited for them. They therefore went up here with much agility and speed. . above all.. The talk that they had with the shining ones was about the glory of the place. What must we do in the holy place ? To whom it was answered. and to the prophets. Now. 9. as upon the wings of the wind.! THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. before they came at it. they saluted them. and tears. to the paradise of God. 17. vi. and the spirits of just men made perfect. you shall go too. . . as it were. and his fellow with ten thousand welcomes from and this they did with shouting and the world . saying. sickness. because of the infirmity of your flesh. : your friends again that are gone thither and there you shall with -joy receive even every one that follows into the holy place There also you shall be clothed with after you. (as it were to guard them through the upper regions. with melodious so that the very sight was noise. ever and anon these trumpeters." The men then asked. and Jacob.) days of eternity. Judo Dan. . and thanks- whom you desired to serve in the world. . 8. City. because they were his and your Also when he shall again return to the enemies.) There also you shall serve him sound of trumpet. can their glorious joy be .) continually sounding as they went. and be ever with him. 3. you shall sit by him yea. with sound of trumpet. and we have brought them thus far on their desired journey. are ministering spirits.) 14. for though they went in with them. (1 Thess. and eat of the never-fading fruits thereof and when you come there. when he shall sit upon the throne of judgment.) There came out also at this time to meet them several of the King's trumpeters. behold a company of the heavenly host came you ." (Rev. in notes on high to them that could behold it as if heaven itself were come down to meet them. You must there receive the comfort of all your toil. . . ii." (Heb. . you also shall have a voice in that judgment. some behind. clothed in white and shining raiment. made even the heavens to echo with These trumpeters saluted Christian their sound. because they had these two men to lead them up by the arms they had likewise left their They have put mortal garments behind them in the off mortality. Thus they went along towards the gate. though with much difficulty. with shouting. There you giving." (Isa. (1 John iii. shout. said they. 5. would. glory and majesty. and have joy for all your sorrow you must reap what you have sown. and your walk and talk shall be every day with the King. being swallowed up with the sight of angels. who. in heaven. 15. 2. by mixing their music with looks and gestures. This done. men that God hath taken away from the evil to come. Thus. bo soon as they sent forth to minister for those that are 8 t0f thfs wor°ld. and put into an equipage fit to When he shall ride out with the King of Glory.) In that place you must wear crowns of gold. (Gal. sweetly talking as they went. — : and that have left all for his holy name and he hath sent us to fetch them. and death " for the former things are passed away. l^tfofthem saY in S> We . and your ears with hearing the pleasant voice of the Mighty One. said they. with melodious noises and loud. 16. as they walked. " Blessed are they that are called to the marriage -supper of the Lamb. they saw the two shining men again. vii. expressed ! Thus they came up to the gate. still signify to Christian and his brother how welcome they were into their company.) -You are going now. and sufferings for the King by the way. let them be angels or men. affliction. rest of the river 73 was but shallow : thus they got shall enjoy over. who told them that the beauty and glory of it was inexpressible. the warm and joyful thoughts that they had ahout their own dwelling there. and when he shall pass sentence upon all the workers of iniquity. 4. 2. Here also they had the City and they thought they heard all itself in view : . to Isaac. that they may go in and look their Redeemer in the face' Then the heavenly host gave a great with joy. though the foundation upon which the City was framed was higher than the clouds they therefore went up through the region of the air.) You are going now to Abraham. There you shall not see again such things as you saw when you were in the lower region upon the earth to wit. and. lxv. and had such glorious companions to attend them. the bells therein to ring. on the other side. vi. while they were thus drawing towards the gate. to welcome them thereto. xii. and that for ever and ever oh by what tongue. because they safely got over the river. And now were these two men. But. 1 Cor. and that are now " resting upon their beds. sorrow. be heirs of salvation. and some side on the right hand. 5 xxii. iv. . 10. even the fruit of all your prayers. even all the (Rev. — out to meet them to whom it was said by the other two shining ones. with such company. you shall come with him and. out of the river. you must mighty hill : note. 13 17.

palms in their hands. AND GLORY. and lo and they had raiment put on. I have eat and drank in the presence of the King. and up to the river. " that the righteous nation (said he) that foot. Then said they. neither did . There. and behold. and found none. Now. which when Turn up my metaphors. it was a dream. Then they took him up. the bells in the City rang again for joy. and may enter in through the gates into the city. and bind him hand and gate. man> that with his boat helped him But if thou shalt cast all away as vain. over so he. but commanded the two shining ones. These pilgrims are come from the city of . holy is the Lord Put by the curtains." (Isa. any man meet him with the least encouragement. xxvi. be bold but he soon got over." (Rev. : . xxii. but take heed sing. or neighbour Him that sitteth upon the throne. . to sing praises withal. instead Of doing good.one. that the gates of heaven. and Elijah. therefore. " Holy. Ignorance comes I turned my head to look back. holy. and gave them to them the harps to praise withal. evil ensues. that the shining men bid them call at the gate. : golden harps. that they sang with a loud voice.) Now I saw in my dream. I Now. They are standing without the The King then commanded to open the out. but yet preserve the gold. and take Ignorance. 14. to whom it was said.." (Rev. but he would not come down to see read them. 74 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. with harps and crowns. " Enter ye into the joy have told my Dream to thee. and that CONCLUSION. Put thee into a laughter or a feud. that they may have eight to the tree of life. for ever and ever. that these two men went saw in the side of the hill. just as the gates were opened to let in the By misinterpreting. which they had received in the beginning those. So I awoke. look within my veil. did ascend the I know not but 'twill make me dream a^ain. . when they were come up to the gate. and do not fail. they answered one another without intermission. he looked at the writing that was above. there " was written over it. &c. as they entered.See if thou canst interpret it to me. some from above looked over the gate. AND POWER. to wit. for the love that they bear to the King of this place and then the pilgrims gave in come up to the gate only he came alone. and the crowns in token Then I heard in my dream. I had seen. and that without side half the difficulty which the other two men met To throw away. that conducted Christian and Hopeful to the City. I looked in after them. Then they asked him for his certificate. Blessed are they that do his commandments. such things thou'ltfind As will be helpful to an honest mind. and carried him through the air to the door that I keepeth the truth may enter in. in letters of gold. the King. a ferryferry him over. When he was come up to the gate. For it happened that there was then in What if my gold be wrapped up in ore ? None throws away the apple for the core Vain-hope does that place one Vain-hope. with. and then began to knock. will but thyself abuse the Lamb. I wished myself among them. saying. said. who when he had : ! . And saying. were carried in unto the King. v. Have you none ? So they told but the man answered never a word. King so he fumbled in his bosom^for. and unto Of misinterpreting for that." I also heard the men themselves. 2. There were also that met them struction. to the : unto them each man his certificate. Where are the men ? To whom him. AND HONOUR. it was said unto them. of our Lord. men. that they might go in and show it hill. Enoch.) Then I saw in my dream.) Now. Do thou the substance of my matter see. " Bles. and put him in there. supposing that entrance should have been quickly administered to him but he was asked by the men that looked over the top of the gate. There were also of them that had wings. while I was gazing upon all these things. 13. and he has taught in our streets. that all of honour. Whence come you ? and what would you have ? He answered. the which when they did. if thou seekest them. they were Then I saw that there was a way to hell. . Reader. BE UNTO Or to thyself. after that they shut up the gates. saw Ignorance come up to the riverWhat of my dross thou findest there. as the others I saw." . to . gate. Now. Moses. : . as well as from the city of Detransfigured shone like gold. and Nor let my figure or similitude : Destruction. even from in at the gate . and Leave this for boys and fools but as for thee. to go it was answered. and behold the City Take heed also that thou be not extreme shone like the sun the streets also were paved with gold and in them walked many men with In playing with the outside of my Dream :» crowns on their heads. : '. and have him away.

10. and Have Yea. by disguise. others half my name. to their own my That they do meet with troubles night and day That they have trod on serpents. under his care What goodly mansions he for them provides Though they meet with rough winds and swelling . . his Wife and Children left are. Tell who they are. to come . that they have their house and 'Tis true. been stout and brave Defenders of that way and how they still Refuse this world to do their Father's will. Go now. and that alone will do. Perhaps with heart and hand they will embrace Thee as they did my firstling and will grace Thee and thy fellows with such cheer and fare. Let them acquainted be. . if . Who's there ? Then answer thou. are. Christiana is here. then thine only way. after all. make them But yet they. : If formerly they did not entertain One Christian. also tell overcome a many also of the evils. Lord. then enter thou. tides. and were delighted in his way Then let them know that these related were Unto him . I have used similitudes . a Pilgrim ? If they say. Thinking that you. Where my First Pilgrim has but shown Call at their door : his face. . into Tell them. home . whose e'er they Have stitched to their books. . . is to say out thy say In thine own native language. which no man Now useth. . ARRIVAL AT THE DESIRED COUNTRY. or name But if they should not. xii. if they will not believe of me That I am truly thine ? 'cause some there be That counterfeit the Pilgrim and his name. also from whence they came Perhaps they'll know them by their looks. PART WHEREIN IS II. they of Pilgrims lovers are. If they bid thee come in. And I will testify you Pilgrims be Yea. . But how. Before them all." — Hos. go about In naughty -wise the country to defile Or that you seek good people to beguile With things unwarrantable send for me.. . some nave of late to counterfeit title set title too. like gipsies. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS FROM THIS WORLD TO THAT WHICH IS TO COME. With all thy boys and then. As show well. I will testify that only you My Pilgrims are . ask them yet again. THE AUTHOR'S WAY OF SENDING FORTH HIS SECOND PART OF THE PILGRIM. to seem the very same And by that means have wrought themselves The hands and houses of I know not who. If such thou meet'st with. AND SAFE SET EORTH THE . How brave a Who to their calm they will enjoy at last. nor with ease dissemble can. . to every place. in the way My Pilgrim. and by his ways hold fast. Are turned Pilgrims seek a world That they have met with hardships . They did. DELIVERED UNDER THE SIMILITUDE OF A DREAM.. by their features do declare Themselves not mine to be. MANNER OF THE SETTING OUT OF CHRISTIAN'S WIFE AND CHILDREN THEIR DANGEROUS JOURNEY. . yea. how they are Beloved of their King. as thou know'sthow. Of love to Pilgrimage. Seek. too. to do.. If. Go tell them also of those dainty things That pilgrimage unto the Pilgrim brings. them next who have. OBJECTION I. . any say. they still of you shall doubt. fought with devils Yea. . my little Book.

And do stir the mind To search well after what it fain would find. That speak to us in such a cloudy strain. you draw nearer home. way . worth more than gold. will wish him well. not foes . my Book. loving wise them greet What means. 7C THE AUTHOR'S WAY OF SENDING FORTH OBJECTION II. That doth but show his wisdom's covered With his own mantle. and hear him tell Those pilgrim stories which he knows so well. him commend. some that did not love him at the first. Some say. Highlanders. And Fright not thyself. with delight . their bosoms. hast reveal'd his What Christian left lock'd up. where men other. that have never seen him. A cloud is in his head. . yet admire they have heard of him. when I at such a door shall For Pilgrims ask. Things that seem to be hid in words obscure Do but the godly mind the more allure To study what those sayings should contain. is. and say. His head is in a cloud. let no discouragement Behold thou art sent ! • Young ladies. and wild Irish can agree. His words and stories are so dark. and went Sweet Christiana opens with her key. as I am But some there be that say he laughs too loud And some do say. Now they have seen and heard him. I think I may be bold To say some prize him far above their gold. With Welcome. Receives there so much loving countenance. and thy words embrace. perhaps I may inquire for him Of those who wish him damned life and limb. Pilgrim . while his heart doth ache When Jacob saw his Rachel with the sheep. Say. say. Thou. and much desire They My By all Christiana. That it was slighted or turn'd out of door. Salute him will . and for stable. As yield them profit double to their pains Of reading yea. as rich. in the heart and head.: . To have his company. ANSWER. Wherefore. as to make One's fancy chuckle. and deck'd with gems. to find his mark. for staggering. Besides. But some love not the method of your first throw 't away^as dust. : : By any kingdom. were OBJECTION III In France and Flanders. value it above Things of a greater bulk yea. Wherefore. yea. and their hearts. And will stick faster. They know not how. 'Tis in One may. and young gentlewomen too. both his laughs and cries May well be guess'd at by his watery eyes. Some : That it might show its features. For young. things are of that nature. Pilgrim should familiar with them be. Or shows his head in any company. Hinder thy travels. yea. Pilgrim knows no ground of shame or fear City and country will him entertain. my Book. by them. Than things from similes not borrowed. But yet. they rich or poor. brave Second Pilgrim. my what my first Pilgrim left conceal'd. new cloth'd. thy Pilgrims. kill each My My My Pilgrim is esteem'd a friend. Romance they count it If I should meet with such. 'tis In Holland Pilgrim said. or nay ? . I think. thou need'st not be Afraid to show thy head none can hurt thee. what should I say ? Must I slight them as they slight me. What shall I do. told. Brave gallants do my Pilgrim hug and love. in all . Do no small kindness to my Pilgrim show Their cabinets. for such bugbears Are nothing else but ground for groundless fears. and its limbs. for old. it will appear. if my Pilgrim be but by. But call'd him fool and noddy. . He is the only stripling of the day. with some. I also know a dark similitude Will on the curious fancy more intrude. Yet could I never come to understand to those whom they love they do him send. to friends that will give place thee. To To friends. : . my lark's leg is better than a lute. Yet more so comely doth my Pilgrim walk. If they do but my holy Pilgrim meet. He did at the same time both kiss and weep. If My : Whereas some say.. too. That wish but well to him that went before 'Cause thou com'st after with a second store Of things as good. The very children that do walk the street. . OBJECTION IV. if with such thou meet. a brother. my Second Part. My Pilgrim's book has travell'd sea and land. As to be trimm'd. say they must. and they rage the more ? Yea. That of him thousauds daily sing and talk. as profitable. Esteem it much. New England under such advance. My Pilgrim has 'cause he to them imparts His pretty riddles in such wholesome strains. they can't refrain From smiling.

Go. . Nor Much-afraid his daughter. and touch these strings if 'Twixt idle ones and Pilgrims to discern. will such music make. if PART OF THE PILGRIM. To turn their feet and heart to the right way. in any wise. that go astray. though a very youth Tell every one his spirit was so stout. Those riddles that lie couch'd within thy breast. or some ill . at last. Then When thou hast told the world of ail these things. Found that the Lord of Pilgrims was their friend. see her in her virgin face. And how love no fish. I say. I then. Yea. with It is for my four sons. though weak in One might true godliness read in his face. who its love this And may with fears and cries spirit Is the hearty prayer of And how. slight chicken. and show to all and bid thee welcome shall. Here's my neighbour Mercy she is one That has long time with me a Pilgrim gone Come. HIS SECOND Render them not reviling But. tell them who and what they be That now do go on pilgrimage with thee Say. at the end. to their choice. a giant quake. may this Second Pilgrim yield that fruit As may with each good Pilgrim's fancy suit And may it some persuade. and in opinion much agree. then. my Book. The Author.. 'Tis like those days wherein the young ones cried. Freely propound. Is now. men who thou art am Christiana and my part Overlook not Master Despondency. . let them remain For those whose nimble fancies shall them gain. But pull down Doubting Castle. Leave such. whom you found Now may To those this little Book little a blessing be : With his white hairs treading the Pilgrim's ground Yea. tell all . but sure and. . And Present thee to them in thy Pilgrim's guise. How after his good Lord he bare the cross. slay Despair That man : Go Say. : . And leave old doting sinners to his rod. but still behind would go. Perhaps with some grey head this may prevail With Christ to fall in love. my Christiana. though much down in He is a good man. . let Book. Forget not Master Valiant-for-the-truth. of courage. They softly went. Yea. Then grace : own house or home Some start at pig. not their friends. not before. how he had like been slain. He was a good man. cripple dance. Tell them also On In pilgrimage. and sin bewail. Which. how Master Fearing went how the time he spent Book and me buyer have no cause to say. and learn . turn about. all know. and make them choose to be Pilgrims by better far than thee or me. but much without fault. the other dance. More than they love a cuckoo or an owl. I pr'ythee on them smile 'tis Who This of Master Feeble -mind also. Did love. . though weakness was their chance Yet sometimes one could sing. Show them Has made them Some Love thus despise or thus retort. and some nor their man was true of heart. A man most humble wise. and solitariness. ! . And wish what thou shalt show them may be blest To them for good. tell them how plain-hearted this man was. some love no cheese. he won the joyful prize. What thou shalt keep close shut up from the rest. one Great-heart did his life regain. as may make them look (With some) as if their God had them forsook. with crutches. When little tripping maidens follow God. . And seek those who to find By no means strive. No man could ever make him face about And how Great-heart and he could not forbear. to tell you what men to take a Pilgrim's lot. Tell them how Master Feeble -mind and he. little my That entertain. . . John Bunyan. though they lie Under such mantles. They'll make a but touched. Hosanna Next ! when the. them Perhaps nature. old ones did deride. report. in Go thee will rejoice : tell them of Master Ready-to-halt. .. His money is but lost or thrown away. tell them of old Honest. but. also. expound and for the rest Of thy mysterious lines. . love not fowl. Tell 77 for revile they frown. also. and doth life inherit. let young damsels learn of her to prize The world which is to come.

methought I got up. quoth I . as we walked. cerning him. I thought that was that city. Others say. many of them them and departed. quoth I. insomuch that he was forced to go on his progress without them for he durst not run the danger of that destruction. I think I may say. Sag. I am glad on't . But pray what that way of late. through the multi. if they think any thing that is true. and whom he left behind. ! have been much hindered and kept back from my wonted travels into those parts whence he went. a populous place. captivities. vi. his journey. that I . Sir. THE PILGEIM'S PEOGEESS FROM THIS WORLD TO THAT WHICH IS TO COME. 4 again. talk have the people about him ? Now. as I was in my dream.) eateth and drinketh. when they perceived that he would be a pilgrim. what town is that below. ^^X where he is yea. and fears. I must : you. (for that was his name. of this town. and I also heard of that he ventured as he did. that he will look regions ? done unto himself and no marvel. Now. that he liveth well where he is obtain an opportunity to make further inquiry after for he now lives at and in the Fountain of life. he had to his Prince Sag. and walketh and talketh. as I slept. PART Some time since.. it is confidently affirmed coniii. dignities that tian. he left tion . and receiveth of the smiles and favours of possessed with a very ill-conditioned and idle sort him that is Judge of all there. having had some concerns there is no grief mixed therewith. Talk the people talk strangely about him about a mile off the place. 11 . why his neighbours set so little by him. of people. till now. will will shortly come if into these parts. and so one that takes pleasure to hear and tell of that which is good pray did you never hear what happened to a man some time : they can give any. 7. it hath so happened.that are resolved never to run his : are here - hazards. it is plicity of business. For it is said he lives bravely fools while they : . (Zech.ones. But. 15. and once myself through that town and therefore know that this report you give of it is true. that the shining was to go some part of the way that I was travel. that his Prince. are become his companions. a. (Luke x. quoth I up towards the higher upon as if for it was for the love that . as I then showed you. Hear of him! Ay. that he has a crown of gold. that his hazardous journey has got many well-wishers to his ways for. I went country.will take Chris- know the reason. that sometimes showed themselves to him in ling. you my dream that I had dangerous groans. was pleasant I told you then also to me and profitable to you. but have sought after and got the records of his pilgrimage yea. I am glad I dare sav. (whose that went on a pilgrimage name was Christian. that I might give you an has what he has without labour and sorrow. having taken up my lodging in a wood. behold. with It is the city of Destruction. iii. were cast upon Chris: tian s parL ' ago. what I saw concerning his wife and children. I dreamed some say. Moreover.) when he beeame all a pilgrim. said I.) For they say. and that he every day Then said Mr. I went down again thitherward. 16. (Rev. the Dord of that . They may. and had him so much in derision. all journey towards the Celestial Country. and of his had on his journey. beset with gentleman came by where I lay and because he pearls. that he met with and tell of Christian the Pilgrim. as here one neighbour is with another. and as travellers usually do. wars. : . . for account of them. and how unwilling they were to go with him on pilgrimage. troubles. Besides. Sagacity. and our talk is. then I perceive you to be a well-meaning man. (Jude 14. that lieth is has bestowed upon him already a very rich and on the left hand of our way ? pleasant dwelling at court. Too true! I wish I could speak truth in speaking better of them that dwell therein. upon his head. and went with him. expected of some. that he now walks in white.) that he has a chain of gold about his And. . an aged neck. frights.) for thus I began with the old man. he is as familiar with them in the place where he I was as if we fell into a discourse. and so could not.nd that So. and that his Sovereign Chri8 tiatf S King is so much concerned with the in. though when he was here he was Christian9 are fool in every man's mouth. happened to be about Christian and his travels Besides. which he feared would come by staying with them in the city of Destrucwherefore. to tell II. Sag. yet now well spoken of he has gone he is highly commended called of all. that the King of the place where he Sir.. well think. that now he is so in the affections of his Prince. : our country rings of him there are but few houses that have heard of him and his doings. Well.) the molestations. quoth I. but him. cries. yet have their mouths water at his gains.

First. Who ? Christiana and her sons ? They like to do as well as Christian Good tidings of are Christian's wife did himself. behold. and saying. many ^ ' ^ a also begin to con- while she fell to sleeping again. also a trembling was upon her but after a . and out of the reach of glad. but Christian and his companions. but that they sprang from another cause to wit. . woman and her four boys. for that now he and has rest her.) and the little children heard her. Hel P against And then she thought she saw Christian. her thoughts began' to work in her mind. but no man living could tell what they said. If thou comest in God's name. but now cxxvi. by swarms. ! ! . suffered to go on as she begins. " Lord. Then they all wept again. and WQuld played fool a( by no means be persuaded by either the tears or entreaties of Christian. brinish tears. If she be waking and sleeping. seek to take her off from the : ! ! . and harped with their harps . saying. that they proceeded of a foolish fancy that he had. . and ungodly carriage. and loving persuasions. have mercy upon me. Now she awoke in a great sweat. of her husband. (John viii. for. After this. ceive we are. or for that he was overrun with melancholy humours. What shall we do with this Mark thig thi(J woman ? for she cries out for mercy. (Ps. in a place of bliss among many immortals. else all the world cannot help but she will become a pilgrim. unnatural. I heartily for bringing of me into this place... I will give And being. come in. you of loving ° relations. for that a in this returned upon her like a flash of lightning. She saw also. or did before Next morning. have sinned away your father. she saw as if a broad parchChristiana's dream. yet now it will not out of my mind. and the crimes. had prayed to God. Sag. and . she thought she saw two very illfavoured ones standing by her bed-side. we shall lose her as we have lost her husband. Then she cried out aloud in her sleep. to go with him yea. I we are all who can it tell but that fresh in may work some behind ? But mind. as I per- considerable way to- you an account of the whole of the matter. ^ . standing and playing upon it before One that sat on a throne. both the good . for that the light of life was given him. ment was opened before her. but I would not go myself I also have hindered you of life. 12 . thoughts of what shall be hereafter. with a rainbow about his head. and she could hear of him no more. (Rev. I rumour of these things country . moreover. She was. to her dear friend which also clogged her conscience. Wherefore we must. her husband. and did load her with guilt. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and cried out. therefore. Then a truth. for that she had lost her husband. and was thoroughly acquainted with the whole ! ^ . there was not any . Mark . It is true I can give you an account of the matter. a sinner !" (Luke xviii. with a harp in his hand. yet second thoughts have so they have wrought wonderfully with them packed up. in which were recorded the sum of her ways. is gone : said she to her children. in the remembrance of the loss . and are also gone after him. This Christiana. thing that Christian either said to her. going some gether. all the while that his burden did it hang on his from his labour.) for that he back. So he said. that are churls r t0 dly re°at ions **"' her husband did cost her But W&S n0t jj-j i Christiana did sider with herself. as she thought. and opened the door. thank was under his Prince's my Lord and King feet. Amen . For. and how she did harden her heart against all his entreaties. though I formerly foolishly imagined. what wife and children and all ? Sag. also is am it fully. Sons. this. and talked with her children a while... said I. while my hear any thing of his wife and children ? Poor hearts I wonder in my mind what they do. much broken with recalling to remembrance the restless groans. for the poor man's sake. " What shall I do to be saved?" did ring in her ears most dole- them that hate him. Sir. You need all that they are not fear to affirm it I mean. and for that the loving bond of that relation was utterly broken betwixt them. 5. g^ : : ! : affair. it seems.) after her husband was gone over the river. concerning the troubles of your father. . one knocked hard at the door to whom she 6pake out.) and for that he has got beyond the is gunshot of his enemies. nature can do no less but entertain the living with many a heavy cogitation. and he he would have had us with him. reapeth the benefit of his tears with joy. looked very black upou her. may report it for Sag. xiv. for I was upon the spot at the instant. and rent the caul of her heart in sunder especially that bitter outcry of his. he has escaped the snares of death. and self-bemoanings.) by the help of which. said he to me. oi This. all her unkind. 6 . Oh woe worth the day The next night Christiana had a dream and. . quoth I but. . gone on pilgrimage. Better and better. Oh (said Christiana) that it had been but our lot to go with him then had it fared well with us. For you know. of her and her sons. 13. 13. With that the boys fell into tears. as if he bowed his head with his face to the paved work that whether her unbecoming behaviour towards her husband was not one cause that she saw him no more and that in such sort he was taken away from her. A man. And upon this came into her mind. saying. by one way or other. is the quintes^nceofhell. (for that was her name from the day that she with her children betook themselves to a pilgrim's life. when she was up. and cried out to go after their father. Then shouted a company them that stood round about. do you good effect on some that are is pray. beyond what it is like to do now. though they all und children. noised abroad left Then undone. as I perceive.

also would have thee to know. or to new language stuns her old (Sol. thee. he said. Pr'ythee. as did he that went before Tim. I wonder in my very heart. as he told me the story. Christiana. The contents of the letter were these That the King would have her to do as did Chris. that thou put this letter in thy bosom that thou read therein to thyself. So they began. until you have got it by root of heart for it is one of the songs that thou must sing while thou art in this house of thy pilgrimage. and with the heritage of Jacob thy father. I pray you ? ana Celestial City. Sir. Christiana. I have also been much affected with My name is Secret . thou hadst a desire to go thialso conded by 'readiness to pardon. Yet they came in gold. ' Mercy come to .troubles. mine own estate and yours. that see we may compa- your father. not one of them is willing to stay behind. (Ps. Thou must tions to Christi. for this kind of Ian. knowest thou wherefore I am come ? Then she blushed and trembled. neighbour knew you but as much as I do. they found the good woman preparing to tian her husband. with legions more. thy husband that was. visitor proceeded. But. Wi -\r . And ' . Nay. Timoreus. which is by nature miserable. and to thy children.) Further instruc. guage they used not to near. come in. and began thus to address herself unto new knowledge hast thou worketh off thy mind from thy friends. ever beholding that and face that doth administer life to beholders they will all be glad when they shall hear the sound of thy feet step over thy Father's threshold. and opened it. do not so unwomanly . not for that I doubt at all been of late of his happiness. and to dwell in his presence overcome. Then Christiana replied. There is Christian. I doubt not but that you would go along ! the farther gate.- . the bitter is ficulty. m and said. will you carry me and my children them. and said. . what or who has brought you into this mind '? Chr. and knocked at her door. that he is a God ready to forgive. My carriage also to your father in his distress is a great load to my conscience. but that for a dream which I had last night. and said. So Christiana called her sons together. Christiana. cxix. At this the good is your meaning by this ? ^yith joy for ever. the Merciful One has sent me to tell thee. my children shall go with me . • that were Christiana's to her house. The which when he had done. did himself seem to be greatly affected therewith. for that stands at the head of the way up which thou must go. my stranger has given me this morning. I dwell with those on high. that so man. Christiana prays her sons to take their journey.! have been sorely . of the women. there is a report that thou art aware of the evil thou hast formerly done to thy husband. Even to go after my good husband.f • i : : . So she took it. Also I advise. to his table. as you may perceive. and that he will feed thee with the fat of his house. .a.) also it was written in letters of perceive to drop from the lips of neighbours. Tim. enter this Chr. (This Timorous was daughKing ? ter to him that met Christian upon the hill DifThen said the visitor. with that she fell a weeping. let us pack up.Christiana but it smelt after the manner of the best perfume. • i. Tim. He moreover proceeded. his companions. a but Christiana. I advise thee to do as did Christian thy husband go to the Wicket-gate yonder over the plain. I have. For what journey. pray what Christiana quite his city. that are My sons. Christiana at this was greatly abashed in herThis self. two . and that he taketh He delight to multiply the pardon of offences. for your poor children's sake. Christiana. and begone to the gate the thoughts of I verily believe that leads to the Celestial Country. and be with him and his nions in peace. Tim.80 saluted her with. 3 . 1 o visit Christiana. them : Peace be to this house. and but that for the encouragement this Come. here is also a letter for thee. under much exercise in my soul about the death of your father. for I hardened both mine own heart and yours against him. and bowed her head to the ground. for I am satisfied now that he is well. what got. that this old gentle- with me. while they were thus about to be gone. and would have had him go back for fear through of the lions. children. and what was his errand to her. according to the laws of that land. Neighbour. * ° . I hope not so. So he said unto her. ther : It is talked of Convictions se. cast away yourself. and refused to go with him on pilgrimage. good neighbour pray.before the sweet. whose name was Mrs. in hardening of thy heart against his way. At this the women _ „ s were stunned. % Christiana answered and said to the eldest of woman was quite overcome so she cried out to her visitor. Now I saw in my dream. whom she said as before. that he inviteth thee to come into his presence. which I have brought from thy husband's King. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. The thoughts of these things would now kill me outright. for that was the way to come to be gone from her house. for joy that the heart of their mother was so inclined. 54 :) also this thou must deliver in at . Timorous and came up neighbours. . . and that tempteth thee to go nobody knows where ? Chr.as if where I dwell. Song i.behold. also her heart began to wax warm with desires to know from whence he came. that we also may go and worship the paring for a journey. So their visitor bid them farewell and they began to prepare to set out for their journey. If you come in God's name. Chr. Oh. Then did her children burst out into tears. and I wish thee all good speed. - Wherefore. and of keeping of these babes in their ignorance. I am prewith you.

with promise of entertainment. is my churlish carriage to him. ! what Christiana had said had taken some hold upon her mind. we are in. keep thou at home. further. . do ? Consider also. But Christiana said unto her. and said to them. and how the King of the country where her husband was. had sent an inviting letter to . Her bowels yearned over Christ.^ way Her bowels yearned over her own soul. are so far from being to they show I am a discouragement. neighbour Mercy. seems to me but as a dunghill. II. I did indeed come with you to see Christiana this morring . Oh. I pray me in so many words. she. and not to disquiet me. too but take heed in time. that in the right. But Mercy was at a stand. to run yourselves upon such difficulties You have heard. as you know and she answered. but kept it to herself. I knocked. Well. Bat's-Eyes. Wherefore Mercy began thus to reply to her neighbour Timorous. to help her on her way. . sweet yea. . do you think she . (to wit. were afraid to go any further. since she scorns our counsel and said she. he would here were see. to which the best palace on . G . ! THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. 2. The Prince of the place has also 4. Oh that my soul was with him He dwelleth in the presence of the King of the country he sits and eats with him at his table he is become a companion of immortals and has a house now given him to dwell in. for my part. and Pliable too. I think to walk this sunshiny morning a little with her. yet. as did her husband. yea. and forasmuch as it so doth. Besides.rest himself content in a whole skin. Mrs. So I asked her. as our neighbour Obstinate can yet testify. over and above.. Then And what. So. and since she is. if I find truth and life in what she shall say. and has brought me a letter. : . and be wise while we are out of danger. me jy^ of all these troubles that I ^ mQQt ^^ ^ ^ way am they . her. it makes Then Timorous reviled her. saying. the madness that has possessed thee and thy husband. I was dreaming last night that I saw him. So Mrs. to wit. and could not ing by her husband's afflictions? again. v. was so hard put to it. I will yet have more talk with this Christiana. )' - Know-Nothing." and that also will make Wherefore since you came not to my house in God's name. what was her meaning by that ? And she told me in short. > yearn over Christiana. Away with such fantastical fools from the Mrs. thy flesh. I see you have a mind to go a fooling. if (2 Cor. the troubles she was like to meet with in the way. If so many hazards for nothing. but Mercy cleaves and Mrs. But she told her not of her second reason. Tempt me not. go she will. She told me also of a dream that she had. I am sure. Inconsiderate also replied. when „ .) is one great argument with her For she told to put her forward on her journey. Timorous returned ney. 1. Know-Nothing. Tin Inconsiderate. until they. for he went along with him . Mer. we are out. which invites me to come. but when . my neighbour I have now a price put into my hand to get gain. Mrs.. : : come thither. Neighbour. Bat'sE es company. w j th t]ie ij onS) Apollyon. Mrs. how he met of the flesh. Inconside- town : a good riddance. Ay. I so readily comply with her neighbour and that for a For my twofold reason. I am now as he was then nothing will serve me but going on pilgrimage." low.give Christiana a visit and when I came at the door. mxiriius n _-— to sakes her. like wise men. to her house. thinking all was well but. Neighbours. let us leave her in Mrs. What now earth. Wherefore.opportunity. And for that you tell : and of her intended journey. afflicted since 81 my husband's departure from me . even in a manner at the first step that he took his way. Come. But that which troubleth when he was under his distress. I found her preparing herself to depart the town. iana. she sends for some to her. if I shall come to him his messenger was here even now. " The bitter must me come before the sweet. she g00 d Christiana . will go ? Tim. if he part. of her neighbours. Light-Mind. the Shadow of Death. Know-Nothing.ii falls to telling of the story of Christ- intends to do. and methinks I know it by this for that which was my great argument to persuade her to stay at home.. as you see. and also her children. for ^ my neighbour will needs be gone. though a man. me most. And thus she began her tale.the sweet the sweeter. and said to her fel. said Mrs. " The bitter goes before the you to be gone. and will she not take warnMrs. and for- Christiana betook herself to her jour- Timorous you say to this ? Tim. being but a poor woman. a taking her last farewell of the country. that she was now of a mind to go on pilgrimage. and many other things. and I should be a fool of the greatest size if I should have no heart to strike in with the A pertinent re. Oh this blind and foolish woman "her own hands. whatever comes on't. And with that she plucked out her letter. Wherefore she said within herself again. compared. when I came in. though thou shouldst be so rash as to will ! home when Timorous was got her house. Mrs. — . what canst thou. as I said. &nd h(?]p gQ R j. ply to fleshly reasoning. and never run So she said within herself. what your husband did meet with. 1 — : we are in. For if he. rate - VOL. and. that these four sweet babes are thy children. but especially since be went over the river.) sent for me. myself with my heart shall also go with her.quaints her mends what the . If you come it is our custom in God's name. and read it. But. having had little to do this morning. We also The reasonings heard. cast away thyself. Tim. Bat's-Eyes. I ^^ j^ Mrs. and thy bones. Mercy's bowels i ana the sweet the sweeter. i they were come to her house. come in. Tim. for the sake of the fruit of thy body. Nor is the danger that he met with at Vanity Fair to be forgotten by thee. I went to . So in I went..

who hath sent for me and my children. that yet remain in our : time past. Whate'er shall me betide. Christiana tills : By town ? And that which makes my grief the more heavy is. put this kind of talk away. Mercy. Well. but also for Christiana glad that she had prevailed 'with this poor of Mercy's com- . The King. said Christiana. nor any to tell them what is to come.) If I thought it would be to to go. where we were as merry as the maids. shall follow. and some others : heaven shall may there fall. Slough of Despond. instead ot mendest at the . THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. she that but I and Mrs. So I too true . and that say they are for mending the King's highways. because they have no instructor. I will tell thee what go with me to the Christiana al. Chr. therefore. Then Mrs. . Mrs. said Christiana. will I Here Christiana. benefit of them.•. thou dost. Lechbeen too°hard toe for Faithful. Now my when the place Christiana in came to the . let us venture onlv let . and thou dost Chr. . in ery. and let it was never a good better come in her room world since these whimsical fools dwelt in it. tions are in. pretty a time Christiana was got on her way. as my good Christian did for me when he left me he mourned for Christian's Payers were that I would not heed nor regard answered lor his . that these tears . into his fold. ^^ ^^ there be that pretend to be Iheir own carnil i conclusions instead o£ the the King's labourers. said she. And.) Then said Mercy. Let the most Blessed be If 't my guide be his blessed will. should she stay where she dwells. weepeth my with her own So they went on together. bringing his sheaves with him. ton. to his Unto his gate. And. I take this as an of thine will not be lost that for the Truth hath said. purpose to go with you. Well. Love-the-Flesh.tuer inquire for thee mises there to thou shalt not meet with encourage : reap in joy . this dear husband had like She perto have been smothered with mud. Slough of Despond. Nor shalt thou be rejected.. is one that delighteth in mercy. Mer. But.• the old gentleman. n0 p e Dut from one that can tell. fellow. cast in thy lot with me. that my lot and retain this her mind. go thither. And let him gather them I of : mine thii. LightMind. r . though the way was ver so tedious. Filth. though thou goest but upon my invitation. Come. and will take what and the Lord grant and her boys. yet . is she began to be at a stand For. her Discourse be. bearing precious seed. : T . and thou shalt go along with me as my servant. old friend proceeded. . I dare say. if thou wilt. being helped by Him that can help. Alas said she r who can but lament. are reaping. Madam Wan. I was yesterday at Madam WanFor ton's. even as the King of have his heart upon me. and so mar. and condition my poor rela.tnou shalt do lures her to the Wicket-gate. said Mercy. But how shall I be ascertained that I also Had I this Mercy doubts shall be entertained ? of acceptance. Mercy. . loving Mercy. . Then Mercy prays. Then said young Mercy. and said. and that bring dirt and dung instead of . have left behind make them pray they may be With all their heart and mind. that shall but rightly consider what a Mercy grievea state. ." and " he that goeth forth and weepeth. Light-Mind added as followeth Come.wno &° J0Xi think should be there.for her carnal re ^t^ 0118. • . with Mrs. and put them he was dead. I well know what will be the end of our pilgrimage my husband is where he would not but be for all the gold in the Spanish mines. Mercy x the bold* * n stones. but would go. tor r j wffl be CQntent return to thy place. and Mercy went along with her so as they went. shall doubtless come again with rejoicing. I also will pay thee for the kindness which thou showest to me and my children in the accompanying of us in our way as inquire for her. I shall never be sorry for her departure let her go. Mercy. : Christiana then was glad at heart not only that she had a companion._ n him but his Lord and ours did relations after gather up his tears. that thou shouldest set forth out of doors with me to accompany me a little in the way.*. Mer.children being there also. Chr. ceived also. That Lord. did make a stand but. Lechery as gentlewoman. I will hire thee. said „. . and now both I and thou. I would never go near the town any more. of her .. began to. ing. I would make no stick at all. for my part. Then said Christiana. anTgoo/cW tiatiaV be S an t0 discourse. 5. and what else was meet and up the pleasure. asked if that was true ? Yes. and e k h or four more. or talk of such matters as no wise body can abide wherefore. Besides. unexpected favour. many was rather worse than formerly. and into his bottle these my sweet babes. Bowels become pilgrims for thy friends. Yet we will have all things in common betwixt thee and me only go along with me." (Ps. n .: 83 I say. . Wherefore sister so ? ! pauy- Mer. I hope. that. Mer. Mrs. and Mercy weep. my lady herself is an admirable well-bred Mr.e. "they that sow in tears shall exxvi. and there I will furand if there Christ/and pro. (for she was but Mercy inclines young. maid to fall in love : salvation. the fruit and sinful . Up holy hill: And let him never suffer me To swerve or turn aside From his free-grace and holy. who could live quietly by her ? for she will either be dumpish or unneighbourly.ways. 6. °. g0 ^here we ^ad to fill m usic is ant] dancing. notwithstanding the command of which my the King it to make this place for pilgrims good.

.

..

us be wary. Wherefore methought I saw and Mercy. and mine!'' was but from her. good friend. ' • a do S came barking upon them and an enemy a dog. I am come and if there is any grace and forgiveness of sins to . that am now is but a while ago abhorred that life ? Then she bowed her'head. " Blessed is she that belie veth. Sagacity left me to dream out my But when Christiana had got admittance for herself and her boys. and what should be said unto him that did open to them so it was concluded.. Wherefore I fear I presume. . Then said the Ke^ei* . and said she. Then he sel. I am come for that unto which I was never Her's was invited. Christiana. for her. 45. But he answered. With that the keeper of the gate did marvel. then she began to rejected. Then said the keeper of . all this while poor Mercy did stand without. Sir. they betook themselves n r to a *ort debate about how they and°li! asw en as in faith and must manage their calling at the hope gate. if it shall please you. and knew not what to do knock they durst not. said the other. go all of them Prayer should U P to the & ate to wllich when tbe y be made with were come. that she.. and a great one too t^. and should be offended pid) with them at last. she said. I beseech that thy poor handmaid may be a partaker thereof.g my friend. and said. answered. that she should knock for entrance. and made a 83 Then they looked well shift to to their steps. and the boys. that one once said. they can possibly assault us with that hate us ? And now Mr. Christiana made low obeisance. Oh am faint . spare. he . for fear that she was - come unto me " and he shut up the gate. ma(j e ^e wome n and children So he opened the gate. Then he took her again by the hand.) Then they went on again and said Mercy to that not once or twice. Damlife I bid thee rise. to prayer. and knocked more vehemently than they did at first. : And My • . that Christiana's prayer for her is come hither upon the same account friend Meic >'as myself. . that Yet Christiana had like to have been in. Well. . . and looked out. and said. all thought that they heard : as if . I have a companion of mine that stands yet without. - made It is Christiana to start. I pray for all them that believe on me. and each minute was as long to her as . they The dog. " When my soul fainted within me. with what troubles and afflictions. I remembered the Lord. to be. and he opened unto them. . into the way that leads unto the Celestial City. What. by this gate. Yea. I said. and. for she fainted. at the & ate with that This done. and so are these my sweet babes also. graciously admitted. as her poor husband did. So he obeyed. the hand. from the King. 7. I as . bnt they thought they heard words that said nnto them. Had design to attain such excellent glories as we do. dream by myself. Who is there ? So the dog left off to bark. we shall all have enough evil before we come to our journey's end. and I know mine and. once the gotten above. but Mercy was fallen down that no gate should be opened to her. We are come from whence Christian did come. that I get staggeringly over. instead of any that and knocked again.Let not gate. Delavs make i c an hour. without sending for. saying. n 1 . Did she desire thee to come with her to ! me maidens. wife of Christian. So Christiana began to knock. Now. of the gate. as she thinks. For can it be imagined. our Lord be offended with his handsaid the keeper. into thy Fear not." (Jonah ii. that the people who Christiana. make intercession for Mercy. Nor durst they for a while to knock any without in a swoon. Now therefore they were greatly tumbled up and down in their minds. they thought of knocking again. How is good ground to hope for a loving reception at the Wicket-gate as you. and upon the same errand as is it and what that Mer. took her by the hand. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Now Mercy began to be very impatient. to entertain Christiana with shouting and sound of trumpet. and led her little " Suffer . and said. to wit. but stand. there is scarce keeper thev x J durst not. And I answer. Good. > : Lord. and was afraid more. my Lord. and that are so envied that happiness as we are. and Now they had no sooner got over. for fear the « her companions of that gate should espy them as perplexed about they so went. for the rest. in the next place. Then . upon them. and filled the air with his melodious notes. is she now become a pilgrim. the devil. whereas I was sent for by my husband's King to come. and tell me wherefore thou! art come. And she knocked then so loud. ' left in ' : the gate. holy temple. by knocking at the gate herself. Christiana entertained but that we shall meet with what fears and snares. for fear of the dog go back for fear the mastiff should fly ." (Luke i. and that she should speak to him that did open. he called to a trumpeter that was above. and led her gently in. Yes and as my Lord sees. for there shall be a performance of what has been told her from the Lord. as my friend Christiana was. and my prayer came unto thee. since Christiana was the eldest.) upon thy feet. Then he took her by and children said to also. you know your sore. wherefore she prevented the hun°-erin°Christiana from a fuller interceding soul the ferveut er. Christiana and _ . she knocked But. afraid. Christiana. I think no Slough of Despond would discourage me. one that is much dejected in her mind. for that Then we have knocked at his princely Whence come ye ? this place ? you would have ? Christiana answered. over the gate. Who is there ? And Christiana a»?d. for that she comes. for joy. and sounded. by what means soever they come . Mercy faints. Mer.. trembling and crying.

mer parlour below. 84 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and further information what we must do.. xii. 2 :) wherefore dost thou keep so cruel a dog in thy yard. But I marvel in my heart If the soul at why he keeps such a dog had I *$$&£$£ known that afore. thereby to stay her faintings. I grant pardon. But my worst fear was. Who. and . where they entered into talk by themselves . that that sight they would have again as they went along in the way. her a bundle of myrrh. it is fulfilled which is written. Lord. (Matt. Undone And afraid I was to knock any more but when I looked up to what was written over the gate. whereby they were greatly He also had them up to Christ crucified gladded. and death. but I : : fggjg cannot tell life how. and per- The children suade him to hang him. for my spirit now struggled be- tween . Mer. (because I had knocked. why he keeps such a filthy ctir in his yard I hope he will not take it amiss. . And now were Christiana and her boys. had much ado to forbear crying out. at the sight of Mercy espostu . Then said they yet further unto him. xi. We are sorry for our sins. Chr. He has frighted . „ . in the promise of forgiveness by deed. the top of the gate. . seen afar off. Chr. as I stood at the gate. Alas to be in my case. But she continued upon her face. and spoke kindly unto by him. I also thought." the one shall be taken. or a took the kingdom by storm. that he spake many good words unto them. I will ask. in Take the first from my the way I obtained it. and that there was a most cruel dog thereabout. what said my Lord to my rudeness ? Was he not angry with me ? answered and said.) ! Mer. (John xx. and said. lips with a kiss. " Two women shall I be grinding together left. but can He xl owner : . all which such women and children as we are ready to fly from thy gate for fear ? lates about the °' our labour had been lost. I thought one time. when I plead with thee. V I thought I never heard such knocking in all my life I thought you would a come in by a violent hand. Now. 1. . by word and deed by word. n Christiana thinks her companion prays better than she. I took courage. thought I. sound of them made me start. and the ground on her face before him. for he showed no sign to the contrary. . we are in. unto me. Fetch something.) Now I saw in my dream. how glad am I that we are got . for we are afraid he will bite us when we go hence." So he said unto her. and that I was left behind. that was so fainthearted as I. and the other xxiv. : with all my heart. Song i. and I am glad : . and showed them by what deed they were saved and told them withal.) that us. said he. and beg of our Lord his pardon. 13. yet let me talk with thee of thy judgments. may . Can you not tell how you J J knocked ? 1 am sure your knocks were s0 earnest. Chr. So you well to leap for joy. So he left them a while in a sumTalk between the Christians.) ! (Matt. " Let my Lord accepc the sacrifice of praise which I now offer unto him So at last Mercy fell to in hither Mer. Then said he to those who stood by. ' . That dog has another he also is kept close in The devil. after I saw that you was taken into his favour. When he heard your lumbering noise. and worshipped. only my pilgrims hear his barking he belongs to the castle which you see there at a distance. 20. 41. " Righteous art thou. I should not have meet with in its had heart enough to have ventured heaven^/would myself in this manner.! . are afraid of the dog " he came down to them again. that I must either knock again or die so I knocked. would not have knocked with all their might ? But pray. that the very .j >' : Mercy. another mans ground. if you please. who that so was could but have done so ? You saw that the door was shut upon me. received of the Lord at the head of the way. (Sol. said the children. . and thus Christiana began Lord. . i-i : come up to the walls of this place. and give it to Mercy to smell So they fetched on.) and a while after she was revived. 12. and said. : Do so.'" (Jer. I say. next time he comes down. h» gave a wonderful innocent smile Cni igt P i ease I believe what you did pleased him with loud and restless P ra e well. and the other as it shall be revealed. to their comfort. and none did answer. But now hardly ever set we are in. especially when that ugly cur made such a heavy barking against Mer. Peace be to thee stand up. but I of all have cause with the calves of my lips.

Now they being. and biting too. carnal fear of will. (as to go. keep any from coming to me ? I deliver them from the lions. . : that are deaf. a dog whose barking I turn to the profit of pilgrims. Then the children also stood crying by. xxii. and knowing that it was in at . I confess i gn0 rance I spake what I un° . Mercy also. And they said.. We intend no hurt to yotir lives 'tis another thing we would have. murder and so put themselves under those laws that are provided for the But protection of women. if she had. of whom mention was made before. as we see Thus our beginning (as one saith) Shows what our end will be. Now. I'll warrant you. with that they both shrieked out. and washed their feet.) the men still made their approach upon them. or go peaceably as you should. We make no assault on you for money. I began A pilgrim And That for to blessed also be that man thereto moved me. and so kept on their journey the children also went on before so that at last Two ill-favour ed ones they met together. you would have us body and soul. that they walked on their way and had the weather very comfortable to them. scuffle : did he that came in for their relief ruffians. covered themselves with their veils. 21. but are come out to tell you. 'twas long ere I began To But now seek to live for ever I run fast as I can : 'Tis better late than never. by Indeed. Christiana. . did : men what she could no money to shift 20. for mzard of the bawling. a garden. call out to the saying. nor regard. What is that thing you do ? . So he fed them. saying. Stand back. by that they were gone about two bow-shots from the place that led them into the way. xxii. up to the women. : Sometimes also he has broken out. (said she. assault Chris- . Are turned. not far from the gate hereafter. . We are in haste. £5 many an honest pilgrim from worse to better. made answer again. Then Christiana began to sing. Chr. rather than lose a supposed patiently. ried Well. the women were in a very great her relief. imagining what they should mean. but began to lay hands upon them at that.. nor yield to what you shall ask. So I saw in my dream. t]ie i the pilgrims. Then said Mercy. but still the boys went on. And and cried. as . Stand back them. she would have been ready to die for fear. Christians. and that they may be afraid to come and knock at this gate for entrance. Then they ° J that : : — you transgress. ^j^ nm ± Came down to meet them. waxing very wroth. We will neither hear. Christiana again and be gone. they that found them did The children eat gather them up. TPIE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. quoth Christiana. and Mercy her friend. that.) that fruit that it my sons. but with intent to keep the pilgrims from coming to me. and to inquire after the way. Now Christiana. as well as she could. The den - Devil's gar- there was on the other side of the wall. than to suffer ourselves to be brought into such snares as shall hazard our well-being . And some of the fruit-trees that grew in that garden shot their branches over the wall and being mellow.) said to them. according as he had dealt with her husband before. With that. and upon the charity of our friends. our fears to faith. their voice was heard from whence they were. and set them in the way of his steps. barking. Christiana's tongue. with design to prevail against them. if you will but 'grant one small request we shall ask. (Deut. they to made haste boys are apt to do. thou known never so much beforehand. that fenced in the way up which Christiana and her companions were and that garden belonged to him whose was that barking dog. hadst to. ruit " But by that they were got within sight of them. for we have Mer. we will make women of you for to lose. owneth him doth not keep him out of any goodwill to me or mine. Our tears to joy. Now. . Then Christiana began to talk of their journey. and eat of them to of the enemy's their hurt. : . So Christiana's boys. a dog in another man's yard. as I said. Christiana. did pluck them. 'Tis true. 25 27.) being pleased with the trees. as you see. Murder ! ! — which they came. regarded not Christiana's words. and has worbut I take all at present some that I loved . and with the fruit that did hang thereon. thither wherefore some of the house came out. . live such too as ever. of a dog. spurned at them with her feet. They therefore cried out again. and cannot 'stay our business is a business of life and death. is none of ours but she did not know belonged to the enemy. T 1 acknowledge that wisdom of their aerstood not Lord thou dost all things well." (Ps. came just tiana and Mercy. so that they are not delivered to his power. he that the great voice of his roaring. to do with them what his doggish nature would prompt him But what! my purchased one. and shall a dog. they spied two very ill-favoured ones coming down apace to meet them. Then said one of the two men. . . when wise enough acquiesce the m - my t : . It is good to cry arc - out when we assaulted The Reliever comes. I also give my pilgrims timely help. But that passed. So again she and her companion made a fresh essay to go past them but they letted them in their way. for I know 'tis for that you are come but we will die rather upon the spot. as if they would embrace them but Christiana said. thou wouldest not have been afraid of a dog. and began to eat. n n t : being pilgrims. Yet these two. and they went on their way. Ay. Bless'd be the day that be . and " my darling from the power of the dog. I trow. Their mother did also chide them for so doing. The A cheek to the beggars that go from door to door.

And confess our folly.) What shall we do with woman ? for she cries . you need not. we shall lose This. I wonder he sent not one along with us. said Mercy. Mercy makes c us to behold our own imperfections. said Christiana ! — At last Christiana gh e knocks at at the door. and tend to make you more wary. I am this be blamed. & Dam. Then said the damsel to them.-o any further.e door. and have provided when provision might have been had. you would not either so have bewailed they came to the door. is very far spent. 86 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. but they did make their escape over tne wajj j nto tk e g ar(j en f the man He also when much to it provision might have been had. and heard the good people within commending her. Christiana's guilt. before Mer. but when the want of a thing is felt. as like these as ever any in the world could look. when you were entertalks to the women. Chr. Shall we go back again to my Lord. as she had done at the Now when she had knocked. you her as we have lost her husband. they heard a terpreter's house about Chrisrru ihen they tiana's going on that oversight of yours in not asking for one. when they had talked away a little more time. and yet did not provide for and we now at this door are such wherefore we pray that we may be partakers of that for which we at this time are come for the day. which house was built for the relief of pilgrims. pretty we have been somewhat affrighted we thank thee also. Thy innocency. some time ago. since our Lord knew it would be for our profit. Your confession of your folly I will present him with to go back again. only : out of doors. thereafter used. has followed us with unasked kindness. (the properly is its due. against all attempts whatsoever. a talk of her and her children's going on pilgrimage. for that I saw this danger before I came out of the doors. With whom would you speak in this place ? f Chr. _ veiled much. knocked. and asked them how they . I will tell you. I will tell you I this their very words : they out. Chr. tl. said. When he had thus said.. and has delivered us from their hands that were stronger than we. for he. may excuse thee b u t as for me. to Mercy. they gave ear. after a few more words. so unwilling -to all places where you shall come. and as now you have occasion to do.hear of going on pilgrimage.- '? . Mcr. thought. tained at the gate above. my fault is so much much . 'tis a poor thing them. there is sufficient to furnish them • . as I said. How knew you you came from home ? Pray open to Chr. Christiana answered.) that is not worth asking for. and behold. as by this neglect we have an occasion ministered unto . that woman who was. who they little thought stood his pilgrims. Had my Lord granted you a house of the Interpreter. that estimate that First Part of these records of the Pilgrim's ProSo they drew on towards the house." (Ezek. heard. it then comes under. and looked. did. two women Avere there. that thou earnest in to our help. But. I set foot the women. as great talk in the house. Rel. So they answered. that you petitioned not the Lord for a conthen might you have avoided these ductor troubles and dangers for he would have granted well. Lord's people to transgress ? attempted to take them. being ye Mark this. my sister. —Before . as we see. ('twas when was in my troubles. they drew near to a house that stood in the way. he went back to his place. It is not always necessary to grant things We lose for not not asked for. • *. want at all for in every one of my Lord's lodg. Alas! said Christiana. as thou seest. Chr. So all things work for you must know Christiana mentioned by name for good. b een p as t au danger. We thank thy Prince. If she be suffered to go on as she begins. you one. Why. Reliever. . ings. thereby to make manifest the riches of his grace. become of little esteem . therefore. We understand that this is a privileged place for those that are become pilgrims. Then said Mercy. of his mere good pleasure. xxxvi. for in had heard that she was Christian's wife.) and when Talk in the luconductor. and we are loth to-night to c. and that there went along. in : waking and sleeping.. that so near the King's palace there Indeed. 37. pilgrimage. So. me to whom came up to the great dog belonged so the dog beThis Reliever then came their protector. . that dangers to come beside. The Reliever . one night. and so consequently will be gress. g00 d use of so our Lord has taken occasion their neglect of . which he has prepared for the reception of they stood still. we were so taken with our present blessing. Mer. and that we should never see sorrow more. Thus now. : . otherwise we had been overcome. " he will be inquired of by them. came to the door a young damsel. know. lest by so doing they asking for. you shall find no Thus. The door !s and opened the door. there gate before. because they Rel. might have made me take heed. to do it for And. . this riddle.. but weak wo\mew that ye were men. and the pilgrims went on their way. the greater. plotting how they might prevent my salvation. for forgiveness. had we asked our Lord for one but. and ask one ? this was the most pleasing to them. What a sudden blank is I made account that we had The mistake of here Mercy. who could have were forgotten by us thought. „ . as you will find more fully related in the the eyes of him that feels it. ill Would you make my The ones fly to the Devil for relief. . for methought I saw two men. even before her. Well. could have lurked such naughty ones it had been well for us. Then said Mercy. as I lay in Christiana's my bed. this ReI marliever said as followeth „. opened to them Innocent. I had a dream about this dream* repeated. stand at my bed's feet.

whereas thou seest him rather give heed to rake up straws and sticks. I am that woman. Art thou that Christiana whom Christian the good man left behind him. and has them first into a room where was a man that could look no way but down. " ! . and his door. also is and these be his four children. de- Christiana's me from this muck-rake prayer. said he. that was so hard-hearted as to slight my husband's troubles. but raked to himself the straws. . those that attended upon the pilgrims in the house came into the room to see them. liver Then That said Christiana. smiled. . the man and his dream. This done. : that pilgrim that some years ago did travel this without spot. come in come. in token of their kind reception of them they also carried it : lovingly to Mercy. for I am convinced that no way is right but this. for this is a figure of a heIn u So he came to the said. Christiana's husband. all waiting for er " somewhat the meaning of this . and blameless Inter. This maiden my companion. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and went. ' 87 Chr. that earthly things. and showed them what Christian. than to do what He says that calls to him from it is above. xxi. and the picture of the biggest of them all together with the rest of those things that were then so profitable to Christian. when they are with power upon men's minds. So be it: Amen. for joy that Christiana to see the young . Inter. and is going on pilgrimage But why standest thou thus thou daughter of at the door ? : Come in. thou art become a pilgrim. because supper Interpreter took The Significant ' Then Innocent ran and the door ? Joy in °f ! in. quite carry their hearts away from God. They also ones walk-in looked upon the boys they stroked them over their faces with the hand. they were bidden to sit down and rest them the which when they had done. ! way too. So he talking of thee but now. and her children.. So when they were within. whereas was T also man could look no w ay but : Chr. muck-rake doth show his carnal mind. I persuade myself that There is Christiana. Then is fulfilled that which is written of the man that said to his son. with the celestial crown in his hand to show. . therethey saw the man in the cage. After awhile. I will not but afterwards repented. and after those things had been somewhat digested by Christiana and her company. 29. with a muck-rake in his the muck-rake expounded." (Matt. . Pray. that I God make it a true saying upon me. " Go. Christiana is turned pilgrim. come in . and dust of fore. what may I call your name.the Rooms. the man that cut his way through his enemies. hand. was become a pilgrim. when he betook himself to a pilgrim's life ? Chr. and bid their Master's house. There stood also one his head with a celestial crown in his hand. children. My name is Christiana I was the wife of that I may be found at the last " of him in peace. was her name. stantial. it is to let thee know. Abraham we were come to Come. had seen some time before. and went and told man of this world : is it not.The man w th wards.. and another smiled. . and the dust of the floor. entertainment here! Then they leaped for joy.) Can you think who is at the floor. the house and her companion. said the Li- prayer the muck-rake. j . . he And. the small sticks. Then said Christiana. for tidings have us before..and grant may tell it to my Lord within ? Chr. that heaven is but as a fable to some. them all welcome into was not ready. that things here are counted the only things subthat the . Here. downwards. good Sir ? Thou hast said right. and that left him to go on his journey alone and these are his four children but now I also am come. /. and . 28. Then I -know Inter. (for that said to those within. : showed thee. maiden. how ! had them all into the house. • . and they _. And one smiled. it Now.) Inter. all „ L Old saints ?lad „ m n An . them into his Significant Rooms. . their Master. .. the Interpreter takes them apart again. Dam. and looking upon her. said Christiana. work to-day in my vineyard and he said to his father. and proffered him that crown for his muck-rake but the man did neither look up nor regard.

and said. c you see all these ? So he said. Your King doth call you his sheep. into the very best room in the house. thing but an ugly spider. and took her death patiently. I thought . §= by her hands all upon Then Then said he. was dwelleth in the best room in the house. Yes. how full of the venom of sin soever you be. lay hold of. where was a butcher killing of the butcher a sheep: and. 37. alas too true. and. so they gave heed. that like spiders. ' . said he. and see if they could find any thing When Then they looked round and round. 8. (as you see. profitable there. that venomous and illfavoured creature. The Interpreter then looked plea- santly on her. Lord. and bid them observe a while. to blush. where and n . 3. of this he walketh in towards his people. was great variety J of flowers Of the garden. . answerable to her. . So one of the into another room. . Christiana held her peace. by the hand of faith. my darlings. i . So he had them into the. Is there but one spider in this spacious room ? the water stood in Chris- was a woman and she quick of apprehension said. and every time she drank she lifted up her head and her eyes towards heaven. who hangs the wall. Then is said the Interpreter again. and thousand. and dwell in the best room that belongs to the King's house above. because you are women. whose venom tive than is far that more destrucwhich is in her.. he led them into his garden. you. Matt. said he. in what fine rooms soever we were but that by this spider. Behold. observe and look. as I see. hen did walk in a fourfold method toWards her chickens. and these chickens Mer.) and king's palaces. said Christiana. Yet again. that. Christiana said. And. and that 2. He had them Of the hen and chickens. By his common call he gives nothing by his special *call he always has something to give he has also a brooding voice for them that are under his wing and he has an outcry. but to his obedient ones. lead you into the room where such things ace. water stood in their eyes . there is more yea. Sir. which Inter. nas lain by till it is almost rnsty : " Give me not riches. -r. . said the truth." And wherefore is recorded. Look again she therefore looked again. in quality. She had a special she hath all the day long. I thought. we were to learn how to act faith. Then said the Interpreter." is scarce the prayer of one in ten Straws. where was a hen a&d chickens. little See. and said. I see nothing . we were Chr. " The spider this taketh hold with her in hands. you must learn of this sheep to suffer.) dust. compare this hen to your King. and that we looked like ugly creatures. and that they overlooked. and said. She had call. and to put up with wrongs without murmurings and complaints. *?. and . Then said he again. with most. and. and they are easy for .. She had a common call. made nothing in vain. for she . and learn of her to acknowledge whence your mercies come. Then they seemed all to be glad — God has . Behold how quietly quiet. himself has his methods. Chr. behold. the flowers are diverse in stature. the sheep and the sheep.. slaughterhouse. chickens went to the trough to drink. great spider on the wall. said he. 1. for there was nothing to be seen but a very Of the spider. are the great things now looked after. xxx. a brooding note. (Prov. Do . and also bowed preter. Then said Mercy. She had an outcry. said Christiana. xxiii. without objecting. that came not into my thoughts. that Christiana and ! Mercy wept. what this chick doth. - Now. to seeth the enemy come. but to show you. upon another. of something but I could not imagine it all. and sticks. Yea. But said the Interpreter. pray let us see some more. yet you may. Thou hast This made Mercy their faces to and the boys to cover for they all began now understand the riddle. . to give the alarm when . THE PILGKIM'S PROGRESS. with looking up. After this. Here is not any : Talk about the spider. 4. And. (a very brave room it was :) so he bid them look round about. by receiving them With It is. Sir. and perceived that the he had them the Interpreter had showed them this. she suffereth her skin to be pulled over her ears. For. but the yet they looked one before the Inter- she takes her death. „ . terpreter. and that she had but sometimes. and yet she had taken hold with her hands.he I choose. and spiders here than one tiana's eyes.

day to w ell. Every shipmaster. very apt colour. whose outside is fair. •' . cut off. . We : need of. Then the Interpreter began. and live .they are. and thinks his barn with wheat or barley. and you So when they w ere come again into the house. which God sets light by. is ungrateful unto but he that forgets his Saviour is unmerciful that lives in sin. he had them into his field. Pray. than to hold out ^s he should : to the end. music at meals . down sin like water. . When and carriage they seem also to have a very great love for professors that are sincere and. of the rest. is like Again. supper was ready. what the life spider in his mouth : so the Inter- above ? preter said. for. and ploughed.) . : emblem.. that God commend eth ? life If the is that to is attended with so many is troubles. they spied a little robin with a great Of the robin and the spider. but when they robin. and swallow T devil's tinder-box. above many. where the gardener hath set them. so the minstrels played. T If a man would him. and to be in their company. the Interpreter had done. . also. .. as he should be. that therefore it is that they frequent the house of the godly. they beheldj the tops of all were He said again. tne_ / which yet lies show said unrepealed. some other things that are is. . whose inside was all rotten at heart \ rotten and gone. and make muck . Lord .. above all others. He to fill and looks for happiness Of the hereafter. He him . as they were coming in from abroad. And the Interpreter did out first ? VOL. as if they could They pretend live upon the good man's crumbs. drink iniquity. but will who with usually entertain those that lodged with him. but their heart good for nothing. to desire to associate with them. a thing of that trodden under foot of men beware that in this you condemn not yourselves. : or tell £ . because supper 1L . which in God's sight is of great price. . as the and gobble up spiders. that forgets his friend. Look here. the table spread. as yet was not ready. There is a desire in woman to go neat and fine and it is a comely thing to be adorned with that fatter the sow the . watching a night or two. only the straw remained. and but what shall we do with the crop ? sowed Then said Christiana. when value in the vessel : in a storm. and quarrel not one with another. they diet.and so they They are at supper. So they looked. Burn some. let him fetch his last make it always his companyof thoughts prove that keeper. so loth be let go by us. Whispering and change sin is in the world. to set forth some professors by for to sight . is it to which many may be compared that are in the garden of God who with their mouths speak high in behalf of God. What a is it such a pretty little bird he being also a bird. that loveth to maintain a kind of sociableness with men I had thought they had lived upon crumbs of bread. Mercy. the more gamesomely he goes and the more healthy the lustful to the slaughter man is the more prone is he unto evil. What means this ? This tree. him that soweth coclde. pretty of note. will wilis lingly cast that overboard that of the smallest had given thanks. that . profitable. .. 'Tis easier. . II. as this robin. but to be tinder for the Then said (said he.. and yet it grew and had leaves. Fruit. there they stand. is counted worth with men what is heaven. you see. . or upon such other harmless matter I like him worse than I did. but Christiana said. than to sit up a whole year together so 'tis easier for one to begin to profess well. to himself. which he had sown with wheat and corn but when field.. The Interpreter then replied. Then. but in deed will do nothing for him whose leaves are fair. : THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. ! Everybody will cry up the goodness of men but who is there that is. ' will get at that Christiana again desired Interpreter would either c . 89 : and smell. colour. . and whose inside is rotten. and had The tree that is them to a tree. and Mercy wondered. There . . This robin is an disparagement the to as robin -redbreast . and for and to be If the world. when one all Now things set on the board . . and some are better One leak will sink a ship and one sin will than others: also. affected with the goodness of God ? seldom sit down to meat but we eat and leave so there is in Jesus Christ more merit and righteousness than the whole world has . . destroy a sinner. and virtue . sat down and did eat. throw the best None but he that feareth not God. Then said the Interpreter again. they can catch can change their are by themselves. is that thing you look it : want of that you condemn to the fire. and The more she desires the mire the fatter the ox is. This ground was dunged. and the appointments of the . he takes them out into his garden again.

after that was but natural affection. that. So I asked her further of the truth of these things. Yea. what Interpreter r _ . then. we asked her what was her meaning ? She said she was sent for to go to her husband and then she up and told us how she had accidentally to see her. with Christiana. Whereofl stand need? up to Why. that between this and the gate by which we got into the way. which I was heartily grieved but him in a dream. in the way : but all this I got over pretty well.. . my intended desperate adventure she also urged what she could to dishearten me from it the hardships and troubles that my husband met with . eating and drinking at his Prince's table. under whose wings thou art come to trust. my Want ° f ex P 01 ience is that which Mercy's answer. but with danger of ruin. was that at first did . And I said in my heart. but for that so many of my And I am come with relations were left behind. thus to betake herself to a pilgrim's ° Arepefitionof \ Christiana answered. . increase. and makes me afraid of every one that I meet. women were They undress and the boys by themselves for bedNow when Mercy was : the . Inter. Thy beginning is A question put good. When we were within. Mercy's good night's rest. But yet not for that I was I came away with a heavy heart unwilling to come away. I cannot tell of visions and dreams. Inter. recompense thy work. perience. and said unto her. she could not sleep for joy. So she lay blessing and thee to come hither. dear heart. dwelling in a curious place among immortals. the . one Mrs. them and make them clean from the soil which they have gathered by travelling. Christiana's ex. sweetheart ? Then Mercy blushed and trembled. . Timorous. „ L asked Christiana. praising God. if I may. any longer in our town." (Ruth ii. What was it And that doth me prevailed with thee to do as thou hast done ? How can I. Sir. unto her husband. (she was akin to him that would have persuaded my husband to go back. : . . Mer. and a letter sent me by the King of that country where my husband dwells. 11. that hath troubled me much it still runs in my mind. and if she would let me go with her for I saw now. go along with Christiana. mourn for was also one that did sing. for that now ! her doubts of missing at last were removed further from her than ever they were before. But a dream that I had of two ill-looking ones that I thought did plot how to make me miscarry yea. Truly. came the troubles and pilgrimage of my hus- band into my mind. Lord lie is only my in support. wearing a crown. and will. The dream and the letter together so wrought upon my mind.. for the love she bare to Naomi. I will leave my father and my mother. for fear of the Chr. my heart burned within me. to come to him. only be- and speak thy mind. that hath that were good relations. as my friend Christiana can. Then. and singing praises &c. that they forced me to this way. His song was this Tli e my refusing of the counsel of those then. the song it and music was ended. In the morning they arose with the sun. and«seeing what she was doing. all the desire of my heart. a neighbour of mine. and a thee of the full rew ard be given T Lord God of Israel. thither. Yes. and led them into the garden. who did. and there wash sanctification. thy latter end shall greatly to Mercy. you must orderly go from hence. and a very fine voice he had. Then said the Interpreter. in my journey. nor know I what it is to ' who had such favour for hen. that' we were made to cry out Murder and the two. If this be true. for so her Master would have the women to do that called at his house as they were going on pil. and will go. Then said he to the damsel that first opened unto them. in bed. and silent. and went in. playing upon a harp. if I may. Jbirst. So guilt took hold of my mind. and the land of her nativity. But met you with no opposition before you set out of doors ? . and preparation was made for bed laid singly alone. and would have drawn me into but that opportunely I had a dream of the pond the well-being of my husband. said he. to come out and go with a " The Lord people that she knew not heretofore. Take them and have them into the The hath of garden to the bath. 12. Talk at supper. that there was no dwelling. want anything Mer. move her . Then Innocent the damsel took them. So she began. lions. and said. and brought them to the bath so she told them that there they must wash and be clean. that made this assault upon us. for awhile continued Inter. ^he at i ogs f m y husband came : into seen my all mind. And what moved : to him for bringing him methought. So w e knocked at the door. Then said he. and that also that fills me with fears of coming short at last. I and another went T When „.— 90 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and the land of my nativity. themselves. for thou hast given credit to the truth thou art a Ruth. she called it. I may tell my Lord. and to the Lord her God. and his King.) Now supper was ended. Inter. Thy setting out is good. and to turn me out of my way. Now . lest they should meet me to do me a mischief. were like the two that I saw in my dream. as .life. So he addressed himself to Mercy. feed . we were both so sorely assaulted. when our friend here was packing be gone from our town. makes me covet to be in silence. and prepared themselves for their departure but the Interpreter would have them tarry awhile For. while she was telling these things unto us. and also how like a churl I had carried it to him as to that. . though I would not everybody know of it.) she also befooled me for. leave father and mother. lieve. Be not afraid .

that we should have pardon by word and deed by word. he parts with that perfection which capacitates him lor the office of mediation.. They wash Then they went . Now saw my they were returned out of the garden from the bath. — son pardoned. with his : which he was entrusted with. which standeth in performance. or in the way that it was obtained. in the way it was obtained. — THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. mise. and said unto them. he parts with his God: Conformed to it be. therefore. Go into the vestry. another. he parts with the purity of his manhood if he parts with his third. teousness of the manhood. and bid him take a sword. Besides these.upon what was . belonged to the family sent them away with many a good wish. nor the righas distinguished from the manhood . was obtained by another to wit. True humility. white' and clean. you are fairer than I am. and live thereby. which they could see in each other. What the promise is. Then said the Interpreter again to the damsel that waited upon these women. Here. And serve the Lord with fear. He has. said . and these boys. as these two natures are joined in one. To take my cross up day by day. and Mercy. said Christiana. therefore. in it. and made their countenances more like those of angels. they looked fairer a deal than when they went out to the washing. it comes to my mind I in . : then.. or than he needeth himself. gee Now. Now the seal was the contents and sum of the passover which the children of Israel did eat when they came out of the land of Egypt. hath obtained it in this double way he hath performed righteousness to cover yon. He has two natures in one person. said one and. (Exod. let I suppose you know us hear your discourse thereof. he parts with his righteousness to us. God speed. " Fair as Then he called for the the moon. dream." thus adorned. : but a righteousness which standeth in the union of both natures. they seemed to be a terror one to . . more b speak of the question pardon that you. he took his weapons and went before them and Those also that the Interpreter said. So the seal was brought. and Great-heart before them so they went. they began to esteem each other better than themselves. ^ for that . The dunghill-raker. But if Chr. So they went on their way and sang ters. if you please. by the promise by deed. by him that let you in at the gate: and he So then. another righteousness. and washed. so as that they. 8 10 . 91 grimage. and looked upon them. came out of that bath not only sweet „ . the Interpreter took them. and spilt his blood to wash you in. and The robin and his bait. And this is not the righteousness of the Godhead. It also added to their gravity.t hath need thereof: not by the per. righteousness belongeth. and may properly be called the righteousness that is essential to his being prepared of God to the capacity of the mediatory the Godhead . . So when they came in. and he set his mark upon them. into The children also stood amazed.. yea. but also much enlivened and strengthened in their joints. Pray Great. Chr. . Great. is pardon ob. and clean. as distinguished from This place hath been our second stage Here we have heard and seen Those good things that from age to ago To others hid have been. to me Have taught a lesson let me. what will he have for himself? Great. If he parts first righteousness. garden. gealj w iierew ith they used to be When were washed in his bath. there a righteousness which this person has. Great-heart. therefore. but in the way. have attained. here also they blessed then. we are not made partakers. that we might be made is just. He has more righteousness than you have need of. and fetch out garments for these people. for it was an ornament to their faces.) and the mark was set between their eyes. To strive to be sincere. and tumbled into a sepulchre.. . Mr. to fied >' christ - at large. Now. « fine j t Wflg them tQ pnt j t Qn When the women were linen. or any of them. in . and helmet. as to separate its Of these righjustice or righteousness from it. of whom we are now about to speak. to wit. to see So that one may as easily what -fashion they were brought. sealed that what was said to us at the gate. : . and came to the place where Christian's burden fell off his back.. saith £"f diseourffof another. they made a pause God. the . You are more comely than I am. hen. to wit. office The chicken too. spider. in which I have obtained our being justiit. The his. The butcher. plain to be distinguished. tained by some one. at which place they will rest next. and Wherethat by which their sins are covered. Unto each of these natures a be divided. cause the nature to be extinct. — . This seal greatly added to their beauty. the field. Also the rotten tree doth yield Me argument of weight head if he parts with his second righteousness. xiii. said the other . that is. and shield and take these my daughconduct them to the house called he SoBeautiful." They are sealed. : one that has not his fellow. and all and they they and the boys J ~. Interpreter then called for a man-servant of one Great-heart. . So she went and fetched out white raiment. impossible to . . . . For. that these went on. Pardon by the deed done. With all my heart but first I must prethat he. for another that A conu ier. To move me for to watch and pray. and laid it down before him so he commanded Theyareclothed. and each righteousness is essential to that nature. they could not gbry ea( h Qne ha(j jn her . or obedience to a revealed will: and that is what he puts upon sinners. of that I know something but what it is to have pardon by deed. should be put upon us. is make that appear. . self. teousnesses. wherefore. that they might be known in the places whither they were yet to go.

an endeared affection begot in us by % Here is a righteousness that Christ. . when thiTway of re. has no need of. that could not be cut by other means and it was to give him a proof of How the strings the virtue of this. v. and covered your polluted and deformed souls with templating upon what I have spoken to you. behold. nor to every one that did see your Jesus as something prepared to cover us withal. your pardon come by deed. Bnt are the other righteousnesses of no use to us? Great. by the How affedion which it was ordained. be always thus with affections next poor beggar he meets. and therefore he can ration. as man. in order to pardon by deed> there you ? Besides. Here. his disciples. again. and therefore giveth it away.wished me with him but. then.a thing special.) Chr. thou that Christ. if he hath two I let him come all alone. Christiana their hearts would be affected. I thought so for though my heart was righteousness that justifies is for that purpose effi. and refuse to another man. surely. he saith. and so with the man that hath wrought it for him Christ. to the will it. (though I have felt but manhood giveth capability to his obedience to little as yet.Jby Gal. Mercy. delivered us up to the just curse of a righteous law the blood run from his heart to the ground. but to Christ is beSo. Great. has it. I wish now with all my heart and one to spare wherefore he freely bestows one that here was Madam Wanton too. 34. The righteousness of his Godhead gives more lightsome and joyous now. union of these two natures to his office. There were that stood by. . demption. nor the powerful lusts of the other. And thus. . as God-man. good Christian's burden fall from off his shoulders. as otm the souL God. There is not only comfort. to give one to him that has none. as well one. and Sloth. not hurt you when he conies to judge the world. Sir. You speak now in the warmth of your and hath given away what he wrought for. redemption. and that saw Sin has bleed. and now from this curse we must be justified by way of yet were so far off this. as God. that thy yea. that. God passeth by you. has no need of. : : : : . think you. yet it is ten times cacious. here is a righteousness that affected with the way and means of his redemption. hast bought me Hence it is called " the gift of righteousness. that he was **. This you have therefore by a special grace. and cannot be communicated unto another. gives no meat to her chickens. loving One Oh. Your Lord Christ is he that worked. and that made him give three leaps of joy ? Great. Again. that he for Thou deservest to have me thou deservest to have me all himself wanteth not.it would make his heart the more merry and blithe." thou hast paid for me ten thousand times more This righteousness. and Mrs. sight and consideration of these. here is a righteousness that Christ. . for he is perfect man pardon comes not only by promise. and Presumption. Oh. doth of the one. Remember that it was told you. 19. True methinks it makes my heart bleed fectly so without it. Timorous also nay. this in mind and my children. for he is God without it. instead of becoming have done and this is by the blood of your Lord. 13.he[n S pardoned by word and deed. ! . . "As by one man's disobedience many were made sinners so by the obedience of one shall many be made righteous. father and mother were here our Lord indeed hath two coats. was not this it that made my the other side. let us labour to keep Christian went by on pilgrimage and. for who can (if he doth but once think that no need of to make him so. then. that they went on Christiana something to be learned by our until they were come to the place that Simple. is he ransomed you from your transgressions by blood. and as God-man. But. and will her common call.) for the sake of which. . Great. thou blessed One Cause of admiof. a price being paid for the harms we they laughed at him and. has no need to think that he should bleed for me. yet it is by virtue of them that the '? : ! ! . But. Chr. : . become good pilgrims. that the hen. Now. Thus has my daughters.. . So that all you have. vile wretch that I was fore he must. righteousness-. but thus) but be without it. or ought by the law. this is not communicated to every must something be paid to God as a price. Yes. . you have by peculiar he has done. must be given tears stand in my husband's eyes. and against him. is a righteousness Oh. brought to us. since Christ Jesus the Lord than I am worth No marvel that this made the has made himself under the law. viii. Surely. one for himself.) that if the most burdened man* in the justify and the righteousness that standeth in the world was here. for he is perChr. ! 92 fore THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. do you remember they were hanged up in irons a little way off on it also. instead of lamenting. giveth au. thou spare it a justifying righteousness. and did see and believe as I now do. lay and slept in. or by the work of prevail with them to go home again. did harden their hearts To be affected who came and stood in your place and stead-. nor could the fear and Mercy. . . . and the rest of you that are here. Where. Chr This is brave now I see that there was Now I saw in my dream. impression made by a divine con. Good Mercy. : . and the ease thority to that righteousness to do the work for of a burden. (Rom. it was the belief of this that cut those strings." (Rom. but to use charity. * . died your death for your transgressions. iii. And I am pervirtue to his obedience the righteousness of his suaded by what I have felt. and that it made away for the law doth not only bind him that is him trudge so nimbly on I am persuaded he under it to do justly.lightsome and joyous before.<£*£<££ fered to carry his burden to the cross. Yes for though they are essential to his natures and office. upon those that have none.. coats. with reference to himself. with Christ ° _ and with what . him were cut.

18. and to count the best of them meddlesome. they turned several out of the way. — THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and left here where they did their mischiefs. husks the comforts of his . . is well that they stand so near the highway. with one No-heart. There Was Slow-pace.. And why so envious. Nay. persuading others that he was a hard taskmaster. rather than take the he pains to go up this hill. Then said Mercy to him . They also began to vilify his servants. they would . my soul. It will do. a wonder that they can get . Chr.. and a ditch._ . . are these three men ? and j for there ? These three men were men of bad quali: till they came at the foot of where again the good Mr. . therefore. and with one Sleepyhead. they should never be bewailed by me they have but what they deserve and I think it : . 93 on. let them hang. ways are since stopped up with going chains.) . Yes. And thou.•!• i ii roneous times. cast away when although. yet there are those that will choose to adventure here. . things to no purpose. They also prevailed with one Short-wind. and with a young woman. . been well if their crimes had been engraven in some plate of iron or brass. and put it into an earthen pot. Thus they went hill Difficulty. . and their crimes live for ever against them I think it is a high favour that they were hanged afore we came hither who knows else what they : . opinion ? Great. saying Now To all that shall against And let him that comes If unto pilgrims then you three hang there. they are hanged.. no. and their names rot. evil report of the Thereat Mercy said. and the water come out by itself more clear. T r this It is difficult . . and so let it stand till the dirt was gone to the bottom." That unto holiness opposers are. that Mer. is not a friend. said Christiana. Mer. these might have done to it such poor women *%$$%£ keep nil as we are ? And you see. with one Linger -after-lust. And. that others may see and But had it not take warning. (Prov. if they were such. was clear and good. of all such men beware. said he. said he. " The way 15:) it is of transgressors is hard. by and now you go by. for a caution to other Great. (Ezek. posts. to turn out of the way. that doctrine in erthis is the spring that Christian . „. xiii. S'mplp. where Formality and Hypocrisy lost themselves. little you will you may go a were at the foot of the hill. after fear this end. are dangerous paths two were here : to the wall. they brought up an ill report of your Lord. . of troublesome busy-bodies call : further. xxxiv. Thus. So he had them first to the spring. fancies the travail and labour of pilgrims. they had no mind to be pilgrims themselves. and become as they. tiuu . and then they drank thereof. as well perceive. in them. saywas not half so good as some pretended it was. But could they persuade any to be of their were sloth and . . . Sloth. i i the What ^^ are ttey hange( folly themselves. j was their guide and conductor. Next he showed them the two by-ways that . that they persuaded to do as they. ' . these The paths. and Presumphanged and why. children. Great-heart took an occasion to tell them what happened there when Christian himself went by. and whomsoever they could persuade they made so too and withal taught them to presume that they should do well They were asleep when Christian went at last.._. Mer. trow ? But said their guide. Christian as came by. here quench their thirst. the bread God. . Lo.£_ . are not desirous that pilgrims should . 01 . GVeotf. ing it good land. from Then she turned into a song. No. They took it up. but now it is getting of good dirty with the feet of some. her name was Dull. bad men So it if ? is. if taken up and put into a vessel that is sweet and good for then the dirt will sink to the bottom.!. Christiana and her companions were compelled to do. Besides. and be a sign the truth combine. drank of before he went up hill: and then it . They also brought up an Their crimes. and whomsoever they could they hindered they ties .

then they railingly return them answer. not only by these posts. ways without clanger . said Mercy. Sir. and had the boys. as it f. Yes. The and began to go up the and up the hill they went but . Let him that The verses were sees this stage. Here Christian lost that love their ease more than their souls choose and here Christiana her bottle behind themselves a smoother way. 28. —witness the story sunshine in a of Christian at this piace. "and their cloud trust . but the little boy did blush. and remember come watch. and this is the very cause in why .. here to rest your legs ? For I have here a piece of pomegranate. than down the hill to death. sit to the arbour. what : is the cause of this ? said. said ChrisI thought he gave tiana. here he speed As some have long agone. (for that was his name. The day wears away prepare to if you think good. Christiana is forgot to take her bottle of spirits Christiana for . and they did eat. ther on pilgrimage trust opinion. he do not. And I remember now what my mother hath told me. if at any time Great. and the little boys went before but Christiana before they got to the top. Come. xi. said the least. and do bid them beware of the danger. to Then they puts the pilgrims to hill l1." (Jer. You are going on pilgrimage. will you do as we ? : ! (Prov. said the other. arbour.. to sweeten your mouths. who. if you look a little further. for they were all in a pelting heat. saw before. little also. . when 'at thou shalt be a sharer in all the good that I have. he gave me. his heart and tongue. and doth call upon them. But. 1 he reason why . they wiU rather choose to walk upon a snare. But the proverb is. So it is iulnlled unto is 1P11 unpleasant to -. : ." Yea. This stage was built to punish those upon. when they had eaten and drank. at the resting-places. and a bottle of spirits. Then Mercy smiled. set forward. for a little above is the Prince's Then he took the little boy by the hand. 19. When and. up-hill some do J choose" them. so he did. stage in that place rendered. left of s P irit8 ' I think this his roll . it shall be first still as I said . the reason of raising up of that P% rimag e ? Sir. Sir. rest of this way to the City. off . on this stage both Misand Timorous were burnt through the tongue with a hot iron. in my I . going all. Then she gave to them.) pilgrims to provide such resting-places for them ! rejoicing ends in tears. but also by being hedged up . and some forget when they should guide made answer. given her a right answer. .r to go in by' is — written. Then said Mercy.. be going. ~ way . her. namely. said Christiana. when. " As for the word that thou hast spoken unto us in the name of the King. must sit down also the least of the children began to cry. they perceived as it were a stage. sit I . a piece of an honeycomb. x1 them of the " The way man is an hedge of thorns. Then is Pilgrims should Mercy. and ditch. will you eat a bit. we will not hearken unto thee but we will certainly do whatsoever thing goeth out of our own mouth. often. and say. How sweet rest to them that labour ! » and remember what they have already received under their greatest enjoyments but for want of doing so. both we came from home Mercy and . come. said Great-heart.) Nay. dare say this to a breathing hill and said. — 94 into these THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. shall be. xliv. and led him up thereto. you shall see that these ways are made cautionary enough. and the slothful Mr. But he answered. Great-heart to the little ones. Then said Mercy. a broad plate. not The cause is sleep. so she sent her little boy gets her botUe began to pant. 16. The little to answer gU d t boy's the alS ° was almost beat out of heart but me a hand at my need. and chain. Then said Mercy. So their down here. some pilgrims some things "When they were come They said in the arbour. let us go. because he called you aside. and tell them that they are in the wrong way. I no marvel if they back to fetch it. underneath." But James said. down the hill will 'Tis a good boy. or forgetfulness some sleep when they should keep awake. Of this it . with her. Then said Mercy. that the way to heaven is as a ladder. . kill. than to go up this hill. Then said Mr. said his master be the hardest of thou hast . So they got up .) The day is coming. it should. Now. you something. and before it.) chatted a little longer. yet they will choose to go there. and the way to hell is as down a hill. They will venture any of the King's servants doth happen to see them. 17. Interpreter put into my hand just when I came out of his door . This is much like to the saying of the Beloved " What shall be ^iven unto . pains . They are idle they love not to take .• . is a losing place. because thou so willingly didst become my companion. as I have heard. Come.*through timorousness or mistrust. said Christiana to And Great-heart. afraid to go furalso. " To go down the hill is easy. and presently I shall return much good may what you have do you At home I eat the same every day. losers. their guide said to them. of breaking their necks. arbour I have heard much but I never But here let us beware of sleeping for. yea. towards the road. take heed I thank you for lending Lest. with a copy of verses written thereon . Chr. But I had rather go up the ladder to life. if Unto The words underneath the verses were. Ve"o do ? °n C ° me *? P* 6 ?* h °y S hoW d ° Y0XL What think you now of going ' > they were come to the place where Misand Timorous met Christian to persuade him to go back for fear of the lions. it cost poor Christian dear. they were v eiT willing to sit down. which Mr. while you sit They refresh themselves. xv. oftentimes their • M . for endeavouring to hinder Christian on his journey. . And how good is the Prince of (Matt.

and Then said Mercy. It is I. and though the travellers have been made in times past to walk through by-paths. for they were behind him. the youngest of the boys. wait upon you. that intended to back them. because of his slaying of pilgrims . Will you slay me upon my own ground ? Great. Mercy. . " now I am risen a mother in Israel. . Mr. you have been so hearty in coun- selling of us. be persuaded to go with us and help us. Mr. as this implore his them turn they should not have passage there. Then said Christiana. at present I granted your request. women travelling there in the night. Watchful. was dead. seeing the guide standing just before it. but they all got by without further hurt. and no hurt shall happen to you from the lions. Sir. so he was not afraid of a lion but yet. But Great -heart their guide made A fight betwixt Grim and Great. or 95 what tongue ? be done unto thee.) the lions were chained. thee. when they were within sight of the Porter's lodge. but the : pass by - tne lions trembled as they passed by them the boys also looked as if they would die . and . glad to see him lie women. 4. They therefore went on. it must not be so now I am risen. With in this . These women and children are going on pilgrimage. for they were afraid of the when troubles lions so they stepped back. because it is dangerous the" Porter's . G. Great. Wherefore. Mr. and have brought the pilgrims hither : in safety. Come now. _ Por. the name of that man was Grim. heart said to the pilgrims. when they were come up to the place where the lions were. Chr. blow victory. and he was of the race of the giants. he said unto him.) Then he swore by therefore bid the lions that aside. And with that he gave him again a downright blow. 7. Great _ tempts Wrt at . What is the cause of your coming hither ? Now. Great- So they went on. J ' that his voice frighte . said he. cxx. I : and lions way it is that thou hast placed the women and these children. so hideously. and this is the way they must go and go it they shall. and went behind. en eel the . in spite of thee and the lions. then you have begged me of him to have of asking this he broke his helmet. and with the next he cut off an arm. with coals shall 3. with intent to make a way for the pilgrims in spite of the lions. Now. he opened the gate. though weak. good Christiana. adieu. Great-heart. my boys do you love to go before when no danger doth approach. that I shall never forget your favour towards us. and love to come behind so soon as the lions appear ? Now. The . because we are so weak. . and the porter cried. for it should . am at my Lord's commandment if he me to be your guide quite through. this way had of late lain much unoccupied. But I. such poor women as we hold out in a way so full of troubles. Then there appeared one. and yet they were sprawling upon the ground. Grim. Mr. (for he saw not the women. and he would have However. Mr. . to go No I will return to my backl Lord to-night. and to that end will back the lions. the guide knocked. . Now. what is your business here so late at night ? I have brought. that and came down for the guide had oft before come thither as a conductor of pilgrims. when old Grim. and stay till morning Great. of juniper. When he was come down. v." . bid But here you Hel should want failed but these for when he me come lost for thus far with you. Oh. Great-heart drew his sword. some pilgrims hither. Though the highways have been unoccupied heretofore. way Then as it is. Oh that we might have thy company to our journey's end! How The Pilgrims can. ? . Great-heart waa a strong man. they must lodge I had been here some time ago. of her country. asked Christiana and she said. till they came within sight of the lions. to So Lod o e - when they were come the gate. have cut him off. thou false Sharp arrows of the mighty. by reason of the fierceness of the lions. and my brave children. and brought him upon his knees. and so of themselves could do nothing. Pray. neither shall they go therein. Then did the giant roar also m. It is com P an y "till. where. the boys that those that go on bravely when -went before were now glad to cringe Ker^butBhrink behind. that he forced him to retreat. had I not been opposed by the giant that used to back the lions. as they went on. backing the to the pilgrims' guide.first his approach unto Grim. that it seems had taken upon and he said giant. must withdraw and so. . I am come forth to withstand them. and the way so dangerous is. after a long and tedious combat with him. (Judg. Then the Porter. I know not how" to be willing you should leave us in our pilgrimage you have been : so faithful and so loving to us. Who is there ? Rut as soon as the guide had said. and laid so heavily on him with his sword. I shall allot the King's highway that we are in. and of her kindred .THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Will not you go in. will willingly at first . and was almost grown over with grass. Now. Now. gone quite through with you. he knew his voice. without a friend and defender ? said James. shall hold on their way in spite of thy lions. and said. by my Lord's commandment. How now." (Ps. and of the grim carriage of him that did back them.) Then said the pilgrims' guide. to say truth. and They follow me. How now. Then said he that attempted to back the lions. This is -not their way. and of his him to back the lions . or Bloodyman. At this their guide smiled. you have fought so stoutly for us. they soon came up unto it but they made the more haste after this Th pome to to go thither. Sir.

Christiana stood still for were awaked. that in her slee Pyou did laugh in your sleep to-night ? I suppose you was in a dream. what aileth thee ? Now. Mer. that I should ever have fol- . : . he said. Laugh ay. the wife of Christian. Then they c J one another. and some began to thrust me about. but methought many thou wife of that good man come in. . xxxiii. (Ezek. as at such times selves to sleep. were gathered about me to see me. twice. With that. to see For you must give me leave to yourself so well. So I awoke from my dream. I am glad of my Mercy glad of her dream. So I was.. lowed him. the most grave said unto her. upon which One sat. xvi. The place looked bright and twinkling. Then hVknocked and. . Yes you laughed heartily but pr'ythee. . But did I laugh ? Chr. and he said to me. daughter. 29. and because the pilgrims were weary with their journey. they were had into a large room. . like the stars. said those of the family. and said. go to rest. and in his chamber. Nay. ye vessels of the grace of God. Well. thither. How this ! said the Porter. and my husband is dead . Mercy. welcome unto us your friends. I am a I came from the city of Destruction his widow-woman. 14 16. Yes. Then he after took me by come me. methought I looked up and saw one coming with wings towards me. Come Christiana. dream. and that. when deep sleep falleth upon men. : ' at the door. Thus they talked the Porter rang his bell. thou blessed woman. by proverbs. . when they wont. Christiana said to Mercy did laugh Mercy. come in. coming. When they into were and Mercy entered discourse about things that were convenient. Go tell it within. therefore. and they followed her that were her children and companions. (Exod.- 96 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. xii. and ear-rings in mine ears. . till we came at a golden gate. .. refresh yourselves first with a morsel of meat for they had prepared for them a lamb.. So he went up. ' . for I hope ere long to see it fulfilled. for joy that ! we Mercy) is one of my towns- women. to lie awake he can visit us while we sleep. Chr Little did I think 0nCe when my husband went on pilgrim > gnms — " age. as you tell you that it was a good dream have begun to find the first part true. the pilgrim." (Job. that Chris- and her children are come nitlier on Pilgrimage. as I a name was Christian. Mer.) the hand. . and had told it to them within. J r ° . be in that when he was and they all here. I had not sat there long. or rather like the sun. Then he is awhile. in a vision of the night. heart. and said. to talk with God and cause us then to hear his voice. so you shall " God speaks once. lay in a room. Mer. 3. . chamber that was my husSo they had them up . Mercy. noise of music for joy that we are here. and to hear what it was that I said. Wonderful are here ! Music music in the heart. Welcome. ! don't 'tis. either by words. when a-bed. And you as little thought of lying in his bed. What was the matter. Yes . and ended their prayer with a psalm.) We need not. did salute each other with a kiss. I was dreaming that I sat all alone in a solitary place. where they were bidden to sit down sat down. yea find the second at last. tell me thy dream. and told it. at rest. as soon as might be. She Joy at the news of 'the Pilgrims' went in. Hark Chr.crown upon my head. and the chief of so they _. and I went on bemoaning the hardness of my heart. s dream. they desired they might come in. . said Christiana. And much less did I ever think of seeing and of worshipping the Lord the King with him and yet now I believe I his face with comfort. as you do now. -what no is e for gladness was k there within. to the making of me laugh again. and I followed. the house were called to see and is kindled at the sight of welcome the guests. and to her the Porter said. t out of her mouth ! So they came with haste to the Porter. Chr. and clad me in silver and gold. to rest. Mer. and I followed him up to a throne. . J Christians love . So when they had supped. So what her dream WdS he came directly to me. Mer. Mercy. they desired. - : 8—13. Now. in the house. and I thought that I saw your husband there. and these are (pointing to was he your husband ? and his children . when they within had opened. Mer. . Welcome. So they hearkened. . and then betook themSo in the morning. by signs and similitudes. But. if we may be so bold as to choose. with the accustomed sauce belonging thereto. r . shall. ! But band's let us. Then some in. and well you might. the man went in. in slumbering upon the bed. Our heart oftentimes wakes when we sleep and God can speak to that. ? Music. . and also made faint with the sight of the fight and of the terrible lions. because it was somewhat late. yet man perceiveth it not in a dream. Now. Peace be to thee he also wiped mine eyes with his handkerchief. you hear a noise believe. and music also in heaven. Now. and there came to the door one of the damsels. and was bemoaning . and a beautiful. some of them laughed at me. said she. Christiana Christ's bosom is for all Pil' . of of the hardness of my Mercy . He put a chain about my neck. and understanding who they were. when he had heard me make my complaint. . with all that are with thee. . when the damsel did but drop that tiana. when they were gone in.) For the Porter had heard before of their coming. and a sweet dream it was but are you sure I laughed ? Chr. . to prepare to go to rest. some called me a fool. So she went in. whose name was Humble-mind . At this. as well as if one was awake. John i. n came m. and said.

It is the holy word of God ? Prud. Ay. whose cate- Matthew Father save thee ? James. if the Trinity ? let they invite us to stay awhile. and the him everlastingly that I may see Christ. A very good. thee? And how doth God the Holy Ghost save James. and by his preservation. and that God pull is so good and loving man as to quainted with these maids methinks Prudence. Jos. Very good. thou go to heaven me who God who Sam. Prud. and love may have that fulness of the Holy Spirit in me. forsooth. children. Then said Prudence to Christiana. Joseph. Prud. By his righteousness. God dwelleth there. justice. said Charity. Chr. Joseph. time to rise. by his renovation. whose name was James. Matt. Sa?n. ^dth the youngest. boy. and thou hast hearkened unto what she has said unto thee. which I can by no means here enjoy. What do you do when you meet with places therein that you do not understand ? I pray also Matt. so brother said. I think God is wiser than I. Chr. A place and state most blessed. Prud. What is supposed by this word. . By his illumination. Prud. I will therefore now apply myself to the next youngest. James catechised. : Prud. of his grace. and that with a very good will. How believe you as touching the resur- rection of the dead ? Prud. Holy Ghost. And because Prudence would see how Christiana had brought up her children. ^° they consented. ? that he will please to let me know good. the devil. With all my is heart. vol. I ask. Yes. Prud. and serve him with- made thee ? that I James. Prud. and stayed there They stay here some time. God the Son. You are to be commended for thus bringing up your children. that had a being until " For in six days the beginning of the first clay the Lord made heaven and earth. catechise Then (for his she said. and Charity have very comely and sober countenances. How doth God the Son save thee ? James. Joseph catechised. A made by God. What man he knows will be for my my reasonable creature. Piety. and became very profitable one to another. you shall have what Prud. Good boy. Prud. Prud. eldest. I believe they shall rise. and the Holy Ghost. they came down. .) name was will you let me you ? (Exod. are you willing that I should catechise you ? Sam. and death. she asked leave of „ l Frudence deso she gave sires to catechise her to catechise them Christiana's Then she began her free consent. to grow better ac- that none can pull us out of clutches but to God . since the youngest of them can answer them so well. Good boy still. and the everlasting happiness of his creature. And canst thou tell saved thee ? James. its I am the wilns willingly accept of the proffer. or before God ? Matt. Prud. Prud. And she James. canst thou said. That man by sin has brought himself into a state of captivity and miserv. Then said Prudence to Samuel catechised. said Mercy it was one of the best : him indeed out of this miserable state. That out weariness may . excepting himself. the same in nature. Those that accept of his salvation. because ? it- the dwelling-place of sin. Yes. Samuel. Matthew. What is God's design in saving poor men and ? We Jos. By his grace. all therein that Prud.) Come. With a very good will. Prudence and Piety. linger to stay awhile here. . Pray. n. the same that was buried corruption. and all . Matt. Prud. to him. : had in my life. Jos. What is know what we must Mer. Joseph thy mother hath taught thee well. But how doth God the Then she addressed herself to the name was Matthew and she said . . (who was the eldest but one. is What is hell ? A place and state most woeful. So when they were up and ready. &c. 11. if you please.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Who are they that must be saved ? Jos. Come. No for God is eternal nor is there any thing. about a month or above. as Prud. God the Son. saved ? Jos. and they asked one another of their rest. If you will be stay here awhile. though not in And I believe this upon a double H . The glorifying of his name. tell Come. and one that has God learned well. I think it is 07 supposed by his being saved by now high do. I suppose I need not ask the rest these questions. xx. shall I also cliised - catechise you ? and life. and if it was comfortable or not. Prud. Prud. Samuel. a great deal. God the Father. then. What is heaven ? Sam. see God. that in is. Prud." them Prud. Come. . Is there nothing written therein but what you understand ? Matt. Good boy. shall see what they will do. night's lodgings that I ever Then said persuaded to the house will afford. death and blood. if there was ever any thing that had a being antecedent to. Why wouldst I . and to Prud. What Jos. because . the sea.) do you think of the Bible ? Matt. God'the Father. That sin is so great and mighty a tyrant.

any further than as to its name which is set forth by thy conditions. . to show kindness to sister was served b herhusbu " d the poor. that I purpose never to And Mr. or my conditions Mercy's resolution for I shall be to me as a husband cannot change my nature . 'for my part." (1 Tim. I might have had husbands before now. and had a little observed the boy. it account : First. Mercy had a .. fors ikes her. and that with : You must Prudence's conelusion upon the catechising of 0)S * was asked the reason why. an ancient and wellapproved physician. if nobody will have me. or more. to do for the poor. Did I not tell thee. as they feared. Then he said to his . So they told her. Now. and inquired you Mer. So he came once or twice. that pretended had been at this visitor Mercy has a sweetheart. that is. my children. laying a foundation against the time to come. wall. Yes. >' - warrant her a good housewife. And what canst thou earn . will teach you what I can while you are here. And yet he was a professor. Mer. gion . The physician' a judgment. though never So did any of them find fault with my person. Mercy. yet Mercy and he are of tempers different. nothing but what is wholesome. seemed to be greatly taken. „ he forbore come at her again.1 Samuel puts his mother in mind «f the fruit his brother did eat. Now. or else he Will die. one Mr. said she. for he was much pained in his bowels. to . Prudence said. : : was of a fair countenance. not knowing where or how she I will disposed of what she made. for that he found her never idle. on the other side of the . he. Mer. the earth do teach you of your father's what the heavens and but especially be much in and his seeming love to Mercy. vi. he finds her at her Then old work. a-making of things for the poor. Mother. Then said Samuel. Prud. . Then hearken more. named Bountiful. quoth he to himself. so that he was with it. said to Prudence to the boys. at times. either for myself or for ms c> others. admit of as long as I live. there are but few that can abide. Mercy and Mr. of the gripes. Matthew. Brisk breeding.. 19. but troubled with ill conditions.) Why. Mercy in our days is but little set by. though I spoke not of it to any but they were such as did not like my conditions. and offered love unto her. You must still your mother. Brisk. and therefore the more alluring. said she. This boy has been tampering with something that lies in his maw undigested. and away without means. Now Mercy I will die a maid. she would be making of hose and garments for others. . •. that there needed no matter of great discouragement to be given to him for continuing so as she had begun. Observe also. notwithstanding his pretence to religion. and he came when he was entered the room. the practice. and his name was Mr. he concluded that he w as sick Gri pe8 of conscience. because God has promised Secondly. and shall be glad if you will ask me questions that tend to godly edifying. And when he ou know that there was an orchard on the left hand. I warrant Mercy then revealed of the maids the business to the maidens that were of the house. that I may lay hold on eternal life. a stranger to the of that power Nay him soul. he said. and to have one that : lies cross to me in this. ' : and his sickness was sore upon Matthew falls 8ick him.. and would bestow them upon them that had need. . we were come from the at the head of this way ? . rich in " that I may lie good works. that he was a very busy young man. for she can learn you also diligently give ear to what erood talk you shall hear from others ° . So the next time he comes. With that his countenance fell. because be is able to perforin it. would quickly cool his courage. is so soon as He Clothe the naked. such a one ! as : them concerning him. and . for they concerning Mr. they and I could not agree. some good-will unto a man of some her. the eldest son of Christiana. Talk between sai(l ne wl at always at it? Yes. i . Brisk would Mercv in the soon forsake thee ? yea. And I tell you. that was married to one of these churls but he and she could never agree but because m" sister was resolved to do as she bad now Percy's begun. and they sent for him. When he had left her. he must be purged. for your sakes do they speak good things. that Mercy was a pretty lass. pulled as There dwelt also not it were both ends together. and why. raise up an ill report of thee w hii e Mercy 'in : . the carefulness. Well. i« . : : 08 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. ah. that Mr. by that these pilgrims place a week. gether. what was that which that will not a day ? quoth he. " I do these things. I will look no more on purpose never to have a clog to my Prudence then replied. her out of his doors. but a man that stuck very close to the world. : 7 mother. and then turned . he will practice of merfor. what dost thou do with them ? said my J I brother did gather up and eat. So to gate that ST . but was. far from thence. Prud. The physician answered. So Christiana desired it. -. I. ! ' What diet has Matthew of late fed upon ? Diet said Christiana. to Mercy. and of such as but I am for none of fell them sick. and one that pretended to reliof he the world is now full he was. Her mind also was for be always busying of herself in doing when she had nothing to do for herself. therefore her husband first cried her down at the cross. then. prithee. and that pretended to religion. that I believe merc V name of so they will never come to- the meditation of that book which was the cause becoming a pilgrim. Skill. clicl know him better than she. said Mercy." said she. 18. I had a sister. said for I which is good.

8a ^ Christiana to Mr. they will do no good. (you know physicians give strange medicines to their patients :) and it was made into pills. . Skill. Pray. and kissed them. Come. Skill had seen that that purge was too weak. say . fruit of what it is is this pill Beelzebub's orchard. . fasting. . cleanseth the heart and mind. Borne of the trees SO hung over the eat. - . and Charity. (John vi. are to a carnal as well as to cure it. it caused him to sleep. . ! ! Skill. according to rules made in that case. with much ado. Sir. Piety. sir. if I can get these. to wit. and the effects thereof. that not wholesome food It is the fruit. thou ever. physic. if thou lovest Mercy.) . To show how unwelcome the word of God. Nay. Pray. and with some of the juice of hyssop. Then Matthew. my child. and yet he would eat thereof. It goes against my stomach. Chr. Then Christiana began to cry and she said. So he made him a purge. and how he was ' healed.versil1 remedy. (Zech. and it wrought kindly with him. take it. Skill. and brought to h * was loth to take it. I do marvel that good all for else ? is none did warn you of it many have died thereof. gave unto Christiana physic for herself. with Skill. good. but it was too weak 'twas said. for the most part. it put him into a fine heat and breathing sweat. heart. if thou lovest thy life. it was made of the blood of a goat. These pills good to prevent diseases. . of his distemper. when the boy was healed. O Matthew. when one is sick. do not be too much dejected boy may do well again. ix. 1—4.'O naughty boy and O careless mother what shall I do for my son ? the Skill. that the word. pared. I must have you take it.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. he made one to the purpose. (Heb. sir. who had been sick. and my brother dip pluck and thereof. said the boy. this potion is sweeter than honey. he did take and did eat naughty boy as he was.) When Mr. said his mother. and to rest quietly. make me up twelve boxes of them . whatever it costs. and for Mercy how he ate any more green plums . if it does of the effects of Matt. that Prudence bid the boys. how The mother tastes it. and it quite tip of rid him of his gripes. it was made ex The Latin I borrow. purge and cause to vomit ? Prud. I will never take are vomit. and her and bid Matthew take heed boys. I knew he had eaten something that was and that food. ^^ does physic.) Christiana But. other physic. and a proportionable Now. they should ask her some questions that might be profitable. ' wall. True. and when it is well pre. — — take them three at a time. Christiana.) I shall vomit it up again. and would go from alt room to room. and ith walked about A word of God in the hand of staff. Pray. said the boy. ^^ . good against the diseases that pilgrims are in. 10. to take the though torn with the gripes as if physic. You must pay the Master of the College of Physicians. It caused him to purge. and provided. her tongue. I dare and stand to it. asked Mr. came et sanguine Christi. that if at any time they would. will keep good time out of mind. for. 19 x. said : . (Mark ix. after a short prayer for the blessing of God upon it. look. in half a quarter of a pint of the tears of repentance. said she.The pill a unicident to . but he must purge and . 51. and went his way. ga j d the doctor Rnd this potion loth When The boy the W. So. the ashes of a heifer. John vi. come. what the one doth to the bodv.) must give these pills no other way In a glasg of the but as I have prescribed for if you tears of repentance So he do. It was told you before. Skill. So. 49. good Christiana. « '?. if thou lovest thy brothers. the other Why that she touched one of the pills with the doth to the soul. and does it taste ? ill It has no persuades him. said the physician. and talk with Prudence. and she would say something to them. he took it. saying. Sir. is even the most hurtful of all. (Heb. If thou lovest thy mother. was prepared. you must take it. xii. he was to quantity of salt. Skill. what will content you for your pains and care to and of my child ? And he said. So in a little time he got up. It a universal pill . 15. Why. Come. &c. Yea. that if a man will but use this physic as he should. physic v >SIC should be bitter to our palates ? Prud. I chid him. try the utmost of your him. Sir. To show. it will make him live for But. with a promise or two. when it works For effectually. 54 57. k e gh^id k e pU ]Jed in pieces. xiii. I hope I shall be reasonable. said she. skill Chr. asked her.

they had them into a 6hould be at the service of. take it down for. The cock's crowing shows to be seen to this very day. : ! : .. said they. downwards. and showed them the altar. and spend themselves place where did hang up a golden GoWen Anchoi% anchor. as our custom is to do to earth ? Prud. By the going up of the fire. to - . : '? . to show them some. said she. Great-heart should be sent unto us. Oh what a man for love to his rible day of judgment. we are taught that the Saviour of the world. Then they had her to a place. 100 Matt.tallow and all spent for this is a curious sight. and the wood. as there were some angels ascending well as in many that are poor and low. Then they were going into upon the candlewick (Gen. p be gone on they called the house together. P ia J ers So she drew up a almost forgot. Heb.Prudence's virginals. '? : .) them from death by his blood. Matt. where stood a pair of excellent Then said Joseph to his mother. showed them one of the apples that Eve ate of. vii. that Christ the bulent weather so they were glad thereof. and that for the eating of grace is confirmed to us in Christ. To show that the grace of God comes which. Whv doth the fire fasten the angels go up .selves. upon the heart. husband. Matt. it was convenient for them to up and be going. iii. you shall have it with Matt. What she thought that was? Then Christiana said. and he had Interpreter seen the contents of the petition. Out of the sea. Whv is the rainbow caused her children. and stood feeding their eyes with this so pleasant to maintain the light of the candle ? Prud. What may we learn from that? thelr wayPrud. when it was come. Why do they empty themselves upon the done. and she held up her hands to us through the body of Christ.) Matt. Which from God. that body and soul and all a prospect. So they turned again. into the closet. that grace of God So they bid Christiana that is in us. Why are the wick and . To show. And by the sun's sending his beat.. To show. they said unto Christiana. So they opened the matter a sight of Sin is amazing. from the sea to us through the asked her. — . we are taught to ascend to heaven by fervent and hot desires. Prud. What should we learn by seeing the flame go upwards. Interpray him grant that Mr. to maintain in good condition. After this. They rovide t0 Prud. said to the messenger. had them to the mount upon which Qf Abraham offering up Matt. was Abraham! Now. his people. thou art upon the way. there will be no true light of life thing else but James said to his mother. Of the pelican. to her. and the knife for they remain Peter's repentance. to Matt. about this time their month was out After they had showed them all these things. To show that the Spirit of grace shall Jacob's ladder. that day is coming on it. It is food or poison. . I had the stron ? t0 the way.. petition. Now at that time Jacob's Ladder. what they know of God to the world. vi. (Joel Then they took them and Blessed so loved his young. as to save iii. they held up their hands. upon it. and turned you forget not preter. and Prud. So Christiana looked and looked to see so did the rest of the company. Of the clouds. To show that the covenant of God's and that she also did give to her Eve's Apple. '? . who. in us. room. To nourish her young ones with her stand steadfast in case you should meet with turblood and thereby to show. Watchful. Why doth the pelican pierce you. and showed her the tops of high hills ? Prud. that Prudence took them into a dining. I know not earth ? Prud. „ Of the candle. wherefore they signified to those of the house. Go tell them that I will send him. the porter. Pray bid them stay here a little longer. reaches down with his grace and love to us below. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Matt. And shall we not show thee something. That ministers should fetch their doctrine give thanks to their King. her own breast with her bill that you may lay hold of that within the veil. To show that ministers should give out pilgrims. Master. . his son. and said.-. though high. and by sun seeing the beams and sweet influences of the sun strike downwards. on which thou mayest meditate when So they took Christiana. Matt. for sending them such profitable guests as these. Isaac. 24. What may one learn by Abraham our father offered up Isaac Of the cock. (Gen. and for denial to himself. Why do some of the springs rise out of and wondered. hearing the cock to crow Prud. that unless grace doth kindle another place. and Of the springs. It is proper that virginals so she played upon them. for 'tis of absolute necessity that you should. 16. xxviii. beams. that he may „. and Of the rainbow. When they hgd seen also. When the family where Christiana was saw that their water ? they had a purpose to go forward. Whence have the clouds Of fire and of the of our fire - to send to the house of Mr. Why do the springs come which they were both turned out of Paradise .) Prud. and blessed themlet then the crowing of the cock put thee in mind of that last and ter. the fire. bv the Prud. and prayed Mr. be our conductor for the rest of sometimes call Good boy. 1 6 Rom. 19. Matt. and sweet influences. 12. Matt. spring up in some that are great and mighty. to send it by some fit man to her good ffiend Mr.a sight of Christ is taking. Learn to remember Peter's sin. and Mercy.

gold angel in his hand and he made The Porter's a l° w obeisance. and departed. Now they began to go down It the hill into the hill. and let not her works be few. Then they addressed themselves to their journey. ' Look . When they came Porter if to the gate. and behold. But let not these suffice. Let thy garments be always white. giant. Upon which angels are. . Now I saw in my dream. Great-heart was there. — — ! THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. late there me. still. Greatheart is to go with us. who them all day long. only one. fear nothing. I often. that of had been a great robbery committed on the King's highway. to refresh you in your way. Do you fly youthful lusts. where Piety. My Lord has sent each of He brings a token from his you a bottle of wine. a little way off on the right hand. when he was come in. and also some Lord with him. . go out to hear them we also ofttimes keep them tame in our house they are very fine company for us when we are melancholy. . 12. what she had showed them saying Eve's apple we have showed you Of that be you aware You have seen Jacob's ladder too. Then said Mr. as long as Mr. and obtain praise of all that are sober-minded. So she ran and fetched it. dren. and to be our afraid. 11. one knocked at the door Mr. Until with Abra'aiu you have gave Your best a sacrifice. And shall from age to age endure. that they went forward until they were come to the brow of the hill. Great-heart s0 the Porter opened. . Christiana any of late went by ? He asked the said. I have „. and then you may hear those curious notes. Great-heart to Christiana and to Mercy. His mercy is for ever sure. when the flowers appear. Valley of Humiliation. ahout this time. : 101 into this excellent song. said he. and let thy head want no ointment. Then said Christiana to the Porter > Christiana takes her leave of the Porter - Sir > 1 ara much all obliged to you for the kindnesses that you have showed to me since I came hither and also for that you have been so loving and kind to my chil. His truth at all times firmly stood. : desirous to be in. But it all my life thy favour So frankly show'd to me. An anchor you received have. dLJi to was come again so she said here. things that thou hast seen at our them at part- house. parched corn> together with a he has also sent the couple of pomegranates boys some figs and raisins. comes again. was a steep and .) /i* €-> but Matthew said. places . Alas I have forgot what I intended to bestow upon Christiana and her companions I will go back and fetch it. also they make the woods. and solitary places. except it be at the spring. and Prudence and Piety went along with them. . . with words much like . cried. bethinking herself. out. as you go but. . Let Mercy live and not die. for thy edification and comfort. „ Piety bestoweth brought thee a scheme ot ail those something on this time Piety . So they thanked the Porter.— . said she. I know . upon which thou mayest look when thou findest thyself forgetful. Mother. a most curious melodious note. and will shortly be tried for their lives. (Sol. and follow after godliness with them that are grave and wise so shall you put gladness into your mother's heart. these : Through Now. the : And listening it. she thought she heard another answer saying and had delivered them from the lions. said. pray. and Blessing. For why ? The Lord our God is good . . as a token of my respect to you. That in thy house for evermore is My dwelling-place shall be. the thieves are taken. Mr. Then Christiana and Mercy were also told . While she was gone. Christiana thought she heard in a grove. conductor. By Christiana. And to the boys he said. and call those things again to remembrance. So Christiana asked Prudence who it was that made our country birds they sing these notes but seldom. Song ii. and the sun shines warm. some time since. what joy was there for came now afresh again into their minds how hut awhile ago he had slain old Grim Bloody-man. No. said she. not how to gratify your kindness wherefore. accept So she put a of this small mite. and groves. They are.

: . he is at also had a brave victory over his enemy : grant that dwelleth above. Fulness to such a burden is. to be faithfully paid them at certain seasons grim's : And . 1. as they were going along. But we will proceed in our discourse. a P illar and Jt looks as if something was written thereon let . In this valley our Lord formerly had his counsaid the guide. are of opinion that that place is haunted with some foul was the fruit of those slips that : and doth have wished that the next way to their Father's house were here. Besides. That go on pilgrimage . he went forward. here : when in the flesh. of this Valle y> for the Valley of nothing to hurt us. but giveth grace . and to enter with him in a brisk encounter yet I must tell you. he he were down in the valley. easier going up than down this hill. 6. Piety said to Christiana. so they got down but they were very careWhen they pretty well. they spied a boy feeding his father's sheep. and the battles that he met with in this place. The boy was in very mean clothes. he has left a yearly revenue. as This is a valley in other places he is apt to be. and have in this place found the words of life. in. But we will come again to this Valley of Huniithe best and most ground in all these parts. and talking. Then Do you he loved much to be he loved also to walk these meadows. as we do now. have found pearls here. • • . people. here a man Lo. and where they had that dreadful fight that they had I know you cannot but have heard thereof. in this place. did not I tell you that there was something hereabouts that would give intimation of the reason why Christian was so hard beset in this place ? Then. to what the shepherd's boy saith so they hearkened. must And hence it is that this look for combats here. Humiliation. n j might find somethe Valley of bit upon it. he got in his going down the hill for they that get slips there. 4. though Christian had the hard hap to meet here with Apollyon. we hope : . Because thou savest such. where hereabouts something that . own doing that such things do befal them content with what I have. no pride He that is humble.. afniid We need not be so liere is Mr. It Christian did also whom he here meet with Apollyon. for he found the air was try-house . 1 Pet. and wears more of that herb called heart's-ease in his bosom. had committed the pilgrims unto the conduct of their guide. yonder So they ug g an(j gee w h a t it is. turning himself to Christiana. before he came hither. with had a sore combat but that fray . when. might see that which would be delightful to him. than he that is clad in silk and velvet. if we was so beset in . and if also delighted himself in the sight of his eyes. that they might be troubled no mere -with either hills or mountains to go over but the way is the way. Some also : . went and found there written.) Did I say our Lord had here in former days his country-house. as you see. It is fat ground. fiend or evil spirit . when they hear that some frightful thing has befallen such a one. 5 . This is the place where Christian your husband met with the foul fiend Apollyon. consisteth much in meadows and if a man was to come here in the summer time. had come after. and he said. Here ~a man shall not be so let and hindered in his contemplation. when we come to be tried. and hereafter bliss. unless - we is protrue. liation.) might give us an account why Christian was hardly beset in this place. and from the hurryings of this life all states are full of noise and confusion. (Hos.) I have known many labouring men that have got good estates in this . but of a fresh and well-favoured countenance and as he sat by himself. so Then A pillar said with James stands to his mother. Greatheart to be your guide and conductor. No disparagement to Christian. Great-heart Huiuiliutiou. Christ. alas ! it is for the fruit am of their there. he know not anything before thereof. hear him ? I will dare to say. he said. be a warning to those that an inscription on it. this boy lives a merrier fife. > Lo. 102 the ful. if This Valley a brave place. Behold how green this valley is also how beautified with lilies.) indeed a very fruitful bring forth by handfuls. and that can be said but of few world. So when these two you will fare the better." pleasant. that we fare no worse. Is best from age to age. Then at said Mr. : He that is down. Great-heart. only the Valley of Humiliation is : house°in the shall Valley of Humihutl0U that empty and solitary place." James it is iv. we Humiliation. more than For it is to any others whose hap and lot it was. in such a place. and to the people that love and trace these grounds. contentment still I crave. that nobody walks life. (Heb. and. and that he loved here to walk? I will add. (Sol. way was slippery . ever shall Have God I fall to be his guide. For the common valley has got so hard a name. Little be it or much . be free from the noise. This Valley of Humiliation is of itself as fruitful a place as any the crow flies over The reason why Christian ano could l I am persuaded. Now.. xii. Him It is fruitful piece of . 5. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Hark. that in former times men have met with angels here. cure t to ourseives . Valley of Humiliation (for " God resisteth the proud. Men tlirive in the Vullev of to the v. Song ii. humble for . xiii. said their guide. And. and they went after. soil. needs fear no He that is low. than he. Great-heart. Lord. Here little. '* Let Christian's slips. said Mr. But be of good courage as long as you have here Mr. . he sung. rest let . 5. and there is an end. but those that love a pil- hills in all these parts of the he But we will leave the good man.

* »-3 1^ .

.

as Groanings heard. ii. and how unworthy they are of them. When Apollyon was beat.: — . and of a contrite spirit.A moTlunieT t of tian's victory. And. Most strange. that is called the Valley of the Shadow of Death. but these better many I stood. he made his retreat to the next valley. Your — more come to it for I persuade myself. did I not tell you. 15 . because they ha daylight. He made the fiend to fly Of which a monument I stand. and they " have confessed the same. of the place when we are . how make good also. father had the battle with Apollyon yonder before us. and melt in one's spirit. on which engraven this battle. for all he met with Apollyon. the ddid ter chilJren and Merc y. I perceive that in this valley father . yonder also stands a monument. was . " also filleth the pools. the place on this ground Christian and up there came Apollyon against him and. word for word. what he has done. they did split the very stones in pieces : verily Christian did here play the man. Great-heart. lxxxiv. and that trembleth at my . I have gone through An experiment this valley many a time. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS for their 103 maintenance by the way. to his fame throughout Christian's vietory all ages. until one's eyes become " as the fish-pools of : : Heshbon. where there is no rattling with coaches. and never o f itw*as better than when here. and read the writing. even he himself. the place. in a narrow passage. Sir. Great-heart was their went the conductor. they thought they heard a groaning. indeed. This is . 4. nor rumbling with wheels methinks. unto which we here. and showed himself as stout as Hercules could. Christian and Apollyon sought Each other to subdue. suits with my I love to be in such places. So. ' " this : Ilard by here was a battle fought. their with their When they were entered upon this valley. look. shall come anon. or some monument to testify that such a battle was fought there. and yet most true . Now. But Great. as they went on. They thought also that they did hear words of lamentation. Christian and Then said the guide to Christiana. I have also been a conductor to several pilgrims. without much molestation. The man so bravely play'd the man. had he been my and Apollyon had their battle but whereabout was the fight ? for I perceive this valley is large. Samuel said to Mr. (saith the King." they were come to the place where the aforementioned battle was fought. they can. Forgetful Green. I think I am as well in this Humility a sweet graue. Then said Mercy. the — . here one may. said their guide . and because Mr. spoken as of some in extreme torment. Ps. that to this day there remains either some sign of the battle. Some signs of the battle re- husband's blood upon these stones to this day Behold. The same to testify. they stepped to it.) and they that go through it shall sing as Christian did. how they did beat the ground with their feet as they fought. make it a well the rain. this is " valley of Baca. and to what the King has called him here one may think. This is the place also where others have been hard put to it. of dying men a very great groaning. These things made the boys to quake." They that go rightly through . just beyond Forgetful Green. Now When they had passed by this place. To this man will I look. as als > fi-ht > most strangely haunted with are able to testify. and Chris. here is some of your : women and children through it." This valley is that from wdience also the King will give to his their vineyards (Song vii. word. and for their farther encouragement to go on in their pilgrimage. it is when they forget what favours they have received." that God sends down from heaven upon them that are here. at a place . how here ! and there are yet to be seen upon the place some of the shivers of Apollyon's broken darts: see also. Hos. 3 upon the borders of the Shadow of Death. because it stood just on the wayside before them. by-blows. valley as I have been else in all any where : our journey spirit. which. be thinking what he is. 5 7. and break at heart. — Lo. whence he came. methinks.) even to him that is poor. a place evil things. that place is the most dangerous place in all these parts for if at any time pilgrims meet with any brunt. to places against each other. also. and this valley w as T longer than the other. 'Tis true.

now it seems as if the earth. as being a little rebut they had not gone far. I have gone often through this valley. for aught I know. for that I am not my own saviour. and put the pilgrims all before him. as it is to abide One of the boys replies. and Joseph said. " Resist the devil. and m me. freshed So they cried and prayed. the conto him. And now it is but a little way off. Well now — v. and went on but they were troubled much with the snares. said one of. saw. So they looked to their feet. So it came up and Mr. and stay upon their God. This waters. they spied a man is cast into the ditch on the left hand. . and it came a great padding pace after and it had a hollow voice of roaring and at every roar it gave. sick with fear. Great-heart addressed himself to give him battle. what is it? An ugly thing. he also drew back. women looked pale and wan but their guide Lid them be of good comfort. Great-heart. So they went on a little further. or at the . Cannot we see to the end of this valley as yet ? Then said the guide. and have been much harder put to it than now I am and yet you see I am alive. 9. pleasant being here as at the gate. " The is heart knoweth its own bitterness its . . before Mercy. Mercy. There is noj such . house where we lay last. cause thereof was fear. as if they would have torn him in pieces. not. and he will flee from you. the snares. for ever. That all rent and one Heedless. that was going way he has lain there a great . to ache. and see what an end will be put to this also. but when it was just come vanished to all their sights. one reason why we must go this way to the house* prepared for us. Thus they went on. ductor met it it . this . not only these. with his flesh Then said the guide. Now I see Christiana E0W what my poor husband went through. Then said hissing. I think I shall prize light and good way better than ever I did in all my life. said she. So on they went. The lion also came on apace. but I think the selves. stand and by. it is not so bad to go through here. child. said she. all the Satans in hell." For my part. let us pray for light to Him that can lighten our darkness. Then remembered they what had been said some time ago. To be here a fearful thing. but like Great. so his ther gave mo- and a stranger intermeddleth not with joy. but I never was here afore now." him some of that glass had been given her at the Interpreter's house. So doing business in great this is into the deep like being in the heart of the sea. Then said the boys. and that can rebuke. Alas! what now we do ? But their guide made answer. Methinks I see something yonder The fiend appears. you be taken in some snare. knows what her husband felt I have heard much of this place. here always and. and they thought that they felt the ground begin The ground shakes. if ever I get out here again. because their path was marred. what is it like ? said he. a pit the whole breadth be prepared darkness see. the fiend came on. was f cast up . I would not boast. and have no light. but none can tell what the Valley of the Shadow of Death should mean until they come in it themChristiana - ! . and God sent light and deliverance for there was now ey pray no let in their way. Yet they were not got through the valley so they went on still. the sweeter to us. as I have told you already. Now. so that they could not shall Then said the pilgrims. and three of the pills that Mr. fell to the way and before they could go over that. 'Tis like I cannot tell what. were about us " But let them that walk in darkness. said Mr. Samuel. to shake under them. when they were come . °st afraid. said. (1 Pet. But when he saw that it was determined that resistance should be made.) Then they went on again. with its bars. Then said she. where but now they were stopped with a pit. him that was their guide. lest haply. But I trust we shall have a good deliverance. Well. or at the Inter- . no. is. and the boy began to revive. as of serpents. Oh. quoth the guide thou hast spoke like a man. looking behind her. and like going down to the bottoms of the mountains. Skill had prepared. or like going down . : Now „ames James began to be sick. but. " Are we not yet at the end of this doleful place ?" But the guide also bid them be of good courage. Then said the guide. Great -heart went behind. that our home might be made preter's. as if some hollow place was there they heard also a kind of . is an ugly thing. It is nigh. a great mist and a upon them. Fear still. So they stayed there. Many have spoken of it. trust in the name of the Lord. shall be out by . and behold great stinks and loathsome smells. pit was much to easier to be discerned. to the great annoyance of them. mother. upon the road before us a thing of a shape such as I have not seen. Then said Mercy to Christiana. save the heart of . something most like a lion. let them that are The pilgrims are afraid." therefore on. and their conductor did go before them. keep close to Great-neart encourages them. it made all the valley echo. said he. said the boy. for we shall presf ntly be among the snares. of spirits that . Mother. but nothing as yet appeared. But. among torn. Look to your feet. the boys. Poor man he went here all alone in the night he had night almost quite through the way also these fiends were busy about him.104 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS . They then also thought that they did hear more apparently the noise and rushing of the enemies the fire also and smoke of the . Then said Joseph. as she A lion thought. not there. Come. Why. and look well to their feet. " : . and came no further. till they came at a place where A pit We and darkntss. till they came to about the middle of the valley and then Christiana said. and Mr. and all their hearts They went .

Thou practisest the craft of the giant down to the ground. to the weak. ' 105 There was one Take -heed with him when heart replied. stood trembling. - .giant missed but little of all-to-breaking Mr. Then the women and children He is slain and filtn rib wi *h that the giant began rejoiced. an end to your trade. Great-heart fairly a kidnapper.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Then Mr. Heedless is and Takeheed preserved. before we fall to it. no longer. and at the first blow the when he went by. but Mr.Great-heart betook himself to prayer . and - nt and Tlie Mr. recovering himself. and taken breatn. Then said the giant. Great -heart. or else went to meet him and. fetched Mr. caped i their' hands. let us understand where. : : — ! . What things ? you know what things but I will put of a boiling caldron. let so Mr. But pray. Bl:iin. and could hold up his club the deliverance he had wrought. and knew not what to do. quoth he God's ministers counted as kid. « : . while. and gave the giant and said unto him. Poor Christian. to set out and yet men are so foolishly venturous. ne was taken and slain but ^ e eS ~ my business is to persuade sinners to repentance. I am a servant of the God of heaven. the giant. Q & s t rail g e country. Great -heart down upon one of his gi ant This Maul did use to spoil knees with that the women and children cried Mini aeiant and out quarrels with young pilgrims with sophistry so Mr. When they had rested them. Greatening of my Master's kingdom. thou gathered up wo* me recover. Great-heart abouts. and Mr.heart's skull with his club. — . . and Mr. So to it they went again. they fell to it. and the nappers. where Christian had seen the cave more ado. out thence came forth Maul. and pierceth him under the from his shoulders. of an hour to that height of heat. Great-heart God also he had a good heart of his own. Great-heart When this was done. Great-heart." and if lightly on pilgrimage. he called G reat_heart by his' name. Nay. Great-heart also praised God for his head disto faint. as he went. women. and smit the head of the giant heat of his spirit. also the (Now the women and children women and children did nothing but sigh and cry fore we must fight.men and children. and to come and from the power of Satan unto God without a guide. and rob it with These are but generals. that the breath forbidden to do these things ? What things quoth came out of the giant's nostrils as the heat doth out Great-heart. he drew his he could never have done it. man. Great-heart come to particulars. posed of. let us But he was beloved of his fall to it as soon as thou wilt. a giant struck Mr. ! must fight - : : . You rob the country. How many times have you been a wound in his arm thus he fought for the space Then said Mr. But now Great. .) Quoth all the time the battle did last. but the giant had a club. said they both fell to it again and Mr. it was a wonder this be indeed the ground of thy quarrel. said Mr. as children "from darkness to light. with a blow. Now they drew towards the end of this way sword. runs to him in the seconded his blow. You cannot I am commanded turn magj ne ^ ow man y are Tailed here- vours to to do my endeamen. that he here escaped Then the giant came up. Greatheart. The giant struck the worst of thefts. they amongst them erected | j > . hold. the giant Then they sat down to rest them. and earnest them let him get up. down Great-heart. So without and just there. seeing that. laid Great-heart. about him in full lusty manner. : ^ — full Mr.

. had the first sight of Faithful. saw that they went on to the ascent that way off. Great-heart. that so my Master and yet he it was that conall have thought what you God has been wonauinir^s God's derfully good unto us. quoth the guide. pray let me crave your name. and his staff. . for thou hast said the truth. Great. I you had been of the Ta]k between company of those that some time Great-heart and he ago did rob Little-faith of his money but now I look better about me. given us such testimony of his love. I see no reason why we should distrust our God any more. My name I cannot but I came from the town of Stupidity : . ! . said and listened the giant's head thereon.) Wherefore here they sat down and rested they also here did eat.. all - That pilgrims did misuse . Well said. and in delivering us out of the hands of this enemy for my part. man.— 106 a pillar. that it is at present a proof of my love to my Master and you and shall be a means. when they came to it. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. quered I thought. So the guide. quoth he. and the name of the place Then said the guide. Now was a tian I little pilgrims. arose. and make merry. when he fetched you down to the ground at the first blow ? Why. Now a lfr^ e before them stood an oak and Old lloiuvst asleep under an under it. *jjk : : . No. Yet the old man gets saint someup. and wrote under it. good Sir. to increase my reward at last. and drink. The Pilgrims' guide to be Until that I did him oppose. here are none Matt. Honest. his brother. As they sat thus and did eat. to have helped yourself. as he lifted up his eyes. to mistrust that I is my own reliance all. in letters that passengers might read. That was their enemy. Chr. Mr. save a little on my flesh yet that also shall be so far from being to my detriment. and stands upon his guard. cast up to he a prospect for (that was the place from whence Chris. for by this I know that thou art a cock of the right kind. Great-heart. himself was served at last. what would or could you have It is my duty.) Chr. Hon. . both in goo ness. I cry you mercy. cried out. said he. My name is Great-heart I am the guide of these pilgrims that are going to the Celestial Country. Great-heart. that thou know- done. : . unless he shall yield of himself. when you saw him come with his club ? . One but friends. Discourse of the ability. may have on Hini that stronger than (2 Cor. When you if indeed we hail been of that company ? Hon. since he has now. now we are so happily met. Well. and in such a place as this. whence Mr. father Honest. awaked him and the old gentleman. But was you not afraid. enemy. he spared none. and went forward. Great. by grace. fight. He But did them abuse : Until that I. and times takes another for his will know of them what they are. Come. bringing us out of this valley. Why. you came from ? Hon. Honest came. I perceive you are honester people. Done why I would have fought as long and had I so done. Then feared that He that did wear this head was one stopp'd their way. And by this also I know. Then they got up. thev found an old pilgrim fast asleep they knew that he was a pilgrim by his clothes. iv. Christiana asked the guide if he had caught no hurt in the battle ? Then said Mr. I as breath had been in me am sure you could never have given me the worst on't for a Christian can never be overcome. Matthew here pl ease > I think est what true pilgrimage is : for all othersVlo think that we are the soonest overcome of any. Mr. . But what did you think. and his girdle. . for that they had gotten deliverance from this so dangerous an enemy. be not so hot. What's the matter ? Who are you V and what is your business here ? Great.

Ob. Hon. should come short of whither he had Mr< F ear i ng 8 pilHe Messeth and how she had left her town and a desire to go. was very well pleased. Hon. not in vice. but I could very well bear it be thou like Samuel the prophet. for those merely y 0Ur town is worse than is the city Great. till thou shalt come thither where thou shalt look the Fountain of Mercy in the face with comfort. he knows : * . Knew him I was a great companion of when he first his I was with him most an end began to think upon what would come upon us hereafter. Joseph. Hon. Lord. of Destruction itself. Fearing. Mercy is deem I you that countryman ? Then I have half a guess of you your name is : thou be sustained. And James. know the thing is true. Gen. as they walked along together. . Now. and his sincerity under all. by my Master all things that are done on the earth but I have often wondered that any . how coidd you guess that I am such a man. Why. said he. At that the old Destruction. . and of his travels and wars. publican. will arise upon him. is it not ? Hon. are honest shalt all man said. Be it spoken to your comfort. Great. Great. and how he managed himself under your James the Just. for I And Great.„ . very well. you have heard Christiana talk. Then he turned him to the boys. and thy name. xxxix. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. . if the Sun of Righteousness . Great. Matthew the bu( . Then said Christiana. I did so . said he.) Then they told him of Mercy. 6. Yes. Great. . chaste. I believe all it thy way. „ btupined ones „ c are worse than should come from your place. since I came from : such a place ? for had heard of you before. the world. x. the old gentleman was taken. Then the old gentleman saluted to the gates of the Celestial City. father Honest. the guide asked the old gentleman. Yes. and said. be thou like him. I perceive you knew him. and asked of them their names. and fared since they had set out on their pilgrimage. Every thing fright. if he did Talk of one not know one Mr. All this while the guide. I was his guide from my Master's house . and one that flies from temptation. But. Not Honesty in the abstract but Honest is my name. and so but was a man in a are more cold and senseless mountain of ice. I have heard much of your husband. f g 00(j Christian was my husband. So the old gentleman blushed. Hon. we lie more off from the sun. 14. ! . Greatheart. he smiled. Why. by mercy carried through assault those difficulties that shall thee in Old Honesty. he blessed them with a thousand good wishes saying. Mr. thus it it. he was always afraid that he (Matt. Matthew. which he underwent in his days. 3. Great. the name of your husband rings all over these parts of : ! . xcix. He was a man but he that had the root of the matter in him was one of the most troublesome pilgrims that ever I met with in all my days. a man of for men of my calling are oftentimes entrusted faith and prayer. have made his name famous. it 107 lieth about four degrees beyond the city of Christiana and with her sons. I was with him. 13. came on pilgrimage out of his parts. and smiled upon his companions. I .troublesome Brima«e Merc}. her kindred to come along with encd him that he heard anybody ' - . Ps. when Ho she told him who she was skipped. Acts i. I Old Honest and suppose. then. and I wish that my nature may agree to what I am called. his courage. his faith.. Sir. My name. the pilgrims with a holy kiss of charity how they had and asked them of their names. and like James the brother of our conduct. for you have given a very right character of him. said the old gentleman. . pray let us hear a little of Joseph in Potiphar's house. I believe hath been with me. which And then said he they told him. be thou like with the conduct of such as he was. Fearing. be thou un *-° tnem Old Mr > — like Hon. his induring. and these four are his But can you think how children. _ ^ yirtue S amne l } said he. to be a troublesome Honest' s blessing on them. his frozen heart -shall feel a thaw. that Mr. yet. Then you knew him one.

what wantest thou? With that he fell down to the ground. as he did to Christian before. many of them. the water stood in his eyes. I think. for gjj jie gaw Beverai g over t e fore . he seemed to get -some heart. as you know how the manner is. so great was his were hanged. and some comfortable things to allow him a stout and valiant conductor. and also told the way he should take. poor man. he was bid go on his way... but a few good bits at the table.How he was enThere were tertaiced there. then one opened to him. Only he seemed glad when he saw ^Xerywhen At last. I went therefore in. and my my Lord looked thereon. be£ore | ie wou ]^ adventure to call. venture to knock. so he did at my Master the . Peace be to thee . and the Cross and the Sepulchre. Nay. thelnterpieter's his desire should be granted. wherefore he carried so towards him. I looked out of the window. and he seemed for a while after to be a tftnd . that though he saw several others for that that would be his end also. after he had lain at the Slough of Despond a great while. and anked what he was. afraid when he knocking get in. and my Lord. till. . and to be a little more com. Nor would he go back again. offered to lend him their hands. and and cold then. I think. as I have told you. especially to them that are afraid it . There the poor man would stand shaking and shrinking I dare say it would have pitied one's heart to have seen him. a slough that he carried every where with him. At last he took the hammer that hanged on the gate in his hand. he said that he doubted He was greatlv dejection. and also to a bottle of spirits. do it. but he shrunk back as before. and when that he was in. if it it. is one of very tender bowels. he carried it wonder. a Slough of Despond in his mind. ful lovingly to him. to entreat to our Lord : him to for to come in . He lay there- about in the cold a good while. and stumbled at every straw that any body cast in his way. Slough of Despond for above month together nor durst he. There. he ventured. So he came up to the gate. I went out to him. and say that he was not worthy. up. so he said to him. him. For. : most to his encouragement. So he went on till he came to our house but as he behaved himself at the gate. for all he got before some to the gate. he saw" the Cross. for thou art blessed. But. you must encouraged at know. as might . # So he lay up and down thereabouts. Well. he would give back. Thou trembling one. So when he had been there a good while. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and I went before he was himself so chicken-hearted a man and him but the man was but of few words. perceiving a man to be up and down about the I confess he desired to stay a little door. he was afraid to call at the door.108 speak of. and give place to others. because eat. gave him grant him the comfort of his house. and we showed the thing so he sent me out again. With that he got up. The Celestial City. He had. and gave a small rap or two . . he was ashamed to show his face. • His behaviour Interpreter's door. Welly when he had had a sight of the things of the place. and went in trembling . I don't know how.. Then he presented the note. one sunshiny morning. yet he would not go back and the nights were long at the Interpreer s oor. would sigh aloud. b or my Master. He that opened stepped out after him. after he had been entertained there awhile. and said. Thus we set forward. for I have set open the door to thee. and there also he His behaviour stood a great while before he would at the gate. When we were come to where the three fellows he was almost starved yea. poor man. yet many of them went in before him. and told it in the house. to look. At last but I dare say I had hard work he came in and I will say that . had but the the a least appearance of opposition in His behaviour I heard that he lay roaring at at the Slough of Despoud. and so got over but when he was over. When the gate was opened. but some of it was laid upon his trencher. he had a note of necessity was ready to take his journey to go to the city. he said. he should die if he came not to it and yet he was dejected at every difficulty. . or else he could never have been as he was. T . though they. so I perceived what he wanted. . . He that spoke to him wondered to see him so faint. Well. venture. and said . He would not go back again neither. yet he was afraid to venture. come in. t ' _ He is a little iortable. in his bosom to my Master to receive him. . Lord. only he yet. he would scarce believe it. (you know what I mean.) that stands at the head of this way. for all that.

) : Hon. He made such a noise and such an outcry here. iii. . I shall. he feared not at all it was only sin. 2. and sing their songs before the throne. Now. But what should be the reason that such a good man should be all his days so much in the dark ? gaw g mftn in &y nfe for he cared not how mean he was. now. you must know that not about such things as these his fear was was about his acceptance at last. Dumpish at the m house Beautiful. the hobgoblins will have me the hobgoblins will have me cried he and I could not beat him out on't. when he had any inclir nation to go back that he always abhorred but he wa. and that made his life so burdensome to himself.) He was. death. xiv. for my part. but that he durst not be so bold as to ask. not from weakness of spirit as to the practical part of Great. . When he was going up to the gate. 16. because he would not offend. it was enough to encourage them to come and fall upon us. When we went also from the house Beautiful. that he had come : the Shadow of man no t for that — he sets the soul in tune for himself. He desired much to b e al ne yet he always loved good talk. but the things with which he was oppressed no man ever yet could shake off with verb is. I think there was a kind of sympathy betwixt that valley and him for I never saw him better in all his pilgrimage than he was eyej j . So he said. M Great. as the pro- he could have bit a firebrand.) Now. a close about him as you have well observed. viii. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. (Lam. we It would be too tedious to tell you of all will therefore only mention a passage or two more. that he often would deny himself of that which was lawful. and so troublesome to others. One bo : is. He and his fellows sound the sackbut. The first string that the musician usually touches is the bass. . But when he was come to the entrance of the — Valley of the Shadow of Death. Humiliation. are that play upon their trumpets and harps. Yes. he should be drowned for ever. 27 29. till towards his latter end. vii. ! ! . 13. had it stood in his way . Mr. embrace the ground. and a command not to meddle until Mr. You say right those were the things were his troublers and they. he was so afraid of doing injuries to others. I make bold to talk thus metaphorically for the ripening of the wits of young readers. or Vanity Fair. (Matt. tracing and walking to and fro in the valley.s ready to die for fear. (Rom. Then it seems he was well at last ? Great. . he said. I thought he would have fought with all the men in the fair. because he had some doubts about see . tender of sin . yes. so many miles to behold. as one may by that relation which you have given of him. at Vanity Fair. His behaviour When he was come to Vanity Fair. There are two sorts of reasons for it it. I got him in at the house Beautiful. (Rev. above many. at the Gate. and that of the Interpreter. xi. But when he was come at the river where was no bridge. he went f M1 > into the Valle y of down as well . Here he would lie down. the wise God will have . and to wish him a good reception above.) Hon. as ever I knew it before or since. I brought him acquainted with the damsels of the place but he was ashamed to make himself much . lions. and some must Reagong why good men are so in that valley. Pleasant in the Vallev of Hufiliation. and hell. and kiss the very flowers that grew in this valley. I think Also when he was in. so hot was he against their fooleries. He also loved much to see ancient things. He was a very zealous man. xiv. some say the bass is the ground of music and. I thought I should have lost my tune. only he was always kept very low. (Ps. I feared there we should have been both knocked on the head. before he was willing. 21. 3. was the imperfection of Mr. Mr. that : - a pilgrim's life. that he loved to be in those two houses from which he came last. little 109 cheery. And here also I took notice of what was very remarkable the water of that river was lower at this time than ever I saw it in all my life so he went over at last. Only there . He told me afterward. lxxxviii. and to be pondering them in his mind. when' he intends to put all in - inthedark . 1 Cor. I dare believe that. nor did he much fear the his trouble . Then parted we asunder.) He would now be up every morning by break of day. that were to him a terror. indeed. there again he was in a heavy case. . arose from the weakness of his mind thereabout. that had they but heard him. I care not at all for that profession that begins not in heaviness of mind. Difficulties. Fearing had passed over it. Great-heart began to take leave of him. Upon the Enchanted Ground he was very wakeful. for When he made no lions : stick at that. company. to wit. his interest in that celestial country. 17. and so never see that face with comfort.. not much above q\ s boldness at last? wet-shod. whose notes are more doleful than the notes of other music are though. I never had doubt about him. and I saw him no more. Yea. dmvn th . God also plays upon this string first. and often would get behind the screen to hear it. But this I took very great notice of. he came to the hill Difficulty. Oh. . Hon. in the Valley of weep. I suppose those enemies here had now a special check from our Lord. and because in the book of the Revelation the saved compared to a company of musicians. that this valley was as quiet when we went through it. some must pipe. so he might be happy at last. I shall. He was a man of a choice spirit. Fearing he could play upon no other music but this. . Fearing was one that played upon the bass.

ay. Great. Pr'ythee. Mer. But this I perceive is not the thing but if I understaud you right. Master Fearing. and so did saved Rahab. in the world Hon. Great. thought I. Selfwil1 tell them of another. as for them that want thy wit. your meaning is. because I lick its excrements. therefore he had allowance to do it of a presumptuous mind. Great.) men's virtues. Then said Matthew. : Great. nor yet example what his mind prompted him to. farewell about And didst thou fear the lake and pit? him.) is no sign of one that pilgrims . thought nobody had been like me. Though there is not always grace where James's sentence. they made him that he could not knock at the houses provided for entertainment but my trouble was always such as made me knock the louder. If I might also speak my heart. and therefore he could do so too. 'Tis just as if the dog should say. So I will. • saw that they . more than once or twice but he Old Honest had would always be like himself. Pray what principles did he hold ? for I suppose you can tell. that they broke out but mine I kept within. no grace. Honest began to Of Mr. can at present have faith or love in . Honest but I persuade myself he never came in at the gate that stands at the I Now. Why. Mr. Mr. His supposing that such may have tlje godly 8. and wast afraid Of doing anything. he could not much have . Ay. &c. Honest. ii. This relation of Mr. High base indeed ! And are you sure Well. at the word. Egypt lied. No fears. down and might defiled itself m the mire. vices as well as the virtues of the (Hos. but on condition that we watch and strive. You must understand me rightly^: he did not say that any man might do this but that they who had the virtues of those who did such things. as well as partake of the virtues of pilgrims. is also a delusion as strong as the other. and therefore he could do so to. For the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom. there is the fear of hell. said Mr. For I have ever been saying ? more afraid of the lake. Hon. wallow- therefore he like wilfully lie down and head of the way. Hon.still went on in their talk. while here. Self-will. I Fearing has done me good. To eat up the sin of is God's people. that because good men heretofore have sinned of infirmity. Mr. present us with a I 'Tis enough. Yes. An opinion that is not fit to be. His also lay so hard upon Christiana's sentence. that a man might follow the . I have. warrant. though have a habitation there part with all the world to win it. I have heard him plead for it.! — . bring Scripture for it. that Jacob got the inheritance of his father in a way of guile and dissimulation. if he did both. Great-heart had made an end with Mr. who addict themselves to their vices. He said. him. thou didst fear Thy God. He said. of this opinion. possessed witli is Self-will's opinions.that tence. and nothing else could he be got to do. Great. He neither cared for man. I must say that something of him has also Mercy's sen. or if. to have to do with other men's wives had been practised by David. Great. God's beloved and therefore he could do it. with any allowance. fell it stumbled at a . the blast of the wind. For after - But what more false than such a conclusion ? For this is as much as to say. that he would do. to be. may I have the happiness to Hon. bring arguments for it. yet to be sure there is no grace where there is no fear of God. But what grounds had he so tence. ' — they "stumble Who could have thought a boar therein. it is possible for the best to be guilty of the vices. He said. dwelt in me. ! 110 CTir. His troubles were so great. and therefore he could do He said. after we have sent after him this farewell from : few particulars. Fear was one thing ! Matthew's sen. Hon. whereunto they also were appointed. so I mean. . and therefore . being disobedient. because a child. he could do it. But we will here conclude our discourse of Mr. Fearing. by Great. been blamed for indeed we are exempted from no vice absolutely. selftalked with willed. he was of this opinion ? Hon. Nor can I believe that one that he should be certainly saved. Had you ever any talk with him about it ? Hon. made me think that I was far having that within me that accompanies salvation. But I see there was some semblance betwixt this good man and me only we differed in two things. said James. practised. that Sarah and the godly midwives of it. 8. Well. How ? If he had said. and so he believed and for his Great. Their That would have thee hetray'd.why may it not also go well with me ? James. and the loss of a place in Paradise. and that. he said he had the Scripture for his Great. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS Then said Christiana. He pretended himself to be a pilgrim. and to be sure they that want the beginning have neither middle nor end. that any one could so far have been blinded by the power of lust! But what is written must be true . thou hast hit the mark." (1 Pet. than I have been of the loss of other things. He held. Matt. or may up have. or for that stone. the stinking qualities of the child. Would others do so too For. and took away the owner's ass. They do themselves undo. He said that the disciples went at the bidding of their Master. Fearing. But if it was so with such a good man as he. to have more women than one was a thing that Solomon practised. lm nor argument. that it was allowable so . said James. that he was of opinion. their virtues. might also do the same. but his name was Mr. Oh. iv. .

and for himself? Hon. though to thought could not have lived a day. when they have not this man's mouth and that makes going first set out for Paradise. When game. master of the house. the other leads them into have seen some who have spoken very well of a pilgrim's life at first. For. while our opinions are proved very good pilgrims. There are many of this man's mind. said he. have come back again. But I know you have made some strong him pr'ythee what can he say . and have been fore. he says. who yet have in a few days died as they in the wilderness. Then were . for the robbers are before you.) is one a little before us. that as much against it. yet to sin. Great-heart. there when we come to die. because they were weary. So they one Gaius. : . Great-heart. I have heard some vaunt what they would do in case they should be opposed. all concluded to Gaius. There are strange opinions in the world. They be the three Hon. and So they asked if they might lie There 23. a toleration so to do. Now. Gentlemen. : met with the villains but whether they heard of turn in thither and the rather. . and said there* is lamented but he that feareth the King of Paradise none. . journey to the last hour of that week. even shall come out of them all. Honest. : . the pilgrim's way. when they have been almost on pilgrimage of so little esteem as it is. at a false alarm. if you love life. they went in. I have heard some. . gentlemen. shift for yourselves. I have seems abundantly more honest than to do it. have been loth. Hon.Great-heart's resolution Well. they came to the door. I have seen some let loose the bridle to lusts. fled faith. and plead who have run hastily forward. as they were thus on their way. dwells. where there that night. Yes. who. that again have. because the old Mr. that after a while have spoken the snare. my house is for if you be true men. that have yet Great. Great. and Fresh news of trouble. Now they a traveller in this road many a day looked at every turning when they should have taken notice of many things. I know one that said. they came not up to the pilgrims. Chr. is worse beholders accidentally. might he have had a week to run said. it was time enough to repent and all. and seen some that have promised nothing at first setting out to be pilgrims. or whether they had some other gentleman gave him so good a report. for none but pilgrims. Why. You have said the truth. say positively there is such a place. to have deferred his weaker sort. we are ready thus.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Such are not over-wise that man would came one running to meet them. I am. Great. to do this by way of opinion so never got sight of the promised land. not knocking. (Rom. against such things. 8eu? an<^ Then they he came called for the to them. and it is to be there. run just as fast back again. that have. and that one would have yet hold contrary to it in opinion. and you of the twenty miles in his life. | j . objections against Ill I have seen some that have set out as if they would drive all the world afore them. xvi. and I have for them so they went on their way. Then said Mr. . a very honourable disciple. knock at the door of an inn. him. You say right and yet the generality of them who count themselves pilgrims do indeed do that set upon Little-Faith hereto. Christiana then wished for an inn to refresh herChristiana for folks use not to wishes for an lun- ner children. is bad I the one stumbles after a little time. as you see. A very wicked answer. Then said Mr. an old man.

above any that I know. whose name was Taste-that-whichls-good. For as death and the curse came into the world by a woman. There was he that woman that washed his feet with tears. . and that the so they all said. and they covet to he or tread in the same. was slain with the edge of the sword. iv. let us entertain one another with some good discourse : ready supper ior so pilgrims. Greatheart and the old gentleman. &c. risen — . that ever any man or angel. who was cast to the lions. 60. sir. So they called for rooms. I will now speak on the behalf of women. extinct. eldest son. The boys take all . his ways. and her children. but such as we have you shall be welcome to. after their father. and Polycarp. more glad. Gal. and while supper is making ready. 27 xxiv. The maid is one of her acquaintance. what hast thou for supper ? for these pilgrims have come far to-day. thou art never destitute of that which is conGreat. This woman is the wife of one Christian. and yet to be numerous upon the face of the earth. Many have been good of this stock their ancestors dwelt first Of Christian's ancestors. and Mercy. and I am glad that I have a house to entertain you in . (Acts xii. a pilgrim of former times and these are his four children. Gaius. Gaius entertains for that the innkeeper was a lover of them. and are these Christian's chiltfren ? j knew your h us b a nd's father. be content with what thou hast forasmuch as I have proved thee. and come seem to their father's end. for the Lord of the pilgrims. yea. was one of the first of the family from whence your husband sprang. will We . Hon. this sex. Great. whose flesh was cut by pieces from his bones. way to preserve a posterity pilgrimage. Whose keeper.) Women therefore are highly . (Acts xi. and a woman that anointed his body to the burial. a lovely couple. way Then said Gaius. pilgrims. 2. another of this generation. . that played the man in the fire. Stephen. and tread in their father's steps. my good friends.) Christian's progenitors (I suppose you have heard your husband talk of woman might be the mother of the Saviour of the world. also his father's father. xxvii. on the earth. to get comes up again. 2.) To say nothing of Paul and Peter. they ways. that have suffered injuries and death for the love of a pilgrim's life. 55 — 61. thy It is . Romanus. so also did life and health.I read not man did give unto Christ so much one groat but the women followed him. and in process of time tween Mercy and Ma " bew they were married but more of : - and covet to tread in his steps yea.) James. so we cannot conveniently go out to seek food . 22. this or that at Antioch. saying. that hereafter. that the name of their father. 37 50 viii. Then said Gaius. but be diminished may is . Then he went down and spake to the cook. there was Ignatius.) that came after made of a woman. if you please. you are welcome to me. Gaius. I am glad to see thee and thy friend this Mercy together here. was knocked on the head with stones. It is late. and cast into the sea to be drowned. I hope they will bear up their father's name. 59. They have. Nor can left that thy husband has I but be glad to see behind him four such boys as these. (Luke ii. (Luke vii. „ . the. Gaiusscook. 23. 'Twas a for the sake of the truth. men anciently of the family from whence your husband came. 'Tis pity his family should and be it Gaius. but let Christiana take my advice. Come. tiana about her to choose heartily their father's j Great. or any print of his foot. . he r . and another for Mr. coveted children. if they do but see any place where the old pilgrim hath lain. That is it that I said. in the muA . It would be impossible utterly to count up all of that family .112 Christiana. brought tidings first to his disciples that he was from the dead. and them that loved him. So this match was A ra atch beconcluded. Yea. was hanged up in a basket in the sun for the wasps to eat and he whom they put into a sack. Gains. take : Mercy the into a nearer relation to if she will. to take away their reproach. that when them) were very worthy men. and are weary. . the Saviour was come. Mercy. . and how. 4. if that will content. they are likely lads. sent forth his Son. John ii. it ministereth joy to their hearts. Indeed. And if I may thee advise. one that she hath persuaded to come with her on wife is Talk between Gaius and his gueats. and bo) ' 8' the house of his progenitors. I have heard of many of your husband's relations that have stood that all trials women rejoiced in him. 2. to show how much they did abhor the act of Wh wonieno f OldTeshappily if old so desired childre P- their mother. Fall it cannot. (Gen. Matt. Is this Christian's God iii.' tament. and that sat by his sepulchre when he was buried.< ° f . This done. Then said Mr. may never be fall for- gotten in the world. and .). Content.Christian's family is like still to spread abroad upon the face of the ground. said this inn- aged matron? and whose daughter is this young damsel ? Great. and he showed them one for Christiana. Gaius. showed themselves men of great virtue and courage. Gaius also proceeded. said Gaius. They were women that were first with him at his resurrection-morn and women that . xxiii. (Acts vii. Good Gaius. He many J comes up again. 3 . in the house venient. before either as I will say again. . Great-heart. to uphold it. wherefore let Christiana look out some damsels for her sons. and said. ministered to him of their substance. and the hoys THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. wife. Wherefore. let her be given to Matthew. They were women that wept when he was going to the cross and women that followed him from the cross. And. to A(j v ce to chriswhom they may be betrothed. 3 xi. 26. Christiana.

|i.K:!!!'i!i.i!iiiii:..i|ii:i!i.i i I .

.

) my a dish of apples. and The more he he had. and 113 but show by these things that they are life. 15. said some at the table. Then Christiana. and the setting of salt upon the board. 13. After supper. Matthew. May we eat apples. and . where his heart lay. Drink of his flagons then. The sight of this cloth. and have found by experience that I have gained There is that scattereth. by which she brought a very good report upon pilgrims. : Mercy. Gaius said. books. There is that maketh himself rich. — Then they all gave good heed. much again. would be making coats and garments to give to the poor. overhearing. 2. But to return again to our story. and sent one to Supper ready. i (1 ret. Gains. the rest sit up< called. who art sick of love. makes glad the heart of God and man. and there is that withholdeth more than creaseth a great while . xxv. wife. if ate. I made the scruple. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. This was our Lord's dish when he was a child " Butter and honey shall he eat. heave-shoulder David lifted up his heart to God with and with the wave-breast. talking of Then were they very merry. because I a while since was sick with the eating of said fruit. vii. that he may know how to refuse the evil. 5. cast away. begetteth in me a greater appetite to my food than I had to set the salt Then teeth. (I will not call shells do shells. xi. and of this forerunner of the supper. he said texts are nuts. Then after much talk of their Lord.) Samuel whispered to mother. will open when compared with the feast that our Lord make for us when we come to his house. they all ate heartily thereof. Whose all Gains. this is the true juice of the vine. freely of Then said Gaius. hath our souls defiled Apples forbid. ix. is : Then they brought up Of honey and butter. then thus replied : . The Heb. corrupt the blood To eat such. My we are cracking your nuts. He who Shall have as thus bestows his goods upon the poor. in course a dish of butter and honey. to show them to their chambed. for this is 24 xiii. a bottle of wine. the cook sent up to signify that supper was almost ready. Then . but it tendeth to poverty. may grow thereby. they it were pre- ^ sented with another dish. do you trenchers. and here to Mercy. 15. 14. Matthew and Mercy married. Forbidden fruit will sharers with us in the grace of not what our Lord has tolerated. and yet inthereby. is his a very good man's house let : us stay here a good while. the before we go any further. These two dishes were very fresh and good. So they stayed there more than a month. Then Gaius bed. So supper came up. -r» that they ii. at blvadwUhtiis cloth and trenchers. for they were The boyg g0 t0 weary with travelling.) and bread in order. . 1. child. and ten times more. for all *" s kingdom S » reat preaching. Gaius °P ens "• • Then Sir. I ber but. Yet sin. to show that they must begin their meal with prayer and praise to God. not apples. while you please. ' Let the boys have i that. With a very good will. the Then ^ said the old gentleman. he used to lean upon his harp when he played. Ps. And first a heave -shoulder and a wave -breast were set on the table before them . (Deut. 32 31. 7. wondering what good Gaius would say so he sat still a while. since they were such by and with which the serpent beguiled our first mother ? Then said Gaius Then said Mercy was given to Matthew to While they stayed here. the lads desired a bed. 14. A man there was. rience. John xv. j doth> and the trencll e rs . VOL. yet hath nothing there is that maketh himself poor. . host.) The next was a dish of milk well crumbed v u A dish . Judg. does us good. So they drank and were merry. Eat good to cheer up and strengthen your judgments and understandings. said." (Isa. Mother.. I dare say. Jose P h wonders. and was Song teeth : vi. So them to have will Mercy. : nothing teaches like expeI have learned of my Lord to be kind.vii. xiii. The which Gaius. Then they brought them up A dish of apples. talking. have been trained up in this freely. and sat many things. : —— — make you sick . to found out. though some did more count him mad.. and said. and they were very good-tasted Matthew. as her custom was. his dove. this riddle : if good landlord. how II. and this. (Lev.) meet. and ay Now While they were thus a dish of nuts. I said Joseph. thou church. Nuts spoil tender of especially the children : which when Gaius Hard heard. . So Gaius said them. this (Prov. Apples were they with which we were beguiled. Then said Matthew. And eat his apples. I . (Sol. — .) before. Drink that Oh way said Gaius. did not think you could have it ! The next they brought up was as red as blood.) x. them cheaters. yet hath great riches. and fruit. t -u of milk. keep their kernels from the eaters and you shall have the meat They here are brought for you to crack and eat. when commanded. that they could not tell . 11. xxxii. said she had them to bed and they slept well but the for Gaius and they were rest sat up all night such suitable company. 15. So let ministering doctrines to thee life Open then the What is to be in this be » et sit m gathered from desire to at the tnee a g reater supper of the . to part. the A riddle put forth by old Honest. let my brother Matthew be married choose the good. favoured. . /i i 1. and ordinances j ag t ]ie laying of the lere afe ^ Km m table a long time.

No. Great. said Gaius.my part to you .. I will tell y 0U a stoiy wort h the hearing. The young man had strong corruptions to grapple with the old man's were weak with the decays of nature. But. old men that are gracious are best able to give advice to them that are young. old Mr. though the old man's corruptions are naturally the weakest. who. Thus they set to sat talking till break of day. Then said Mr. to be sure. as men do a common stone. battle that it is strongest especially when it also holdeth pace with that which meets not with half so much. with a purpose after that to pick his bones for he was of the nature of flesh-eaters. that " he had no form nor comeliness in him. Then said Mr. Mr.— 114 : : THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. because they have seen most of the emptiness of things but yet. man can be a living monument of grace. That sin would mortifv Who. when they have found one.„. of the King's highway wherefore come out : of thy opposition. There were two men that went on pilgrimage the one began when he was young. told thee before. began to nod. helmet. And now comes into my mind. and slew him. do you expound it. having taken Feeble-mind in ls an him in the way. to see if we can do any good. any that knows either reason or grace. as I know. . come. we will walk into the fields. or which of them. So he saulted and slain smote him. whom his servants f0U nd with one had brought unto him. ." said Mr. gives best demonstration . and the giant made Mr. Then said the old gentleman : 'tis ex- . as I beguile themselves. the. when thou hast dragged them out . now you are here. Then Who ! abroad would. The young man's. Honest. still and then stood to take wind. ii you please. therefore they judge Of him by the meanness of his outside just like those that know not that precious stones are covered over with a homely crust. . To the second I say. they found him with one Feeble.. The weapon fall out of his hand. the young one has the advantage of the fairest discovery of a work of grace within him. To the first Because the church of the "Jews. doubtless. words are spoken in the person of unbelievers. Now the giant was rifling him. here is a riddle for you. who. Mr. that does much annoy the King's highway in these parts and I know whereabout his haunt is. Honest. . Why are you here on my observed that old men have blessed themselves with this mistake namely. . and their journey. Unto himself must die. he Old Honest nods. first must die at home.. that he lives. themselves. So they went to it again. it is altogether without heart to oppose sin. when the family were up. Great -heart give back but he came up again. you begin to be drowsy come. cast it away again.•. said Gaius. . Sir. the other when he was old. itself. must first be overcome Great. after we have refreshed ourselves.. if you please. Great. how should make resistance before is loosed from that infirmity ? Nor will . they showed his head to the family. : • ' . I have So he armed himself and came out. Then ground ? said the giant. About a mile from hence there is one Slay -good. it is a hard one hard to expound. and brought it away to the inn. Great -heart. For that which heads it against the greater comparison. When they came to the place where he was. Giant Slav-good . would convince me. Great-heart and his friends at the mouth of his cave. old age does not. because they know not what they have found. taking the decays of nature for a gracious conquest over corruptions. and harder to practise. So they consented and went Mr. : . and to they went. for an old and a : young man out both together. He also took Feeble-mind the pilgrim. he had done. Wben they were come home. first It is right. Honest. had their graces shining clearest. He is master of a number of thieves 'twould be well if we could clear these parts of him. What. and shield and the rest with spears and staves. because they want the eye that can see into our Prince's heart. and pected you should answer it. that put forth the riddle to Gaius. mind m his hand. ' . sin Satan's cords. Great. cave.. a giant. so soon as he saw Mr. I will. that he made him let his . and in the greatness of his mind he let fly with such stoutness at the giant's head and sides.. and cut off his head. For. Let us hear it. believe that such a that is . landlord. leave . as. and brought him with him to his lodgings. and I will hear what . I answer. to be alike ? A Hon. heart . until grace displays its and overcomes the soul with is glory. rub up now. We want thee for we are come to revenge the quarrels of the many that thou hast slain of the pilgrims. since both seemed A question the minding. The opened He by grace must conquer'd be. said he. Honest asked why it was said that the Saviour is said to " come out of a dry ground" and also. good doctrine and expefirst. Great-heart with his sword. rience teach this. he demanded what they wanted. Ha said Mr. Great-heart is good at his weapons. had then lost almost all the sap and spirit of religion. When Another question. a slave to his worth it own corruptions. The young man trod his steps as even as did the old one. He that would live kill.. it by which the Secondly.. Well. you say. Well. Besides. her son James that he should read a chapter so he read the 53rd of Isaiah. soul lies it . : bound. said Gaius . if Besides. Now. Then said Greatheart. and was every way as light as he. To revenge the blood of pilgrims. it was put to you. and since. with their weapons. and so have been apt to A mistake. . and fought for above an hour. of which Christ came. Indeed. Who now. Christiana bid .

! . 14.. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. mind came be a pilgrim. . is he slain? He overtook me some days before Mr F ee bi e . He boarded them by the year. He and I have been much of a temper Feeble. Not-right. both . What thou hast a him - crawl. though none was willing to go so softly as Now just as Mr... Now about this time Matthew and Mercy were married also Gaius gave his daughter Phebe to after which James. if he keeps heart-whole towards his Master. and what thou wouldst thee. Other brunts I also look for but this I have re. ' ' Mark this. and said. indeed he WM my my father s brother. i . What. and. terpreter. Hon. solved on. there comes one running. to be.) and so went on their own pace. as they had done others before. a cast like his with i 1. I was carried up that by one of his servants. and your speech is much alike. Feeble-mind and Gaius were Not-right was am forced to do bid me be of good I will of their . Feebleyet we were well acquainted.prepare to go forward But heart called for a reckoning. Robbed I looked to die by the hand of the enemy. for mind's uncle. they asked Mr. whatsoever charge he was at with feast. as they came on. . Sir. and called at the door. as you see to How Feeble- man. Then said Mr. is. Now the hour was come that they The p ij gr ms must be gone wherefore Mr. to. but looked for hi3 pay from the good Samaritan. aud escaped but it seems he escaped to die. and you as the means. . . i your eye. alas feeble one that I was. at his return. where I and my father were born.. though I am. I received much kindness^ there and because the hill of Difficulty was judged too hard for me. and to As to the main. my mind is beyond the river that has no bridge. : have heard that not any pilgrim that is taken captive by violent hands. I perceive you knew him. Fear. Indeed I have found much relief from pilneither objected he against against my feeble mind . and Gaius comforts my house. - When * 2 . ^^ ' : they were to depart. ! then this giant met with me. and resolved to let me go no further ? Did he intend. pilgrims use to do. Feeble-mind. who had promised him. said good Gaius. to wife time.. whose face is death. a pilgrim ? Yes. Feeble. But. live. a pilgrim. freely . they thus in talk. . they yet stayed about ten days at Gaius's house. and said. and I was taken to I came kill Mark for I me. That very Providence. Feeble -mind how he fell into his hands. Ofttimes delivers from the saddest plight. as you see. and bid me hope When I came to the house of the Into the end. . though I can but of Uncertain. v.. Then man. since . but of a feeble mind. Then said old Mr. Slay-good intend me this favour when he stopped me. so far as hither. Honest.. This is an unex_ pected favour. to wit. mine host ? Yet t. Great. to run when I can. I should go to Gaius. shorter than 1 but yet we were connexion. which lieth four degrees to the northward of the city of Destruction. I had more need of a cordial so he came up and took me. Matthew's brother. Gaius told him. escaped with life. nor but gave me such things as were necessary for my journey. one would ' . Have not you some time ago been acquainted with one Mr.. Come. When I was come to Assault- That about a mile and a half slain by a thunwas one Mr. ing. yet still. » J* I bethis. . but would. if I could. Fearing. I conceited he should not lane. . : have my servants do for a ready mind. ! . with a thunderbolt. he came Acquainted with him from the town of Stupidity. little of a it• . He was also with me when Slay-good the giant took me. that it was the Lord that comfort should be given to the feeble-minded. by the laws of providence. I am a sickly and because death did usually once a <% knock at m Y door J said the poor : > whitely look. and ae manv °ff where I was born Mr. as you see. doth seek to slay outright. (1 Thess. besides. and as the sun shining Notice to e out of a very dark cloud. that after he had rifled my pockets. Gaius made them a and they did eat and drink. Alas said Mr. Gaius. When the head of the way. I went not with him willingly. . Mr. thought I should never be well at gQ j b etoo k myse lf to a piland have travelled hither from the town Feeble. and robbed to be sure I am but I am. Him that loves me. think. spending their time and the seasons like a3 . Fearing' s features. and bid me prepare for an encounter... they will do it with so it is. spend I my life in the pilgrim's the came at the gate that is at Lord of that place did entertain me way. nor yet of mind. much Then Feeble. Hon. one to another for you have his some f Mr. my weakly looks. struck dead upon the place where he was. be my " lieved 1 should come out alive again . Did giant taken of Providence. and I am apt to believe also that you were related _ T » ieeble-mindhas . and would mind's comment upon lt company-keeper. : . off there cheer. and were merry. Most have home . and life to me. . I thank creep when I cannot go. grims. for a he was a terror to those that should attempt to do as ho hereafter. I am fixed my way is before me. for the which I thank my King as the author. Also when he got me into his den. but he was nimble of his heels. grim's life. that at his house it was not the custom for pilgrims to pay for their entertainment. I am a man of no strength at all of body. Feeble-mind. to go when I cannot run. be of good you are welcome to me. and set it 115 up. Doth ofttimes to the lowly life bequeath he did escape and flee I taken was Hands cross'd gave death to him. for the said so that have known us what I have read in him I have cheer to most part found in myself. mind call for freely.

heat of their discourse. and His excuse for *' shall be offended and made weak at that which others can bear. as I said. Man.) so that I know not what to do. 35. Ready- . thou shalt do well. a dog. he profitable questions. thou dost faithfully. Then said Mr. Mr. Ready. good Mr. Great-heart him : Great. : son of my many to infirmities. he said. Feeble. both ^ Christian sjiirit. rathef than . & n of weak and feeble mind. and to support the must needs go along with us . It is with me as it is with a weak man among the strong. faithfully to THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. am ? companion. (Rom. rather than you should be left behind. (Luke to x. I will be your conductor. wait for you . with us . whatsothey greet one another at to parting. wea]j I choose therefore rather to come behind. xxxviii. though I thank thee will. You commission to comfort the feeble-minded. when they were going out of the door. I shall be glad of thy company.) Then How said Mr. brother. 6. Sometimes. ReadyAo^halt come by. lest. if I hear some rejoice in the Lord. Now Mr." (Job xii. and was going on pilgrimage. witness of thy charity before the church whom if thou yet bring forward on their journey after a godly sort. Fe «ble-mind. Welcome.) Now. by rea- we will lend you our help we will deny ourselves of some things. my crutches. " Beloved. I Great-heart's good Mr. . said Mr. 17. Great. repay him. with his crutches in his hand. to Nay. 5 . pray do you go along (3 John all. weak. Mr. since we are thus happily met. we will be made all things to you.Feeble-mind also able companion. . vii. may help me against when occasion is. but thou art accord- ing to my wish. for your sake we will not enter into doubtful disputations before you.116 them.) and his children. I myself and to you. (Ps. Feeble -mind. " He that is ready to slip with his feet is as a lamp despised in the thought of him that is at ease. and you shall fare as the rest. But. commission. Feeble-mind. we will it have in thy good I it I am not inclined to halt before I think. Ready-to-halt. Feeble-mind to him. opinionative and practical. I shall like no laughing I shall like no gay attire I shall like no un- burden should be both a I am. Feeble-mind. him something to drink by the way. for Nay. and particularly Gains's last He also gave kindness to of Mr. Come. Great -heart espied. said the other and. but . Feeble-mind. how earnest thou hither ? I was but now complaining that I had not a suit. I am so weak a man as be offended with that which others have a liberty to do. it troubles me be: came by. Great-heart. The which when Mr. we will part. Howbeit. or as with a sick man among the healthy. Alas ! I want a suitable Feeble-mind for You are all lusty going behind. or as a lamp despised . xiv. to-halt as they while they were at Gaius's door were thus in the Promises - . I hope thou and I may be some help. and strong. I do not yet know all the truth I am a very ignorant Christian man. : ever thou dost to tne brethren and which have borne strangers . am lame. a 1 Cor. I will lend thee one of Feeble. cause I cannot do so too. welcome. all this m and behold. . Feeble." Then Gaius took his leave of them 5. made as if he intended to linger. 31. said he. J as you see.

it. Sir. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Hon. did Christian and Faithful meet with Evangelist. as the pilgrim well said. any of his children was ever of any esteem with they consulted with one another how they should any that truly feared God. . Yes. that he would be his ways. where Vanity They come >' with . yea. Feeble-mind and Vanity Fair. with Adam the First. when they saw in sight of Vanit Fair end with his by-ends nor did I ever hear that that they were so near the 'town. good quickly to find him out. chapter that then he did read unto them. . - Fair is kept. Christiana and her and prophesied to them what should befal them at children went next. Mr. Thus they went on till they came to the place Mr. and Shame four as deceitful villains as a for Hopeful. Hon. A very arch fellow. and his Great. mode of religion for everv fresh occasion. Ready-to-halt came behind. but pray go on for you are well good Faithful was hardest put to it wi-th Shame acquainted with things. were converted by his death. and Mr. whichever way Great. will. By-ends what was he ? and Faithful met Talkative ? That same was also Great. But. priss through the town . Well Faithful bravely suffered. where was it that Christian Hon. Hon. Thus. . Then said their guide. Also I think you cannot but daunted they were when they stood before the judge? have heard how Faithful was put to it by Madam Hon. Ay for. one By -ends all men had the wrong name. Above all that Christian met with after Great.. Feeble -mind. Great. 'Twas so but he gave them encouragemeet with Apollyon ment withal. was the arch one. a downright hypoa notable one. | my have gone on pilgrimage before us. Pray. Great-heart where Evangelist met with Christian and Faithful. we are both at thy command. and plead for so doing. . Hon. New talk. they went on. but Christian put him into a way thee a pleasure. If either myself or 117 Ay. But what do we talk of them ? in the Valley of Humiliation. who prophesied to them of what troubles they Then said Mr. ! . tell us should meet with at Vanity Fair. so far as I could learn. So he did. with one DisconGreat. as the story relates man can meet with upon the road. Say you so ? I dare say it was a hard some profitable things of some that crutches can do Great. Hereabouts Mr. and some others. Honest. He had his sure neither to lose nor suffer for it. : . So. Sir. now we are upon the road. I have heard of all this but indeed. Wanton. With a good heard how Christian of I suppose you have . Do not you remember how unShadow of Death. But pray. Now of the by town this time they were come within sight of Vanity. he of he had passed through Vanity Fair. Great. too. with his crutches. Well. . Honest went before. and also what hard They were a couple of lion -like men they had set work he had to go through the Valley of the their faces like flint. He was a confident fool yet many follow the world went but so cunning. he was an unweai'ied one. Ready. therefore. crite one that would be religious. : . Hon. was as good at it as he. and as brave things come on't tent. He would turn from opinion to opinion. and some said one thing. old did . he came to an wife ill . He had like to have beguiled Faithful. and Mr.

that they feared would have We . How far rest. go you. Hon. 'Tis hard keeping our hearts and spirits Contr. they have been ashamed to burn any more. A suffer trouble. Love-saints. said Mr. was at present. tell my friends. I promise You you. will you have the pilgrims up into their lodging ? Mnas. Honest asked his landlord if there were any store of good people in the town. we are seldom at a certainty. _. as you see. They then asked her of her welfare. but of late. Contrite. have ye come to-day? So they said. Hon. So he had them to their respective places and also showed them a very fair dining-room. quoth he. Contrite. neighbours. Great-heart. a Cyprusian by nation. so soon as ever he heard tongue ° _ _ so he opened. in there. I think the blood of Faithful lieth with a load upon them till now. who with was so shamefully handled in tiana Content. Mnason's to lodge. and are going to Mount Zion. but Mr. to rest. in You may good order when we are in a cumbered condiThe fruit of tion. and Mr.. Mnas. And when she had told them they were. n . is "S^ like t0 the a PP earin g of the m oo n sailing and upon the Some seas. They are much more moderate now than You know how Chris. . an old disciple. said Mr. I am acquainted with one Mr. have a few for indeed they are but a few. their host. — .. Then Mr. our town. Holy-man. eventide by that they got to the outside of the town . at whose house we may If you think good. and we will do what we can to get it for you. make you as your father. ask Mr. for since they burned him. But how desire to see some of the °f g re °tbe t o°wn shall we do to see some of them? They for the that of g ood men to them are going on pilgrimage. where they might be and sup together. have. and so . I say. and that has to day. Mnason and Faithful were used at our so hot at Vanity Fair as for " town. the wife of Christian. But -who. sometimes downThe wind is hill. and his daughter Grace came up. . They enter into one Mr. Honest (when they were all sat down) asked Mr. Feeble -mind . you see what it is but for good company. it j . called at the door. Dare-not-lie.. Mr. said ChrisContent. stars to them that are stamped with his foot. and they came and after salutation made.. Then said their guide. they sat down together at the table. Great-heart said. Penitent. Contrite to them. Hon. his . you have gone a good stitch. Contrite and the Some talk be- We little . nor is every one a friend that we meet with in the way. said he. So Grace went to call them. do bid you welcome and whatever you want. For harbour. what cheer.: 118 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. In those days we were afraid to walk the streets but -now we can show our heads. Then said Mr. and bring you where he is in peace. Mr. the famous pilgrim. Christiana and her children were beset by two ruffians. said Mr. Great-heart. pointing his finger to Christiana. Great. that will appear in the trial. Now. and they all came n said Mnason. Mnas. you must think that it was . our guide for . < Contr. he can give the best account of that. I also. and if these young men were her husband's sons. and cheery after their journey. Then the name of a professor was odious now. So he said unto her. I will. We have met with some notable rubs already. .) religion is counted honourable. So thither they came and he and the old man within knew . Great-heart knew the way to the old man's house. Then said Mr. they have merly been far more moderate. for . Now when were a little they were seated in their places. So they sat down. He that lives in such a place my friend. Mnason their landlord. Pray how fared it with you in your pilgrimage ? how stands the country affected towards you ? Hon.Persecution not *_. good sirs ? I dare say you are welcome to n> i^en At that they stood amazed. as it happeneth to wayfaring men sometimes our way is clean. Mnason. and what are yet behind we know not but for the most part we find it true that has been talked of old. be sure w e are full of hurry in fair-time. said old Honest Content. until the time was come to go . Great. tian . thought to see Christiana when Grace came to call us wherefore this is a very comfortable surprise. I have. Mr. At last Mr. side. may well be weary sit down. Faithful his brother It is Christiana. Well. But how are your neighbours now quietness ? Contr. that I have a friend or two at my house that have a mind this evening to see them. said he. Come. Hon. Mnas. Mv sent for. not always on our backs. especially in some parts of our town. . and ment now I hope we have both. Mr. Mr. said Mr. with such as we have. The King. formerly. do you think this is ? . - do watchfulness. often been a conductor of pilgrims through this town. I strangers and some another. they said. Grace. do but say. . when compared with them on the other We . . It happens to us. Mnason. sometimes foul sometimes up-hill. saying. Great. good man must . whom you love and serve. Now. . From the house of Gaius our friend. Mnason. Our great want awhile since They are glad of entertainwas harbour and good company. . they said all. we will turn lodge. as you may understand. a company of come to my house they are pilgrims they are come from afar. You talk of rubs what rubs have you met withal ? Nay. have been beset three or four times already. Then Mr. (for you know our town is large. has need of an item to caution him to take heed every moment of the as this is. in what posture their r town Honestand^Mr. _. First.

Phebe. and he lustily laid about him in conclusion. they nor are Mr. Now. Also he has not made that havoc of the townsmen's children as formerly he had done and it is verily believed by some. . and go see if we could light upon any of those that are enemies to pilgrims for we heard that there was Now Gaius knew his a notable one thereabouts. F l men and such men as loved their . Feeble-mind. Dare. Great-heart. And. Mr. Dare-not. Holy. was bellies like to live in the world. possessed with who go on pilgrimage courage. xii. Now the monster at first was very rampant. go forth to meet him.) It made great havoc of children. there came a monster out and slew many of the people of the town. Contrite. Love -saint. who in process of time gave his daughter Grace unto Samuel. Mnason's house again. Mr. and set up by the wayside. and Martha. Penitent. when saw Mr. lives more than their souls. . Christiana's son. J was like a His shape. . lo. until the way is cleared of such spots and blemishes. The monster. Then said Mr. I found to my cost. . . and came out. i insomuch that in process of time he became not only wounded. and his head cut off. Lovesaint's speech. The monster was like unto no one beast on the earth. and to my to pick my bones I every comfort. . The time. Holy-man. he left the poor man in his hole. but they so belaboured him. : have the pilgrim's lie. If they have not courage.r ms like to have that grace put upon them and their Pilgrim's Progress as they desire. if perhaps they might deliver the people of this town from the paws and mouths of this so devouring a serpent. Now Mr. taken out of the mouth of the lion. when we came there. „. that they lay here. gageJ. dain . This. Dare-not-lie. and an unspotted life. because he dwelt thereabout. 119 fair were beset with Giant Bloody-man. 3. here is ungodliness. Mr. we did rather beset the last than : were beset of him. approach so near for my deliverance. t ]ie pilg. we were minded upon a time to take our weapons with us. So we looked. and refreshed their weary bodies. Thus they sat talking and spending the time until supper was set upon the table. Great-heart. till at last we discerned then we were glad. being sturdy men at arms. into his net. another outward and their hosen out behind here a rag. no man in the town durst so much as face this monster but all fled when they heard the noise of his coming. was long. with their weapons. Then did Mr. Great -heart and his fellows of great fame in this town . ought to be troubled for his speech. this poor man. So we approached up to and. these seasons did these valiant worthies watch in. accepted of those con- Mr. : . he had his den dragged.. to my cost and comfort : when he threatened moment. so they went to rest. While they . Then said Mr. and there a rent. . W eed. said Mr. Feeble. therefore. Holy -man. Then said Mr. There are two Mr. had his certain seasons to come out in. he was brought down to the ground. so that many of the people that wanted their taste of things. is not needful among you. supposing. to the disparagement of their Lord. Its body dragon. they can never hold on their way and if their lives be loose. that they made him make a retreat so they came home to Mr. These things. Penitent. and looked. and did much good in their places. with their weapons. and his daughter Martha to Joseph. They were also all of them very fruitful so that Christian's name. Mnason's house. as she was wont. Mnason. . neither 'Tis true. . lay here. But when he saw us. and did them what service they could. Holy-mau's things that they have need to be speech. him . house of this Mr. Great-heart and his friends.. Penitent. but all awry with their feet one shoe goes inward. you must know. but lame. that this beast will die of his wounds. made Mr. for a terror to such as should after practise such That I tell you the truth. and teach them to suck its whelps. Love. for it was not now as in former times. and yet it was governed by a woman. caution road. Wherefore the pilgrims grew acquainted with many of the good people of the town. away We Now they stayed in the a great while at the Indeed. as I said. They . as we thought. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. and she was there an ornament to her profession. of the woods. unto which they went. the man himself to affirm it. Mercy. and did still continually assault him . and it had seven heads and ten horns. And thus it was after we had been some time at the house of Gains. to it full sore. haunt better than I. who was as a lamb . entered into a covenant to go and engage this beast. laboured much for the poor wherefore their : and backs blessed her. mine host. Then said Mr. and to make his attempts upon the children of the people of the town.. Feeble-mind. by mere force. (Rev. and was about to bring him to his end. I hope this . to wife.How he is enditions. Giant Maul. Mr. to say the truth for Grace. and Mr. and the mouth of his cave plucked up our spirits. This monster propounded conditions to TT ilis nature. he had another prey.together with those who came to visit the pilgrims at Mr. they were all of a very good nature. Pen. yet had a reverent esteem and respect for them. So we fell but. nor the pilgrim's courage they go not uprightly. taken good. Mr. they will make the very name of a pilgrim stink. and Giant Slaytheir lives. his speech. and of the whole church. this true. as was said before. It would also carry away their children. At strangers to pilgrimage. and looked upon these enemies with great dis. But truly there are many that go that upon the rather declare themselves So they came under. than strangers and pilgrims on the earth. Dare-not-lie.

that these pilgrims got not much hurt here. if taken inwardly. Also there was here one that was entrusted with them. they ' marvelled. and their friends accompanying them so far as was convenient. talking of Christian and Faithful. they again committed each other to the protection of taeir King. there were cotes and folds for sheep. pany went . that stood also within view of Sodom and its stinking lake. i | | j Hopeful joined himself to Christian after" that Faithful was dead. Therefore they made a stand. they set conferred with them they had some time suffering as his was. 10. they quickly came to the place where Faithful was put to death. that could see no more than a mole. means Mr. True. that men of j that knowledge and ripeness of wit as they were should be so blinded as to turn aside here. and when their friends had bid them farewell. went on till they came to the river that was on this side of the Delectable Mountains to the river where the fine trees grow on both sides. a house built fbr the nourishing and bringing up of those lambs. Great-heart went before them. their journey. and that could gently lead those that .. . apart therein to commit each other to the protection of their Prince. who could have compassion and that could gather these lambs with his arm. and into which. Feeble-mind had more to sympathize with their condition. the women and children being weakly. Well. and whose leaves. Ready-to-halt and Mr. as some think. therefore. as did Christian before. are good against surfeits (Psalm xxiii. sent for their friends . that were fit for the weak and the strong. By-ends feU and perished wherefore they considered that. especially if that thing upon which they look has an upon the foolish eye. They . after this a further. (Acts xxviii. nor understand no more than a beast these had no reverence for these men. When they were gone from the townsmen. that they — where the meadows are green all the year long and where they might lie down safely. Now. They. But when they were come to the . Only they considered again. 120 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. good way and how brought them of such things as they had. By this river side. nor took they notice of their valour and adventures. the time grew on that the pilgrims must go on their way. and thanked Him that had enabled him to bear his cross so well and the rather. this Upon account therefore it was.) Then they set forward on their way . . and carry them in his bosom. for the women and the men. that were of the pilgrims' comon. and Mr. Now they were come up with the hill Lucre. wherefore they prepared for . there were some of the baser sort. and parted. and so laded them with such things as were necessary. where the silver mine was which took Demas off from his pilgrimage. . therefore. They were again that They went on. in the meadows. they were forced to go as they could bear by this . to wit. because fhey now found that they had a benefit by such a manly . to the pillar of salt. that nature is not affected with the harms that others have met with. old monument that stood over against the hill Lucre.) attracting virtue I saw now . the babes of those Avomen that go on pilgrimage.

.

J 1 S .

intQ Doubting -castle. could strong. This man. old was also an encouragement to them so to do was. though they good. done. and that none of them might be lacking in time to come. xxiii. It is I. xxxiv. therefore. harboured. When Mr. here. to set them at liberty. lxiii. Beelzebub's garden but fruit that procureth health and he came out in iron shoes. . . drink. for I am come to take away this man will die before one of those committed to Besides. old Honest. Despondency. them the head of the giant. as they say. if need was. and Now. and Diffidence. and her daughter Mercy upon women in the road. xi. and put that you know might with ease be Doubting-casGiant Despair. four daughters to . and went out. They. also when creaseth it where it is. another said they might. : : . the lute so since they w ere so merry disposed. And so will that it was the head of Giant De..) and down to the with Giant Despair ? I will therefore attempt the road and to their companions they came. when they were Then they fell to demolishing Doubting^castle. Ezek. Mr. 14. here they shall be thy head. to the stile Thev being come to Bv-patb.tion tion offered last cannot be universally true. yet I were prisoners in Doubting-castle to that tyrant have a commandment to resist sin. with a great club where there is none. Great-heart for their conductor. Who will go with Feeble-mind and Ready-to-halt saw They have me ? Then said old Honest. and and again. Though that asser. shall So he harnessed meadows. since Giant Despair was dead. man Christiana admonished her commit their little ones. and will strengthen them that are sick. Now. but Mr. to the care of this 121 (Heb. they took Mr.music and daucwe too. Ready-to-halt with his crutches. one of . Honest cut her down at one blow. (1 John ii. demolish his castle. Then said he. spair indeed. Christiana. and consulted what was best to be done to wit. But it would giant. So he took Despondency's daughter. — . for he left him not to By-path meadow.in his hand. are with young. to look for Giant Despair. ' . They were seven days in destroying of that and now they were so strong. Great-heart and his companions had One questioned if it was lawful to go upon unconsecrated ground performed this exploit. and if there were any have made you a-wondered to have seen the dead pilgrims in it. he will bring them again he will also bind up that which was broken. tle demolished. 11 (Jer. are delicate waters. Great -heart replied. Great-heart. And when they were come hard. Then said he. Despondency. Matthew. as many lives as a cat. — So Mr. his wife. mS'toWa fellow Hopeful. that by these waters they might be housed. over which Christian went with his till he had severed his head from his shoulders. and to dancing they True. Also thought he. by the hand. . 13. Since heretofore I have Despair has overcome angels. 2. follows. and had.) Here they the King of the Celestial Country's conductors of and I demand of thee here pilgrims to their place will never want meat. v. Mr. to fight the good fight of faith and I pray. He had a cap of steel fruit. until they came back for in that place the dance. went to go up to Doubting-castle. r : . into their protecfor they were honest people. his trust shall be lost. and Ready-to-halt would guard. said Christiana's four sons. they keeping in the Much-afraid. and one Much-afraid. Now they went on. Great-heart said. Giant Despair dwelt so near. as you see. provided their end was and his daughter Much-afraid. because he was a giant. and Mr. Then they fouerht for their lives. : . . Samuel. I will. but was very loth to die. and pluck with taken by Giant Despair. succoured. variety of trees. but Great -heart was his death. when taking away of his life. and with them Mr. and that continueth and in. another said the contrary. and that thought no man could overcome him you know is a favour of no small account. Doubting-castle. almost starved to death. not like that which as bear wholesome fruit Matthew ate of. and such Great-heart make me afraid ? himself. sure to have good nurture and admonition. Now Giant Despair. that fell over the wall out of upon his head. So they were content to and beset him behind and before commit their little ones to him and that which Diffidence the giantess came up to help him. At that the old giant comes to the gate. and clothing that thou open thy gates for my entrance prepare for they will be kept from thieves and robbers thyself also to fight. Isa. if any of them go astray. went any further. and nourished. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. to be their she played them a lesson. whether they had not best to make an attempt upon the daughter: these two they saved alive. and the demolishing of showed them what they had done. and the four young men.) Now. a little child miglrf lead them. When they came at the castle gate. and James for they were young men and and merry. He struggled and orphans. 16. Who and what is he that is so hardy. and Giant Despair is loth for that all this was to be at the charge of the to die. and and how full of dead men's bones the dungeon was. 6. they knocked for entrance with an unusual noise. and had got such a man in it of pilgrims they found one. his as Mr. So one said one thing. they were very jocund 1US or Joy Joseph. if not buried under a heap of stones.) went in the road. (Isa. dainty flowers. they sat down. pleasant made a conquest of angels. he could not dance withroad. 4. before they bodies that lay here and there in the castle-yard. a breast-plate of fire girded to him. and so was an hospital to young children Despair was brought down to the ground. Then these six men made up to him. I say. to overcome Giant Despair. : . . (for his body they had with whom should I fight this good fight. shall be taught to walk in right paths. Feeble -mind. Great-heart. as after this manner to molest the Giant Despair? Mr.) So they left the play upon the viol. or be lost. King. and to demolish Doubting-castle. took with evil.

had done Christian Doth show from they have deliverance. and set it upon a pole by the highfor present relief. This head when doubting fears cripples dance. and had slain Giant Despair. I saw in my dream. the Shepherds seeing so great a train follow Mr. and Diffidence his wife Brave Mr. Great-heart replied : . they went forward. and then prepared him someand in a little time the old gentleman came to himself. to take a caution to pilgrims that came heed of entering into his grounds. So Christiana gave him some of her bottle of spirits way-side. Who Up Great-heart for them also the man has play'd. if he'll but cast his eye hither may his scruples satisfy.— 122 — THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.) they said unto him. is the head of him. you find all these ? When these men had thus bravely showed them- Then Mr. Now. and went on till they came to the Delectable Mountains. Mr. : As much Mr. whose In former times did pilgrims the Shepherds there. A monu. before. for that he was almost starved. when all these things were finished. (for with him they were well acquainted. Good Sir. thing to eat : pillar that Chris- tian erected for after. Great-heart took the head of Giant Despair. unto the Delectable Mountains. put I promise you. his daughter Much-afraid. terrify. Despondency. Great-heart has bereft of life. and began to be finely revived. j footed out one crutch in his hand. right over against the for | for . Then he writ under it. as they His castle's down. hereof doubts. Great-heart. for she answered the music handsomely. where Christian these verses following and Hopeful refreshed themselves with the varieties name only of the place. They also acquainted themselves with who welcomed them. you have got a goodly company here pray where did . he it well as also the girl was to be commended. also. the music was not so him he was for feeding. Now. Despondency.This ment of deliverance. rather than dancing. upon a marble stone : selves against Doubting-castle.

meut. shall The to some new places. those is to show the innocency of his life. and had refreshed themselves. and that were pleasant to the palate. after they were ready. ##» wonted liberty. Great-heart. for we have for the feeble. So they made them a feast of things easy of digestion. 23. as well as for the strong. his daughter. he is a man above many. Great-grace. the Shepherds took them out into the fields. your faces and that . the dirt. as you see. Mount Inno- said the Shepherds. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. (Mark xi. they went to their rest. what difficulties they should meet with. or must So they told them. This man is named Godly -man. here's old Honest come on pilgrimage. When they were also set weaker down. and the rest that are strong. . you are my Lord's Shepherds in- deed. : so it shall Then they morning was come. for that you have not pushed these diseased neither with side nor shoulder. behold. We further go? Then Let's know whereon is to trust. good man. And so also is Much-afraid.) of these. saw a man clothed all in white and two men. True-hearted is. as well as to the warning of the unruly. I know him. Great-heart. to show you. yet his bundle or roll of cloth was never the less. Then said Mr. Mr. that that man was the son of one Mr. Ready-tohalt come in.) Then said Mr. we leave you to your . continually casting dirt upon him. who has a heart to give of his labour to the poor. Then they asked the Shepherds what that should Then they had them first And never want He that watereth. be with him that liveth Whoever they be that would make such men dirty. like the wain. 40 therefore infir- mity must not be a block to our entertainment. they labour all in vain for God. was Mount Marvel. xxv. the which when they had received. Then said they. whatsoever they cast at him. What means this ? The Shepherds answered. as you should. we call in by name. is Our Prince has an eye least to what cence. who. will cause that their innocence shall break forth as the light. Now. and nourishing. May we have entertainment here. by that a little time is spent. . by faith. and beheld a man at a distance. called mean. Mr. Despondency. said they. else . and showed them first what they had shown to Christian before. and so is Feeble-mind. shall be watered the cake that the widow gave to Mount Marvel. xxxiv. So they had them to the palace door. where they looked. 21. that tumbled the hills about with words. I dare engage. . Prejudice and Illwill. where they showed took them. and because it was the custom of the Shepherds to show the pilgrims before their departure some rarities. Then they had them to another place. Ready-to-halt too. This a comfortable You are welcome to us . that throw dirt at him are such as hate his welldoing but. (Matt. And there they . Shepherds. or to tumble out of their ways. Who willing was not to be left behind Despondency. that he wherewithal. the Shepherds said to those of the sort. Great-heart. This day I see that A description of grace doth shine in false Shepherds. They had them also to the place where they . his daughter. What is it that you would have? for.company. Mr. said the that had before him. and then said unto them. (Ezek. Next. 24. Mr. Her sons. of whom you read in the first part of the records of the Pilgrim's Progress and he is set there to teach pilgrims how to believe down. Keep by the pole. the prophet. and his garment would look as clear as if no dirt had been cast thereat. and had them to them a Mount man a bundle of cloth lying out of which he cut coats and garments for the poor that stood about him. the dirt will not stick upon . What should this be ? This is. Much-afraid. Greatheart and the rest did follow. and their righteousness as the noonday. Come in.) So the feeble and weak went in. did not cause that she had the less in her barrel. each one respectively unto his proper place. Their entertain. and this garment Now.. here is speech to the Shepherds. is coming after. all things must be managed here to the supporting of the weak. and Mrs. From sin to grace. and her sons' wives. done to the . would in a little time fall off again. therefore. but have rather strewed their way into the palace with flowers. First. Mount Innocence. . These. Feeblemind come in. for that they are most subject to draw back but as for you. his clothes innocently in the world. and do by compass steer they had not been here. and Mr. who. Then said the pilgrims. said the Shepherds to the guide. himself. When Charity. The guide's 123 Christiana and her train. because the mountains were high and the day clear.

and entertained them with what the house would afford. said she. Great-heart. but was ashamed to ask. whether living or dead whether in earth. an tion . that will show him with one Turn-away. Oh. a good name.) and said unto them. saying. and gave thanks. Great-heart in the slaying of Giant Despair. Wherefore. for she looked as one not well. thing that she saw there. Watchful. and bid Mercy hearken a while. Her mother-in-law then asked her what she ailed. Wherefore of him Mr. they let them go in peace. and it For their relief that pilgrims are become. waslied him> the blacker he was. Experience. but a virtue. Ethiopian. too. That show we pilgrims are where'er we go. though pilgrims. they put earrings in their ears. By this I know that I have obtained favour in your eyes. that dwelt in the town of Apostasy. So Sincere ran and fetched it. how fitly are the stages set was the word present a man. and the demolishing of Doubting-castle. if it tne niu or might be see tlie llole Mercy has a > m > mind to see the hill. such things bestow. I would. ask the Shepherds if should men know that longed. also herds adorn the pugmns. how would I deny myself. Then they asked mean. I will mention thy wants to the Shepherds. 18). Yea. and they the approaching. such an excelit there in this glass. then they had them back to the palace. That make the other life our mark and home What novelties they have to us they give. The great glass that hangs up in the dining-room. whether coming to suffer. . their guide. off which I cannot take my mind if. Thus it was with the pharisees and so it shall be with all hypocrites. And how . 12. saying. But Mercy. but gave not to them those certain cautions which before were given to Christian and his companion. who carried with him the character . to long for such a thing as that. Then But she said her mother. now put them in mind. one way. longed for someand for what. This is the place where Christian met with one Turn-away. I am ashamed I that these Nay. for that these had Great-heart to be their guide. the wife of Matthew. I have tallied with them that can tell. Then. head. and so could give them their cautions more seasonably. and they will not deny it said. and came trembling away. Call her. I think I shall ! ! . who was one that was well acquainted with things. and said. When they were minded to go hence. Then they went to the and they of a hill it was on the side door opened it. turn it : would show one the very face and similitude of the Prince of Pilgrims himself. shall in conclusion tend but to make him more abominable. even when the danger "Was nigh . and with a joyful Then she bowed her consent it was given her. and so did they about the How the sh necks of her four daughters . that I think doth* long for something that she hath seen in this house and she thinks that she shall miscarry if she should by you be denied. they have therein also seen the holes in his feet. From thence they went on singing. Experience. way of peace and life. - : miscarry. lose her longlngMercy. It the glass was one of a thousand. lost my soul live again. with intention to The work of one Fool and one hut the more him white Want-wit. by looking in that but another way. Then said Mercy. The reason was. here was the advantage that this company had over the other. mother. When they were gone from the Shepherfls. That we. Mother. if you please. and heard one saying. therefore. daughter. 2 Cor. xiii. So she ^ oth not they called her. it is What cautions Christian and companion had received of the Shepherds. Now. her mother. did one where they have a mind to see him. or coming to (James i. Christiana apart. being a young and Mercy longeth. Blessed be he and she that is delivered from this place Now when the Shepherds had shown them all these things. they are willing to sell it. So Mercy said. . make they reign. with his of God. Another said. his said. they glass . they us receive without one let. what that should So they told them. to save my And another said. ! a breeding woman. It would Behold. saying. breeding woman. my no shame. iii. I have it not. call her she shall assuredly have what we can help her to. About Christiana's neck the Shepherds put a bracelet. — ! 124 saw one Fool and one THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. for that they had joined with Mr. and Sincere.They also gave to the other young women such things as they desired. 23—25. thee. There is a looking-glass hangs up in the dining-room. There is one of my daughters. . and jewels on their foreheads. own features exactly and. and they have said that they have seen the very crown of thorns upon his head. they had also lost by that the time was come that they had need to put them in practice. the vile . that commonly mother bra k e her tQ heU> g Shepherds. his lency to is and his side. Yes. joyful lives may live They do upon us. quickly came to the place where Christian met hands. So she hearkened. If I were to life. and said to her. Thus it is with person all means used to get such a one the Shepherds therefore went to the Shepherds (now the names of the Shepherds were Knowledge. to wit. that I had been torn in pieces before I had.. what is that thing that thou wouldst have ? Then she blushed. or in heaven whether in a state of humiliation. or in his exalta. Then said Mercy. rather than Then there was as if the come to this place very earth had groaned and quaked under the feet of this young woman for fear so she looked white. and to their husbands great commendations. Cursed be my father for holding of my feet back from the hole in the ^ called the By-way mind to the . to Christiana. and said. 1 Cor. Want -wit washing .

let them. to wit. I have read in some records. Besides. and soul and spirit. with a hand to wield it . and looked Ha! it is a right Jeruit would say to the second. Inconsiderate. was delighted with him. truth. salem blade. Then they took him. and when the blood ran Blood - my fingers. Valiant. to turn him into the way again. there were three men ^id beset me. and having done much despite unto him. as you see. the place from whence I came. come in and go out with us for we are thy companions. and very for for unprofitable this way. lay on. therefore he questioned with him . and said he was resolved to go back Before he came to the gate. and I also drew upon them. drew upon me. hear your horse dash. upon the place. Great-heart : Great. I Who The man made art thou ? answer. and have also carried away with them some of mine. 2." said one. in his hand. and stamped. But this Turn-away resisted to lay hands on my King. and afford invisible help. my life cost far it that I should lightly give more dear than away. you have nothing to do thus to put things to my choice wherefore at your peril be it if you meddle. The flil. and gave him of what they had. Then said Mr. Thou shalt abide by us.were not weary. Thou hast done well unto blood." &c. had I not found incomraodity there. and propounded truth beset with urito me these three things : 1. Let a man have one of these and skill to use it. because Mr. persuasion could not How nen ne came to the one Turn. an host should encamp against me. Then they went on and just . flesh and bones. in this will I be confident. Besides. him and so they went on together. he said. I had been a true a long season. He need not fear its holding. And I told them.THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. refresh flight. as they went on. So we fell to it. They are but just now gone I suppose they might. and therefore it could (Prov. was could hear me. I forsook it it at all . It is so.d him look there . and all. that he found to be a (for he loved one greatly one. and he may venture upon an angel with it. I fought till my sword did cleave to my hand and then they were joined The word. am a pil- grim.) first I answered. three against . i. and his face all over with blood. Wild-head. and that my One Valiant-forthieves. So he showed not be expected that I should with thieves. and washed his wounds. Valiant-forthyself. where Little -faith formerly was robbed. and so they betook themselves to . way. Whether I would become one of Or go back from whence I came. to . there stood a man with his sword drawn. was sufficient for me. who offered bim. sayis am one whose name I Valiant-for-truth. striving against sin. and Pragmatic. Why have that some might So I did. But you fought a great while blades. but rinding it altogether unsuitable to me. in and am going to as I the Celestial City. " my heart shall not fear though war should rise against me. as the saying is. Now.h together is if a sword grew out of . he got away over the wall. Valiant. - my arm through courage. some of the marks of their valour. 3. — Then said Great-heart to Mr. for the space of above three hours. So I told them. Or die To the man for lot I 10 19. 'Tis true to man of his hands. then I fought with most : thou hast resisted Great. Then they asked me what I said to the third. but once a falling. you not cry come in for your did succour ? Valiant. him. Then these three. I had not forsaken me. now cast in my Then they demanded what When he had taken it thereon a while.sto P away managed place where the cross and sepulchre ' ^m W wer6) he did meet with one thftt b. that one man has fought an army and how many did Samson slay with the jawbone of an ass : : ! Then out. if he can but tell how to It will cut Its edge will never blunt. said he. of his rebellion at his back. have left upon me. Valiant. said the guide. Now. say concerning this man . I wonder Great. who I knew him. at the place Great-heart.) and be- him are nothing " Though that has the truth on his side but little or more : cause there were in company them that were feeble and weak. ing. you. he to his own town. and so escaped his hand. one against They three. Thou hast worthily behaved me see thy sword. his apostasy. but be gnashed with his teeth. —he would hearken And this I have to to no counsel. But here was great odds. to met with Evangelist.

make that out ? But now you are upon it. I perceive whereabouts as to this. you must go over the Valley of the Shadow of Death. and that after all this. Now.. or that they shall rejoice to see themselves in that bliss ? and if they think they shall know and gather me up in his net or that. I Again. lie doth not said the guide on the same coast with the city of Deit see they are wanting ? Valiant. . They told me' also of Giant Despair. of the lions culty Bloody-man. Look you. will it will be a comfort to next to the joy of seeing himself there. Valiant. and gins. bling-block. that is . of the hill Diffiof the wood and dark mountains and also of the three giants. pits. that there were or Formality and Hypocrisy are there. as. to shoot them who should knock at They told me also the Wicket -gate for entrance. that ByDemas. Great. a danin the . where the hobgoblins are. . yet why may shall born. gerous way yea. doth. for. . Yes. Yes. from . what countryman . Great. j . And what did they say else ? Why.! : 126 about THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. ling that ! . It was also confidently reported. It was also told what welcome he had at all his Lord's lodgings. Christian's name famous. friends were laid would never countenance a pil. . is this Christian's wife ? it Great. said they. . me to come on pilgrimage was this e We had one Mr Tell . Did they show you wherein this way i3 so dangerous ? Valiant. out of the path. he was. Great. was full of deceivers. Valiant. why not know others. did . Great. Why. it not be rationally concluded. So I got from them. would go near to that the Flatterer would catch me to do this. I should find a river. Talkative. many tilings . over which and that that river did lie there was no bridge betwixt me and the Celestial Country. and rejoice in their I would presume go on to the gate. nigh smothered. especially when he came to the gates of the Celestial City for there. Valiant. Great. and am come thus far on my way. You came > in at the gate. how he had forsaken his of Destruction wife and children. Why. Valiant. be a joy to meet there his wife and Without doubt which the pilgrims go. Yes. say they. They said also. l -j. welfare also ? self. we Great. men children. Yes. and of persons _. . pray let They told me. They told me of the Slough of Despond. They said also. first. and he told it about what Christian had done. >' . u s that all did no t begin you not ? same man also told would be nothing. The great stum•jt im> n -/t iildle hie and if I myseli were not bling-blocks inclined to sloth and laziness. of Doubting-castle. which was dangerous .1 i xi that lay m wait there to turn good that . with green-headed Ignorance. that Mr. with many other In a word. shall now I man so forbear to relate. No. . and these also are his four sons. and w hat h e has gotten thereby. Worldly-wise- me we see your opinion about question. where the way is full of snares. And was this all ? They also told me that this way Valiant. then. and of the ruin that the pilgrims met with there. Besides. yes for the He begins right. me at the heart. . I . Valiant. continually on the road. you should become a pilgrim ? Oh no they used all means imaginable to persuade me to stay at home. traps. Valiant. they said I must go over the Enchanted Ground. Well. that went from the city namely. is spread abroad far and near. Great. and going on pilgrimage too ? Great. Maul and Slay-good.in his way. they told me that it was . and there that my and mother are . The second. Great. moreover. It glads He is much rejoiced to see Christian's wife. and had betaken himself to a pilgrim's life. they are following after. Yes. Name some of them. Thev said it was an „. than to am of Dark-land father for there was I still. Yes and that in many particulars. what could they say against it ? Valiant.true came age? into our parts. Great. But how did they Valiant. if we to enter this way at the gate. Further. were your father and mother wilValiant. and what golden garments he was clothed with things that . verily. ^ y<jt tQ ^^ ^ h{m ^ ^^ him it . since relations are our second though that state will be dissolved there. my ™tp£^ - . Dark-land. . you are struction ? Have you any more things to ask me which caused How Mr. Valiant. grim's condition. Do you think they shall know themselves ends. where Christian was well The first stumThey told me. that there was a foul fiend haunted the Valley of Humiliation and that Christian was by him almost bereft of life. ones. He told also how all the bells in the city did ring for joy at his reception. . that about beginning to come on pilgrhnage ? Great. said the guide to Christiana. the pilgrimage of your husband. ^ ow J ovm l w iU ne be when he shall see them that would not go with gates into the Celestial City Great. the most dangerous is way world. that be more glad to see them there. that. whether we shall know one Some make a another when man did lie there in wait to deceive. where the light is darkness. he was received with sound of trumpet by a company of shining Valiant. that told the story of Christian and his travels that my heart fell into a burning haste to be gone after him nor could father or mother stay me. Good man. . lhd t b hl f . how he had killed a serpent that did come out to resist him in his journey and how he got through to whither he intended. What. that there were archers standing ready in Beelzebub-castle. said the man. . . Valiant. They said.

and also (which I had almost forgot) that Christian himself. Obsti- nate and Pliable. that here was but sorry going for the best of them all but how far. am come out. . to feel one for another by words for they walked not by sight. . all things considered. Great. for a great while. it is a question. was certainly drowned in the Black River. Can daunt his spirit. furnished with benches and settles. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. come weather. to the satisfaction of the conntry. the side of the back to the hole that was in and made to go the by-way to Hobgoblin. believed had said . : . Feeble -mind. He knows he at the end Great. Valiant. so much as one inn or victualling-house. The bushes have got such fast hold on me. He'll with a giant fight. that to see if me also of many had tried that way of old. should fall upon their rear. down . upon which if a man sits. whether ever he shall rise or wake again in this world. fought all that set themselves against me. this courage yon Valiant. Let him come hither will constant be. Then this was your victory..Anarbouron grims for it was finely wrought the enchanted ground. here was very wearisome. Said they anything more to discourage old Atheist. . But any one must think. for that he was the guide and Mr. Great. How came that about ? How he got over these stumhling-blocks. and how they came back again. or in which if a man sleeps. in ^' wll ° WaS P%rim '. Despondency had like to have been starved therein yea. as And they named several that did so. and thkt carried me be y nd them all. and all befooled themselves for setting a foot ont of doors in that path. where the air naturally tended to make one drowsy. through Nor was there. some say. . Yes. They went on here. for fear lest peradventure some fiend. 127 Ayas sent hill. Here. and heart were but tender Yet so it was. therefore. . for some time. Why. Great-heart commanded should come up after him and Mr. I am also The way dirt and slabbiness. being rear-guard. Fearand how And that place was all grown over with briers and thorns. excepting here and there. nor foul fiend. "Wherefore they were forced. you must think. Also they cheered up one another as well as they could. was so. was grunting. Valiant. where was an enchanted arbour. Then they came at an arbour. Mr. whereon the weary might lean. whence he hell. Mistrust and Timorous. faith. But he will have a right To be a pilgrim. and so do mischief. Great-heart went before. Do but themselves confound His strength the more is. and Mr. some of them. there that so they conld find something of the glory many had so much talked of from time they were got to the Enchanted Ground. Ho. It what Mr. they made a pretty good shift to wag along. I still. Valiant-fortruth came behind. I believed. And did none of these things discourage you ? Valiant No they seemed but as so many nothings to me. was tempting for the pilgrims already began to be foiled with the badness of the way but there was not one of them that made so much as a motion to . after all his ventures for a celestial crown. warm. Mr. Whoso beset him round With dismal stories. or thief. and never went a foot farther. . : The fourth. I think I cannot get away from them. and sighing while one tumbleth over a bush. and. this By time to time. but a great mist so that they could scarce. with several . but not one of them had found so much advantage by going as amounted to the weight of a feather. and therefore way. however it wr as smothered up. away and they said. — Come wind. The third. lost their dirt shoes in the mire while one cries out. . stay. Turn- more who. or dragon. you ? Valiant. all Now they had not gone fell and darkness upon them . They told what men say He'll labour night and clay He'll not fear To be a pilgrim. There's no discouragement Shall make him once relent His first To avow'd intent be a pilgrim. Despondency was under the eye of Mr. had some of them gone far to see what they could find. and puffing. . and had gone a great way therein. . both one and another. and another. each man with his sword drawn in his hand for they knew it was a dangerous place. . much worse of feet for the women and children. . was enough to disbnt did they make an end there ? that Shall life inherit Tli en fancies fly away. on all this ground. . and of him that brought them up behind. above-head. Who would One here true valour see. about whom there has been such a noise. No lion can him flight. beautified with greens. or giant. even your Tell-true Valiant. This. by believing. see the one the other. It also had in it a soft couch. Great. that also he never had a comfortable hour therein that Mr. Over this forest therefore they went. ! who both Great. No. wherein to refresh the feebler sort. I promise yon. that through the encouraging words of him that led in the front. . another sticks fast in the and the children. got into the came to this place. and promising much refreshing to the pil. They told me a of one he found his way so solitary. where are you ? and a third.

128 stop there. And in that ar. they did most pluck up their spirits. had pilgrimage he not been careful here to look in his map. So they concluded to go to pilgrimage but would have one of them and awake them that is. some of the pilgrims there to take up their rest when weary. Then thought I with myself. none knows how that the sleepers were in a pitiful case. deep. Friend..Then the guide did shake them. till they The way diffi- came to a place at which a man is cult to find. and that at the end of stood the cleanest way too.they consulted what to do. These two went thus far on less and Too-bold. in probability. they continually gave so good heed to the advice of their guide. that they went on in ground. or to step to them and pose to destroy the pilgrims in. Who that goeth on try to awake them. I Yea. and spake to the men. for they knew Then was a pit.. it to or fore from the Celestial City wherer he struck a light. When the pilgrims saw them. bour there lay two men. which bids him to be careful . and two asleep another arbour. ' . being wearied with their And. whether to go on and leave them in their sleep. Then they went on in this Enchanted Ground. (for he never goes also without his tinder-box. ' leading to or of his in that place to turn to the right hand. P nis pocket a map or all ways leading ra ap of all ways •. and of the nature of dangers when they were at them. .there was no voice nor answer. and shook their heads. and so fell had all. that he may with this caution. though when enough . still. ^ . sat down to rest themselves. namely. and it was built by guide it seems did know them but try to awake t em the highway-side. . and hearten one another to deny the flesh. the guide has a . But he had in m . yet in the dark he was put to a stand. saw then in my this their solitary dream. they hook or map. This arThenameof the hour was called The Slothful's arbour. for aught I could perceive. that usually when they were nearest to them. . whose names were Heed. they journey. waa to light their guide could well tell how miss those ways that led wrong..) and takes a view . and do what he for just a little before them. to take heed that they look when he is at a stand which is the way he themselves did not sit down. on purpose to allure. but here. fast asleep. if it might be. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. nor embrace^he offered must take ? benefit of that arbour. if they could but these maps about him. . been smothered in the mud. Now. for the xhe pilgrims An arbour. and he did so faithfully tell them of dangers. full of nothing but mud. and tne Y came to where there was called each by his name. So they went in. . it apt to lose his way. there made on pur.

The light of the the help of the light of a lantern. was it for that some special mercy laid obligations upon thee. Right glad I am.) But let me go on with my tale. and said. But as soon as Mr. and so it standeth against us with the more advantage. beat them. As I was thus musing. we are. So he struck a light." Valiant. as one of them . as I said. They drew nigh. that they might go the rest of their way by twenty Enchanted Ground . farther. they will answer you after this fashion. said Standfast. and her bed. did you see me ? Yes. Well. and he slept as one upon the mast of a ship. Now. Why. Honest saw him.. said the other. you there said he. as you see. but their words are not governed either by faith or reason. For. are fallen asleep. I say. with my heart. was the cause of They found him at prayer. And as glad am I. or. 35. The story of Prithee. and speaking. and they came up to him. that the Enchanted Ground is placed so nigh to the land Beulah. 34.— THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. At which the guide shook his head. Wherefore let pilgrims look to themselves. that I am. Then the pilgrims desired with trembling to go forward only they prayed their guide to strike a light. her purse. : ed d ^rou lifted ^ey thought. Think said old Honest what could I think ? I thought we had an honest man upon the road. quoth the other. to wit. and as I was what it was coming along. But why. I was both weary and sleepy also as poor as an owlet. and none can awake them.-. he is certainly a right good to pilgrim. to the Celestial City. but Did you . that I did. saying. earnestly one that was above. Honest interrupting him. lest it happen to them as it has done to these that. one but they are served thus for this is one of the last refuges that the enemy to pilgrims has wherefore it is. there was one in very pleasant attire. and offered me three things. . ! . begins that journey with desire and that " what was : pleasure. fear doth further confirm me that things are right between the Prince of Pilgrims and your soul. who presented herself to me. I could to disturb them. as I suppose you do. ay. and began to run towards the Celestial City. Then said Christiana. as there was before betwixt their going on pilgrimage and sitting is fruitless. when men talk in their sleep. If you strike them. This. Yea. that drove away the fog so the air became more clear. but could not tell what he said so they went softly till he had done. (Prov. is the mischief of 'tis it. ir. and comfortable. Ho.-. i. Those that die here. Then Mr. xxiii. What is the meaning of The guide said. I saw Heedless and Too -bold there and. for aught I know. disease. I was musing with that fetched him on his knees myself of what a dangerous nature u P the road in this place was. Then Mr. Valiant-for-truth. as sure as Ay. So the man stopped. and how many that had come even thus far on pilgrimage had here been stopped and been destroyed. and they went by the help of that through the rest of this way. there they will lie till they rot. as of one that was much conQ Standfast upon . Well it but. was glad at the sight. For he that goeth away in a sleep. I thought also of the manner of the death with which this place destroyeth men. . or whatever else you do to them. upon the Enchanted Ground. said the other. I will fight so long as I can hold ! ! 129 my sword in my hand. said the other but your are there.) The children But * ne children began to be sorely - word cry for wearineS8 ' weary. Then said Mr. and therefore should have his company by and by. you Talk betwixt him and Mr< Hone8t - down when to here. as you see. At that. 19. There is an incoherency in their words now. I am the truth is. brother. said Mr. they perceived that a little before them was a solemn noise. I repulsed her once and again. as you see. His Standfast . that I espied you on your knees. or how ? Stand. Ay. see the two men asleep in the arbour ? Stand. as they thought. but old. how happy am But if I be not as I should. . . : vol.<. That is true. to with man upon his hands and eyes up. I pray thee tell us . heedless ones go on pilgrimage. her body. When he had done. So they came up father Honest. Now when they were almost at the end of this ground. that who is it ? It is one. and so near the end of their race. 'tis I alone must I bear it.) You know. placed almost at the end of the way. " Blessed is the man that feareth always. when the waves of the sea did beat upon him. 7. his knees on the ai before as them . Soho. what did you think ? said Standfast. will these fools be so desirous to sit down as when they are weary ? and when so like to be weary as when almost at their journey's end ? Therefore it is. Standfast. such acquiesce in the will of that the way wherein they should walk. . ? And presently Standfast said to old Honest.. then. I know this man. a his knees. Great-heart called after him. will pay you when I take my money. and they cried out unto that loveth pilgrims to Him their make way more a little : So by that they had gone wind arose. n their sleep. said Standfast. they say any thing. They talk Their endeavour this? _ Mr. . For when. he saith. he got up. (2 Pet. (Prov. if you go. and that perhaps the witch knew. said. x. he said. . cerned. So they went on and looked -.said in old time. j name is comes from whereabout I dwelt. Yet they were not off (by much) of the Enchanted Ground only now they could see one another better. die of no violent distemper the death which such die is not grievous to them. If you thought not amiss. are one another. that I have found you on this road. thy being upon thy knees even now. friend let us have your company. and. one of the children laughed. Then : Hon. Wben I awake. Why. he. and behold they saw. I wall seek it again. thinks the enemy. Then said one of them. though the darkness was very great. Standfast blushed. a .

betwixt parents and children. 4. now you talk of her. She loveth banqueting and feasting mainly well. ground is enchanted. 'Twas she that persuaded Judas and that prevailed with Demas life. She has given it out in some places that she is a goddess. Perhaps you have done both. by my repulses. by which we know that there are more . iv. you could not more amply have set her forth before me. she would have drawn thee into many foolish and hurtful lusts. and yet they received as this . and Jeroboam against his masGreat. ! Some of in the ditch are spoil'd. She loves to be sought after. 1 John ii. are counted the enemies of God. betwixt the flesh and the Spirit. Lord . comely dame. ter.) This is she that maintained . Do leap into the fire. she is always at one full table or another.! — ! : 130 she put to be THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. but highly commends the rich. ! Whither nay. had as good lay it down on that block over which the axe doth virtue What danger is the pilgrim in How many are his foes How many ways there are to sin. but she still followed me further from her with enticements. This woman is a witch. So just as you came up. Madam Babble Is she not a tall. what a mercy is it that I did resist her for whither might she have . both she and her daughters. fingering her money. vi. . At this discourse there was among the pilgrims a mixture of joy and trembling but at length they broke out and sang mischief that she doth. ! . and have better described her side. something of a swarthy complexion ? Stand. : features. to be sure. and because the orchards and vineyards that were here belonged to the King of the Celestial Country. Here. a man from she is mending. betwixt a man and his wife. you hit it. and he that wrote of her said true. and were let in at ! the golden gates to-day and therefore some do worship her. and ten thousand times more to hell. Then I betook me. Hon. Wherefore. 15. Great. but rather sought make stop of my journey. as you saw. If there be one cunning to get money in a place. therefore they were licensed to make bold with any of his things. . stay. to my knees. to dwell with they will but love her and She will cast out of her purse Madam the distress of for 8aid she l Bubble. . 9. and men are made happy > am gold like dust in some places and to some persons. Doth she not wear a great purse by her and is not her hand often in it. she would make me < would be great and happy. saying. be as your name is and when you have done all. a legion of shining ones just come to ! town. I make much of her. much refreshing as if they slept their sleep never so soundly. and then preferring the excellences of tins life. Oh said Standfast. and it is by her sorceries that this The world. She is a bold and impudent slut she will talk with any man. call* Lie tumbling in the mire Some. I prayed to Him that had said he would help. the gentlewoman went her way. the land of Beulah. Stand. She always laugheth poor pilgrims to scorn. Hon. this is she that hath enemies of bought off many a pilgrim's life. She is never weary commending her commodities. (Jas. Right. and she told me by me> Then j agked her namej This set it was Madam Bubble. parable to hers. U. Yea. where the sun shineth night and day. that they could not sleep. yea. Hon. that none can show a good com- angry she but she mattered that nothing at offers again. at one pilgrim's heels or another. and with hands lifted up. Standfast. they in their splendour all those that are the pilgrims. She will proto lie in the of mise to some crowns and kingdoms. Then if I began all. . if they will but take her advice yet many hath she brought to the halter. 'Tis just so had she stood by all this while. You fall right upon it again. betwixt a man and himself. : betook themselves a while to rest. Hon. Whoever doth lay his head down in her lap. Stand. now comgossiper . as if that was her heart's delight ? Stand. ! whither. After this. And so many went over the water. my me great deliverance in . for I verily believe she into drawn me tended no good. Doth she not speak very smoothly. (1 Tim. Then I continued to give thanks for this me bosoms of men. children's children. She promiseth if Then made and said ruled by her. time. or this vain the world. and the trumpets continually sound so melodiously. for these are her very actions. spoken well of. She has her and she will There is now They would cry again. And because country was common for pilgrims. She is a great always. say and avow it. methinks I either have seen her. she is just such a But. and open places of cheating . though they shun the frying-pan. Here also all the noise of them that walked the streets was. . Then he that drew her picture was a good limner. She makes variance betwixt rulers and subjects. Hon. which drown men in destruction and perdition. Without doubt her designs were bad. stand. But a little while soon refreshed them here for the bells did so ring. and world. none but God knows But in general. betwixt neighbour and neighbour. More pilgrims are come to town And another would answer. to sell his to forsake tell the godly pilgrim's None can of the one. and give you a smile at the end of a sentence ? Stand. and smiled. I beheld until they were come into hang and whoever lay their eyes upon her beauty. she will speak well of him from house to house. or have read some story of her. No living mortal knows. good Mr.) 'Twas she that set Absolom against his father. and«she loves them most that think best of her. because they were weary. and cries.

.

*&7 &ie> .y^K^ // /'k )/•// Ay/ /r? ///// a. ///'/ .

it. It has been in a manner dry for some. . when he comes. ' lo old Honest. In there was a record kept of the names of them all . with spike- and cinnamon. easily into delivered from the of Giant Xo Mr. Feeblemind. Valiantfor-truth. the flesh. the messenger may come. and out of Doubting-castle. .called for Mr. . calamus. but that will make thy rest the sweeter. Sir. the wife of Christian the So inquiry was made for her. all Her last d But. and that they had kept their garments so white. I would also entreat you to have an eye to my children . Standfast a ring. was set in their foreheads. . tv n. Then came in that good man Mr. „. my sons' wives. iu clothes of immortality. Great-heart her guide. chief spices.' . But how were their ears now filled with ! things should be prepared for her journey. and told them that she had read with comfort the mark Toher that children - heavenly noises. she bequeathed to the poor that little she had. celestial visions ! saw nothing. and be ready for at an hour when ye think not. and said of - Here also grew camphire. an arrow with let a point Then she said to Mr. So he told her. remember your deliverance from the hands of Giant Despair. . and was come to bid her^nake haste to be gone. and if at any time you see them faint. with blushing. Now. the tide. But To Mr. death sent to Christiana. Valiant-for-truth. Then she called for old Mr. and to her children. Then she bid him that he should give advice her take her journey. but sweet to the water of the river over which they were to go. and gather nosegays for the pilgrims. m whom is „ . you have in all places showed yourself true-hearted. The effect of that mercy is. had had its fl ow ings. and shall be glad to see that you go over the river dry-shod. for here they come to how wait for them.•'•• how the river to some -i-. I long to be gone for however the weather is in my journey. and the house was found out where she was. For my daughters. fod°i e and that she was the first of this . which by degrees wrought so effectually with her. Then said you a fair day when you set out for Mount Zion.. and their eyes delighted with In this land they heard nothing. she called for To Mr. Thus and thus it must be . and all we that survive will accompany you to the river side. and see thy King w^th When How death that tlnn is to Christiana saw that her time was come. before he sends for thee lest thou shouldst. So she said to To Mr. Be ye watchful. The contents were. In this place the children of the town would go into the King's gardens. and walked to and fro. Slay -good. with nard and all saffron. ' them. to see her. . speak comfortably to Death has its ebbings and flowing like . " Behold an Israelite indeed. Mr. that was offensive to their stomach or mind: only when they tasted of the . with thankful. and manner deP arture - of behold the banks beyond the river k 2 . pilgrims 131 upon the road . be forced to stand before him for that fault comfort. and expecteth that thou shouldst pilgrim. Thou wast sharpened with love. and my King will give you a crown of life. . You ought hope to the end. smelt nothing. v^ J bitter to ' . company that was to go over. that you are brought with safety hither. . I wish . Lastly. The token was. When she had spoken these words to her guide. Death felt nothing. with all the trees of frankincense.. they thought that it tasted a little bitterish to the palate . within these ten days..1 . Then she called for her children. and ness for ever to she said. . Readyto-halt. myrrh. Thy travel hitherto has been him. and commanded her sons and daughters to be ready against the mes? senger should come for them. of old. good woman His message. and a fulfilling of the promise upon them will be their end. . and bring them to them with much affection. while it has overflowed its banks for others. he. ' .dency and his daughter. bers were perfumed while they stayed here and with these were their bodies anointed. saying. had wnue others have gone over. but it proved sweeter when this place it was down. Come wet. was here also much discoursed. stand in his presence. and aloes.-. her heart. that thou mightest live in mouth the light of the living. and to comfort them after all their sorrow Then the pilgrims got up. tasted nothing. and what ebbings it has ° ° It . THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. to prepare them to go over the river when the time appointed was come. to Now to see the day drew on that Christiana must be full gone. be faithful unto death. they have been faithful. while they lay here. But watch. be sober. him. So he told her he was heartily glad of the news. Despondency and his daughter Much-afraid to whom To Mr Despon _ . there was a noise come from the in the town that A messenger of Christiana. Ready-tohalt. and said unto him. "With these the pilgrims' cham. . come dry. Standfast she gave Mr.. and gave them her blessing. . Hail. After him came Mr. with difficulty. Honest. Feeble -mind. that had been pilgrims and a history of -. and could have been glad had the Her speech her guide. with matter of g reat importance to one Celestial City. and was glad to see them with her there. So the road was of people Post come for him. I shall have time enough when I come there to sit down and rest me and dry me.. So the post presented her with a letter. When he had read this letter to her. and cast away fear. and waited for the there was a Tost good hour. welcome them Only I advise thee to repent of thine aptness to fear and doubt of his goodness. he gave her therewith a sure token that he was a true messenger. I bring thee tidings that the Master calleth for thee. But she answered. m no guile. the famous acts that they had done. d0bUtand to ld him how matters were. that at the time appointed she must be gone. she have no.

take this for a proof: so he gave him a grasshopper to be a burden unto : ! . and told them. he addressed himself to go over the river. and entered their sight. . saying I am come to tell thee that thy Master hath need of thee. you know wdiat we have been. Mr. said the messenger. Great-heart and Mr. shall . . faith and patience So . Then also gave him a token that he was a true messenger. So he in- him." (Eccl. _. 5. to shout for joy for thy deliverance from all thy doubtings. saying. .C summoned. Honest in his lifeGood-conscience . Mr. 4. xiii. and God shall they will tained offer themselves to others. And for a. and lent him his hand. Hold out. for that I shall have no steps. DespondenTrembling man these are to sum. that my message is true. the next day after Easter . with a beckon of farewell to those that followed her. At her departure. : summoned. Ready-to-halt called for his fellow-pilgrims. Feeble-mind had tidings brought him that the Post sounded his horn Feeble-mind summoned. that she would go with her father. her But Mr." (Eccl. to present thyself before thy Lord. xii. that our desponds and slavish fears be by no man ever received. said. Then Mr. nor is it worth bestowing upon the poorest pilgrims wherefore. His last words were. So she came forth and entered the river. So she went in at the gate with all the : ceremonies of joy that her husband Christian had entered with before her. be ready against this day sevennight. and how troublesomely we have behaved ourselves in every company. ! : 132 THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. Despondency was sent for for a post was come. Ready-to. for I know that after my For am sent for. In process of time. will. to what purpose should I make a will ? As for my feeble mind. Mr. and bless thee! So her children and friends returned to their place. which were come down from above to accompany her to the citygate.1 . The last words he was . and delivered to his hand these lines Thou Mr. for those that waited for Christiana had carried her out of and called. 6. xii. . Despondency said to his friends. So all departed to their respective places. Despondency's daughter.. for my honesty. but none could understand what she said. When the time was come for them to depart. were full of horse8 and chariots. •. though Now Mr. Feeble-mind called for his friends. The last words were. and brought this message to him Mr.town again. science to meet him there. saying. And take this as a token of the truth " Those that look out at the winof my message dows shall be darkened. So he came to the house where he was. since yonder are chariots and horses for me to ride on. The last words that she was heard to say were. to be with thee. My will and my daughter's is.tokeD that my message is true. whose name and my message is to tell thee upon crutches that he expects thee at his table to sup with him in his kingdom. These crutches I bequeath to my son that shall tread in my may with an hundred warm wishes that he prove better than I have been.i -i * he went over x to the other side. he wherefore prepare thyself for this journey. As He makes no I die. Great-heart for his conduct and kindness.) quired him out. and told them what errand had been brought unto him." Then Mr. . welcome day! His daughter went through the river singing. it shall go with me let him that comes after be told of this. The last words of Mr. and said. . Mr. 1 T theard to say were. Honest. /-m n . And So he desired Mr. they went up to the brink of the river. I desire that you.. Myself and my daughter. of Mr. which we enterbegan to be pilgrims. and that in a very little time thou must behold his face in brightness. that I will leave behind me. . Valiant. he entered the river as the rest. Lord. need of in the place whither I go. shut the doors upon them. mon thee to be ready with the King by -the next Lord's day. Then it came to pass a while after. from the day of our departure for ever . and the day being come on which he was to depart. I am come from Him whom thou hast loved and followed. and what token he had received of the truth of the message. and his business was summoned. Now the river at that time overflowed its banks in some places: but Mr. Now I shall have no more need of these crutches. Honest called for his friends. I was Much -afraid. . and so helped him over. and told him. make his will. This done. Valiant because he had nothing bequeath EiswilL them that should survive his crutches and his therefore thus he him but good wishes. Then he came in. when she His daughter S oes t0 °heard what was done. and said unto them. Honest plain with you. and loosed thy silver cord.) After this.His last words. When days had many of them past away. When he came to the brink of the river he said. and could never shake them off after and they will walk about. time had spoken to one Good-conhelps Mr. Since I have nothing to wil1 bequeath to any. would bury it in a dunghill. Farewell „. " I have broken thy golden bowl. with Mr. i . first death to be eurely visit to to you to also. when I am gone. said. at hi 8 chamber door. ' . His last words. I come. they are ghosts when we . at his Father's house. and seek entertainment of the pilgrims but for our sakes. When the day that he was to be gone had come. Then he thanked Mr. "All the daughters of music art commanded to : - be brought low. Valiant played upon the well -tuned cymbal and harp for joy. and so addressed himself to his journey. the which Honest over the he also did. children wept.) Then Mr. night. And. Then He makes his he said. V\ elcome hie So he went his way. Despondency r J His last words. After this. that there was a Post in the town that inquired for Mr. (Eccl. but shall make no will. Ready-to-halt. there came a Post to the halt : ! J' Mr.

and tears for them of which it will you acquaint them. has been a terror to the thoughts of it many His . Tell them also of what a happy end she made. where is thy victory?" So he passed over. and to the stomach yet the thoughts of what I am going to. and talked with his companions that had waited upon him thither. and whither she is gone I have little entreat . (for I know that you will go and return to your Master's house. while he was thus in discoi. . His words I did use to gather for my food. although to be much in days of my pilgrimage. he said. . Mr. battles who now will my re- When the day that he must go hence was come.) that you send to my his family. hi. Valiantwas taken with a summons for-trath sum. When . His name has been to me as a civet-box. 17. I have formerly lived by hearsay and faith but now I go where I shalllive by sight. the four boys that Christiana brought with her. him that shall succeed me in my upon that on which the feet of the priests that pilgrimage. yet now I do not repent me of all the trouble I have been at to arrive where I am. Take me. I may give those that desire it an account of what I here am silent about. said the messenger. he also went down to the river. His voice to me has been most sweet and his countenance I have more desired than they that have most desired the light of the sun.. prayers suffice that . unless it be Pare well! . Tell them also of Christian and Christiana his wife. And he said. if peradventure they may prevail. gate of the city. also have often frighted . sweeter than all perfumes. This Mr. " That his pitcher was broken at the fountain. He has held me. and so would be for the increase of the church in that place where they children.) When he understood it.) The waters indeed are to the palate bitter. . . As for Christiana's children. : have fought His warder. me fixed but now meth'nks I stand easy my foot is to ill. . Should it be my lot to go that way again. many accompanied him to the riverside. Honest were. tern.by the same Post as the other. of my happy arrival at this place. you need not doubt of the truth of my message for here is a token of the truth thereof " Thy wheel is broken at the cisHe calls for Mr. and hap said unto him. Also. And the Post brought it him open in his hands the contents thereof were that he must prepare for a change of life. into which as he went he said. At this Mr. I did not stay gone over. . he called for his friends. THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS. I have loved to hear my Lord spoken of. xii. and that face that was spit upon for me. •and of the present and late blessed condition I am in.irse.Mr. my steps hath he strengthened in his way. and all the trumpets sounded for him on the other for side. : Great-heart. and shall be with him in whose company I delight myself. he ceased to be seen of them. and let them be acquainted with all that hath and shall happen unto me. Then he said. and moned had this for a token that the summons was true. But glorious it was to see how the open region was filled with horses and chariots. This river „. Now there "was a great calm at that time in the river wherefore Mr. when he was about half way in. Now. and the time being come for him to haste him away. to welcome the pilgrims as they went up. Standfast was is summoned. 6. I am going to my Father's and though with great difficulty I have got hither. and told them of it. since the time I knew His speech to y on you have been profitable to me. where is thy sting?" And as he His last words. for I come unto thee. When a wife I came from home. left be- hind me and five small children let me you at your return. Great-heart. and followed one another in at the beautiful cold . and of the conduct that waits for me on the other side. and for antidotes against my faintings. with singers and players upon stringed instruments. (Josh. last words. Standfast Standfast. his countenance changed his strong man bowed under him and after he had said. for a time. who was it their guide. doth lie as a glowung coal at my heart. and my courage and scars skill to him My marks and I carry with me. yea." Then he called to him Mr. I see myself now at the end of my journey my toilsome days are ended. Meantime I bid my reader or nothing to send to my family. and wherever I have seen the print of his shoe in the earth. . and hath kept me from mine iniquities yea. there I have coveted to set my foot too. Sir. I . Standfast was put into a muse. with their wives and where I was till they were came away. for his Master was not willing that he should be so far from him any longer. I am going ta see that head that was crowned with thorns. . Nay. in hopes that you may yet be a conductor to more of the His errand to holy pilgrims. Standfast. family. since I were. and how she and her children came after her husband. . that can get it. " Grave. Grace world. Then there came forth a summons Mr. went down deeper. to be a witness for me be that I bare the ark of the covenant stood while Israel went over this Jordan. reigns! 133 . with trumpeters and pipers. " Death. I heard one say that they were yet alive. he that the rest of the pilgrims found upon his knees in the Enchanted Ground. yet. > was not my your good company during the him. stood a while. moreover. Tell them. My sword I give After this 1" it M V t- for-truth - . . yea. Standfast had thus set things in order. So he left the was noised abroad that Mr." (Eccl.

Le been foil who closely Having stated in the prologue that ::" his poem to reading the bral Roman de la Rose.- oral transmission of ideas." . and even richly. B- by the numero . ondos. Scores of men of Dante in common Let iny one read the opening of the Pilgrim's Progress.: -•':. PtUrinage de F Homme. favourable to untut*.: - When hard to slumber were my senses bound. ':: and then prepares : to tit is ::: . excellent analysis of ' notion that tke dean here spoken of was Bedford I very properly questioned by those who are best a *)uainted with old English. - .- :. :__. TE I EL in Paris. V Homme his min»i. : — 1— . red g . writers : ' In the in: I foe:. and could - • treasures contained in her palace. for L'Ame sjparee du Corps. tiaL at that time. that if he be really de5h her gracious wir image.. liveliness pr~ Her nar. ou <Tun noir sac a dkarbonmer. they had combined the religious he was indebted . the most awful of ture. from that of Dante's Inferno.- We take the following from . Hoses rnibrt. the second. That though _ .:::. ". — and dense. sidering how he might best fit Whilst employed in conhimself out for such a pil- Italian r. Among the personages in se are Prude:. I will relate what else 'twas it is mine - to see. :. some of them being grievously troubled by the presence of Moses. it been translated into Spanish.him.have a further striking coincisome wood or ::dence between Bunyan and Dante. obviously answering to the characters in Bunyan. but she stops him.. or the groundwork of invention. that the former had 2sote S.. .. from ail row and anxiety with which he is oppressed are soothed by . 1 ::. 3 ' . saying that he must pus on a suit of armour.:.'. In whose abyss eternal groans unite. to pierce the I gloom m could see within the gulf immense. than any : " Beneath me lay. the xas no lack of books in Buncreate a taste for reading a . in time.— • Seen ! Wkg tke valley itsel/ ~t taken advantage of the colloquial traditions which. and a staff. became models of thought. of -\risi. . most interesting iduMratinns of any great popularity. that Bunyan had. work was madBunyan ado Le model. and. and laid me down in that place to sleep. these evangelical monitors. . and the description of the armoury in Bun-rquence of presumption in both cases. by some means or die other. had grimage.'. and - an I roua Fhefltu literatu. and is invited to her house.:" ... The commence:he Pilgrim's Progress may thus hare bee:. . as if they had out of a " bourbier. and entitled. this work was translated from rhyme into French prose at the requ queen of Sicily had I4SS s.. The similarity between the passage which follows. G_ . the author supposes that. he is going forth. falling r beheld. to know Italian to be acquainted with the plan of the Cbmedia. from the path of b I entered. finds himself li . he has to pass a river. Dantr is probable that his most striking images. r" j." I o> . repeat. who does aU he can to prr charitable work of Gracedieu. remarkable as grand and wonderful. Satisfied with these.i"-:: I much closer resembla: -en the Pilgrim's Progreat. Gracedieu cannot quite convince her pilgrim that he needs the armour. in those re pleasantly. :. And blend their thunders in the depth below. to popular of Italian authors. among the higher to behold^ in reality. Le Pelerinage de L'Homme compared viiA ike Pilgrim's Progress. as well as _ • r . . but they had no sooner gone on than they appeared hideously dirty. which is Hope. and then the first few lines Inferno. . the vale of woe..-. in vision. a coincidence most reasonably accounted for by supposing. a work i :. London: PickeriL g a BJ . in truth.. and a work lately brought before the public. To reach this mansion. -. . - be Eog . According to the Riograpkie UnicerseUe. Like Banyan's pilgrim he soon discovers that he could spare none of the help offered him. a lady his astonished eyes.ed. the bra had heard. has been given in the edition lately published from the haniel Hill.ion. and was written by Guillaume de N rz 4. - iread remembrance still re: More Litter scarcely I d death itself can be. as I slept I dreamed. and the second part v. or its most marvellous passages. -'. . from which al recoils. translation of is De Guileville's much easier to believe that . Tke Ancient Poem of Guillaume de GmileeUle. I found.'. and he can hardly fail to be impressed with the sup:. ' The common . Senlk des Trots Pilerinages^: : the writings to which the author - may have le Soman and which may or tor the more substantial education of - ceasioijal helps. and passing through it.. Tie . he shall have her help. I strained . Bunyan did not need i. describe the good which there Faiin . :. are tl. - Den anciently meant with much interesting information respecting it. aboc: IS r .in a gloomy wood the path direct to show.- - The sor- Tasso and Ariosto were leen translate familiar names. and goes forth trusting to bis «crip and staff.— 7\: :-::-: .i. and as 1 dreamed a dream:"' and a_ g taken up my 1 lodgings in a wood. but enters it. Bunyan writes "Asli rmess of the worl _ rrtain place. - of expression - and imagery. " 4*-] " And moreover at this Fair there is at all Banyan lived through a period — . . the heavenly Jerusalem. . _' . - - TVrigkfs Translation. m listinct the house of his f: _ pilgrims are there assembled. :'« translation. He fries ff. He tliankr ffer.. Abbey of Chaaliv liad recourse. - was born and died prior of the of these durant qu'est en third. H:^v \ fir.: :. times to ie seen. burdened with poetry.— 1 : — N — —d . mee between so many incidents in the two works ean hardly be attributed ^d as an early . become acquainted with Dante. than to suppose that he and this ancient French poet chanced to dream the same dream.

. (Hawthorne. and as the dreamer. Reeves. we caught a hasty glimpse of hirn. what was likely to be the moral condition of the people at large ? Could Bunyan's pictures be overdrawn? Note 5. thrown into the loose bog. Pitiful Comedy. of English : — .] — However "Now startling Giant Despair. formed by a bold speculator. The pounds. urges them on board. he would have seen folly swelling into such gross and hideous shapes that he would never have thought of her flying.) commou poetry of the times. or the like." §c] — " The They would regain engine. He brought in The that of the Gibeonites. Nathaniel Hawthorne. 24. but would rather have marked her as a loathsome reptile." very day following the fast. showing how the neglect of exacting justice on offenders (by which he insinuated such of the old king's murderers as were yet reprieved. and every species of extravagance. effected by the introduction of Damnation. " Then gan the villein him to overaw. known to Bunyan. p. them still at at other tables. And brought unto him swords. employed by Bunyan. and Charity. ii. but the final A steam ferry-boat awaits station is in the land of Beulah. by the blacksmiths.1 G»>2. and other sueh materials." says Evelyn. p. sect. the passengers." : And mouth. his majesty opened the revels of the night by throwing the dice himself. (Wharton. The persuasion to suicide is the same in in before his majesty. ladies also played very deep. " Their only way would be to make an end of themselves" §c] Spenser's personification of Despair is It must have been well truthfully terrible and affecting. the following account of a play." says the narrator. Horror a-sdls the travellers when they hear the growling of the cavern's Note 6. the stage direction. Judas. both in prose and poetry. at length. p." (Evelyn's Diary.theEpiphany." A A of Orniond had passage. that even so late as the close of the sixteenth century. and feel the chill of the river."] —An I beheld until they modern were com*" structive symbolic adaptation of another humour. preached -on St. which ought to he an example of virtue to the rest of the kingdom. and so on. . The responsibility being thus distributed the Fall of Luthe Creation. the people of this country had relished far coarser appeals to their imagi- nation. dreams that he is on a railroad. by the dyers. i. startled by his terror. the Deluge. of Despond would hardly have terrified Christiana by the is by elegant the foundaroute. that had.Porter's. i'iety. but he himself stays behind. only fit to be strangled. Death. The Sli ugh the City of Destruction to the Celestial City. and.) While sueh were the manners and sentiments of the leading classes of society. and left. Joshua vii. forms. " This night was acted The Widow. S. It passed an bridge. cards. or of the base. Sorry am I that such fiercely pulques the unhappy Judas and Dives. Moral and The play referred to was entitled. such as Charity. spacious tunnel carries the train through the Hill of A — — Difficulty. il Clad in fitting habiliments. the Shepherds Feeding their Flocks by Night. new tions of which were prepared by vast heaps of French philosophy. vol. i '. this terrible excess of passion amongst Groom. 121. prurient spirit fostered by the court." The town of Vanity is an important stage in the journey."' Next appears Dives. comes in. He looked much like a heap of fog and duskiness. a solemn fast was kept. and its . in the year 1327. vol. — Faery Queen. for we are told. Sin. Mr. ii. but it is too late. has ever been able to "As we usshed. vi. " to avert God's heavy judgments on the land. a wretched custom as play to that excess should be countenanced in a court. Margaret's. " Methinks Prudence. His " Vanity Fair " may be regarded as a pictorial sketch of the forms and incidents which crowd upon the reader of Evelyn's Diary. " with such like apparel as Judas hath :" but This is the great triumph of personification is still to come. and witli a fearful vizard. Thus. some sprays of the death-cold water fall Miracle plays frequently on the face of the required the introduction of allegorical characters. will show.) After this amusing. plays were entirely consisting of sueh personifications. pitiful p." both. named Transcendentalist ' but as to the form or features of this miscreant. and in the Tower) was a main cause of God's punishing the land. " making a lier. superstition in its grossest giant. imitators. and lost his one bundled The year before lie won fifteen hundred. 56." $c. he awakes to rejoice that he had not attempted to reach the celestial cit\ '>y so deceptions a route. Charles II. longer to be seen in their ancient cave. "according to custom. the Killing of the Innocents. c. by the goldsmiths the Oblation of the Three Kings. but in the prologue it is described as" " In the last scene. where was a table set on purpose. Smooth-it away. by Thomas Lupton.— NOTES* was at its height. Their place is occupied by a tenable German giant. Dean of Windsor.'. the Purification. accounted a day of great religious solemnity. has lately been made by an notion of a He admirable American writer. written in 1578. p. neither he for himself. I came away when the Duke won about £1000. found the king ami his friends Hist. p. Mosses from an Old Manse. This was only a natural consequence of the actual state of manners. —"417. the grand projector. This solemn fast was held for the House of Commons. bad him choose what death he would desire For death was due to him. Poetry. both there and at the : like a damned soul. And all that might him to perdition draw. nor any body for him. that is. a lewd play. 97.) Note 7. according to Pleasant Tragedy. provokt God's ire. especially among the French. series much in allegory. show an utter contempt for the moral restraint which society has a right to impose on the expression of licentious sentiment. " by the describe. and at the expense of the different trading companies. and others. by cifer was to be represented by the tanners the drapers. or that of Tope speaks of " shooting folly as it flies:" had lie Pepys. because he was a the language or images gaming. till personaga they pass (Col- away. . Beligious observances. in the privy-chamber. have very comely. Hope. bk. by the painters and glaziers." A of such dramas was exhibited at Chester. The wheels are set in motion: the shore. in black. as a real character. Faith. as well as Achan. . poison. under the date of January 6. observing the wicked folly and monstrous some losers. fire. Co temporary writers." to their final abode. Note into 130. " This evening. noise. we learn how the king and his court had been edified by the services in which they had taken part." A few days after this. vol. ropes. to convey travellers in the quickest way from ami intended the land of Beulah. at Dr. and not unintravelling to the religious pilgrimage. by the mercers. lived in the reign of. were blended together in a mass of nndistiuguishable confusion. Hist.. 135 deal when folly began to founded. painted with flames of fire. &c. and the earth taken out of this tunnel serves to Pope and Pagan are no fill up the Valley of Humiliation.

The objection to the Puritan writers. It is true this state of things did not long exist but it continued through the whole of that period during which men had the most passionate desire for religious knowledge. The Puritan writers enjoyed a popularity which shows how readily even uneducated minds could master their repulsive style. while he rendered the sentiment subject by fresh proofs and evidences of its importance. tracing a difficult route for his son. The simplest reader turned with scorn from writers whose elegance of language cast a veil over their doctrine. therefore. that some of his writings are characterised by all the peculiarities of the Puritan theologians. either in manner or Banyan's mind was too full of the theme to exhaust matter . when faint. we fasten with eager appetite on fruit. when he has truths like this in hand. Their faults arose from the nervous anxiety of a scrupulous conscience. Our distaste for a harsh style. but it was scarcely as an imitator that — — A . There was a charm in their This served both to attract and persuade. triumphant in his theorem. more esteem than beauty. admits but of one These writers felt answer. As the value of what he tells us becomes more and more felt. No one could doubt the sincerity and earnestness. that enough to represent a doctrine dilated and coloured. we learn even to relish the style so-repugnant to common tastes. however familiar a reader may be with the subject. arising from the unchangeableness of the doctrine more and more intense.PREFATORY REMARKS S AYE D B Y GRACE Bunyan must have preached many or times on the subject of this treatise. the want of an anatomical distinctness in all the parts of a discourse left the student vexed and uneasy. to occur repeatedly in his writings. theologian like Bunyan could be in no danger of erring by an affectation of novelty but he would have written to little purpose had he not possessed the power of giving new interest to the Thus. is actually to show their sameness through all ages and varieties and the diamond would lose its value with its Gold is proved by the crucible of dispensations. invigorate him. that. if his numbers be preserved an affectionate father. It bore the character of an eternal decree. wishing his plans to be minutely understood a mathematician. therefore. but the suspicion would be wrong. suspect that the present treatment of the doctrine cannot offer much that is fresh. drawn from it. fore. Bunyan's treatise will comfort and . while we should reject sweetmeats served in embossed silver. for a time. Bunyan was one of the people thus agitated and instructed before he himself became a teacher. Here there was ample room for the exercise of wisdom and he so employed the resources of his fertile intelligence. It is no wonder. He felt with them in this respect more than in any other. and the character of unchangeableness is of hardness. is greatly lessened when we begin to discover that it was the stern honesty of the author which induced him to adopt it. and yet unmarred by human handling. when it it would be easy required the exercise of very severe thought to exhibit it with force and life. than were the Puritan writers to show exactly what they regarded as the truth. could not be more anxious to avoid the slightest stroke of the pen which might distract attention. he accumulated numberless arguments and illustrations to strengthen unstable minds against every opposing notion. The more distinct the truth itself the better. men of genius and eloquence. A . An architect. It would scarcely be uncharitable. though offered on a wooden platter. The goldsmith and the lapidary know this. in the ordinary estimate of style. The truth with which he was here concerned owed its preciousness to its itself in old generalities. complete revolution was thus produced. It was felt by many of these writers. However honest and profound. . and strict formality of arrangement. . that others might know it as well as themselves. according to the knowledge of which men would be saved or lost. There was nothing. Nor i8 this an imaginary case. that they were dealing with truths. as painfully formal in style and argument. The labour of the expositor. truthfulness of the men who took so much pains to open the entire groundwork of their system. fixed. therewhich could ever wear the impress of novelty. No rhetorical shapings or shadowings could be allowed in such a case. in the doctrine itself unchangeable nature. or any other quality in the nature of their articles. Arguments founded upon. This is just as.

S. and where he had to instruct by moving the fancy or affections. or to lead humble and facile minds to a state for which they yearned. He set before him his supposed antagonist doubt. blasphemy. but he intended it for another order of readers. Had he designed merely to comfort the afflicted." is one of those in which he felt it an especial advantage to be skilled in the use of method. He adopted their method because it seemed the best to convey a definite knowledge of great truths. The blow pretended. To these means only he would have recourse . every word or sentence obstinately opposed. rather than by any strict appeal to the understanding. the doctrine of grace. and as unaffected by his scholastic models as if he had never known them. which did not directly avail to the great purpose of conviction would be worse than vain. 137 he wrote as they wrote. and in the following Treatise we have an excellent specimen of the manner in which he employed them. His own experience helped him to or the other of these he had to contend. or coldly neglected. disbelief. — II. . Could a better have been found. or given and not felt. It was with the one He knew them well. . he would have used it. In their case. is ruinous to the controversialist who strikes it.PREFATORY REMARKS. The discourse on " Saved by Urace. understand by what means they were to be overcome. we see him employing a style genial and free. the form into which he has put this discourse might It was for those who either not have been the best. Bunyan would never trifle.

Courteous Reader. is them " according to the the Apostle treating of the doctrine of election. . putteth forth his grace. was God's free choice of some. WHO THEY ARE THAT ARE SAVED BY GRACE. he proceedeth to show them that their first quickening was the resurrection of Christ their Head. V. The means conducing to that end was Jesus Christ " himself. III.) 3. WHAT SHOULD BE THE REASON THAT GOD SHOULD CHOOSE TO SAVE SINNERS BY GRACE RATHER THAN BY ANY OTHER MEANS. and that is. But just thus it is therefore by grace ye are saved . that in time then the true cause of your blessed condition is. (ver. thus. according to the Having thus called them back to the remembrance of themselves. from the 4th to the 12th verse.) Moreover. A DISCOURSE OF THE GRACE OF GOD: SHOWING. with that little I have.: . SAVED BY GRACE.) — his blood. he tells us. 4. 5 2. the free grace of God. 14. Eph. book thou art presented with a discourse of the Grace of God. WHAT IT IS TO BE SAVED BY GRACE. course of this world. then you deserve no more than others. should forget tells many how little they deserved them." past they were dead in trespasses and sins. (ver. HOW IT APPEARS THAT THEY ARE SAVED BY GRACE. II. 15 tified and saved you by his Christ. « "WHAT IT IS TO BE SAVED. thus. and the way of the sinner with God in the same where the grace of God. and means conducing thereto. (ver. 3. and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance with the saints. TO THE READER. and what was the exceeding greatness of his power to them-ward who belieVe. and the wickedness of the sinner do greatly show themselves." (ver. he in the down in heavenly places. SAVED BY GRACE. If thou findest me besides the truth in aught. Thou shalt also find in this small treatise.) glory in their salvation. ii. he them. (ver. the true cause of this blessedness. the end. for his great love wherewith he loved us. even as others. as also of their being sealed by the Holy Spirit of God unto the day of redemption. 2. at the hearing of these privileges. If you Ephesians were indeed dead in trespasses and sins if indeed you were by nature the children of wrath. who is rich in mercy. what the'y*were in their state of unregeneracy. which he wrought in Christ. . &c. If thou findest me short in things. according to the prince of the both with respect to the act itself. The end was God's 11. therefore all the good . even when we were dead in sins. and that then they walked in In the first chapter. Thine to serve thee. by the way. BUNYAN. the spirit that (ch. according to the working of his mighty power. In whom we have redemption through power of the air. the way of God with the sinner. he telleth them how he gave thanks to God for them. impute that to my love to brevity. 1. as it was held forth to them word of the truth of the gospel. and left others —20. even that he would make them see what is the hope of his calling. (ver. to wit.) as good as you by nature to perish in their sins. hath quickened us together in Christ. thus. the love and grace of God " But God. The Son putteth forth his grace. 6 . And their so lest the Ephesians. Again if God hath chosen you. 5. the forgiveness of sins. 5. 12—14. The Father putteth forth his grace. in the children of disobedience." These last words seem to be the Apostle's conclusion. and of salvation by that grace in which discourse this little . impute that to shalt find here particularly handled. 7. treateth of the subjection of the Ephesians to the faith. now worketh ii. in whom they before were chosen. impute that to mine infirmity." 2. as to his Conversation^ mercy of God. IV. As who should say. The act. with what else should be by us enjoyed in another world.) This done. — In thou shalt find how each person in the Godhead doth his part in the salvation of the sinner. And the Spirit things thou But the Which if thou findest anything here that serveth to thy furtherance and joy of faith. rightly drawn from the premises. 3. 1. if God hath juswhen he raised him from the dead.) inserting. and that by him they were already set riches of his grace. 6. . J. (by grace ye are saved). bestowed on thee and me. making mention of them in his prayers. — " By grace ye are saved.

I beseech thee.) do to be saved. To save. QUEST. . may either respect salvation in the whole of it. . Who How are they that are saved it by grace ? appears that they that are saved. deliverance from the wrath of — — ? (Acts xvi. last are to make way for demonstration of the whole. that knoweth not experimentally something of the dread of these three things as is evident. then he called. please themselves with it. shall he this I will propound certain questions upon the words." are. equivalent. and the flames of hell for ever. and they do all of them suppose us to be in a state of thraldom . it is impossible else that he should ever cry out with all his heart. deliver my of the Lord When he knew what soul. because of the dread "0 generation of vipers. and keep it close under Besides. this word " saved. 5 . WHAT IS IT TO BE SAVED God how then can he tell what it is to be saved that hath not felt the burden of the wrath of God ? He he that is astonished with. you cannot* I say it again. of the wrath to come ? who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come?" (Matt.) only. in this senseless condition of yours. by that application understand its . neither is it anything '' itself." it. and this be saved. or. of all other. What more abominable than sin ? What more insupportable than the dreadful wrath of an angry God ? And what more fearful than the bottomless pit of hell ? I say. embrace it. what more fearful than to be tormented there for ever with the devil and his angels ? Now to save. because the words themselves admit them the first three are grounded upon the several phrases in the text. it is of mere good will " By grace ye are saved. and that trembleth at the wrath of God he knows best what it is to be saved. from which they that shall be be delivered. the curse of by their salvation God. supposeth the person to be saved to be at' present in a sad condition saving. Further tell . xvi. salvation completing. this is the it is The saved dreadful miseries" shall . that knows what to ! . are they are no less than sin. to wit. in the general terms." " to deliver. The I. knew what it was to be saved. 37. with guilt. and that maketh not its virtue to appear. how can he what it is to . in my distress. that never was sensible of the sorrows of the one. hide it still within their mouth. Then : called I upon the name of the and misery: therefore of great worth dreadful. IV. and so shall : : 139 But I say. because all others do even by their practice count it a thing of no great con." " to redeem. this word "saved. if this word " saved " concludeth tell our deliverance from sin. And this is evident. for the wrath of God. that there is such a For to thing as damnation due to man for sin. Clap a plaister to a well place. 7. both : I think this text respecteth both. I. I say. nor have that esteem of it. " Men and brethren. if he shall gain the whole world and lose his own soul?" (Matt. to be as . 26. according to my text. of the highest concern among men " For what shall it profit a man. cxvi. What is it to he saved ? What is it to be saved by grace ? III. it is feel it not become a doubt to many if there be any. Sinners. somewhat at least. it is to then he be saved. how do they set light by salvation ? love it. neither can he to whose flesh it is so applied. as he that hath received cure thereby." it concludeth de- liverance from death and hell." as I said. But to come to the question.) cern. And although sinners may think that it is no hard matter to answer this question. rather than by any other means ? Now the reason why I propound these five questions upon the words. not know it from his own experience. " then called I upon the name Lord. This question supposeth. because. as it is manifest by the little regard that the rest have to saving. or the little dread they have of damnation. How then can he be saved. xviii. yet I must tell you there is no man that can feelingly know what it is to be saved. . you cannot know. hath no sores or aches. 3. what shall we do?" that is. and the pains of hell gat hold upon me. What might be the reasons which prevailed with God to save us by grace. is to deliver the sinner from these. then. the expectation of the godly and conscientious reader. nor distressed "with the The Psalmist says* " The pains of the other ? what it is to sorrows of death compassed me. 29).) Alas! do not the most As for sin. this word " saved." then. signifies nothing. What is it to be saved ? To be saved. and a mock to those whose doubt is resolved by atheism. I say. with all things else that attend them." (mark. concludeth . The man that (Acts ii. or salvation in the parts of it. iii.— SAVED BY GRACE. Again . what it is to be worth. and therefore cannot prize. save. and salvation completed of for " to save" is a work many steps. Where is he that seeks and groans for salvation ? I say. are saved by grace ? V. or 4. cannot know the virtue of the salve I mean. where is he that hath taken his flight for salvation. which you enjoy more than others. is in the sense that the Apostle here doth use a word forasmuch as the miseries from which we are saved are the miseries of all most Lord. (Ps. questions are II. be saved that hath not in his conscience groaned under the burden of sin ? Yea." The method that I shall choose to discourse upon these words. draw towards a conclusion. : man. to him that is not lost. and direct particular answers to them in which answers I hope I shall answer also. it is. and I found trouble and sorrow. they their tongue they fly not from it and for hell. when yet it is. saved. and the two : you I mean that are not wounded and oppressed with the burden of sin. 4.

(Eph. he was by the devil cast oft into the fire. 5. as we may easily conjecture. some hands of men yea. and oft into the water. and that before the world began . " I will pardon them Called Christian. i. for his great love wherewith he loved us. ii. yea. conversion. For all this he hath also appointed them their portion and measure of grace. was a great which he committed he was driven from his own land. but must not die before they have been converted. though his dwelling was near the sea-side. v. and therefore all this must come upon them. 22). him before the foundation of the world. Apostle saith. that the saved before they are called " God. they have been justly arraigned. 20. and called us with an holy calling not according to our works. some into wells." and again. he saith not. xi. and therefore will not frustrate his own purposes. Manasseh before he dies. according as he hath chosen effectual for the blessed . and saved. even so hath he served others. called and preserved. 29. The sin that we stood guilty of before called us. .) and according to this beginning all things concur and fall out in conclusion " He hath saved us according to his eternal purpose which he purposed . but they must be saved to be called. I have elected and kept. and grace. and . converted. therefore. to be justified." (Eph. But the judgment due to them hath been by the patience of God prevented. the text is very full " he hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ. and condemned. and laid up in him a stock of grace. but it could not be . and for the trespass . they Manasseh.) 5. 1. They are ordained before conversion to eternal life . he was not yet called God had chosen him in Christ. so we may be said to be saved before we are converted. God beareth with his own elect. They are by God And here lies the reason. They were preserved in Christ. God well as his calling. therefore that they may partake of all these privileges. 3.140 plain as possible. and fetters. they could help him often -to break ! in Christ Jesus. for Christ's sake. which must be given sinner. and called. then we may be said to be saved in the The purpose of God before the world began. at the yet is God very mouth of the grave ? said concerning thee. 9.) with all the sins which he had committed in the to "to save" is a work that hath beginning before the world began. and the devils had power to drive him too. are saved and called . Let him live." (Jer. 4. (Rom. called. preserved in Christ. i. i. So. you know. is to be brought to." that whom Paul expounds it. 1." he saith not. 4.) gift.) And this part of salvation is ac- complished through the forbearance of God. Yea. that he "saved us. . but according to his own purpose. As it is said of the young lad in the gospel (Mark ix. : time of his unregeneracy. Christ hath purchased us with . 9. we had not now been in the world to partake of a heavenly calling.) ungodly and unconverted and those many hells that at the hands of God. even when we were dead in our sins. ." (Eph. and cut himself with . 3. (Rom. (Mark v. : . cannot drive them out of the world before counted in Christ before they are converted. and helped to lay hold on Jesus Christ by faith and " For this is called saving by grace through faith . and saved out of before conversion Some have fallen into stones. this saving of us arises from six causes hath chosen us unto salvation. to be glorified. 30. and that all the sins they commit." to save us God in thus saving to may be said his chains by determining make those means mad him as a to completing of our salvation and hence we are said to be " chosen in Christ to salvation . . which was given us in Christ before the world began. That legion of devils that was in the possessed. How many times was that poor creature. to destroy him. and could also make him as bedlam they could also prevail with separate from men. is. First." us in him they could not drown him they could not he was saved to be called he was. blood. state for from that death our sins we deserved that (Rom. 8. preserved in Christ. and shall not be completed before it is ended. yet could they not drive him further than the mountains that were by the sea-side Yea. : some into the sea. xi. Therefore Manasseh must be convinced. he hath called us and saved us. all the time of their unregeneracy. Behold. and called . yet could they not kill him. ! rivers. again. until the time comes which he hath appointed for their conversion. but kill ." This is the beginning of salvation. 29. and into the called. To be saved. Third.) hath preserved us in Christ. (1 Thess. long life is granted to the elect before conversion. but he puts saving before calling. as others' thinking. we are said to be " preserved in Christ. and we saved all the time of our conversion. (2 Tim. its SAVED BY GRACE. that he hath in that choice given us that grace that shall complete our salvation. 3. And hence " saved " is put before " called. (Jude 1. his hath given us to Christ and his is without repentance. and called us . laid thee how many sick times have thy sins upon a bed ? and to thine and whom " those I reserve. 4. How many deaths have some been delivered from. had the judgment due to them been executed upon us. notwithstanding all this. as 2. and carried to Babylon but kill him they could not.) And therefore God saith again. could not take life away his before his conversion. As we may be said to be saved in the purpose of God before the foundation of the world. Now : God v. as the thief upon the cross. assaulted for his life by the devils that nvere in him. for he : Rom.) Second. or called to Christ. to be called. . who is rich in mercy. and all the judgments they deserve. though his Bins had deserved death ten thousand times but what was the reason ? Why. viii. and elect are not yet converted." " He hath saved us.) 6. yea.) 4.

(Hos. saved. therefore. 11. 20. 4. is on that Christ. to make Christ Jesus the object of thy faith for justification for by his righteousness thy sins must be covered from the sight of the justice of the law " Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ. cannot arrive to that saved state. even the elect. and rage of the devils. his Christ when he ." (1 Pet. is the merit of his flesh and blood. wisdom and righteousness ." (John vi. iv. Wherefore perseverance is absolutely necessary to the saving of the soul. xi. The devil . but they lust against us. and saved from that just judgment of the law that was due unto him. and policy." (Isa." And again." heirs. 13. will conclude. as saved. 19. it. therefore. that the believers are called " the children." and hence again it is. 3 6. we are said to believe " according to the . the law of sin and death. world without end. have too many infirmities to come to Christ without help from heaven inviting will not do.) 2. ii. a prince." (Phil. iii. this part of salvation dependeth not upon human power. cannot arrive there if he be drowned by the way.) : world world ? especially if is terror. starvings. as silver and gold. and put on Jesus Christ for life. But. so from that day it was offered through the Eternal Spirit a sacrifice of a sweet-smelling savour to him wherefore Godimputeth the righteousness of Christ to him that believeth in him. for it was his life : our redemption and blood that were the price of " Redeemed." " for he shall save his people from their sins. that with the power." of yourselves. To be saved is to be preserved in the faith " He that shall endure to the end. are kept by the power of God." (Acts xvi. : yea. fear. it hath done to obtain the favour of God. xlv." says St. 21. Rom. but upon him " that hath begun a good work in us.) " Saved by faith.) be saved by faith. except the Father which hath sent me draw him." (1 Cor. i. Any man that understandeth this. that thereby they may embrace and put art. are against us. alluding to the redemption of money under the " but with the precious blood of Christ. drownings. 10. 23—25. which whoso eateth and drinketh by faith. Rom. yet is not faith exempted from having a hand in saving of us ? Not that it meriteth aught. hangings. lion. v. by which righteousness he is personally justified. For life. so they went from them. they shall not be ashamed nor confounded. i. hath eternal life. i. v." and we are said to be "justified by his blood. and that not it is " not with corruptible things. and hell itself.) Fourth." law. which he wrought raised him from the dead. called a god. 31. SAVED BY GRACE. : : : — . unto salvation. because by faith we lay hold of." (Eph. is the meritorious cause of their justification therefore he is said to be " made to us of God. believeth not shall be damned . (1 and a thousand xvi. 12. Matt. He that goeth to sea. so they must be helped to lay hold on Christ by faith for as coming to Christ. hath given him life to communicate to sinners. 2. 8. 23. majesty. Wherefore this faith is that which here distinguisheth them that shall be saved from them Hence it is said. " can Christ. you consider. and the life that he communicates to them. whose habitation is do against a god. venture upon. Perseverance is here made absolutely neces17. 5." For although salvation beginneth in God's purpose. no man. a roaring lion said. 53—58. through faith. that John 3. that all the corruptions dwell in our flesh are against us.) 6.) Men. a roaring . 6. and the blessed with faithful Abraham . 4. gibbets. malice. Peter. 17. 26 v. and saved from wrath through him." (Matt. &c. " He that that shall be damned. 1. therefore he drew them with cords. because he that falleth short of the state that they that are saved are possessed of. the and the power of death itself? Our perseverance " the gates therefore lieth in the power of God of hell shall not prevail against 2. of our salvation is great. with a purpose to arrive at Spain.) They must be brought unto : drawn unto him " For come unto me.) This part. burnings. laws. a prince. 9. But what is one poor creature And here let Christians warily distinguish betwixt the meritorious and the instrumental cause of their justification. that consider. As they must be brought to. Christ. i. a lion. i. gaols.) not that perseverance is an accident in Christianity. 2. 32 (John v. the gift of God. by grace 1. iv. by whose righteousness they must be saved. 13 .) kinds of death." that the promise by faith in Jesus Christ might be (Gal. I say. Rom. John Add to this. in flesh. the to the end same shall be saved. that it is he hath death and the power of it. ii. and thou shalt be saved . 141 are ye saved. banishments.. 1 Pet.) . as I said. vii. " through the faith of the operation of God. Rut what can a poor creature. xxiv. as I have said. and war against ii. v. and calleth for no less than the power of God for our help to perform it as will be easily granted by all those .) sary to the complete saving of the soul. to bring us into captivity to (Gal." Now we are said to (Col. All the world is against him that shall be to all the given to them that believe. 44. that to be saved is no small thing. Eph.) But perseverance is absolutely necessary to the complete saving of the soul. but is given by God to those which he saveth. iv. As they called them. and that not only in their nature and being. Rom. 30. and comes to us through Christ's righteousness. because that flesh and blood hath merit in it sufficient Yea. That all the power. with what he hath done and suffered. so faith is not in our own power. with an everlasting salvation . or a thing performed by human industry " They that are saved. Eph. . us." saith Christ. because God having made him the Saviour. through faith. and therefore it is included in the complete saving ofus: "Israel shall be saved in the Lord. vi. Thou working of in mighty power. therefore we are said to be raised up with him. 33.

Here we are saved by faith and hope of glory. all the world. and take the care and charge of our soul. (Ps. called the the saving of the soul. 12. 9. heaven that is the place for the saved to enjoy their salvation in. of the saved . 14. is iv. 12. 19. but as helped by Omnipotent power Israel. . that it is ten men made of all. the pains of hell gat hold upon me. commissioned of God. 11. or by grace to pardon if they fall. lxiii. come down from heaven to do this office for them. shall enjoy the end of our faith and hope. is it no wonder to see him.) But now. nor our weakness of faith.) For.) Christians.) Fifth. but there we that are saved. . What conduct? conduct of "Are they not all ministering spirits. would be matter of wonder to you. 9. and entered the land of Canaan. Isa. as Peter says. It is not our meanness in the world. because it is that which faith looks at. because .) 5. thou art fallen by thine iniquity. that the beggar died. and church of the first-born:" there is the "innumerable company of angels. viii. and to present us faultless before the presence of his glory. 23. and by. to rise again. and corruptions ? cry. it may be. not nor fear." " The sorrows of death." (Jude xxiv. ! . 24. Heb. so plausibly handled. Rom. " But we are not of them that draw back unto perdition. but of them that believe to full enjoy their salvation. wonders . beset with a thousand fears. Wherefore. the heavenly Jerusalem. when he dies.) bands that the godly have in their death. . But how Why. There is " Mount Zion. 6. as . he calls the 3. again. not in trouble as other men. walk with God again. for the place where they that are saved must to the This heaven is end of our faith. and Jesus the Mediator of the new covenant.) Suppose the poor Christian is now upon a sickbed. lxxiii. and that without intermission. (Hos. sick-bed temptations are ofttimes the most are the saved. : . that " as an eagle spreadeth abroad her wings.) True. when this world can hold him no is longer. But how shall I come hither ? There are heights and depths to hinder. 39. 39. and was not God himself engaged. to see a man assaulted with all the power of hell. poor creature. so And again. the sight of death. These things. xxiv. xiii. here tion of his soul : . "Receiving the end of your faith." (I Pet.) one sin. how came they thither? Why. have a safe conduct to heaven. and it may be of hell itself fears that by the withdrawing and silence of God and Christ. we shall be saved indeed. xxiii. and is managed by the power of God for he only " is able to keep us from falling. to conduct it safely into Abraham's bosom. Lazarus the beggar found this a truth a beggar so despised of the rich glutton." said he. and I found trouble and sorrow. . . and yet to fearful suggestions of the devil. out of all these the Lord will save his people . and to lift them . Some of these made David . xiv. : violent. and ring of : . xxxix. therefore. x." says God. up iii. cxvi. tells us. many of which are so cunningly woven. 14. xxxii. who moth. he the Lord alone did lead them." (Ps. 1. the gospel ? He that knows himself." There shall our soul have as much of heaven as it is capable of enjoying. come off a conqueror.142 4." (Ps." bore them and carried them all the days of old. with that perfect gladness is not attainable here. thou must have a safemust this be ? conduct to heaven. nor devil shall hinder nor the grave nor hell disappoint thee. in another place. with exceeding joy. before (Ps. wonders indeed perseverance is a wonderful thing. as I said. and the spirits of just them All the delusions in the world are against that shall be saved. and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom. and so he should dwell in the house of the Lord for ever. are not to fail them that that He that that is saved must. this is the life of the point. and persevere after all this in the faith and holiness of Or if strength. all his lusts not a wonder to see a in himself is weaker than the Is it are begotten and the grave. "compassed me. Eph. (Job iv. 9.) Those of the children of Israel that went from Egypt. and ten'thousand sick-bed fears at the end of that and they are sometimes dreadful ones fears that are begotten by the review of the sin perhaps of forty years' profession fears that are begotten by dreadful and Judge . 22. and the " They are plagues that others are not aware of. Every fall against the salva- but a Christian once fallen riseth " not. (Rom. that he was not suffered to come within his gate a beggar full of sores and noisome putrefaction yet behold. when devils and guilt are upon him. But now foV a poor creature to be brought hither. even the salvation of your souls. 13. perfect :" there is " God the thousand wonders that the elect are not swallowed up with them and swallowed up they would be were they not elect. the text says. stand upon his feet again. the general assembly then the devil plays his last game with us he is never to assault us more besides. sent angels forth to minister for them that shall be heirs of salvation ? " (Heb. perhaps God suffereth it thus to be. I say. so rarely polished with Scripture and reason. . he that knows temptation.) to stand against and overcome devils. but in me Ps. that I may recover he fall.) David also mercy and goodness should follow him all the days of his life. wonders he that knows what falls and guilt mean. were you awake. These angels. is thy help. i. SAVED BY GRACE. the appearance of the devil himself. A : (Deut. " O spare me a little. even the salvation of our souls. They must come. To be saved calls for more than all this. the angels come from heaven to fetch him thither " And it came to pass. when Ave come there. that the entering into heaven may be the sweeter.) I go hence and be no more. 9 xxxvii. that shall hinder this nor shall the loathsomeness of our diseases make these delicate spirits shy of taking this charge upon them." (Luke xvi. either by power to keep them from falling." And again. but must. i. neither are they plagued like other men. (Matt.

in incorruption. saved perfectly. itself. Of the soul it. xv. all the rage of men. we cannot see bottom of this word saved. 1. then that which is in part shall be done . But they which shall be counted worthy and the resurrection from the — is mortality. It is compared to the shining of xv. (Pa. 2 . diseases. nor pen. when body and soul are thus 2. Then will our memory be bo can express. neither marry. part blood of Christ. joy that neither tongue. 30. and then for his angels to conduct us safely to glory This is saving indeed. 20. to be perfectly saved. everlastingly. . 14. and to the shining of the stars for ever and ever. the sun in the kingdom of their Father. of men or angels 4. and this body and soul together possessed of the heavens. (Eph. sickness. (1 Cor. xxv. I Sixth. . 35. 42. to serve the Lord with shouting. 23. rious.) : angels : " to obtain that world. what a great 20. (Dan." (1 John iii. for they are equal 4. Then shall our will and affections be ever in a burning flame of love to God and his Son Jesus Our love here hath ups and downs but Christ. heaven.) Wherefore. that to the angels.) 3. and in body and soul together in the heavens. which raising is (Rom. until the time of the resurrection of the dead. The possession is our body it is called i. and glo. iii. the faculties of much of heaven as at present it can hold but man. we every way Here the body some- . fectly when is possessed of heaven. calls this. that joy unspeakable. • . and how God made. 21. so is in the heavens. There earnestly all our days. the Lord shall change " this " our vile for fashioned like unto his glo- Then shall we have perxiii. True. all Satan's all our own weaknesses.) The 1. for To be more than saved all saved. 3. all work together for his glory and our good. this vile brightness of the firmament. and hath as . Death So is swallowed up in victory. 3. and that blessed one his Son Jesus Christ. 22 God to ! saved saved in God's decree. hath ears to hear.) united. then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written.) like redemption of our body. 14. and a member of the body. thanksgivings.SAVED BY GRACE. as well as his spirit his body is the temple of God.) and everlasting visions of God. then will he save the body from all those things that at present make it incapable of " For our conversation is in heaven. and glory. the redemption of possession is it is the price forth by several things. saved by faith. 5. There is that sinful filth and vileness that yet dwells in it. there it shall be always perfect with that perfection which is not possible in this world to be enjoyed. this salvation the louder. rious body. xlviii. The understanding shall then " Now we know but in be perfect in knowledge." (Luke xx. saved in Christ's undertakings. The godly are not pertheir soul is Before I conclude my answer to the first queswould discourse a little of the state of our body and soul in heaven." (Phil. Then will our conscience have that peace and ." until Lord Jesus comes to raise the dead " It doth yet appear what we shall be. then shall we be every way saved. 54. First. so that with unspeakable aptness we shall call to mind all God's providences. Now. we have : the not in this world. and with a crown of everlasting joy upon their head. consisting of body and soul. earnest of what we shall be we have the Spirit of God. blessed state of salvation. It is said. Oh." we know God. aches. away. Eph. 1 Cor. enlarged to retain all things that happened to us God hath put into this word " saved. His body long as but part of him is the price of the . — . all the parts of shall be it meet They will now be both in capacity." (1 Cor. 3. without jarring. 43. a good thought of whom doth sometimes so fill us. body. to the everlasting ravishing but the the malice. and of the bones of Christ . fect he cannot then be completely saved. and of the flesh. it is a blessed thing for be our God and our guide even unto death. then . 10. 143 Oh. when we shall enjoy this it will then be filled. when this comes to pass. and full of glory. when Christ shall come the second time. 44. gloriously. True.) then. 1 3. then we shall be enemy to death " So the last body of Jesus Christ. Second. but in part " but when that which is perfect is come. possession." (Matt. neither can they die any more. pains.) . glory of which It is is set "a purchased. In this world there cannot be that harmony and oneness of body and soul as there will be in heaven. and this mortal shall have put on immortality. 6 troubles as well as others. under which we groan 2. cannot be said to be perfectly saved.) good God hath put into this little word "saved!" We shall not see all the good that iii.) then this our vile body shall be like the glorious the grave and death that is for : when this be destroyed corruptible shall have put on incorruption. that it deal of who may be the Saviour." (1 Cor. 41. the heavens : from whence we look Jesus Christ. it causeth 2. 13—19. (2 Cor. let him hear. of our hearts.) the sun : And when body is made " Then shall the righteous shine forth as unto his glorious body. v. is and death. nor are given in marriage. For our body it shall be raised in power. v. while in this world. who can imagine what glory they both possess? saved then will salvation in together in our glory. vi. (Phil. viii. which is the earnest of our inheritance. 2. And he shall out of sick-bed Bave Israel out of all his troubles xxxiv. xiii.) tion. Their state is then to be equally glorious with Who There are three things from which this body must be saved 1. saved in perseverance. that subjecteth us to age. saved in soul. xv. And is there dead. Christ. 21. . 3. 1 John iii. a spiritual body.) till it appears what we shall be. compared to the this purchased the raising of called the it out of the grave." because of blood. in all with as much bliss and glory as ever it can hold. And now. their spirit made perfect. xii. until the redemption of the purchased possession. (1 Cor.

long-suffering. 1. xvi. 8. Isa. cxlix. (John xiv. these.) : . But " grace in the text is taken for God's good -will. when he saith. &c. 2. Fifth.) 4. cxxxii.) Sometimes — variously (1. " And this is the will of him that sent me. I must touch a little upon the word " grace.) 5. may have everlasting life. iii. " By grace ye are saved. It-is everlasting.) shall (4. Shall I speak of their continuance in this condition? 1.: : " 144: SAVED BY GRACE. by each of is these expressions intimated. in heaven.) dom. xix. he frankly forgave both. that every one which seeth the Son. the goodwill of him that dwelt in the bush.) Sixth. which must needs be free an act of his own will. and the deservings of the creature. 28. 7. xxxiv. It is 3." it is all one as if he had said. and let him that heareth say. have their proper place in our happiness also. goodness. 18. It is an act of God's will. which is all one with the riches of his grace. " My sheep hear my voice. that it passeth words and thoughts. (Heb. It is called glory " When he shall appear. " And it is to pay. 4. 6. xi. and I give unto them eternal life. 4. 9. the good pleasure of his will. and is expressed of God putteth 3. ! and the bride say. " the Spirit him 17. First.) 2." (Ezek. it is taken for the charity of the saints. 10. are set in flat opposition one to another " And if it be by grace. second question. They shall stand and live in the presence of the glorious God. then it is no more grace . and the soul again vexes and perplexes the body with dreadful appre- WHAT come to IS IT TO BE SAVED BY GRACE ? hensions of the wrath While we be in this this way. 6 8. ii. 21. (Ezek. and abundant in goodness and truth. . 6. xxxv. Third. pity. the Judge of all. and I know them.) Fourth. iii. signifying their clean and innocent state in " And they.) 4. ii.) 5. as 2 Cor. xxxvi. and loving-kindness of God. i. 1 Sam. 2. They shall be with Abraham. intimates to us. and believeth on him. men.) is a city. It is salvation. It is life eternal. hence we have other hints in the word about the nature of grace. 7. Come. the Lord God. 17. Rev.) 4. 32. (Isa. . ix." (Rev. and the (2.) 4." (Col. xxii. pity. (Heb. they shall as never to jar more. and sin. and the soul the there. 19. It is called a kinghouse. " By grace ye are saved. . 47. (Rev. They shall also have crowns of righteousness. 34. 5. 28.) like. 1 Pet. and the like.) 4. 2 Tim. lvii. xi. 2 Sam." says Christ. and Jacob. Yea. 5. they shall be clothed with the 2. kindness. we shall appear with him in glory. gracious. 10. (Eph. iii. 4. keeping mercy for thousands." (John x. lxi. ix. and they shall reign for ever and ever. Heb. . Shall I speak of their company ? Why. as. 4. It is called God's called heaven." (Luke vii. world without end. and both so perfectly suit with the heavenly state. Shall I speak of their heavenly raiment ? 1. 9. Isaac. not but that those expressions. Eph. 4. kind.) Sometimes. It is world without end. 1—3. doth most properly set forth the true cause of man's happiness with God." (Isa." (Rev. pitiful. 27. " But Israel shall be saved in the Lord with an everlasting salvation. 16. " shall walk heaven with me in white. xxii. be it known unto you.) 3. And again. (Prov. free love. 1. Ruth ii. and all the prophets (Luke xiii. (Esth. xvi. 9. i. It is called everlasting habitations. free kindness.) 7. iii. otherwise grace is no more grace but if it be of works. (Luke 1. v. with the Lamb. 4 3. and transgression." I to the Now What is it But now the glory of the with the glory of the soul. xii. times sins against the soul. mercy. let ." (Exod. xvi. Second. come and whosoever will. 23. It and show you how diversely times it is it is taken. 3. iii. for they are worthy. 4.) Sometimes it is expressed by goodness. "And they shall see his face. he ii. iii. Had not God loved us. grace had irbt acted freely in our salvation had not God been merciful. QUEST. your sakes do I this. and they follow me. It is called Paradise. 4. come then.) 2." (Rom. xii. i.) garment of Isa." (John vi.) The word "grace" therefore being understood. when he saw us in our blood. 7. Deut. Come and let him that is athirst. lxiii. be with an innumerable company of holy angels. free mercy.) ii. Tit. that grace a free act of God's goodness towards the sons of 2. then it is no more of works. It is for ever and ever. mercy. be saved by grace ? for so are the words of the text. of the good pleasure of is his will. 24. good. Sometimes it is taken for those sweet ornaments that a life according to the word about the neck. 4." (Eph. the Lord Jesus. iv.) (3. iii. (Ps. forgiving iniquity. 22. ii. to wit. that these are free acts of God. the body oft hangs but quite contrary have that perfect union . 20. shall so suit and judgment of God.) in the kingdom of heaven. he would have turned away from us.) So then. kindness. 8. 32. By the goodwill.) styles himself." (Rom.) 2. They They shall oe (Rom. Sometimes it is called. merciful. And therefore grace. 4. 1. love. Shall I now speak of the place that this saved body and soul shall dwell in ? Why. " being *justined his grace. It is called glory. and his name shall be in their foreheads. so it As the word " grace " all signifieth all This raiment is called white raiment.) 2. 42. ye : . everlasting joy and glory. they shall not be shamed nor confounded. II. 22. 6. Some- body taken for the good-will and«favour of men." But. his good pleasure. x. otherwise work is no more work. 10. and that will by no means clear the guilty. 5. love. 40. world. (Luke xii. (Col. " Not like sinner What sayest thou ? How dost thou being saved ? Doth not thy mouth water ? doth not thy heart twitter at being saved ? Why. saith the Lord God. free mercy.) take of the water of life freely. " The Lord. Therefore freely by when they had nothing them for expressly said.) 3. (Heb.) salvation. (Heb. 16 .

i. as also by these that follow. . that he hath given to Jesus Christ: "Fear not. II. that in the we find Godhead there are Father. and helped again to rejoice in God's mercy. ix. i. 1. i." (2 i. 24. and when he pleases.) 5. iii. 23. 9 Gal. his grace unsearchable. to be communi• we is wherefore grace is attributed to the Father.) . This is the cause that sinners are so often recovered from their backslidings. the forgiveness of sins. of power. as consisting of Father." also and that the grace of God. 3. 2. and Spirit the first and although it second consideration Godhead. i. 9. power and Godhead and as thus set we are to conceive of him by his attributes 2. grace. and that he had kept them all the days of his life.) . Rom. and giveth the : (Rom. 2 Cor. 4. But I must not here conclude by it We that are here discoursing of the grace of God. (John vi. i. Second. 21. the Father's Grace. 33 xii. 6.) why great sinners are saved. for their preservation attributed to the Father. he will be gracious to whom he will be gracious. containeth in the nature of the We This Christ mentioneth. have compassion on sion. little flock. i. 18. Heb. Son.) And election : is but the Father's " Blessed . and " The for us our redemption Father sent his Son to be the Saviour of the world.) This is the true cause that some sinners are so at you thus. (2 Tim. scriptures in the faith. and faithful perseverance through this " not according to our works. 15. (Zeeh. 10. 14. 2. then. Why. That God doth this to whom. words conjoined with the text do also further manifest " But God. whom he will have compasthis point. 1." saith Paul. . is the beginning of our salvation. who is God and by the grace of the Spirit. and saved by and tells us. healed of their wounds that they get by their falls. by the grace blood. i. yet doth not demonstrate the persons in the Godhead. the sinner. 4. The Father's grace giveth us to Christ to be his righteousness. 2. and I first manifest it by all those texts above mentioned. and he will reckoned not the Son's act. i. The 9. he is frankly forgiven.) Now he is here called the Spirit of grace. xi. holiness. God is set forth in the 1. 25. xiii. — . 2. Of First. according as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world. 49. i. at this present time also. The Father's grace saveth us for Christ's sake. i. and Spirit. Grace . 20. even When we were dead in sin. a suffito those that ciency of cated to all spiritual blessings. 42. Now. Eph. 16. 2. v.SAVED BY GRACE. Father. 1. 2. 12. (1 John iv. in Christ Jesus before the world began. Son. 2. Philem. 7. 2 Cor. his life. 4. 1 Thess. who is God. 16. by the grace of the Father. remaineth that I show you. 7. vi. The words thus understood admit of 1. 15. How we are saved by the Now this will I open unto grace of the amazed and confounded their the apprehension of is own salvation. Grace also is attributed 4. to his own purpose and Eph. 5.) i. saved. I say. 1 Tim. which was given us Tim. The Father's grace provideth. i. that is. 62. xvi. who is God by the grace of the Son. 2." (Luke xii. h . Acts ix. vii. for his great love wherewith he loved us. " according to the riches of his grace. John iii. 2. for God pardoneth are eavadj as the : i-:. who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ. be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. by the grace of the Father. 63. Gal.-' Rev. (Ezek. Cor. justice.) Tit." Eph. 37 39.'' (Eph. in whom we have redemption through his Son undertake we are saved. 3. 7. Son.) Now this election is counted an act of grace so then. 3. xxii. Son. and Bom. 2 Thess. that in the ages to come he might show the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness to us-ward through Christ Jesus. and puzzles and con- by unsearchable grace God oft founds our reason. 3. in saving of these few conclusions. This is the sure. vi. He set forth in his own eternal forth. Col. we must conclude. because he is the author of grace as the Father and the Son. Father's grace saveth us by the blessed and effectual call that he giveth us to the fellowship of his Son Jesus Christ. The to Father's grace ordaineth. Philem. word unto us under is ." (Eph. (1 Cor. hath no respect to the sinner's goodness hence it is said. Phil. First. because it is an act of his own good pleacause 3. iv. 2 Thess. It is also attributed to the Holy Ghost. hath quickened us together with Christ . by grace ye are saved. 32.) Fourth. i. How we are saved by the grace it So then How we are saved of the Spirit. 18. we have him this set forth in justified by washed in his blood. 32. it is his Father's will that they should be safe -coming at the last day. 28. 1 Thess. 3. Third. iii.) riches of his grace . goodness. How we are saved by the grace of the Son. . that it is by the grace of the Father. (Gal. 2 Tim. 25." Third. 4. pardons to us by multiplying day by day " In : VOL. distinctly. (Luke vii. i. since we are said to be '' saved by grace. x. but according life . 3. and they shall never perish. viii. everlasting. a double consideration. xvii. as these i. &c. 1 i. and since in the word. xii. i. testify. there is a remnant according to the election of grace. 2. 6. 14. and Holy Ghost. Gal. are saved them at their need. i. according to the of God. 9. 2. ness. Phil. (Rom. But.) freely justified. That God. And. and layeth up in Christ for those that he hath chosen. and Holy Ghost. are saved by the grace of God. The Father's grace giveth the kingdom of heaven Now. the word of truth . as was showed at first. " who is rich in mercy. i.) 5. 15. to the Son. The Father by his grace hath bound up them that shall go to heaven in an eternal decree of election and here indeed. it is your Father's good pleasure to give you the kingdom.

) When he betook himself his ministry. and his But above all. patience and forbearance towards us The hy exercising all glory of kings. and he was also Prince of peace.) denied himself of this world's good. that we through his poverty might be made rich. God over all. so cloth the Son put " For ye know the grace of our Lord forth his Jesus Christ. and he made him.) but of his Godhead he could not strip himself. 1. beasts. (6. besides. they were under him upon a double account first." (John x. 146 SAVED BY GRACE." (Luke saith for the clearing of this viii. of angels. Phil. have redemption through his Hood. I come now things. Christ." saith he. and birds of the air have nests. : : : was in him originally as in the Father. 6. finished our pilgrimage in this As Jesus Christ was possessed (5.) Therefore the glory of worship. i.. being . He was made 1. To which ticularly. ix. so. he made himself. 30 xvi. Phil. that ye through his poverty might be made rich. which alone was worth ten thousand worlds.) Here you see also. then. is greater than all mountains and hills. so : . in a word. 58. this condescending grace of Christ. and their worship. Particularly. into this grace. to ii.) 9. of peace. stars. 16. by manifesting of his love unto us." (Eph. and then how poor he made himself. a manifold glory with him.) The Father's grace 10. for the life of the He laid He gave world. and princes. Man was his. that though he was rich. He was rich as the Father " All things that the Fath&r hath. he lived upon the charity of the people. the obedience of the sun. subjection. and judges of the earth. and he made them. in the salvation of our souls. and that by searching out how rich Jesus Christ was. ami fear. and by keeping of us from all "My Father. (Heb." He was a Prince 1. 2. The heavens were his. He John vii. Now this heaven he forsook for our sakes " He came into the world to save sinners. Of the Grace of tlie Son. The earth was his. to . The Father's grace saveth us. by accepting of our persons and services. 24. the time of our unregeneraey. were due unto him ." Jesus Christ he is the Lord of all. even sins. 2. 8.) . iii. . therefore he is called the Prince of it because it . 5 . which he stripped himself of.) (2. (Col. moon. we must die but the grace that was in wrought with him to lay down hid life . i. Now this is the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ " he was rich. " are mine. were due unto him. and service. sakes laid his heart that he or • down that also for so stood the matter. Luke ix.) But. " He thought it no rob- by trade a carpenter. Again As he was Prince of life. but the Son of man hath not whereon to lay his head. Angels were his. heaven and earth were his.) The glory of the heavens themselves was due unto him . _ : " He gave his life a ransom for many. whom we the forgiveness of his grace." " He " " . 36.) Again As he was Lord Prince of life. or ons of no reputation he became the reproach and byword of the people. as he was their Creator. and flying fowls. obedience. 29. the service of them all. . Hark what himself : eternally God. (Ps. down Again his life for his sheep.) secondly. 2. i. creeping things. (4. xxii. When went other bery to be equal with God. he was Lord of all the creatures. forsook his peace also. 3. 15." life. 35. but for our sakes he became poor. 9. 2. the glory of that unspeakable communion that he had with the Father before his incarnation. when we have world. How rich was Jesus Christ ? 1." down laid his life that we might have his flesh and blood . clouds. • beasts. ii." being naturally and . cattle. reverence. snow. 15. angels. deeps. a worm. were due unto him the fear.) Father's grace saveth us. according to the riches of 7. First. Acts x.) (3. from all creatures. and they had all their all life from him." (1 Tim. cxlviii.) fering of death. Generally. He laid aside but he peace . as he saith." saith the power of the enemy. 4. (Rom. earned his bread With his labour. 15. and all vapours. as the Father. as he was made the heir of God. " that gave them me.) and by him was maintained that harmony and goodly order which were among things in heaven. that the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ is brought in as a partner with the grace of his Father. blessed for ever. Jesus Christ had glory with the Father. . 4. was due unto him . again with this. and things on earth. and breath . by sending of his angels to fetch us to himself. and . to the men went to their own houses. viii. 2. ix. 9. and no man can pull them out of my Father's hand. : Second. honour. viii. yet for your sakes he became poor. and he made them. Take things briefly in these few particulars 1. hy holding of us fast in his hand. that was ever his. of glory. 6. 3. (lleb. the glory of communion with Father was his I say. he was Lord of life this glory also was Jesus Christ's in him was life. all dragons. Par: lower than the angels for the sufii.) When he was born. so he for our . 6. (Ps.) He gave to life speak of the grace of for as the Father putteth forth his grace the Son in the saving of the sinner.) He had the glory of dominion . that we through his poverty might have the riches of salvation. Rom." To inquire. laid in a manger. What shall I say? saveth us. (Acts all iii. Jesus Mount of Olives." (2 Cor. fire. by lifting up the light of his countenance upon us. (John x. and he made it. was due unto him ( 1 " Foxes have holes. i. 7. hail. I answer. (Isa. Generally. Mark vi. 3. the worship. he was born in a stable. yea. men.

) Grace came out where the whip 4. 10. Man by . what grace was manifest in thy condescension cepted. and the Spirit's grace must be showed in this text.) Luke iv. it was for our sakes to the In taking possession of Ans. where Jesus Christ will deny himself of a whole world to the nails and spear pierced thee. 19. And what will become grace to astonish devils of them that trample under foot this Son of God ? of grace ! ! ! Of . 23. but the Son. and chose upon that account to be a man of sorrows. xii. : . there in his making of us his house and us for his own was a necessity that so it should be. this cise thereof with great crying. (Gal. . as he expressed . and The Son fulfils the law for us. (Rom. But some may say. (Ps. Ps.) and despicable. at the hour of his death. 6 xxii. grace made thee bear such burdens 2.) 3. Prov. as they wrath but to prevent that. jected of God and angels. with the world. (1 Cor. God concluded to Son gave his life and blood for us. &c.) sakes " For our sakes he became poor. . that spilt his blood for sinners. Man by sin had made himself lighter than vanity and this Lord out of thy side with thy blood. Matt. ii. but to hinder that Jesus was the Son. John vi. Man should have been yea. As there is grace. Dan. John stripped thee of thy glory. giveth us to Christ. grace came bubbling 1 Tim. vi. Jesus Christ. (Rom.also to the Spirit of God. 1. 22. " By grace ye are saved. 2—5.SAVED BY GRACE. struck. 38. to the . so by God and men. ! . " He became poor. O blessed Son save him. scourged on earth. and the Son his another. xl. i. bears in his own body our sorrows. was mocked of men. and acquainted with grief. 10. hated. 5. insomuch that the 147 see the And you | argument that prevailed with Christ to do this great service for man. Wherein doth the . . 58. (Luke ix. and made himself the object of his Father's curse. " In his love and in his pity he redeemed them. sin only ex. 16. Now by sin we had lost the glory of God therefore Jesus Christ lays aside the glory Grace brought thee down from heaven. Jesus was pierced both must be beholden to the Father and the Sun. rulers. and afflicted him : and in the grace of our Lord Christ :" both which agree with the text. Eph. before we come to heaven. him. 24—26. xlviii. In many things. Man by sin had lost peace with God but this would Jesus Christ .stripped himself of. (Isa. and the exerthe Father therefore shows his grace one way. xxiv. What need was there that Jesus Christ should do all this ? could not the grace of the Father save us without this was the grace of the Son.) Son's grace is showed on the earth. It was not the Father. But perhaps some may say. i. iii.) 6. . or else no flesh can be saved. The Father chooseth us. end man might be saved. 39. ! ! himself subject to death his life to save sin . Father's grace is showed in heaven and earth the Numb. . iii. The xxvii." I say. as also the prophet saith. ix. as the Father and scourged in hell. such burdens of his heavenly paradise to save him. (Isa. and denied. 7. John xix. condescension of the Son ? The Father indeed gave the Arts. poverty might be made rich. but the Son. 15.) 7. Man by sin had shut himself out of an earthly paradise and Jesus Christ will leave of sin. 2. grace made thee poor xvii. 46. 9. Zech. 8." according to this in the Corinthians. was absolutely necessary that Jesus Christ should But methinks we should not yet have done with put himself into our very condition. made himself lower than the with every word of thy sweet mouth.) 5. 11. Son of God grace was in all thy tears. but to prevent that. and the like. 22. 23. I told you. unthought-of riches of grace grace to make angels wonder. that we through his our souls and bodies. Jesus was forsaken of God. by kings. xlv. God's curse. the Grace of the Spirit. and therefore was persecuted from his cradle 2. aside his peace with his Father. Man should have been The Spirit. is God. He laid to his cross. iii. and on the I might thus enlarge. the grace that was in his heart . 8. (Gen. 21. but Jesus Christ will lose vi. all was for our habitation. Man Third. 26. grace came forth God. and blessed be the Father for that and the God and man having sinned. ii. and that by authority from cross. xii. . . and it is also absolutely necessary that he put crowned with ignominy and shame but to prevent forth his grace also. that left his heaven for sinners it was not the Father. Man by sin had made of God here is grace indeed unsearchable riches conclusion hid his face from him. as are unspeakable. 12.and smote thee. . : . had procured to himself the curse of God but Jesus Christ will bear that curse in his own body to save him. where the thorns pricked thee. and is therefore also the author of grace. 24. 7. iii. Heb. Man should have been re." gloriously put forth gracious acts in order to our lose also. 22. Matt. angels to redeem him. Man The Spirit of God hath his hand in saving of us should have been pierced with the spear of God's "many ways for they that go to heaven. and heaven to us. : l2 . takes the curse of rejected of men. ! . it was for our sakes all the saving grace of the Spirit appear ? sorrows he underwent. xxvii. the law from us.this grace of the Son. and sets us justified in the sight of God. Man by sin lost his right to the creatures . 17 xi. grace to make sinners happy. . so there is justice in Son." All the riches he Quest. and blessed be save him in a way of righteousness therefore it the Son for that. . Thou Son of the Blessed. . 17. 37. 2. that ye so that though the Father and the Son have both through his poverty might be made rich. I come now to speak of the grace of the should have been mocked of God therefore Christ Spirit for he also saveth us by his grace. " You know Lord smote. grace that he had with the Father. least circumstance of the sufferings of Christ. 13. such burdens of sorrow. that Jesus was crowned with thorns.

else i. will save them. the grace of the Son. 5.) good Spirit we have help and light the wisdom and cunning of the world. i. believing in Christ without the conviction of this xvi. i. By this good Spirit we are sealed to the day 13. This is he that setteth up his kingdom in the heart. III. iv. the Spirit sufficient of itself. . 14." (Rom. 7. (John xvi. by which the devil made to give place unto grace. . this life By of redemption. (Eph. xiv. the xi. by whose power else we should be carried headlong to hell. 5. And thus have I. (2 Cor. This is he that worketh faith in our hearts. and our hearts are directed into the love of God.) ii. namely. xii. but the Spirit. the Son must die. Rom.) Spirit coming into us. viii. Some think that the love of the Father. 9. 7. x. ] 1. as well as our immortal soul. Tit. without which neither the grace of the Father. 2 Thess. heaven. know these things distinctly. (Gal. By this blessed Spirit the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts. it is necessary that you wit. ways of the flesh into the ways and by it our mortal body. liii. 8. 18. 1. and without which we arc liable to the worst damnation. but they are deceived also . that he would send the Father. as these three do put forth grace jointly are deceived also for it 10. and how it putteth forth And verily. to . By this Spirit we come Christ. 2 this By against all Tim. 9 — 14. by shedding the love of God abroad in our hearfi by sanctifying of our souls. 43. 11. ever. and perish. Christ. can save us For he that . that saveth him that shall be saved indeed.) must be the grace.) we should 3. and so consequently delivereth us from that darkness. even the seed of God. showed you the grace of the Spirit. a third sort. for " without shedding of blood ix. yet the Spirit is the first that makes which putteth tications. by illuminating of us hence he is called " the Spirit of revelation. 5." because he openeth the blind eyes. of first by the word infused into us. (Gal. as I also have showed you before.) 9. v. Mark xvi. 20. nor the grace of the Son.) it is He that convinceth us of the evil of our unbelief. viii. is quickened in the service of God. therefore. 16.) v Now all these things are so necessary to our salvation. (1 John iii." (Heb. 13. the Comforter. and each of them in order also to our being saved for ever. if they By this Spirit . xv. i. and the grace of the Spirit jointly. 9. 18.143 salvation. Luke xi." (John xiv. 14. (Rom. But yet. and truly in the salvation of a sinner. and applying Christ to our souls. 17. that think the holiness ot is La. 1 Cor. that at the God was i. so.) is no remission. Mark xiii. grace of the Son. xvi. not by electnot by dying. 2. Rom. who- — The Father's grace saveth no man without the grace of the Son neither doth the Father and tho Son save any without the grace of the Spirit for as the Father loves. to seizure of us. 13.' 2 Tim. 1 Cor. that I know not which of them can be wanting neither can any of them be by any means attained but by this blessed Spirit. that must save them. By this blessed Spirit we are led from the of life . and that shows us the necessity of our . as faith. in a few words. without the blood of the Son. 11. but they .) for 4. ever wanteth." And again. said not. hope. 9. Eph. the Spirit of truth. He savetli us from our darkness. love. good Spirit our graces are mainand vigour. 15. 1. but by his revealing Christ. (Rom.) 6. without a sight of to see the beauty of which we should never any man have not the Spirit of Christ. 3 7. 26. Heb. " Without holiness no man shall see the Lord. " I will send him.) tained in The Holy in us. SAVED BY GRACE. and blood of the Son. wait with patience until the redemption of the which (Eph. believeth not shall be damned. which kingdom of the Spirit. 11. QUEST. Christ. and that he should be in us for ever " If I depart. we are helped to praise God acceptably but without it. without the holiness of for the Spirit of God. v. 15. 23. 13. (Matt. Eph. 25.) 5. and the Spirit must sanctify. itself towards the saving of the soul.) 7. .) And by this good Spirit we are made to .) By this good Spirit we keep that good thing. 16. he is none of his. it . 20—22. 14. and by that means keepeth out the devil after he is cast out. that is the work of the Father that is the work of the Son. " if desire him. 2. a spirit of prayer and every grace.) 14. v." said Christ. perish. but of all these three. lie liable to a worse possession xii. Some think that the love of the Father. and dwelling worketh out many salvations for us now. but they. 13.) is 13. 12. vi." (Rom. and the grace of the Holy Ghost . Luke xii. xv. but should certainly live in the neglect of him. (Luke This that finger of Sirs. . WHO ARE THEY THAT ARE SAVED BY GRACE '? TO BE I come now to the third particular. are deceived . (Matt. of the Father. would drown us in the deeps of hell. 19. it is not the grace of one. and the Spirit makes us meet for heaven. they put forth. 18. 13. 1 Pet. viii. is God. the Son redeems from sin and death. to the grace of the Father. This is he by whom we are born again and he that is not so born can neither see nor inherit the kingdom of heaven. There had it. 12. ii. is (John purchased possession comes. they of the devil than 24. will do. ing. (John iii. when he went : forth itself in its most cursed sophisoverthrow the simplicity that is in away. and taking possession of us as an earnest of our possession of heaven. 25. or no soul must be saved. after a The Father designs us for diverse manner. iii. vi. it is impossible to be heard unto salvation. 22.

6. a persecutor .) They that take up the cross daily. Those of all these kinds that the Spirit of God shall bring the Father by Jesus Christ. shall not shall be saved ? for aught can be gathered by what you have said.) dalene. xix. 69 74. set him that hath sinned the unpardonable sin aside. for St. xxxiii. and were saved by grace. and how they were converted and saved. nor thieves.) They that believe on the Son of God shall be saved. 3. All. nor drunkards. (2. by grace he was forgiven his iniquities.) So was Noah. Now. and Third. xii. can never shine into him. ii. shall be saved.) (4. (Ps. (4. (Luke viii. a catalogue of : " Believe on the . 1.) You read of them that murdered the Lord Jesus. are great. " Confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus.) Now when I say. 21. 14. hut sinners to repentance. 3.) So was Solomon. without he first awaken them to see they have need to be saved by grace. as namely. he is a hypocrite. Her condition yet she was saved." (Mark ii. 2 Kings xxi.) (2. 35. — Fifth. Mark xvi. But.) man that Fourth.) Acts xix. least . and Take 1. But to this question. ." (Eph. and of the mind. for because of these things cometh the wrath of God upon the children of disobedience. (Ps. v. a dreadful one xxvi. (1. must Sixth. : : : and sins. heaven : " Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God ? Be not deceived neither fornicators.) You read of the exorcists in for wickedness. 31. those that walked in these sins. cxxv. left for him but a certain fearful looking for of shall a witch. 1 4 and stay thyself. and that yet by grace he was saved.) — . . Eph. 5.) And again. . how dreadful was his condition and yet by grace he was saved. I say. That it is not the greatness of sin that excludeth the sinner. I have not in the suggested that any sinner is rejected. (2. in the lusts of the fulfilling the desires of the flesh flesh. encouragement. The grace of God saveth. — . shall not inherit the kingdom of Obj. 28—34.) They that are sanctified and preserved in Christ. Quest. There is nothing . 23." (Luke i. 27. 9—12. Not the self-righteous have no need of the Physician " The whole have no need of the Physician.) shalt be saved. xxxiii. vi. by the revealed will of God for in the word we have mention made of the salvation of great sinners. nor adulterers. 2. nor covetous. nor effeminate.) Oh. Christ Jesus came into the world to save the chief of sinners. Matt. 7 (4. 26.) Quest. I mean not that they are utterly excluded. among whom also we all had our in trespasses conversation in times past.) was dreadful of (3. certainly be damned. who is the image of God. 15. 7. The sinner that maketh religion his cloak (Acts ii. (3. ii. sent unto him by yet this man was saved. Acts xv." said Christ " I come not to call the righteous. it seems. ii. in whom was . 15.) (2 Chron. (Luke xiii. miah xxxiii. word of God. even as others. (Gen. Second. devils in him. and none but these.) great one too yet by grace his soul was saved. even according to the prince of the power of the air. but the continuance in sins. 51." Let no man deceive you with vain words. for further iii. Mark xyi. The sinner that persevereth in final impenitency and unbelief shall be damned. and yet God saved him by grace. (Acts ix. and wonder at the riches of the grace of God. every sinner that persevereth in his wickedness. and how he was saved by grace. .) So was David. so. "according to the course of this world. xxiv. 2 — 13. I am a backslider. and follow (6.) You read of Manasseh. there is as bad saved as damned.) (3. who was an idolater. yea. 2. and yet he found grace in the eyes of the Lord. Hos. in the nature of them. Son. nor the rich. That sinner whose mind the god You read of the had a legion of ! this world hath blinded. and must be damned. 53. 2—5. 3. nor idolaters.) (5. . (Gen ix.) (5. because his sins. and a 13. shall be saved. Ezek. thou sayest. can be saved because else the sinners might be saved without the Father. 50. 5.) They that are effectually called are saved. Eom. 7—9. iv. is lost. SAVED BY GRACE. 16. nor abusers of themselves with mankind. (1. " He hath filled the hungry with good things. 17.) You read of Saul the persecutor. xxxvi. and thou Acts xvi. yet nor revilers. (6. 7—11. which (Heb. that the glorious light of the gospel of Christ.) In a word. and continuing 5. . (1. True there are as bad saved as damned. But what kind of sinners shall then be 2 Pet. 13 . how they closed with Christ. sins stand recorded for our encouragement. x.) You read of Mary Magseven devils. (2 Cor.) 2. read Jere26 li. 1 10.. But how should we find out what sinners besides. . Christ.) Besides. Isa. '' shall inherit the kingdom of God.) So was Lot. 25. lxxxix. 4." (1 Cor. where their names and their As. saved ? Ans.) So was Peter." (Mark xvi. 22. is evident. the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience. and were by nature the children of wrath. that indeed damneth the sinner but I always exclude him that hath sinned against the Holy Ghost. 5. (2 Sam. they that were dead them thus Lord Jesus Christ. It is not therefore the greatness of. 16. nor extortioners. 16. a rebel against the the prophets judgment. — .) devour the adversaries. Paul was such a one but he saveth not such. Ans. 2. Ans. which do give an account of what kind of sinners were here saved by grace. (Matt. not him that hath sinned the unpardonable sin. or without the Spirit. are that are to he saved 149 by not they that First. From the words before the text. (Mark v. show you who they grace. or without the in all that I have said. xiv. It is evident also from the many sinners that we find to be saved. These. 25. hut sends the rich empty away. not the self-righteous.

i. come to further proof. 3. Take heed . Delays are dangerous and damnable they are dangerous because they harden the heart they are damnable because their tendency is to make thee outstand the time of grace.) " Thou shalt save the afflicted people. 30. In I have advertised you not to of the world. and thou 5. given to us ceive freely. Christ was ordained to be their Saviour before the foundation of the world. " Be justified by the blood of and the dispensation of the fulness of times to them that shall be saved. it will further appear we are saved demonstration of the truth wherefore first repeating.15) believe in thine heart that SAVED BY GRACE.) 3. that he giveth his Son. (Heb." But now. 19—21. my God. that he giveth his righteousness.) See some other scriptures " He shall save the humble person. saves nobody for the kingdom of Godj or the gospel. iv. ii. Heb. according to the riches of his grace.) Again so. or that the Father would have given him to be the Saviour of men. him 4. (Ezek. in a few words. In whom we have redemption through his blood. i. that concur and go to our salvation. yea. be- justification and salvation. since he refused to give him to be the Saviour of angels. .) " of the needy.) 2. 19. soul-astonish- . when a council is held in eternity about the salvation of sinners in time. (Job xxii. " Be reconciled to God by the death of his Son. 1 Cor. that he giveth his Spirit. Beware of resting in the word of the kingdom. it would no. thou shalt be saved.t have been proper for an apostle or an angel to say." if one of the three to (John i. i. especially that fearful. and the kingdom of heaven. blame before him in love. 2 Tim. the Son.) Again could it have been thought that the Father would have sent his Son to be the Saviour. Ixxii. that we him before the foundation. x. i. cast thee away in his anger. 10 . (1 Thess. as was as their salvation said. is not in word." (Ps. is naturally grace. 4 6.) and amazing part thereof! Who could once have imagined that the Lord Jesus would have made himself so poor as to stand before God in the nauseous rags of our sins. that are saved." (Ps. the Scriptures testify. whose appearance and themselves were one. 17. — . according he hath chosen us be content without the power and Spirit of God in your hearts. we should in reason have thought also that he would never have taken the work wholly upon himis rich and Yea. xcv. (John iii. Isa. that thy inside to and outside be the alike. 4. cxlv." (Rom. grace is But. (Eph. i. Rom. 16. this . 21. 22. and thou 9. the forgiveness of sins. I will say * it again. this grace. sinner. i. v. v. hold to relap. to be communicated in from the dead.) 2. 19. 4. h 21.) thou. Take heed of living in a profession a life that is provoking to God for that is the way to make : . this is was contrived by God.) him : he will hear their cry. : that beware of these four things 1. 27. to wit. 8—11.) 3. 1 Pet. and will save them.) grace. 7. iii. 11. iii. hat hath been said before hath given some of his grace. 29. according to the good pleasure of his will.) Had there been a contrivance in heaven about the salvation of sinners on earth. shalt be saved by his life. the Son of the Father. shalt be saved. Luke xik 82. that whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. Having predestinated us unto the adoption of children." : Eph. to the praise of the glory of the salvation of the soul. yet if the result of that contrivance had been^ that we should be saved by our own good deeds. All things cause God them by faith. Ixxxvi. and we are commanded Sinner. xlviii.) 3. wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved. . 2 Cor." (Rom. (Ps. where it comes to salvation.) 4. 1. but in power.) — W Again if we Consider the terms and conditions upon which this salvation is made over to them . 29. 9. (Rom. up thy God so loved the world. xviii. 4. i. by Jesus Christ. the sum of what hath been . Christ. and when the result of that council shall be. dreadful. thou wouldst indeed be saved. I shall That this is true. 9. 3 7. for without him you partake of none of the grace of the Father or Sonj but will certainly miss all this. xii. the same laid up in Christ. God hath raised him x. they are offered. 22. HOW if This fourth question requireth that some de^ monstration be given of the truth of this doctrine . Beware of delaying repentance. to himself. were also in Rom. 16.) needy. Jesus Christ. save thy servant that trusteth in thee. 16. this free. " By grace ye are saved.) " And it shall come to pass. "•Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord ing. by grace. and both conformable word of his grace labour to be like the living creatures which thou mayest read of in the book of the prophet Ezekiel. and the Holy Ghost will themselves accomplish the work of this salvation. (Eph. 17. this is . unthought-of unthoughtof grace for who could have thought that a Saviour had been in the bosom of the Father. 10. " He will fulfil the desire of them that fear 2. and subject himself to the curse and death that were due to our sin ? but thus he did to save us by grace. that they that are saved are saved by grace. without the spirit and power of the kingdom of the gospel for the gospel coming in word only. chose them to salvation before they had done good. The things that immediately concern 'our said 1." (Acts ii. that the Father. should be holy and without ." (Ps. 13.ix. QUEST." (Eph. already." (Ps. APPEARSj THAT THEY THAT ARE SAVED. ARE SAVED BY GRACE? IV.) . (Ps. salvation was undertaken by wit. — self." (Rom. viii. as who hath in blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ. v. " fie shall save the children of the " He shall save the souls Ixxii.

81. 5. v.by his sin. 19. bestows this grace. iii. 7. " and dost thou open thine ?" eyes upon such an one (Job xiv. lie givetli faith. but to see God entreat a sinner. reconciling the world unto himself. He comes to him while he is in his sins. and take this man. but for God to open his eyes upon such an one." Sinner. mingled it with every faculty of his soul. and made an agreement with hell . and to come to some other demonstrations for the clearing of First. 19. let us a little take notice of— The carriage of God to James 1. God the Father. . and meekly beseecheth the sinner to be reconciled unto him. Is not this God rich in mercy ? hath not this God great love for sinners ? Nay. founded in his blood. 16—18. Let us a is. little consider. (Heb. be ye reconciled to God. this. .) It is expected among men that he which giveth the offenee should be the first in seeking peace but. word in this text smells of grace. and bowels of love not in clothing himself with vengeance.. 29. Rom. as the Scripture hath it. He giveth pardon. than we have sin to (Acts v. : . behold thy time was the time of love and I spread my skirt over thee. . and in He God in his conversion. to hear Christ say. . 3 . 20. 2. I said unto thee. i. i. I aware unto thee. sinner. and to us by him " For all the promises in him are yea. : through grace. 31. 20. " I stand at the door and knock/' with a heart full. but thou was cast into the open field. I said unto thee when thou wast in thy blood. the Father. xvi. Live yea. viii. : him amen. not only beseech thee to be reconciled to but further. What sayest thou now. would be a stranger sight than that. an enemy in mind is enmity to God not subject to the law of God. for thy encouragement. 2 Thess. v. would be a strange sight to see a king entreat the traitor to accept of mercy. ! ! . saith Lord God. All this the grace of God every 3. and covered thy nakedness yea. God found the Jew when he came upon him to save him " As for thy nativity. Oh grace oh amazing grace To see a prince entreat a beggar to receive an alms. Ii. further' into 'the chapter. but he drank this sin like water. We First. nor swaddled at all. betwixt God and man it is not so not that we loved God. thou wast not salted at all. Lord. neither wast thou washed in See where to look : water to supple thee . thee. Isa. xxviii. he bids his ministers pray you in Christ's stead " as if God did beseech you by us. but in the cool of the day. and because it is established to us in the doing of Christ. o. not into judgment. who knew no sin \ that we might be made the righteousness of God in him. Phil. . none eye pitied thee. grace. . i. in his blood he comes to him now.) man. 16." (2 Cor. to have compassion on thee . neither in- deed can be. Jer. wilt thou not open ? Behold. . to the glory of God by us. stablished upon the best promises made to him. pity. not in the heat and fire of his jealousy. and entered into a covenant with . lv. in the day that thou wast born. beseeching there for favour from thee. God is the first that seeketh peace and. . we might have a strong consolation who have fled for a refuge to lay hold on the hope set before us. Of God's carriage to man." says God> " in the day thou wast born thy navel was not cut. But before I pass this. and an enemy to him in his very heart and wilt thou. that thou wilt be reconciled to them. that by two immutable things in which it is not possible that God should lie.) But to pass these. and looked upon thee. 31. when thou wast in thy blood. 18. iv." (Col. but into mercy with thee ? Further man. and member of his body by the means of which he became alienated from God." sinner. and saw thee polluted in thy blood. as I said. had not only given himself to be a captive -slave to the devil but continuing in his sinj he made head against his God. not that we chose God but God was in Christ. i. the Son. Live. and his Son Jesus Christ. he giveth more grace.) But this is not all. Pro v." If God would have stuck at any thing* he would have stuck at the death of his Son but " he delivered him up for us " freely " how shall he not then with him freely give us all . 7. stand both at the door of thy heart. things ? " (Rom. if thou wilt comply. 21. this is amazing. but in a way of entreaty. By his for nature he : is an mind it is " The carnal enemy to God.) So that the state of man was this he was not only over-persuaded on a sudden to sin against God. What man upon ichom and the Spirit. into his very nature. Now. sink us in thither. in unspeakable gentlenesSj mercy. vi. to the loathing of thy person. and a heaven full of grace to bestow upon him that opens this is such a sight as dazzles the eyes of angels. to forgive thee all thy sins.) . sinner. struck up a covenant with death.) 30. God doth him . s . lie 151 the Ho also giveth repentance. 32. to keep us from sinking into hell. with promise. further. because it is in opposition to the covenant of works. and hath confirmed them by an oath. when I passed by thee. that thou mayest not have any ground to doubt that all this is but complex menting. to do any of these things to thee.) yea. thou hast also here declared that God hath made his Christ " to be sin for us. and thou becamest see is mine. IS . And when I passed by thee. . and good hope (Acts v. 1 Pet. (Isa. viii. and again of man to hath made all these things over to us in call it a covenant of a covenant of grace. he hath pronounced in thy hearing exceeding great and precious promises. Ezek. SAVED BY GRACE. open thy heart. giveth everlasting consolation. 6. and to take hold of him by riches of grace. 6. ii. not imputing their trespasses to them. we pray you in Christ's stead. in a way of entreaty. . (2 Cor. .

vii. get thee to thy pleasures take them for thy portion. says God. ! good opinion self to of himself. and vows. (Isa." (Zech. and will feed him of them hereafter such thoughts unmanly. of salvation. Christian. and that from the day now him upon his own seeming goodness. his sports." " closer to them. that he serveth God as well as any man in England can but all this while he is as ignorant of Christ . his prop. and ! show him the shortness of his performances. and make him betake himself to his own good deeds to ease his conscience wherefore this was . and shows the sinner the necessity of turning now now. though such conviction be the first step to faith God now comes up (Prov. or what is 1. God in this way of the sinner will mercifully or come upon a sick bed. the alehouse. yet what shifts will they have to forget them^ and wear them off! Yea. says God. and repentance yea> and to life eternal. in the righteousness of Christ. then. even then. short of Christ. sleep. But behold. be a very busy one in religion. to be deluded by. from from all to one. they like not to ponder upon what they have been. and thinks besides. . I will venture that. as to the justification of his person with God. will either him. that they should not hear. But. away. law of Moses. xxviii. says the sinner sweet sins. 4. If he yea. says the . Turn Lord. will leave off his swearing. sweet delights. if God had taken thy denial for an answer. .) And now they are for anything rather than the word an alehouse. and . the sinner. and commits iniquity grace. yet oftentimes. Then get thee to thy sins. sweet pleasures. Now. yet he hath it not in himhave a good opinion of the grace of God. now he will be a good neighbour. I cannot leave my pleasures. all thy happiness. There is a generation that are pure in their own eyes. that he cannot put it off. this turn of the sinner. is a turning they object. sports. and no nearer heaven than was the blind Pharisee. and the uncleanness of his righteousness. get thee to thy delights.. they count with chapters. But perhaps convictions Why. now lights And. and begins to fasten conviction upon the conscience. at the sight and sense. so they may stave off the 2. or turn from one from great ones to little ones. plealike to become . they shall be all thy heaven. and long as God will or as the chaff that is with the whirl- . and thrice. xxx. preventing grace. that if salvation be alone of the grace of . Let us come SAVED BY GRACE. and yet are not purged from their filthiness. and that of a man's own is utterly rejected. pray. 6. talk of Scripture. and he will hear Sinner. only he has got in a as the stool cleaner are : way to hell than the rest of his neighbours sures. I cannot tend it. and cast him out of his sight might he not leave him here . says God. will not thus leave him. and what not. and you have thrown water as fast as he hath by the word cast fire upon your conscience. and promises. true. says the sinner. (Ezek. a playhouse. through the delusiveness of his own But what grace is it in God thus to parley with the sinner! Oh. he will pay every man his own. and that the personal righteousness of Jesus Christ. his stay. ! To he the will please God. . the patience of God to a poor sinner What if God should now say. and now he falls. and lxiv. they are too young to turn yet seven years hence is time enough^ when they are old. begin with God's ordinary dealing with sinners when at first he ministereth conviction to them by his word. or a driven bird. they will study to wave a present conversion 5 to his his own choice. Then will I carry the it word ? of salvation to another. of his own . the sinner now. and there stop. turn. nothingness. hath given him. If power of the word of God. what they are. and all thy portion ? sinner. now God hath taken this from under him. the reason of this sinking of heart and giveth the sinner this conviction so strongly. and prayers. or burn. Wherefore Jie con- cludeth. what an enemy is man to his own salvation I am persuaded that God hath visited some of you often with his word. many to few. wherefore his best doth also now forsake him. and carnal dehe will read.) Might not God now cut off this sinner. the world.) said. he will turn from profaneness to the will dwell as but behold. to deal performance . . they pulled away the shoulder. . disadvantageous therefore " they refused to hearken. xxxiii. or not at all 3. is it which of God is ordained to save the sinner from the due reward of his sins.) But It is preserves him. 20 follow him. 12. a sight of the uneleanness of his best performance the former the sight that . hurtful. 152 Second. and that only. God through all the righteousness of Christ. Turn and be saved. because he trusteth to ? in it. But behold the sinner has one spark of enmity still. of . God sight of his immoralities did somewhat distress must needs turn now. : . and flies away like the morning dew. they stopped their ears. although they now begin to see that they must either turn or burn. and to fall own righteousness. now to the carriage of first let these sinners to God. even to the time that they are to be taken up into heaven. Oh. 11. says This I speak of the sinner. even twice. and make him amends for all wrong he hath done him. then he is cast is But God comes again. . : he sits on. falleth it into a kind of to despair for although he hath in him presume . he 6in to another. how strangely do they behave themselves They love not to have their consciences touched. and a great many more such dainty dishes as these persuading himself that now he must needs be fair for heaven. such as it is . And observe him he is a great stickler for legal : he beginneth with their souls. a whorehouse. the emptiness of his duties. 13. what had become of thee. as I said. the salvation whose soul is graciously intended and contrived of God for he shall by gospel-light be wearied out of all he shall be made to see the vanity of all.

or worse where he the formality of them is a reproach to religion. but behold. woefully backslides. as I said. '. and that freely. xxiii. xxxiv. that he may dwell in the house of ! . Besides. hearing. encourageth to hope and wait upon also.) God again perhaps it gives some little sight of Of God's ordinary way of fetching the backChrist to the soul.' SAVED BY GRACE. bid him not. &c. and with dying deliver them out of all places where they have been thoughts it begins to faint when it goeth to prayer. will rise up in judgment against Behold I. he de. . I bind that which was broken. and fears damning again he also entertains hard thoughts of God and Christ.faith which is in Christ now it hath a calm and sed Comforter. I perish. to choose as easy a place in hell as you in the day that he is among the sheep that are can. . 6. he has no faith nor hope in his heart. and for hopes of 5.) mercy to his soul." (Ezek. which word of from Jerusalem to Jericho. as kindly breaks his heart with joy and blood of Christ. he sends the Spirit of adoption. damned. 3. But behold. things does again begin to wear off the heart. if you must be seek them out. any gracious disposition in for the sake of the blood of Christ.the sinner such a sight of the grace of God in long to God's mercy. . and therefore not willing to reject the broken in and the rock pours him out the rivers of oil. Will he let him alone in his aposthe mastery of him. questions God's days of their life.flesh and blood of Jesus Christ by faith driven by the power of his grace to its knees. nor hath an interest in the Christ. and is tor.) God again. the bles. he comes by his Spirit to the soul again. : . and of his blessed undertaking slider home. he fying to it. and will thinks to do as it had been taught." At this the again it also forgets the grace received. as he thinks. and fell among thieves God commands a calm in the soul. and will strengthen die. makes unbelief and thus he dealt with the prodigal you read of give place. unbelief. saying. sealing grace and pardon to the conscience. which Thus he dealt with the man that went down the soul never thought of before . millstones upon his shoulders. and you at last therefore better it is. he will seek this man these thoughts. that its sins are forgiven. leave them under guilt . and the soul casteth off closet-duties 'quite. 20. xiii. deadness." (Job heart bids him cry. and I will or to hear the word . God therefore. But after this. and backwardness to all gospel and newcovenant obedience which sight of himself lies like . and godly company. for this. which himself again you frequent. he doubts. this revelation of the emptiness of his own righteousness brings also with it a further hypocrisies. for sinners. the God of all grace leaveth him not in his distress. the as he broke David's or whether he will all the sinner gives place to unbelief.) 153 . 6. thank God for forgiveness of sins. or else retains only left again in his first plight. Tell him that grace is offered him freely. no more than that which will hang upon a mere loseth the life and savour of heavenly things. (Hob. perhaps the soul grows cold be hid in the day of the Lord's anger. and brings him home to " Fdr thus saith the Lord God. and thinks former encouragements were fancies. and inclination to hear the by the strength of his now languishing graces ? word any longer yea. he sinks in his mises it also knows what it is to eat and drink the now it is heart. and the smoke out of a chimney. I will not now discourse. . I will seek that which was lost. to him. will both search my sheep. to tell him " God is love. . scattered. and takes off the very edge tasy ? No. and waxsinner takes some encouragement. now receive Christ.) 6. and therefore concludes he cloth not be." (Ps. when all hope bring again that which was driven away seems to be quite gone. so soon as the power of whether he always breaketh his bones for his sins. . probability. wind. being quite discouraged. And why doth not God now cast the sinner to hell. Besides. 11. for his thus abusing his mercy and grace ? Oh no " He will have mercy on whom he will have mercy. : . after all these provocations. and reading. he answers. as a shepherd seeketh out his flock. ." sunshine now " he washeth his steps with butter. discovery of the naughtiness of his heart. But behold. in its pride. : . The soul at this. in comes on a sudden the Spirit of that which was sick. and the soul concludes. . but comes up now to him closer an inheritance amongst them that are sanctified by than ever. perhaps for several now ? Will he take this advantage to destroy the weeks together wherefore unbelief begins to get sinner ? No. And now has finds not. and concludes he shall never be* saved. yet he can get eth carnal begins again to itch after the world. He can- the Lord for ever.grieves the heart of them that are awake and tenmented with a thousand fears of perishing for he der of God's name. . 11. in the heart is blown quite away. that all your prayers. and brings will answer. mercy. and he will have compassion on whom he will have compassion " wherefore "goodness and mercy shall follow him all the days of his life. with some good word of God. his soul. Will he leave him to recover himself and spirit of prayer. hardness of heart. . : . and pray for an evidence of xxix. and sinks him yet For. 30—35 xv. lamentably bewails his miserable state. 16. . : . testiBut I have no heart to receive it. ix. further into doubts and fears of damnation. What then ? Why. namely. he dies in his thoughts. he dares not. But what will God do hears not a word from heaven. delusions. Ask him why he cannot. he says. even I. and says. scattered so will I seek out my sheep. and out till he finds him. which by the next doubt that ariseth grieves the Spirit of God. (Luke x. or mere thinkso's. and therefore dares not presume comfort now the soul knows what it is to eat proto believe wherefore. Peradventure you may 7. to spairs. . the devil also claps in with No.

as from these corruptions yea. he stand? But there is forgiveness with thee. or whether lie will kill tliem now." (ver.xxvi.) 8. who freely poureth them into their bosoms but from all these sins are they saved by grace. worldly thoughts. how often doth ! God forgive through the riches of " are bent to backsliding from me. 11—13. xix. make promises to God. words* ways. as he dealt xi. and that attend them in their best performances not that I intend. 5. even then when they most heartily acknowledge how unworthy they are of them also. I say. Peter ! (2 — . sometimes many hundred times a-day ? yea. secret sins. It it may happen just as his walk humbly now. shouldst mark iniquity. not to the Lord's table. who should These are with them. Gal. ." And God himself : .) But to mention some of them Sometimes they question the very being of God. millions of pardons from God for these and every pardon is an act of grace. they wink too much at known sin. though their land be filled with 30 — damned with them wise. My people. than these motions of sin from their flesh. that thou mayest be feared.) 9. wanderings of heart. and seals up to him the remission of his Bins a second time.) He is . and the world sometimes. 154 and darkness that they . doing " evil is present with me. and break them Yea. they ! . of the Spirit. deadness. often. and save them them in the lowest pit in darkness. ! — by not walking answerably to mercies come short in their thanks to God for them. 12 cxxx. the itching inclinations which they find in their hearts after Vanity go too often from them unrepented of I do not say but they repent . even then they sin by not having such reverent. some or other of them . nor Judah of his God. dweU in the flesh of man and they may as soon go away from themselves. him a little. : . and ordinances of God." (Job xxxiii.) As also in the 3rd of Jeremiah it is said. that must receive. it ? . though all they have was given them to glorify him withal All these things. the next gap he finds. " If thou. They received yea. they come . . and his if recovery. his standing is of God if . 32. of those common infirmities that are inci• dent to the best of saints. But see yet more grace.: ! . for I cannot mention them particularly. all fundamental truths lie open sometimes to the censure of their unbeliefs and atheism as." said again. Ps. li. who can understand his errors? Cleanse thou me from my . or speak. oh." says Paid." (Jer. 1— 5. or other holy appointments of God. misapprehensions. xi. and holy thoughts of them as they ought they sin also by having too good thoughts of themselves. reading of it. 1. of Christ. in the deep. while he stands. 21. 1 3 xx. or foolishly ask how he came to be at first sometimes they question the truth of his word. " gone again. they may sooner cut the flesM from their bones. 2 Chron. xix. and can tell how to emHe can bitter backsliding to them he loveth. Wherefore. &c. because their blind hearts and dull heads cannot reconcile it yea. that would be a . the infirmities of the flesh . whether there be such an one as Christ ? such a thing as the day of judgment ? or whether there will be a heaven or hell hereafter ? And God pardons all these by his grace." what will the soul do will it now it Surely it will will it holily all days . will not it may happen : will is God keeps him . Jehoshaphat and his grace Sam. are both of God. through the redemption that is in Christ's blood. saith the Lord. . I will speak here of heart^wanderings. and a thousand times as many more. they hear they read not. performance of duties they pray not. that " Israel is not forsaken. And herein again appears wonderful grace. his standing. all these things dons. and save them. especially when the man intends good in so " When I would do good. he can lay break their bones. xviii. And Lord. unclean thoughts. and of daily miscarriages I mean. These will be with them in every duty I often do they How afterwards ! ! ! j . namely. they bewail not. 3. (1 Cor. mean. 29. or if they keep promise in show* how much doth their heart even grudge the performing of them How do they shrink at the cross and how unwilling are they to lose that little they have for God. yea. But suppose God deals not either of these ways with the backslider. They forget God while they pray unto him they forget Christ while they are at his table they forget his word even while they are a . as often as they look." How many times did David backslide . " But thou hast played the harlot with many lovers. : not. they give not alms." says God. 22. Matt. may not be ment." (Matt. task impossible . by which a Christian transgresses many times may I not say. ein against the Holy One of Israel. how little of the strength of them is spent to his praise. xxiv. But all these things. or think. the soul that must be saved by grace he renews his par" Lo. ignorance. them in the general. . as they should. so many times God brings him again I mean. " I will heal their back- slidings. there are some saints. or hear. SAVED BY GRACE. . of sin. . 4. and suspect^ the harmony thereof. let me say. and them not long lived neither. and save them he can slay them as to this life. Seventy times seven times a-day we sometimes sin against our brother but how many times in that day do we sin against God ? " Lord. They sin in the most exact and spiritual sin . in the day of judg- at Corinth. When they believe these things. saying. . but such there are. David.G9— 71. but in and with much coldness. for aught I know. and love them ? its freely . too low thoughts of God. high. before they enter into life. yea. God leaves away he's falls. and never backslide again. O Lord. ii. . . yet return unto me. and multiplies them worketh God oftentimes with man. for al- though his sins are of himself. but shines upon him again.) Here is grace So many times as the soul backslides.

hlasphemy. (Rom. the best of his performances filed are also de- God's hand than ours." complains. . 14. iii. to affirm that God saveth defiled man for the sake of his defiled duties. that " every imagination of the thought man is only evil. To be saved by grace.) Grace will not trust our own salvation " He putteth no trust in his in our own hands saints.) ders. grace. : should glory (Rom. and that con- will save man by no other means than by grace no flesh he. Besides. 23. Here is the holiness of God engaged for us. Ixxxix. ix. 5. ii. what is it favour with God. what became .) what is it but to say.) Grace can make them God's people. man having sinned. 5 8. apparent. 16. God accepteth of One sinful act as a recompence and satisfaction for another ? But God. 14— grace. out of the heart. i. God hath ordained. these performances. . and that blood. 8. lasciviousness. nor chooseth to save us by any other way than by grace. the Lord proceed evil thoughts. 21 — and they " defile Now. justify us with Christ's righteousness . 10. . foolishness all these things the man. 9. is God evident in in the . the Jews. ix." boasting 8. 25. fallen angels. and therefore hath God secure way of salvation shall I What say ? lasting. . what can deliver the soul from these hut grace ? By grace ye are saved. — We Grace can make children of us.) 2. lest any man should boast. the who being turned over to another you see in short time way than of them. but God's design to cut off boasting from his creature cannot be frustrated or disappointed therefore he . If a man should be saved any other way than by grace." Heb. wherein he aboundeth towards them whom he hath saved by grace ? (Eph. 3 4. even of old. and salvation. other To assert that we may be saved any way than by the grace of God. because since sin world he can save us no other way sin and transgression cannot be removed but by the grace of God through Christ sin is the transgression of the law of God. Gem vi. wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.) His wisdom and prudence found out no other way therefore he chooseth to save us by grace. First. 24. ourselves.) Grace can pardon our un: . 1 — 3. Here is the to and be sure it is it is safer in Hence called. and best " Therefore it is of faith. supposeth that God hath taken the salvation of our souls into his own hand .) sin but (Rom. Rom. fornications. end the promise.) What shall I say ? Grace can take us into Second. I will add. that : might be by grace to the I to come now to answer the fifth question namely. as we through frailty multiply transgressions. thefts.. God will not lose his praise. When our salvation is in God's hand. xvi. and that of God. in the judgment of the law even mixing iniquity with those things which we hallow unto " For from within. 6. i. V. that he might have the praise and " That we should be to the glory of our salvation praise of the glory of his grace. Here is the wisdom of God engaged for us. I Where faith. show why God saveth those that he saveth by . (Ezek.) 6. us and his watchful eye v. (Ps.) can put the Spirit of Jesus Christ within us it can help us up when we are down it can heal us when we are wounded it can multiply pardons." (Rom. (Rom. cannot be a recompence for sin. By mean. iii. hath declared fices . 27. and every one of our performances . of the heart of tinually.) deceits. an evil eye. who is perfectly just. 26. therefore} we continually defile . i. wickedness. ii.) Now. must be saved by grace. and. (the promise of eternal inheritance.) " might be sure to all the seed. 7. Christ Jesus himself needed not to have died. it . that : God hath . (Eph. (1 Pet. They are built . himself is engaged to accomplish it for us. iv.) when we are in our but to object against the wisdom and prudence of God. Rom. mercy of God engaged for us. (Hag.) God engaged for uSi. God would be disappointed in his design to cut off boasting from his creature . is then ? It is excluded. and his glory he will not give to another therefore God doth not choose to save sinners but by his grace. RATHER THAN BY ANY OTHER MEANS ? we should be saved by grace. 15. Here is the justice of 5.) 5. further. (Rom. iii. Adam. Sixth. the salvation of God. yet this secureth the soul. hath designed that in his presence. 8. but by the law of iii. Fourth. within. ix. and doth choose to save us by grace. This 16.) 3. i. Third. Infinite justice cannot be satisfied with the recompense that man can make for if it could. 21. is always over us for our good. 9. (1 Pet. I say. covetousness. nay. SAVED BY GRACE. Here is the power of God engaged for us. Here is the care of God engaged for — — . how he abominates imperfect sacritherefore we can by no means be saved from by grace. 3. 8— 11." (Eph. 4 . 15. godliness. (1 Pet. They are They rejoice against judgthe delight of God. xxvii. 30 35. . Grace and mercy are everup for ever. it is the way that is safest. i. And therefore it is the most safe and ment. No other way could have been sure. 7." QUEST. works " and therefore he refuseth their Not of works. (Eph. Besides. 23. Nav. ix. and defiled himself thereby. 24> 25. WHAT MIGHT BE THE REASON MOVED GOD TO ORDAIN AND CHOOSE TO SAVE THOSE THAT HE SAVETH BY HIS GRACE. which were not God's people. therefore." (Job xv." come from (Mark vii. because else it follows that God is mutable in his decrees for so hath he determined before the foundation of the world therefore he saveth us not. for so I say is every work of his hand. though by nature we have been enemies to God. the salvation of the by his hands. Lord. Isa. rather than by any other means. 7. because were there another way ordained. . ? of works ? ii. vii. (Eph. mur: what law Fifth. • all his acts are the acts of a defiled man .) By these things.) is saveth us by grace. i. adulteries.

19 . Ps. xi.) must be saved by the grace of they that wrath to come. and are there- Godward. 14. cxxxvi. as grace is pleased to bring home to him. Eleventh. 5. of promise. it be but a man's covenant. by the men that you read of in the l'Jth of the Acts with many others. iv. (John i. some worse." (Rom. but of God therefore man must be saved by grace. works of the flesh. 1. then to think of another way is against the will of God. That none are then not by works. that are enemies tu him in their minds by wicked works ? Indeed. and our sins and iniquities he will remember no more. by the murderers of our Lord Jesus Christ. 25. — —therefore men . ix. but that shall never be the righteousness of men. are brought home to God. the new covenant. 1.) . xxviii. men one to another seem to be. is God for men by grace. must be saved by grace that imputeth this righteousness to whom he will. promise. to wit. who is the gift of the grace of God to the world. Christ." (Eph. by which God will be merciful to our unrighteousnesses. Phil. is in Christ. to the praise of the in our salvation . . ix. to-day. ii. the good pleasure of his will. (Isa. men must tion that 4. present themselves to for justification. There can be but one covenant by which men must be saved but that shall never be the covenant of the law. God is not willing that by their own natural abilities of the law which men do to be fore Abraham by why God hath not respect to the personal virtues Did of men in the bringing of them to glory." as this is.: 156 chosen to save us by his grace and than any other way. by the death of the testator. but that shall never be the will . 13. 16. therefore we must be saved by grace. 2. and so I shall con- void. 23. (Heb. Hence they that seek to establish their own righteousness. " the same yesterday. . by nature . then not by grace if by grace. Luke x. that in their salvation praise may will not have his will are saved are " predestinated to the adoption of redound to the glory of his grace.) therefore men must be saved by virtue of the election of grace. (Rom. James ii. God is not willing that faith should be made : A few words by clude. then it is no First Use. There can be but one will. or addeth man must be saved by virtue of a covenant of grace. received of God for their good deeds. 6—13. Christ. but of Christ submit to the righteousness of God. 18. . . therefore by grace ? state it again . some better. Election. mercy rather iii. xliv. according to Seventh. We God's glory. and perished. to wit. " Brethren. are such as are accounted to stand out in defiance against. but even so many of both. (Rom. notwithstanding that salvation that provided of 3. This is evident by Manasseh. 18. lxxxix. the glory of his grace. Rom. The covenant of grace. 13. 1. Men are not rejected for their bad deeds.) men should be saved I say personal virtues ? how can they have any to it to . 24. ix. that also must stand. iv. 2. None are received for their good deeds." (Isa. 34. or else the main pillars and foundations of salvation are not only shaken but overthrown. Are men saved see the reason Then here you may why of conversion runs at that rate among the sons men. but God gave Gal. 6. xliii. i. xiii. yet if it be confirmed. Gal. who is the contherefore they that have sought trivance of grace 2. because he is a sure foundation.) therefore be saved by grace. Mai. 3. and only so many. 16. 31—33. election. way of use. that must stand called the — but to God they are all alike. to the righteousness that he hath willed to be that through which alone we are saved by grace. to be justified another way. 25. 11. Works and grace. Ps. as I have showed. But if it be his will that men should be saved by grace. for that he will not give to another therefore men must so be saved from the God. the master children by Jesus Christ to himself. or else God . therefore they of the righteousness of the law are excluded " For if the inheritance be of the law. but all the works saved by. Is the salvation of the sinner by the renson grace of God? Then here you see the more 4. but hath also rejected the persons that have at any time attempted to though (Heb. (Rom. are if he be in this matter opposite each to other . j We will. they are the works of men's natural abilities. 16. 8. that is. have come short of. be his will that men should be saved through grace. Rom. 2 Tim. saved by works.) . Eighth. for the weakness and unprofitableness thereof therefore men must be saved by the covenant of grace. iii. and that do not man. Isa. If it . through the redemp- 33. for then they would not be saved by grace. therefore no way but by his grace. dead in ^trespasses and sins. We must be saved by grace. he must stand. iii. xxxvii.) 1. 4. and the promise of none effect. 1 3. 3. and for God in their own good deeds This I have showed you before. 2." li no thereunto therefore man disannulled!. viii. then it is his will that men should be saved by faith in that Christ. which layeth hold of men by the grace of God. SAVED BY GRACE. Isa.) . lv. Ninth. and the glory of God but these must not be overthrown . I speak after the manner of men : not only because he declares his abhorrence of the supposition of such a thing. 8.) POSTSCRIPT. is evident. Heb. glory of his grace. 2. but by works. iii. iii. : deeds nor tejected for their bad. 17. 7.) Tenth. God hath purposed that that shall stand " the election of God standeth sure. ever. that none are converted for their good . There can be but one righteousness that of shall save a sinner . ix." (Rom.) But God is not willing that men should be saved by these.

16. . But. Acts xviii. that he should follow him to the kingdom of heaven but told him. : . better than other men for then they would not have been saved by grace grace shonld not have had the dominion and glory of their salvation. and be able through grace. This grace of God. i. 17. moreover. Noah found grace in the eyes Lord . xv. 15. that is.) Neither may it be imagined that these men were. before grace laid hold on them.) cruelty and outrage must not hinder his converMen's good sion. i. HenGe some of the Gentiles were taken from among the rest. as St. which were not my people. whose sins were of as deep worst of men. Paul says of himself. both in his day. and of those that were saved by grace . God Grace takes them because God's book. to reveal his Son in me. in bis backsliding. (Gen. God. that were not beloved for their works. " in . xii." And hence it is again that he (Gal. 37. There was grace for David.) It will be said. and Saul perished There was grace for Peter." says he " and his grace which was bestowed upon me was This man kept alnot in vain. " who separated me from my mother's womb. for he is a chosen This man's vessel unto me. cribes to the grace of he also asGod. xxxiii. for his name. and reacheth all the children of men. they shall be day of his power made willing. but Lot was saved notwithThere was grace for Jacob. . them that come to Christ by reject them besides. vi. " Sin shall not have dothat are elect by grace minion over you for you are not under the law. Christ Jesus alone only excepted. But are they the people on whom God doth magnify : God Then here you may see is the reason why one backslider recovered.) thus become the people of God these men. that it was by grace he was what he was " By the grace of God I am what I am. (Ps. 23. Third. therefore Judas is left to but none for Judas perish in his backsliding. 12. how much evil he hath done to thy saints at Jerusalem and here he hath the authority from the chief priests to bind But what said the all that call upon thy name. but none for Saul therefore David obtained mercy. Christ also the drawings of the Father saith. 1. His call he ascribes 2. but who granted and gave the one repentance ? The Lord turned and looked upon Peter he did not turn and look upon Judas yea. 9." 'But their minds are averse. " He obtained grace and apostleship . (Gen. SAVED BY GRACE. Hence he lavs his call and conversion at the door of the . 14. There was grace for Lot. Abraham served from the flood. withal told him also. What.) Lord and therefore he must not be blotted out of . that were not a people. . God." says he. men's bad deeds are no argument with him to I mean. and was therefore converted. no wise for we have proved before that both Jews and Gentiles are all Tinder sin. because he had taken them from among the rest. iii. (2 Cbron. (Exod.) : Paul tells us in that epistle of his to the Corinthians. the Lord told Peter before he fell. it was that which saved from all And his labour in that charge — the beginning. for he would go ." (Rom. God granted them repentance unto life.) Grace respecteth. heard by many of this man. I have to the Lord Jesus Christ. all to the grace of to the grace of to the grace of God. (Acts xi. . because he was a chosen vessel. xxxiii. ." (Acts ix. St. 2. justifies grace of God : " When it pleased God." (John At Saul's conversion. saying. Moses found grace in the eyes of the 1. utterly dejected. by unspeakable grace. it in the salvation of a sinner. of the 1.) ways in his mind a warm remembrance of what he was formerly by nature.) So it maybe said of these blessed ones for indeed this conclusion is general. " Repentance was found in one. grace has designed them to this very thing. Is the salvation of the sinner by the grace of God ? Then here you see the reason why some sinners that were wonderfully averse to conversion by nature are yet of their salvation. 2." (Rom. But doth the guilt and burden of sin so keep 27. and also how he had added yea. and her beloved." Lord unto him ? " Go thy ways.. 3. to cause them to believe and to walk in his ways.) them down that they can by no means lift up themselves ? Why. are xv. that he should deny him first but . deeds are no argument with God to convert them. vi. were yet beloved by election . 8. . and Peter is saved from That text stands good to none but those his sin. those freely through the redemption that Christ. : . grace of Is the ? salvation of the sinner by the left by the grace of God " I will call them my people. But." grace to in Jesus Ananias of Damascus brought in a most dreadful charge against him " Lord. which was not beloved. the riches of his grace ? in the to believe Why. therefore Esau was left in his backfor Esau sliding. 13 15. Acts ii. Well. and calling. 10. " I will in nowise cast" such " out.) Second. 18 These men. (Eph. vi. and pre. . he had perished in his wickedness. This blessed man ascribes God. 14. but under grace. 157 a die as the sins of the 2. work in their souls also by the Spirit of grace. and another to perish in his backsliding. wherefore is those that it findeth under that purpose." (1 Cor. by the exceeding greatness of that power by which he raised Christ from the dead.) found grace in the sight of the Lord and therefore he was called out of his country. and the gifts and authority of an apostle to preach the gospel of the grace of . and called me by his grace. made to stoop to the to do. but none standing. . ex. God -will. he truly to his vileness by practice concluded in his own soul. put a stop to his wicked proceedings. convert his soul. but none for his wife therefore she was left in her transgression. then. . are we better than they ? No. 3. chiefly the purpose of God. he shoidd not let his heart be troubled. but Jacob found mercy notwithstanding. but not in the other.) saith. 18—20. . that had not God. His apostleship he ascribes 3.

deceived. it is to rehope to enjoy him for ever. " be strong in the grace that is in Christ must study the doctrine of grace. that it can no sooner hath appeared to that denying ungodliness. The is joy or what rejoicing joice in is like rejoicing here ? To step to the cure of a wounded for thee to grace of his sight. light man. i. towards his own salvation. That power that is in man by nature to do something.) Again when thou hast smelt out this grace of God. therefore." (Matt. that that may be purged from dead works. conscience. to be The and knowledge that are in every natural willingness that is in man 3. My second use shall be to them that are dejected in their souls at the sight and sense of their sins." says he. : which some their guilty consciences said Paul. 1. ourselves were some- foolish. who by grace tasted death for every man It ministereth to this that knows : God. as it. Are they that are Then they that would have saved. Jesus. " It is a good thing.) : 3 — We law. ii. ii. by which alone the conscience getteth health and cure " For everlasting consolation and good hope How is given through grace. " to God.) 3. ix. know the grace of God. and expecting to be an heir according to the hope of eternal (Tit. but in thy practices. to distinguish it from the law " The law was given by Moses. (John xiii. It is Satan's great design." What then ? Why then.) And indeed what am first sure this is true as to the case in hand. yea. and hating one another. saved by grace ? have entitled the grace of God. Paul's epistle to " give thanks. that when man is wounded in his con- that the love and kindness of God our Saviour that works of the law. especially the God as to justification from the curse in hope of the glory of God. causeth much fruitfulness in all holiness and " For the grace of God that bringeth but sinners to repentance. v." . either to keep the sinor. they . 23. 11. Second. then to hide and keep from his thoughts the sweet doctrine of the grace of God. consider. But I said. men call the grace The 2. we should live soberly. that are not. and strength that comes day you heard .158 and prepare a place for SAVED BY GRACE.) Second Use. that there is no establishment in the soul that is all men. for the hope which is^laid up for you in heaven whereof ye heard before in the word of the truth of the gospel. he knows God is at peace with him. a of man by the knowledge grace of God. disobedient. And to enforce this use upon thee yet further . hateful. 9. There are many things which of God. As it manifesteth matter of joy and rejoicing.) Wherefore thou must study the grace of God. 12. (Heb. The knowledge of. and he Though he fall. since the saved." (Tit. my son. science. eth forth fruit. I say. not only in notion. being justified iii. with that is eternal glory that 2. 1. but from all those things that men blasphe- mously call this grace of God. which is come unto you. . in him.) envy. righteously. and of the love which ye have to all the saints. as it is also in all the world. 13." thereby insinuating." believeth." rejoice in (Rom. whereas the word says. but by the knowledge a of the grace of vers lusts and pleasures and after God. and bringfaith in Christ . in this present world. 17.) That is a blessed word of God. and godly. " The steps name these three will . praying always for you since we heard of your 8. Jesus. once for all. because he believeth in Jesus Christ. the first " by whom grace we have access by faith into tin's wherein we stand. and thinks God must be pacified by something that he should do. this doctrine of the grace of him matter of joy . . gets yet more advantage and by growing strong in this rightly quieted. good man are ordered by the Lord. Suppose thou hast a disease upon thee. for the Lord upholdeth of a delighteth in his way. but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. and the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. First. and rejoice in hope of the also step to thy cure is to know the medicines.) then shall the conscience of the burdened sinner be quieted. x. but do thou remember." (John i.) Yea. 36 1_3. " that the heart be established with grace .) Study it. 16. and come again and 38 xiv.) Fortify thy judgment and understanding but especially labour to get down all into thy conscience. to serve the living God. and worldly lusts. and canst distinguish it from that which is not. 1. then labour to strengthen thy soul with the blessed knowledge of it " Thou therefore." saith the Apostle. " by the which" good-will " they are sanctified through the offering up of the body of Jesus Christ. xxxvii. A so it godliness. him with his hand. that the grace of God is his good-will and great love to sinners in his Son Jesus Christ. teaching us." (1 Thess. 10. " I will have mercy. 24. 3—6. there are also — many other . 2." (Ps." (2 Tim. appear times to the soul. I him. and that not only from the See also that in St. I glory of God. life. and not sacrifice for I am not come to call the righteous. xiii. he naturally leaneth to the appeared. " he the more heedful by his grace. but : it '• causeth this blessed fruit in the heart and life We ." (Heb. he shall not be utterly cast down. for he grace aright. salvation. serving diliving in malice right. . is careful to maintain good works. as he thinketh. so to study it as rightly. if God makes him ner senseless of his sins sensible of them. receive him to himself. which is not to be cured but by such or such medicines. if he perceiveth not the grace of God? Study. and knew the grace of God in truth. ii. it so naturally tendeth this way. wherefore thou must therefore be so much to study the grace of God . : the Colossians so as to distinguish it." (Col. it does also in you. man under a wounded conscience naturally leaneth to the works of the law.

my righteousness. (2 Tim." says put within you . " There shall the name of the Lord. and Ave have this at hand called us. not according to our works. may come into world." (Ezek. then if all the sins of the world were thine. 9. and they shall trust in And again. that are dead to ? " sin.) Suppose it should be urged. Ans. " By grace ye are saved. there the a (1 . 2. 9. to damn. (1. and they shall mourn for him as one mourneth for an only son.) Yet the Gentiles. and from all your idols will I cleanse you. " I will bring the blind by a way they knew not . and impose them. but accord- near fied.) But I cannot repent. grace hath much more abounded that as sin hath reigned unto death. and he will have mercy against and all manner the of delusions that are. " and a new spirit will I and I wall take flesh. new heart also will God. ly. at the apprehension of our own unworthiness cursed man that I am. man. Hold. 26. iii. afflicted God of all grace. and I will away the stony heart out of your give you a heart of flesh. and in the knowledge of our Lord : (3. xii. Third. : and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem. (2. uncleanness. as one that is in bitterness for his first-born. 10. that man's righteousness saveth the sinner . Unless you do these things ye cannot be saved. yet the God of all grace can pardon. Ans. But of prayer shall pray to God for mercy. a from good.) But I cannot believe in Christ.) But my heart will not be affected with the God live forbid.) iii. many people and strong nations come to seek the Lord of hosts in Jerusalem. "ye stouthearted. exhorting the believers to Wherefore St. any longer therein is for the of free grace believed the most sin-killing docvi. will I (Isa. and let him and to pray before the Lord. SAVED BY GRACE. blas- phemy. that are far from righteousness I bring heart that . Pet. foolishness. Ans. as to fall from their own stedfastness. (4. than the grace of God can be to save. Rom. the Spirit of grace and supplication: and they shall look upon him whom they have pierced. " Then will I sprinkle clean water upon you. iv. 8. covetousness. while I am thus." But : I cannot Ans. this exhortation grow in grace.) But I am as blind as a beetle." (Zech. and the unrighteous man his thoughts.) (8. 25.) (7. 12. 1. own by which stout-hearted sinners are justithough ungodly.) (1. 18. Mark 28\ Isa. 13. Peter. and they shall say. : 7." through the justice of God being satisfied by his Son. saying." (2 Pet. and in thou art not the man of all sin if God be the God of all grace. xii. 8. i. Him hath . and not forsake them." it is the only remedy against despairing thoughts as. and pardon. 20. 21. &c." xlii. 22. "Hearken to me. (Isa. will be running after vanity.) Suppose it should be urged. 10.) But I have a heart as ing to his own purpose and grace.) But though I see what is like to become of me if I find not Christ. Ans. God hath graciously promised a spirit " Yea. I will lead . It is my people. that by the doctrine of free grace we must not understand God's extending free forgiveness as far as we have." (Acts xv. I will say. and hanged on a tree . him shall Rom." be a root of Jesse. even as the false apostles urged circumcision of old. But my sins are of the worst sort ." saith God. known I will them in paths make darkness that they have not light before them.xv. viii. they were not carried away with the errors of the wicked. and shall be in bitterness for him. all. were able to bear ? But we believe that through the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ we shall be saved." (Zech. upon him." that is. " But adds. " The God of our fathers raised up Jesus. xlvi. xxxvi. 5. 11. These things do unto them." 7. " A hard as any stone. God.) (2. wickedness. doctrine tending to looseness and lasciviousness 16. which was given us in Christ.) the Gentiles trust. that this " a and crooked things straight. 31. the righteousness of Christ. I give you.) (10. xxxvi. eternal (3. nor we. why then God " hath saved us. by or the 159 grace of God. even as they. v. 1. Why the answer is ready " Why tempt ye God. 12.) (Rom. and Saviour Jesus Christ. xiii. Ans.) is Suppose is should be urged. and you shall be clean from all filthiness. 10." " Let the wicked forsake his way. or else it should seem that sin is stronger in a man penitent.) (Zeph. for he will abundantly iii." (Ezek. murder." &c. Suppose men should attempt to burthen the church of God with unnecessary ceremonies. is a sovereign antidote return unto the Lord. as their only help.) But I have a stout and is far rebellious heart.) Thou criest out.) trine in the world. to put a yoke upon the neck of the disciples." (Rom.! . Ans. it v. 12. 10. " unto . The answer is. and I will hear them.) to our xii.) But not to enlarge. " All manner of sins and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men. which neither our fathers. (9. But God hath promised to make thee be- : lieve my is sins will sink me into hell is Ans. This doctrine. I cannot understand any thing of the gospel. The Lord is my God. sufferings and blood of Christ. and he shall rise to reign over . ye slew. God in heaven that " I will also leave in the midst of thee an and poor people. take heed that (Matt. iii.) (4. How shall we. " But where sin abounded. whom Ans. wherewith soever they shall blaspheme. Phil. Ans.) life.) (5.) the answer shall ready : What shall we continue in sin that grace we say then may abound doctrine ? ? (6. " I wiU pour upon the house of David. They shall call on my name. yet my spirit. adultery. so grace might reign through righteousness. or do sin.

" ." See here a (Heb. God's grace. To come boldly. so we should do it in our life." Come boldly. This is the Apostle's exhorta" Let us therefore come boldly to the throne tion sins into the : : with him. it is and to do acand condescend to Others. that to stoop God did wonderfully . (Ps. : as for ourselves iv. glorifies me. consider. for there is Abraham a sufficiency in the grace of God. faith. praising. We 3. and begs for grace. 26." (Heb. You may Ans.) . giving xiii." Now a fountain can never be drawn dry.) to is it to come J>oldly ? come confidently " Let us : ever. and that in the name of a gracious Christ. . renness of Sarah's at the . 15. Christ therefore let us offer the sacrifice. pity. and now we are come to his throne as Job says. obtain mercy.) Now a sea can never be filled up by casting into it. This grace thou wilt cast all our (Gen. I. In life. it vi. "We have been all this while discoursing of the grace of God. in full assurance of Third grace ? I. as we should advance this grace But again our hearts. and compassion in God towards us and accordingly we should be full of bowels.) conscience. he asketh. 22. we we full I enlarge. often to our door. and so advance the grace of God I mean. Third. And to I go except thou it is bless me. : Advance . To come boldly. to an open fountain " In that day there shall be a fountain opened to the house of David. will not only ask. Come boldly to the throne of grace by hearty prayer. is. It is a great word " Only let your conversation be as of the Apostle becomes the gospel of Christ. at noon. 23.ef praise to God continually : that the fruit of our 1.) 3. "' Thus Jacob came will not let thee to the throne of grace it are a great disparagement to it." (Eph. xxxii. 20. 1!>. but was strong in faith. . 27. through Jesus Christ." (Micah vii. To come boldly." (Ps. for this is the way also to magnify the grace of God. iv. and take it for granted God will give us. being we are such abominable sinners. it in another place. Fourth. but such a sinner must obtain mercy and grace to help in time of need ? The gospel shows us. " It endureth for ever :" he says so twenty-six times in one psalm. iii. that in God there is a great deal of willingness to do good to others. should in our conversation adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things. (Zech. The Psalmist cries out concerning the grace and mercy of God. true heart. giving glory to God. that is a throne of grace. and to the inhabitants of Jerusalem. surely he was taken a great deal with it. xii. when a God of grace is upon a throne of grace. Believe in God's mercy. the bold beggar. thanks to his name. We : . In heart.) 5. Paul says.) God expecteth that there should in our whole life be a blessed tang of the gospel or that in our life among men there should be preached to them the grace of the II. by often admiring. First. language of a gracious God they are promises by which our God has engaged himself to do that for poor sinners. and the forgiveness of sins. so thou shouldst conclude of the grace of God. Oh these words. for sin and for uncleanness. Oh. venture confidently. that there was abundance of pity. It is What (1. 31.) and wonder. ask me." (Eph. it is is to ask for great things magnified the grace of God. use to count them bold beggars that come venture heartily. stoop and condescend for our good cordingly. x. To come boldly to plead God's promises depth of the sea. it is to come and take no : nay. will I pray. and a poor sinner stands by. 1.. 30. " 2. " God exalted with his right hand to be a prince and a Saviour. break a commandment here is as bad as to break of grace . as God's word says. bowels. draw near with a Use. even to his seat. it. saved to . by heightening of it in thy thoughts have always good and great thoughts of the grace of God narrow and slender thoughts of Second. 18." says he. 19. and at night. gospel of God. cxxxvi. This grace is compared to a fountain. The gospel shows us. by Then heart. : . advance God's grace in thy and blessing God in secret for God expects it : " He that offereth praise. i. Are they let that are saved. can it be otherwise. The gospel shows us.) 4. "I will" and "you shall!" they are the Thus might should not presume to come boldly to the throne but yet so we are bidden to do and to . we are apt to forget this exhortation (Acts v. 160 SAVED BY GRACE.) think. Christians labour advance II. for the Holy Bible is of this exceeding grace of God. Therefore. in and by the help of the Spirit of grace. to give repentance to Israel. 16. love." help thee in this matter. Heb. to forget the exhortation. in of grace. that but also choose the thing that it is to ask for others as well " Praying always with all prayer That womb when he staggered not promise of God through unbelief. whatever we ask in the name of Labour to his Son. But not Indeed." (Phil.) 6. neither yet the bar- when we come." In . Surely he saw a great deal in it. and compassion to others. which is the gospel of the grace of God. is compared to a sea: " And 1. that we may little. To come boldly. love. " The God of all grace can do more than we can ask or think. and find grace to help in time of need. 4. St. and that in this manner. and behold. both in a to lie way of justice and mercy. 2. because hath said it. (Rom. which would else be left undone for .) and supplication in the Spirit for all saints. having our hearts sprinkled from an evil and our bodies washed with pure water. heart. " By Jesus lips. it is to come frequently At morning.) 5. when he considered not his own body now dead.

God declares that he forgiveth us ten thousand talents. intercession for them at the right hand of God ?" whose intercession is so prevalent with the Father. for this goodw ork among sinful men and then thou shalt go to receive that wages that grace also will give thee for thy work to thy eternal joy. let him ask it of God. lying before him under the preaching of Conthe word. 3. then thou art out also for every Christian. Deut. than he that is in the world. Perhaps in the day of thy conversion thou wast more unruly than many.) 3. are contrary the one to the other. even him by whom thou art to be made blessed for ever ? Obj. And again. SAVED BY GRACE. but I ob- tained mercy!this this grace of Oh. my heart is so wretched. as to conversation. whilst here.. to the ! : . ex. 5. " who ever liveth to make laid to their charge." (Rom. saved of the Lord be much more subject Consider. by Christ Jesus. as thou wert. indeed. 17. By the gospel. and the day of God's power hath made him so. yet they sport it. No more could the best of the saints of " To will is present with me. provable. persecutor. 1. so spiritless. ! . 5. " The flesh lusteth against the Tim." they are included by the grace of God in the death and blood of the Son of God.) allowed thee but a little time for this good work. that T . and carry thee home to his Father's house. I cannot do things as I would. " for they are not under the law . is a willing man. I I was a blasphemer. and to God thy Lord belong the issues from death. Like a bullock unaccustomed to the yoke. 7. And truth. Wilt not thou serve him with joyfulness in the enjoyment of all good things. . and unblameable in his sight. yea thousands were. far better than " Father of spirits. God hath saved thee by his grace. though that god be none other but the devil and his lusts. thou wast brought home by strong hands thou wouldst not drive the Lord Jesus must take thee up. I cannot. and desperately wicked.. The gospel shows us. Christian. It may be. thou art delivered from wrath to come advance the grace that saves thee in thy heart and life. 21 — 32. Let this also have some place upon thy heart every man shows subjection to the god that he serveth yea. But thy God is the God of salvation. and dance all the way they go.) Obj. be given praise. in his right mind.) 4. and torment them in the fiery flames of hell. according to his truth and faithfulness should we be in all our actions one to another."' (James i. and glory. old " but how to perform that which is good I find : not. Ixxviii. : God hath according to the tenor of a covenant of works. and we ought likewise to forgive our brother the hundred pence.) 2. and yet that did not hinder the grace of God. God acteth towards . v. I was^ a was an injurious person. were. who at last will plunge them into the everlasting gulf of death. even the few days that thou hast now to live. 2. i. and upbraideth not. that is thine own fault " If any man lack wisdom. and God would have them affect thee to the advancing of his grace in thy life and conversation. this should affect thy heart should engage thy heart to study to advance Ans. They serve that god with cheerfulness and delight. many did take even offence at God in his converting and saving of thee by his grace.thou hast said an untruth for " stronger is he that is in us. 7. notwithstanding their conversion to God. " here. 14. This is that which kills me honour God I cannot. as to take away the iniquity of our holy things from his . are so infirm and weak. Consider. 15.) 3. Consider. before I conclude this use. and life. What dost thou mean by cannot ? 1. again. that should even of is the sin that in the best of their performances be make God abate his love to thy soul. If thou meanest that thou wantest wisdom. 1—6). perhaps the most part of those that God refused that day that he called thee by his — grace. let me give you a few heart-endearing considerations to this so good and so happy a work. . God left millions in their sins that He left millions day he saved thee by his grace. I mean. vii. If thou meanest thou hast no will. O man. This should make thee study to advance the grace of God in thy heart 6. so that ye can- not do the things that ye would. 67 72. If thou meanest thou hast no strength to do it. by reason of a body of death that yet remaineth in them. and to present us holy. thou hast escaped the lion's mouth. through the help of the blessed Spirit of grace." said Paul. lieth a great discovery of this . It may be hundreds out. and salvation by Christ through grace." for the children God. .) 18. by all his saints. 4. Consider. (Luke xv. ever. This shotild engage thy heart to study to advance in the grace of God. that 101 . siderations of this nature affected David much. Amen.. (Luke xv. and these vii. who giveth to all men liberally. And now. God hath saved thee. and pitched upon thee. lay thee upon his shoulder. But why do 1 talk thus ? It is impossible that those that are saved by grace should have their infirmities laid to their charge as afore. : ever thou wert. And wilt not thou." (John iv. and thanks. Ye are saved by grace . hardly tamed. (Ps. nor ! God (1 and the spirit against the flesh. in the day of thy conversion. they would find it impossible ever to get into glory. now and for sight. Ans. and so us." spirit. even as the elder son was offended with his father for killing the fatted calf for his brother. and dominion. also. yet he took thee. Gal. (Ps. and live ? Alas they are pursuing their own damnation. and unreTo Him.

Here is rebellion against the highest and noblest influence that can act upon its faculties a resistance. Man is unceasingly doing or thinking. begins to test his conduct by the rule of his faith. But. Its common sense is offended at a contradiction between what the ear hears and the eye sees but even common sense would shudder. But just as the decision is and often very severe in particular instances the entire malignity of the case is not known to the world. of the crystal The preciousness is to the Christian what polish is to the diamond. but with horror. and by those who share their offences. The inconsistency from which he is warned by the common dictates of conscience. must reflect the light of heaven. When a humble and earnest believer. not with disgust simply. popularity. adversity was looking out at the time for promising pupils. he speedily discovers that not only is he bound to observe the weightier matters of the law. nor is likely to be. Every moment of conscious existence has its full complement of action. as far as faith is concerned. Could we actually discover what is passing in the heart of a man who knows God and his word. as base as it is audacious. guilt of Christians. The world is ignorant of what has been done inwardly for the soul of that man whose actions oppose his creed. But if he remain satisfied with only such an agreement between his religion and his life as may protect him from a visible hypocrisy. therefore. To render him of worth among his fellow render him dear to God. There the dreaming. There is something in the very expression " Christian behaviour " which ought to excite our interest. The unusual hypocrisy. whatever his outward condition. as it came to view. he will infallibly become a hypocrite. . however rough he leaves it but while left in its roughThe believer has qualities which ness it has no value to the common observer ignorant of its nature. But the bare suggestion of the truth of the case ought to impress the individual believer with. stern into her school. inconsistency is one of the least offensive of the elements in the compound of a Christian's sin. Happily for him. These he instinctively feels are not likely to be transferred to his own character. . is well . which gives the world some intimation of the fact. The world is not likely to obtain this clear understanding of what is absolutely involved in the his graces is It — — . As far as human judgment is concerned. not unmingled with indignation. and still walks in the way of sin. would never inspire such hate did it not hint at a kind of iniquity deeper than that which meets the eye. very natural and reasonable for the world to express surprise. heart-stricken penitent became a patient thinker He undertook the study of divine truth in its applications as well as in itself. has broad features of deformity. would excite fresh abhorrence and the culprit looked at by himself. and apart from the crowd. or had enjoyed without interruption the fruits of his early mind would have probably resulted in a vague fanaticism. but that he ought to employ the most circumspect caution in regulating the habits ol both his mind and temper. its course is only obedient to earthliness and sensuality. It is seen by God on both sides but more especially awful for its strength and splendour is the light which falls upon our deeds as they are turned towards heaven. . the latter often having no less practical importance than the former. the guilt consists solely in saying one thing and doing another. Conduct. would be regarded as a felon and a blot on humanity. The profession of Christianity is just as much a declaration of belief in the highest form of holiness. and he found admission a hard. in one respect. men. and his general reverence for the gospel. a solemn dread of contradicting his faith by his life. The inconsistency must be of a startling and unusual character to meet with its due share of reproof.PREFATORY REMARKS CHRISTIAN Had Bunyan BEHAVIOUU. known to the lapidary. been untried by persecution. Christian behaviour is viewed in the -world only on that side which is next it. each particular instance. seen in its ordinary character. to the truth and the love of God. though never regarded as such. The result is reasoner. could it witness the conduct of a soul when. They are viewed in the mass. Life and conduct have exactly the same measurement. and descend precipitately from the height when called upon to act. owning the presence of the Divine Spirit in it. when Christians mount to a very lofty scale. the untrained energy of his — seen in such treatises as the following. .

from time to time. that is. or even indulge a thought which contradicts the moral law of God. it is out of the prevailing dispositions of the heart that our conduct takes its rise. . When the mind is hourly renewed by divine grace. If he content himself too long with looking inwardly. S." the temper of the great exemplar. according to the rule of the gospel. The religion of itself into the hope that God is satisfied. as it is 163 and conformity to the one in life and character answers Thus. . is as malignant a resistance to our covenant with him as to question of faith in divine mysteries and doctrine . Amid these promises the mind voluntarily deceives A vague feeling of holiness is indulged. to survey. and reject the creed. the warnings of example. " where the Spirit of the Lord is. indeed. or against ourselves. it is prudent." But notwithstanding this. after all. Christian life A referred to one grand . impossible really to deceive the conscience and did not the truth so force itself upon the understanding as to convict the man who pretends to trust in such things. when obeyed. Thus equivalents for duty are invented appearances are invested with a fictitious value signs are employed which it is never intended to follow with realities. of hypocrisy towards God. are not without their use. but will not disturb its peace. 7 . only in cases of great enormity. Love is the fulfilling of the law and. The sensitive scrupulous conscience would faint under the burden. is conformity to Christ. Habit. might not the several instances of duty be and comprehensive principle. Happily for us. This ia rendered possible by the indulgence of a notion that God will judge only as the world judges that is. he may involuntarily become a hypocrite and enjoy a flattering sense of his perfections and his progress. of life. character. even the bitter satires of worldly judges. catalogues of virtues and vices. to perpetrate an act. . Christian behaviour. the various particulars which make up the sum of duty and obedience to God. PREFATORY REMARKS. the comparison of its state with the requirements of the sternest outward rule may increase ite urgency in prayer. but through the ever pervading and active influence of his own Spirit. or with many exceptions to the sentence of condemnation. against God. though to deny an article in the creed would seem the to acceptance of the other in the heart. had it to inquire perpetually what obligations were involved in this or that class of social relations or how each particular thought might be made to suit exactly the prescribed lesson of the hour. while his practical inconsistencies are visible to every eye but his own. there is " the minding. sentiment gives a species of gracefulness to looks and words and somewhat of actual devotion would exist were it not. the course and conduct. there is liberty. Thus treatises on Christian conduct. far more offensive opposition to divine truth. There may even be an attempted hypocrisy with respect to God as well as to the world. . is obvious as soon as it is earnestly desired.. the highest principle of duty is that which. H. even for the most experienced Christian. is very powerful but habit itself rests upon the basis of motives secretly acting upon the springs of our moral and spiritual . . is the perfection of freedom. . This is an utterly impossible attainment. whether practised against the world. if seasonably employed to correct an undue tendency to repose. Where that is. In every case. would present appalling difficulties. The remedy for these deceits.

&c. if they may be had. or so big. Christians keep their all duty of parents to their children. \vhereon is no fruit " Whoso boasteth himself of a false gift. is too much neglected xxv. (Rom. 13. and then they shall both honour the garden in which they are planted. I have written this book to show that T bear a fellow. WITH A WORD OF DIRECTION TO ALL BACKSLIDERS. 12. a before men (James ii. the duty of the master of a family . and what makes it truly and gospelly good. present thee with a few lines touching good works. 3. 3. this doctrine of which some are forced to hunt for in a whole quire. that thou mayest and by this means every oue certainties. Multitude of words drown the memory and an exhortation in few words may yet be so full. TEACHING HUSBANDS. that the price . ix. doing as becometh and When Christians* stand . this reason of my brevity. as at first I showed thee the treat thus of good works are. I know there are in large good works I doubt as many that have treated of and learned discourses. PARENTS. because it is it. To take away those aspersions that the adver- upon our doctrine. to their shame. . if we should not be rich in good works ? Wherefore take heed of being painted fire. Having formerly writ under their particular relations which I think is some small matter." (Prov. is just. that discourse is intended . as before is touched. in the heart that hath savingly received Lastly. that I might. which retain no smell. whose saries cast damnation 2. I discourse of them as we stand under our several relations in this world among men. which are . Because these few books that do particularly trine. &c. of their several works too left at much J. with all that know God. (2 Cor. but particularly.) that because we preach justification without the works of the law. now so good and glory of the one.dishonour of God. as also in the days of Paul.) profit for Farewell.) how contrary to nature. From the hyssop in the wall. is one might neither be burdensome. Because. nor the reading long and tedious. through Christ before God yet we are justified Nay. as unfrom them. 12.— . 18) by our works.testimony and witness. The Lord teach us this wisdom. . great obstructions to a truly gospel conversation. life of holiness flowing from faith in us that are . (John xv. the sap conveyed thereout the fruitfullest sap. of the and pleasant their quality to God when calling. MASTERS. BUNYAN. . the world. and the gardener that hath so disposed of them. after some discourse about works flowing from faith. duty to add this dis- that are past and that for these reasons 1. for whose sakes principally this short . especially our new we are justified (Rom. to their parents and of the servant again to his master with a brief touch upon good neighbourhood and a discovery of covetousness. and expectation. that justifies us before God. . 24. and station. 4. to the cedar in Lebanon. relation. that stand and grow where the gardener hath planted them. and of hers to him . touching the doctrine of faith. and will have. 11. 8. and the blood.) freely by grace converts. The Lord be with thy time to come. treated of the reader may find that in one side of a sheet good works. — . and as the doctrine of the grace every one in their places. that but few have them and few beauty and excellency of the other: for though buy them. but all have not so gospelised their discourses becomes them. to example. therefore they pretend we plead for looseness of life. and of being painted trees. I do here. . it However. so now show thee the scarce. of amiable the husband to his wife. WIVES. as the second to that doc. iii. &c. though there be much discourse which we are planted is the fruitfullest stock. 1. yet a particular discourse of them.) I have not here. of the operation that grace hath. 14. CHILDKEN. and. THE EPISTLE TO THE HEADER. their fruit into is their glory. ii. and the dresser of our souls the wisest husbandman. I thought course to all my . iii. pride. first. saved by grace. I think. about works in general. I have thus written. As. should we be. only in general. ETC. 1 Pet. Courteous Reader. HOW TO "WALK SO AS TO PLEASE GOD. is like clouds and wind without rain. relations. one reason of that disorder in families and places as justification by grace through the faith of Christ's where God's people live. it doth justify that grace before vi. rank. and of children of masters also to their servants. And seeing the stock of God calleth for. SERVANTS. 1 . wherein is no warmth and painted flowers. spirit. and uncleanness. and do the work of their then they are like the flowers in the garden. indeed. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR: BEING THE FRUITS OF TRUE CHRISTIANITY.

it is." and by that means doth good. faithful saying. and the barren land fruitful. Luke xi. before faith.) It is also a principle of strength. is. 4. and possessed by the spirit of wickedness. Yea. Isa. Now. 4. by which a often affirming to others the doctrine of justification " This is a by grace. I shall in a word -or two make way for what is to he the main of this book. lxiv. : flow from faith. this scripture. that made the naughty waters good. faith. sinners. hopeless which have believed in God should be careful to maintain good works. as a castle by a conqueror. 9. without strength enemies in their minds by wicked works. from any other thing faith. This is evident divers ways. we should be made This is a heirs according to the hope of eternal life. (Gal. or figs of thistles?" (Matt. Heb. we should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life. Tit. 2 Thess. is like the salt that was thrown into the From not at it is the impossibility of their flowing . show you that they flow from xxi. . by which of holiness. 20 . yet it is rejected. but shall briefly fall upon those things that I judge most I shall not at this the wilderness. 4—6. 6. one that believeth should be careful that their works be good. that though the carnal man doth never so much which he calleth good. . and without that ambiguity that calleth for such a thing the general scope being this. 8. that they who have believed good works. 33.) Now man is made good by i. First. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. (Prov. 7.. forth and a corrupt " tree cannot bring " That being justified by his grace. and his righteousness as . Col. to Thus you no good works. Good works must come from a good heart. " This is a faithful saying. that the way to provoke others to good works. without the covenant of grace. Godless.) like leaven hid in the meal. III. 8 . even our comes them Faith. their explication they themselves being plain. But yet." which ? This Why. A thorn bringeth not forth figs. God The From I. ii.) and whose hearts are the habitation of is. (Heb. that all these things being thus. 23. That they . (Eph. And lastly. in the evidence and demonstration of the Spirit.) life. slighted. face again . that which goeth before.) fruits Wherefore thorns . 6. 2 Cor. 2 Col. but should also be careful to maintain them that is. " That being justified by his grace. in the heart of a faith. Neither shall I need to make any . because he wanteth faith for faith " worketh by love.iii. I do gather these things observable. before an evil and turning the smell of the leather into the savour of . (Isa. v.) Faith. faith. ." I. 21. 7. then. 12. whose are briars compared and dragons. by which the soul opposeth its lust. 17.) it is Now. xi. to show them the certainty of their being by grace made heirs of eternal life.) faith." (1 John v. xxxv. " That they which have believed in might be careful to maintain good works. " With6. (2 Kings ii. thorns. (Luke vi. 7. (Gal. necessary for the people of God. 7.21. it (Rom. and over" This is the victory. and for the present do them. 4. see that without faith there are Now faith. they should carefully study to keep in a constant course of good works. or all : " For whatsoever xiv. a corrupt tree. his prayers are abominable. . That every believer should not only he careful that their works be good. .) And hence again it is. 16." (Rom And again. 45. or out faith impossible to please him. in God might : be careful to maintain I begin with the first That good works do walks towards heaven in the iv.) they must either flow from is not of corrupt fountain." (Heb. great preamble to the words for And hence again that they are said to be faithless. (Matt.) a principle of faithful saying . because he wanteth faith for it is that which purifieth the heart. the impossible heaven. 8. to prosecute what I intend with what clearness I may. of devils. Jude 19. faith. For that faith is a principle of ii. are time discourse of every particular at large included in these words. spiritless. and to believe it ourselves : Christian lives." saith way Paul. and these things I will." good a fruit: Do men gather grapes of vii. and these things I will that thou affirm constantly. 19. the devil. Christian. when it is wrought in the heart. 6. 19 is — 22. menstruous rags. men under affirm constantly. so ? . his ploughall ing is sin. And that. That the best way to provoke both ourselves and others to this work it is to be That good works do flow from II. and by that bringeth forth the fruits that are acceptable to God. and this world. v. this the unbeliever wanteth. because it wanteth the nature of the figtree and so doth the bramble the nature of the vine. constantly. xv. namely. "that thou affirm constantly. that they which have believed in God might be careful to maintain good works. is like perfume that lighteth upon stinking leather." Why Why.) motion. 5. that are unconverted. ill. xiii. These things are good and profitable unto men. i. to ix. 12.) Good works must come from love to the Lord Jesus but this the unbeliever wanteth also. That' every even as impossible. . This is a faithful saying and these things I will that thou . Every man by nature. Acts xv." meaning is. Christless. therefore. that vi. should be able to bring forth one work rightly briars . as for all the good and thorns under heaven to bring forth one for indeed cluster of grapes. is sin. IV. or one bunch of figs they want the qualification. and turned as dirt in his .

(Heb. i. that I submit to the word ii. if it were otherwise. of faith in the Bible. God and Christ shall be with it the chiefest good." (2 Cor. it. that it is both monstrous and ridiculous to suppose the contrary. then : xi. argue over the heart to the embracing of it.) and having its holiness. iv. xvi. that they which live. It doth profit .) saith the wise man. guilt. and Further. having freely justified us through the blood of his Son. . (Rom. I say. and also see what he underwent to deliver it from under that death. This will make a man run through ten thousand difficulties.) Faith receiveth the promise. yet that God will have me an heir of glory. ciii.) ! : 166 the perfume . 26." (Phil. and the irksomeness and evil of all things else. to his faith virtue ? faith (2 Pet. 1 Cor. ordained that . Faith is so great an artist in . Phil. Heb. v." (Luke vi. iv. it being then planted in the heart. yet he loved Jacob.) called " the faith according to godliness. 2. — 7—12. 14. 9. faith will . Rom. Rom. shall not i. and so bringeth forth fruit " A good man out of the good treasure of his heart bringeth forth good fruit. by faith. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. iv. the most lovely and amiable a heavenly life shall be of greater esteem. xi. 24. 14.) For it must be by the all is to faith of Christ in my heart. as saith the Apustle " For the love of Christ constraineth us. vi. saith no* profit the Apostle. 1—8. is a marvellous argument. " The word preached did not "the most holy Second. and odious thing. forgiveth us our sins. 33—39. as 8. do unbelief and ignorance. to answer God though he never can for the grace he hath bestowed on him. Faith layeth hold of that which is able it: to help the soul to bring forth good works layeth hold of. horrible. we should walk in them and shall both our second .) For faith alone can and so I see the reality of what the gospel saith say. that they have run through so many trials." them. . Heb. Faith showeth us that God loveth us. 29—31 hence it is that the people of God have groaned to be gone from hence into a state that is both sinless and temptationless and hence it is. it not being mixed with faith in them that heard it. and by that overcometh that which oppresseth " I can do all things through Christ that strength . putting darkness for light. is Hence life it is that there followeth an alteration of the and conversation. xi. natural inclination to constrained to bend and yield to what before he neither would nor could. 4. both my vileness against God." (Tit. i. and God hath. shall not he that can but see by faith the love of a tender-hearted Saviour. What. i. him Fourth. nor no satisfaction . afflictions. shall not he be holy ? (Gal. iii.) We are by made good fruit ? trees. a^id he he add most justly and highly deserved. were all dead and that he died for all. O my soul. which also it knoweth it hath called to glory and and 43. 16 xiii. that he way them.) created in Christ Jesus unto good works and Thus is faith whereby he is a prevailing fetched off argument to the sinner. 13. 20. that if one died for all. show us all things out of order. (Heb. (2 Cor.) which treasure. before the world was. I say. is this faith. embraceth comforteth the soul 'unspeakably with it. that he accounteth us for his children. even because of that love to holiness of life that faith being in their hearts did prompt them to. shall not we bring . my remembrance at once. and bitter for sweet." and "What shall I render unto the Lord for all his benefits?" (Ps. faith ii. " should not hence. is And therefore it is that faith 5. and arguing and reasoning with the soul. Song viii." (Sol. that though I deserve not to breathe in the air. 5. 25 . it would be utterly contemned. 14. And .) . Cor. (1 viii. forth good (Luke They that believe are 2 . Now.) virtue. as the fruits of sin. v. ." (Heb.) Good works must needs . Third.) He that is that hath by received the spirit of iii. 25 27.) That though there were thousands more besides me that were as good as me. forth live unto themselves. 2. or no 1. xii. 15. and his goodness towards me it will show me. 1 Pet. 1 Pet. " is strong as death many . xi. then "bless the Lord. unspeakably prevaileth with the sinner. and rose again. a detestable. that it will bring over the hardest It will bring to heart that it hath to deal with. iii. and engageth the strength of Christ. but to that died for " Love. (Mai. 1. holiness. to make them comply with holiness. and more desirable than all the treasures of Egypt Righteousness and sanctification will be the thing after which it will most vehemently press because it seeth not only death and damnation. vii. 6." that is.) and fears. and hell that now it feels hath life have motion ! (Gal. flow from faith. cxvi. a life of holiness and godliness in this world doth so inseparably follow a principle of faith.) By faith we see this world hath no abiding it in — — for us. again. yet I must be the man that must be chosen. 45. distinct from the place before our eyes. by showing them the worth and durableness of that which was good.) In a word. 12. from what he was. because that alone carrieth in it an argument sufficiently prevalent to win upon our natures. there is no argument greater than this. otherwise as. ii. as well as obedience to the (Rom. because we thus judge. 7. condemned soul eneth me. 13." and faith. If a man would give all the substance of his house for love. i. punishment belonging to it. and adversities. hence it is that gospel obedience called the obedience of faith. Jude 20. Faith is such a grace as will represent to the soul all things in their proper colours.) Oh ! when the broken. 7. 2 . that though Esau was Jacob's brother. Now this. but will set everything in its proper not. show me how distinguishingly this love of God hath set itself upon me it will show me. but sin also in itself. neither can the floods drown it. waters cannot quench love. dying. (James accordingly : And faith.

the word that they have formerly heard and received. xv. That every one that believeth should be careful that their works be good. joy. we find how frequently men have mistaken. &c. with which they worshipped. for the second thing. For doctrine. 7. creation. 13. v. is abomination in the sight of God. v. &c. iii. to wit. both for time. 1. .) fast in hereby are sinners conthe world condemned. fore -ordination be ii. hay. 19. believer to the 13—16. then it must needs cry out. be stronger in believing. themselves. i." . (Matt. because they did not hold fast. xvii. quit (1 Cor. God's people are fruitful in good works according to the proportion of their faith if they be slender in good works. the operation of his people's faith. That world the power of his grace. (Prov. you like men. vi. "it cannot do the thing that it would. For time.) (1 Thess. The unbelievers read indeed of the power of grace.) That of faith is a very be fruitful in so barren not beholden to the heart. Mark i. peace. 11 15. worship. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. xxx. God is not mocked. 15. the cause why you find so often in the Scriptures so take pleasure in those things which they are most averse unto. Wherefore I conclude upon these three things." is sin and the pleasures of and the Spirit against the (Gal. yet barren upon two accounts. touching good (1 of our own fruitfulness. these went just before. (2. and candles on a candlestick. Keep thy heart with all " Watch ye.) .) Many have miscarried both as to doctrine. iii. 8. and matter.) That the seed faith is fruitful seed.) . 1. But if faith doth so naturally cause good works. wood.) such ground. The reason why Sardis had some in it whose are dles. what then is the reason that God's people find it so hard a matter to be faithful in good works ? I answer. to have a good crop from is of faith are the children of light. and stubble. of the faith. works were not perfect before God. hope. That the heart of a Chris- are to fore. 17.) Now." (Prov. There may be a great mistake in our judging — with men. and the prosecution of each. though both out of love and affection to his Master. iii. and of the day. Now sin-killing operation that is in these things . The is soul that indeed is taught by grace to judge itself. heart of a Christian is naturally very barren that is upon which. that shall he also reap. that God.) Besides. 9 11. 12.7. in that it will ing ? (Matt. forth they shall see what they cannot find in themselves something that is good. This followeth from what to II. 1 3. John xviii. it was. was deceived touching good works. be sown. Chron. It is one thing for a man's ways to be right in his own eye. love. xvi. though the seed of grace. 12 Obj. and shall not they shine ? They are the salt of the earth. by faith. xi. It hath been that which man hath . (1.) It may also judge itself barren because it falleth so far short of that it would attain unto. saints There is and : flesh as well as spirit in the best of as the spirit of grace will be always in a generation that shall serve him and by them putting flesh will is evil. it is because they herein is God glorified this vinced. they teach " things they 11. for filthy lucre's sake.) Now this considered.) 3. which though they shine and have heat. 17. 23. instead of gold and silver. 1. for all its fruitfulness. and from that sight this and by though means they shall " For the flesh lusteth against the Spirit. and traditions of men. 1 Pet.) for it seeth itself wonderfully to fall short of a conversation becoming one who hath received so great a benefit. (Gal. to wit. and another for them to be right in Often that which is in high estimation God's. . the fruitfullest of all seeds.) As also. xiii. though fruitful. To by this. or All works are not good that seem to be so.) 2. 10. Little faith is like small canweak fire. (Matt. stand diligence. candid and right at heart. ii. vii. 22.) The the alone man by whom God but the heart to therefore the it is it. For he that soweth to the flesh.) Seeing corruption is not yet out of our natures.. but they feel nothing of that showeth way to be a more fruitful Christian. flesh. xv. 5. and sanctification of the heart of the Christian.) — How -phet. so the be putting forth continually that which be convinced that this life be sweet to them. First. and in dissuading of him from his sufferings. are Christians called . 23. vet Second. and precious stones. shall not they be season(1 Thess. the doctrines 9. 4 . made frus- the heart 10. 1 4.) ought not. works! also. As." (Tit. was both David the king." the faith . yet there is a people otherwise minded.) When it compareth its life to the mercy bestowed upon it for when a soul doth indeed consider the greatness and riches of the mercy bestowed upon it. love. Christ tells they taught for the doctrines of the Jews. hope. shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting. 7. 7.) Peter both his defending his Master in the garden. (3. — — in xvi. God worketh faith. saith the Apostle. I say. 11. weak in faith. (Matt. v. v. for whatsoever a man soweth. place. doth argue the fruitfulness of the seed. there is a proneness in us to build upon the right foundation. Luke xvi.. 24. be strong. the children naturally subject to bring forth weeds. (Rev. when compared with bigger candles and greater fire. Heb." (Rom. Whereto show them in others what they find not in tian is a heart subject to bring forth weeds. " wretched man that I am. trate ? 167 and God's (Eph. (Gal. Also touching worship. Lights upon a hill. iv. vii. Nathan the proand Uzza the priest deceived.) is a soil. shall of the flesh reap corruption but he that soweth to the Spirit. (2. iv. and is . (1. them as a story of Rome or Spain. (1 Cor. many items and cautions to the Christians to look to their lives and " conversations." " Be not deceived. The . even such a people that do indeed see the glory of that which others read of. yet but dim shining and small heat.

a time to do. when she should have sat at his feet to hear his word. and their companions. iv. have erred in the business of good works wherefore every one should be careful to see that their works be good. It must be done willingly. Again they have persecuted vi. Instead of bringing according to the commandment.. be hearing when we should be preaching and doing. to prevent. at Gilgal and Dan. (Rom ix. shipped at Jerusalem. not they affirm. 2. viii. when they should have done it and lambs. was the misplacing a work . 2. and vain. Mint. elms.) of the law. (Acts xxvi. Right time and. As things must have their right time. Second.) (2.) Isaiah. 2 — — 5. racked. is misplacing of works. John xix.) as without faith there will. is not good. ! . (1 Kings xii.) Good things mistimed. I shall : Now. that is. is sin . would sanctify themselves in gardens. shall feel no evil thing and a wise man's heart discerneth both time and judgment. 8. 53. (Jer. which God hath commanded. and every thing is beautiful m its time. .) For Martha to be making outward provision for Christ. It must be both rightly timed and rightly placed. burned. it " judgments into wickedness. Christ was very wary. less." saith They change God's (Isa. (Rom.) must be rightly timed. under poplars and 30. I mean. (Rom! : work of less moment that honour that belong^ to a work more noble. let men's They pretences be what they Third. First It must have the word for its authority. Acts This is setting up our post by God's posts. A good work must have the word for its authority. that they touching men's prosecuting their do think right. . . 32. in gardens. 31. his worship. and for her sister to have done it at her request. flow from faith. Again zeal for their worship. as I showed you " for whatsoever is not of faith. 9. when I should be instructing my " Whoso keepeth the family at home.) with him. Second. 2. nor whereot (1 Tim.) . yielding active obedience to that 17. of . When I say things. 11. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR 32. 26 Isa. drowned. starved. 2. : : (Eccl. (1 Kings " change the ordinances.) But what need we look so far from home.) And herein we ought to follow his steps. 2. lxv. is not good and to be talking abroad." Now. they would think they did God good service. (3. i.) Those who count the ceremonial part of an ordinance as good as the doctrine and signification of it. were it not that I would seal my sayings with truth ? We need look no Nebuchadnezzar bave his fiery furnace. then. are not so weighty matters as faith and the love of God as in Matt. 1.) also misplace They works. For a pastor to be exercising the office it of a deacon. . For place.) There is a time to pray. though the thing in also.) These are said to be teachers knowing what they say.) propound unto you what it is for a work to be rightly good. a time to meditate. viii. " what wisdom is in them ?" saith in this matter. 1 3. the torn. to Now. How many God alloweth it. and act not by that. &c. further to affirm this position. Every work is not at the same time every time not being " There is a time for for such a work all things.) They also misplace them that make them — copartners xv. 168 devised. they hear. Hos. As it must have these two aforenamed. 13—15. so also place. to entrap and to entangle and if they could at any time but kill their words the persons that dissented from them. 17. Fourth. and divine. and murdered. xxiv. v. dismembered. 1. (John ii. 3. to prevent the misplacing of good works.) When they should have wor2. &c. both openly and in secret ? and all under a pretence of God. 6 men even to strange cities have laid traps and snares in every corner. if good. 1. anise. 6. I say. As there must be the word for the authorising of what thou dost.) Wherefore see thou have the word for what thou dost." and " without faith it is impossible to please God." (Eccl. they worshipped at Bethel. who ascribe to a the prophet. though with no reason at will and Darius his lions' den for Nonconformists. Christians and heathens. before from which it must flow. as afore was said. Thus you see how wise men and fools. saints and sinners. not xii.) They misplace them that set them in the* room of Christ. 20. all how hot hath it been. is no good. and a time to suffer. (Ezek. 7. so they must be rightly placed for the misplacing of any work is as bad as the mistiming of it. with swine's and mice.) x. (a. if God will. must be rightly placed. (Isa. under which we ought to suffer. are fruit- . Zeal without knowledge is like a mettled horse without eyes. and cummin. miscarriage good. First. &c. 3. xxiii. 51. a time to 1. 1. had been her sin (Luke x. Isa. Third. as high. at Jerusalem with bullocks flesh lxvi." saith Ezekiel. neither should we give it less. For the matter with which they worshipped. that both his doings and sufferings were rightly timed. (c) Those also who count it enough to do some- . To be at plough in the field. Third. itself Now. And such are. a time to confer. is as bad commandment. 5. 39 — was • 12. without the word there is no faith. (1. and good works. as the leadings and movings of the Spirit of Christ. (b) Such who account the dictates and impulses of a mere natural conscience as good. unprofitable." . It must. Right • (Ezek. so there must be faith. viii. (Acts vi. (Dan. instead of the office of a pastor. Luke xi. must have. they brought the lame. 23. 7. iii. or like a sword in a madman's hand and there is no knowledge where there is not the word for if they reject the word of the Lord. and man's righteousness by the righteousness of Christ. than to the Papists have they in all ages hanged. a time to read. xliii. we should not give to any work more than the word . 4 xiii. cheerfully. . It be done convenient to . 11.) iii. x. 5. and the sick . 7. when I should be hearing the word.

lovingly. xii. v. a to work First. 1. to think of to be mindful to do them. 7. greatest of avoid. I say. 12. (1 Tim. and of good report." (1 Cor. 1 5. iii. to do things according to the word of God. that thou in each of them hast a work to do for God." (1 Cor. 1.) " what manner of persons should hath. xiv. 3. be conversant in this godly exercise in our family is very worthy of praise. 24 . according to what a man . and so to God's honour. and so not to edification. take 12. as before is touched. also much misplace them. 2 . 22. with simplicity and charity. we be (2 Pet. in the midst of thy observers. that thou dost not enter into doubtful points with of a family. 13. But deal chiefly. (Rom. 8. (1 Cor. for your further a plain rehearsal of your several general duties The ex- and works. Rom. for if rule in the word of God for such a practice the thing itself were but of good report. be vessels of honour. pediency or inexpediency of what I am to do. (1 Cor. " covet earnestly there is the best gifts.) But. that Christ in his precious benefits . Again if thou wouldst walk to the edification of thy neighbour.) 2. of them. The edification of his neighbour. (e) But the grosser. all holy conversation edification. and frequently to lay before his household such things of God. and : . . If thou be stronger than thy brother. he hath. That thou in thy words and carriages dost so . x. I beseech you.) Further there are three things that a man should have in his eye in every work he doth. Christ. possibly the least. 4. and to begin it where it is Wherefore.) " Wherefore. 12. 2 Cor. and that something. 13." that 8. in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. and (d) They the things more necessary and weighty. to which God engageth you in his word.) and for Wherefore here is thy wisdom that thou in some things deny thyself ought to be very diligent and circumspect. out of his word. and doth much become all Christians.) honour of God is wrapped up in the edification of thy neighbour and the edification of thy neighbour. Again as good works should be ordered and qualified. compass and bounds even of nature itself. The honour of God. xiv. (/) And they who put bitter for sweet. and the glorious appearing of the great God. Col. 1 Cor. vi. that the (1 Cor. xiv. and relations in this world. tiling of 169 that under • what God hath commanded.) walkest not charitably. the Apostle exhorts us to. who count things indifferent as high as those that are absolutely necessary in the worship of word take heed of going contrary to any pretence whatever for without . as are suitable for And let no man question his each particular. and ought to be done much more things of a higher . 1. Wherefore. nature. 31. who place men's traditions above them. nor thy brother's edification. general : He that is the master may be with clearness spoken forth by thee and take heed. for whom Christ died. callings. that you may. both to increase faith where it is begun.CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. pure. confirm the weak.) Covet communion with God. cheerfully. he ought diligently not. viii. is not expedient love. the several relations thou standest under and art to know. that you put yourselves into a conscientious performance of them. v. . . better than sacrifice Wherefore touching good works obedience is that is. First. and darkAll these things we must shun and absolutely obstructive to things good works. ii. take heed that thou do not that before him that may offend his weak conscience I mean.) Ah we ! that are in order. all this while keep thy eye upon the so not to Christ's . . " walk wisely in a perfect way. while you live here. I say. beware. and deliverance from death and hell : " Comfort the As touching the spiritual state of his family. viii. thereof. " that you may be sincere. redeemed from among men. 1 Cor.) "I will not eat meat while the world standeth." Wherefore (Rom. then. in the expediency of what thou dost. xii. in demean thyself. to this end. know thou 22.) and that rejoice in hope of the glory of God. 40. doing his utmost endeavour. and wisely with their consciences about those matters that tend to their Touching the spiritual Touching the outward. (Tit." " have this faith to thyself before God. and that he expecteth thy faithful deportment under every one As. for the blessed hope.) 3. But if thou walk otherwise. 2. and Besides. until the day of Christ. in iii.) Having thus. ci. and our Saviour Jesus Christ. according to your places." saith Paul. and without offence. xiv. to wit. TOUCHING THE MASTER OF A FAMILY. xiv. viii. is better than to do them according to my fancy and conceit. (Rev. as under that relation." (Ps. so they should be done from the heart. instead of all. (Rom.) own family. and a . vi. lovely. 26. (Rom. (Phil.) is. 12. (1 Sam. in few words. To conclude . iv. This is one of the honour but dost sin against and wound thy weak brother.) that are excellent. thy brother's sake. " lest I thing tending to civil honesty. ness for light. it is within the make my brother to offend. and prepared to every good Study to approve things work. (1 John . xv. 20. whatsoever things are just.) Fourth. things that " All that is lawful in themselves may be lawful.) we that look. xv. 18." (1 Thess. and fit for the Master's use. 14. he feeble-minded. vi. do for God ." (1 Cor. the word God. vi.) and godliness?" 11. 10. then thou art to consider . i. nothing to God's glory. 3. The right governing of his is them that are weak." (Phil. If thou have under thee a family.) 2. showed you what are works rightly good. v. establishment in the faith of their justification. willingly. ix. 12. And always observe it. " Whatsoever things are honest. as all. First. them. Second. And his work state twofold. But to . let all things be done decently. all that is lawful edifieth not. (1 Cor.

and his household after him. i. all books or discourse in thy " Evil communications corrupt good manners. (John iv. to Shiloh. though they were worth fifty thousand pieces of silver. . that they might.) . where there are souls that have need of Christ. Stephanus.) some family which yet remained unconverted. xxxv. but from house to house I say. and to exhort. 25. Though this be true. so inferior as not to be chosen to pastor must any office in the church of God. iii. bring in those in tion 4. For if a man knoweth not how to rule his own house. yet thou must rule them. you know. (Acts x. Saith Jacob to his houseand to all that were about him. we New Testament. by the (Acts xvi. But my family is ungodly and unruly. yet know that thou hast both liberty to go if God through in a capacity of heart. vi. how usual it was in the day of Christ to invite him to their houses. possible. 9.) " for he will command his children. both to rebuke their vice.) Hannah would carry might abide with God Indeed a soul rightly which good Joshua designed should be his practice as long as he had a breathing time in this world " As for me. then. how shall he take care of the church of into the God?) which thing considered. What shall I do ? looseness of Am. and thou art to use the authority which God hath given thee. 28.) Also. or heretical — — touching that is good. Deut. (Gen. pastor must himself be exemplary in faith and holiness and so also should the master of a " I. to save them from death and eternal damna. the governing of his house. a pastor . that a man that governs his family well. 41. and masters of families . thou must them how sad thy state was when thou wast . " I and my household. iii. (Tit.) Lord. Gaius. and not they thee Thou art set over them of God. 2. 21 . as reading the word . how much more. 7. 19. ruling their children.) 3. and to change their garments. hath one qualification belonging to a pastor or deacon in the house of God. 24 xx. in their houses. Lydia." (Ps.) Mark a little the Apostle seems to lay down thus much. (1 Tim. xv. then do thou get godly and sound men to thy house. If they are obstinate. . if peradventure God and all that was with him. Eph. and also art at that time having the universal church join the whole number of those that shall 4. ci. who took their curioils books and burned them before all men. yea. and I will make there an to God. (I know him to be a good man in very deed. (1 Sam." saith he. 2. Christ. and so should the master of a family. This is Take heed that thou suffer not any ungodly. made gracious by the word preached. 22. 1G. 2. if . (Acts x. 2. 3 viii. 4. Chron. ! pastor should be apt to teach. with thee for be saved. xxviii. word preached xviii. (1 3. 20. if . 2. iii.) also in the Further inferior .tljou art alone.) And this. and in their sins. I know that Christians must be allowed their liberty as to things indifferent. i." find (Josh. 8. and they shall keep the their souls. I will walk in." (1 Tim. how " The shall he take care of the church of God ? deacon also.) All those in the Acts set a good example for this. " will behave myself in a perfect way . might be one reason among many why the apostles taught in their day not only publicly." saith family. 24. 12. and to show them the evil of ! life. and their own house well. tell Lord. First. This did Eli. xxxv." (Gen. and others. 15. duties Take heed that thou dost not neglect family among them thyself. when thou hast. house.) David. A A must be sound and and indeed so must the i. if not all. having his children in subjection with all gravity. then to pray among them." (1 Cor. You know that the gaoler. churches. had not only themselves. they ought to be abandoned by and especially by the pastors of their rebelling against the though not enough ii. not only their families. xviii. and so labour to recover them out of the snare of the devil. but a whole city after Jesus Christ. 5. I answer." saith God. " my house with a perfect . xxiv. (1 Tim. 33. or such as do oppose the fundamentals of the gospel. 170 things for which CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR.) This was a thing also Sam. uncorrupt in his doctrine master of a family. God : so highly commended his may convert hold. 7. such profane or heretical books. Thou oughtest also to labour to draw them forth to God's public worship. that answered me in the day of my distress. (Mark v. and to preach unto them. (for he that knoweth not how to rule his own . " Let us and go up to Bethel. as either tend to provoke to house profane. A be one that ruleth well his own house. 2—4 iv.) way of the Samuel for ever. and there let the word of God be preached. to put away the strange gods from among them. as Cornelius. that they are looked upon as Christians of an rank that have not a due regard to this fit duty. also Obj. and that some of them. to reprove. arise altar servant Abraham.) If this be the way with those that have outward diseases in their families.) 2. 19. and that with which his heart was so much affected " I know Abraham. we will serve the : touched will labour to draw. but for those things that strike either at faith or holiness. vi. if they had any afflicted. then. but their families. that he Lord. and thus did David." or before." (Gen. commendable in christian masters of families. which practice was figured out by Jacob's commanding his house. Crispus.) for some. and will not go forth with thee. that either would not or could not come unto him. The pastor is for getting the church together and when they are so come together." saith he.) 3. " must be the husband of one wife. 1 Cor. gathered thy family and friends together. to thou hast one in thy family that is nay. it giveth us light work of the master of a family. touching 1. take encouragement. 1 in their condition. &c.. 1. and prayer gracious. 9. all Christians. (Luke vii. for aught I know. 14-^-34.) I mean.

in subjection.) glory. as believing . as to hinder thyself and family from those duties towards God which thou all engaged. he may . 11 See.) Learn to distinguish between that injury that in thy family is done to thee. again. wept not . with all gravity. 10." (I Tim." (Eph. thou must consider the condition of thy wife. and their deceivable works. and to come to particulars. iii. before her. Matt." (Phil. xi. v. vi. that they may have food and raiment and if either they or thou be not content with that. as those that rejoiced not and they that use this world. 7. It woman that feareth the Lord. then. 5. but unbelief. and to bury . 14. in language. men.to bless God for her above rubies. than many are aware of. must be together with him in the eternal happiness. yet When husbands it. (1 Tim. how and care xii. thou as becomes harmony among those under thee." — Christians. indeed. having thy children.) 2. as heart to feed. and is for thy adorning and xxxi. It is easier both among children and servants. and the husband the head " For the and saviour thereof. (2 Chron. That it lieth upon thee to care for them. and yet either in oblivion : laugh.) As she is thy flesh and thy bone " For never man yet hated his own flesh. Thus much touching the spiritual state of thy household. and gave needful. vii. Rule thy own house well. as that they disengage their heart to God's worship. therefore. 7. when the word saith. that they have a convenient livelihood " If any man provide not for his own. Thou oughtest so to carry thyself to " and . yet let all thy labour be mixed with moderation " Let your moderation be known unto .) Thou must look that thy children and servants be under subjection to the word of God for though it is of God only to rule the heart." (Tit. read- " Favour 2.) Take heed of driving so hard after this world. n . iii.) Solomon was so excellent sometimes this way. (2. . 40—42. : If she believeth." it giveth thee no licence to distracting neither doth it allow thee to strive to carefulness grasp the world in thy heart or coffers. and art is . whether she be one that indeed believeth or not. 8. " thou art to provide for thy house. for vain talkers. Thou art : '•' For her price is far . 25.) As she is together with thee an heir of the grace of life. never do for . to love her. First. is deceitful. 1 Cor. the The word careth in saith. that is And it will never object. as not have none . that they be not gluttons. for. nor to take care for years or days to come. that they that have wives be as those that and they that weep. . 29. as doth Christ to and before his church as saith the Apostle : So ought men to love their . sins. 32) that believe the wife." (1 Tim. 29 31. he hath denied the faith. (Acts xix. and this world the one thing necessary when. is as much can wish. then.) But to break off from this general.) must see that there be that If thou wouldst be such a master of a family thee. I say. as becomes that house where one ruleth that feareth christian God. should engage thee to love her with christian love . (1 Pet. 19.) may have wherewith to " maintain good works for : he expecteth that thou shouldst rule their outward man which if thou dost not. Touching the outward of thy family. (Luke x.in a short time cut off [every male of] all thy stock. for the fashion of this world passeth away.) This. 18. but a christian conference. and is worse than an infidel. and she is the gift of God unto thee. scent wrapped up in the relations of husbands and wives (Eph. 4. 3. iv. Hast thou a wife ? Thou must consider thou oughtest to behave thyself under that relation and to do this aright. all the things of this world are but things by the bye and religion only the one thing — and 3. 8. 1. And now to its outward.) that unless you reach farther. nor drunkards not suffering either thy children vainly to domineer over thy servants. 4 1. (1 Sam. that he made the eyes of his beholders to dazzle. wives. as private prayer.) Many Christians live and do in this world as if religion were but a bybusiness. (Eph. (Eph. clothe.) behave themselves like husbands indeed.. yet here will be thy wisdom." a base thing for men so to spend themselves and Thou : oughtest to love her under a double : families after this world. and especially for those of his own house. state Second. v. hi. v. for sparrows. dearly beloved of God and abusing it. " That God and feedeth ravens. in apparel. iv. iii.) himself for . but such an ordinance of God to the wife as will preach to her the carThere is a sweet riage of Christ to his spouse. even as Christ loved the church." (1 Cor. signifying the church. to carry themselves foolishly towards each other. and that which is done to God and though thou oughtest to be very zealous for the Lord. necessary uses. them like . (1. . thou art to consider these three things. and to bear nothing that is open transgression to him. then will they be not only husbands. 23. or at least not soberly rebuke and warn." (Prov. Therefore though thou shouldst provide for thy family. with others in thy family. But mark. nor they. when God " is dishonoured. I say. as though they and they that rejoice. but so to provide for them. " The time is short : It remaineth. (Luke 6—28. consideration (1. to subvert whole households. ix. and beauty is vain . to pass by personal injuries. v. This is to labour. 4. — . xii. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR.) 171 The neglect of this fourth particular hath occasioned ruin in many families. that thou keep them 14. 34. by grace obliged to ing the Scriptures.) temperate in all things. she shall be praised. as those that you both are Lord Jesus Christ. 3. clotheth the grass which three. that you vi." " Love covereth a multitude of Be not like those that will rage and stare madmen when they are injured. you launch out beyond the rule of God.) (2.

Thus God spake to his children. I say. 29. 10. may see in the book of CanWherefore bear with their weaknesses. of death. and they must be begotGod as well as of thee. To instruct them as the Scripture saith. Take heed of filling their heads with whimsies and unprofitable notions. that the things of which ! and bless thou speakest. or a mother. but honourable and comfortable to parents : " The father of the righteous . but nourisheth and cherisheth it. protected her. 16. lest they be discouraged. help their infirmities. Deut. be such a husband wife. iii. It is no matter for many words. Job in a few words answers his wife. but realities . 10. O (2 Tim. 3. but also maketh his wife lose the benefit of such an This is shall we receive good at the hand of God. her frowardness with thy patience and meekness. vi.) 2. God hath not only given me to a husband. for no man ever yet hated his own flesh. this is not only profitable for children. and honour them as the weaker vessels. as she less. 21. speak to purpose. and Paul to his. and when she is most likely to hear. as you ticles. than sober and humble. a father." (Eph. to proceed in evil. When God for that instruction and good they have received from them. for she lieth in thy bosom. and we not receive evil ?" (Job ii. 4. or the least " With meekness instruct appearance of anger those that oppose themselves. by a conversation thou instructest them are not fables.) : ordinance.! 172 CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR.) 3. they will drown stood your children. who hast another principle. 2. might be wherever there is a couple that Wherefore that husband believe through grace.) And. and hell of a crucified Saviour." and to do this diligently. or they perish. are not worthy to be compared with the glory and worthiness of these things. and helpeth her in her employments in this world and so ought men to do for their wives. to qualify thee for a carriage suitable. 6. Second. 1. 2. Open therefore to them the state of man by nature discourse with them of sin. then speak to her very heart. when thou liest down. xii. Do it in terms and words easy to be underaffect not high expressions. 26.) TOUCHING PARENTS. to convince of espying the least miscarriage in thee. 53. then thou art to consider thv calling under this relation. If she is behave herself unseemly and unruly. And know also. that carrie th it indiscreetly towards his wife.) Now to do this to purpose 1. Take fit opportunities to convince her. that she to thy believing may say. 5. (Hos. Isaac was so holy before his children. after a sense of Labour seriously able state. (Col. yea. provided they be pertinent. First. that when Jacob remembered God. Solomon and Pharaoh's daughter had the art of . 7. iii. even "as Christ is the head of the church. There must be much gentleness and patience in all thy instructions. but such a husband as preacheth me every day the carriage of Christ to his church. may yearn her misertowards her 2. 4. to do as she. they may perish thus doing. and realities so far above what can be here enjoyed. but thou mayest save thy wife?" (1 Cor. (1 Pet.) Christ laid out his life for his church. and as being of a frailer constitution. and when thou risest up. that Christ and his church. if peradven. then thou hast also a duty lying before thee.) In a word. ten of Thy children have souls. that all things. . being Christless and grace- then labour thou to overcome her evil with thy goodness.relation. 4. and when he is old he will not depart from it. : : .) Ah when children can think of their parents. 25. little Oh how by their sense of the worth of souls . vii. 1 Cor." and he is the Saviour of the body. is there in the hearts of some husbands as is manifest unchristian carriage to and before their wives Now. were they a thousand times better than they are. who are taken captive by him at his will. For that she lieth liable every moment to eternal damnation. If thy wife be unbelieving or carnal. And here thou hast need to double thy diligence. Observe her disposition. " So ought men to love their He that loveth his wives as their own bodies. subject to do. " when thou sittest in thy house. under a figure." " And how knowest thou. Beware that she take no occasion from any unseeming carriage of thine." (Prov. that thy bowels soul. that unless thou be very circumspect in thy behaviour to and before them. (Gen. xxii." saithhe. Therefore. 6. and crosseth the mystery of his . one of God's chief ends in instituting marriage. loveth himself. " like one of the foolish women. xxxi. iii. 7. he doth not only behave himself contrary to the rule. and takes her off from her foolish talking : " Thou speakest. communicates to her his wisdom. them. Let all be done without rancour. vi." (Eph. shall husband is the head of the wife. Labour answerable. . " Train up a child in the way he should go. and to " bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord . 28.) man. wife. which thou art engaged to perform under a double engagement 1. ii. v. If thou art a parent. That she is thy : wife that ! is in this evil case. covereth her infirmities. he remembered that he was the fear of his father Isaac. for this will sooner learn them to be malapert and proud. It is a shame for thee. and the promise of life through faith. even as the Lord the church.ture they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil. and therefore is capable through thee the thoughts of which should provoke thee both to instruct and also to correct them.

Servants that are truly godly. 2. thou with but become thy spiritual son in the end. learned which thou them by Many children learn wickedness of their parents for which they beat and chastise them. if they lie. Wherefore deal with him. to him : " Folly bound up in the heart of a child. 2 Chron. " shall not dwell within my house and he that . greatly rejoice . nor at his going more ters. " He is such a man of Belial. as to admonition. 8. 15. it is the like to Israel's enemies than Christian mas(Exod. and judgment deals with his. none of this severity should have been. and compunction may of spirit. Speak not much. but the rod of correction out. that they be not companions with those that are rude and ungodly.) 3. as you are guilty of against Christ. so also they may be at their going out which is done by masters that either : change their wages. show them.) commit greater." — most 7. 7. ! spiritual delicates may 2. i. 1. is sciences the day of their death. 5. or livest con- veniently for the means of grace. Both these the Apostle opposeth. Touching Correction. Take heed thou use not unsavoury and unseemly words in thy chastising of them. 1.) or by keeping it back. (2. Second. at first was said of it. xxiii. that which is just. Look to them. Follow this with prayer to God is for them. to encourage them in small faults. that if possible they be convinced you dislike not their persons. that if fair means would have done. 7. xliv. believers can be got to do thy labour. Be often endeavouring to fasten on their con- Take heed thou do not turn thy servants into by overcharging them in thy work. (1. but pertinent to them with all : As servants may be circumvented at their coming into their labour. And. This is devilish. — that it is thy duty so to behave thythy servant." (Col. out.) fear God " He that worketh deceit. to come. to get : them that wise child shall have joy of him." (Eph. place. with soberness a continual dislike of their naughtioften crying out to them. nor often. ." just labour. xxv. when masters greedily seek to wire -draw their servants to such wages as indeed is too little and inconsiderable for such work and labour.) Take heed that thou make not a gain of thy gravity. iv. if none at the present but un- Let those words yon speak to them in your reproof be both sober. will be a swift witness. at their going into service.) The other way is. ehall 17-." (Prov.CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. (Mai. and he that hegetteth a (Prov. iii. OF MASTERS TO SERVANTS. but their sins. but for the good of thy servant. vi. mixed with lightness and laughter this will harden. (1. This will win them from evil. give to your servants deed. 6. and just wages. " Masters. Take heed thou do not use them to many chiding words and threatenings. through thy greediness. 21. and that both in body and soul.) I hate.) 4. when it is. 5. saying. provided they may get into godly families.) (2. few. if and who knows but that bringest up thy servant. " Oh do not this abominable thing that . If they refuse to hear the word.) And the Apostle bids you forbear to threaten " them. Masters also have a work to do as they stand related to their servants. 2. or where they may be . that thy service may not only be for thy good. because thou art gracious. and pertinent. and soberly their fault . then strike advisedly in cool blood. 4. adding always some suitable sentence of the Scripture therewith as. xxi. To make men serve with rigour. as God did of old ness unto his. 14 16. showing .) As who should say." said David. This." (Jer.) By their masters lying unto them. Observe these cautions 1. xxv. in- Lastly. as with thy children give him the same bread of God thou givest to self to . miscalling. (Prov. wherefore do with and to your servants as you would have your Master do with you. 9. 4. " knowing that you also have a Master in heaven.) lies shall not tarry in my sight. Let all this be mixed with such love." 24. as railing. lest that thy carriage to them be an encouragement to them to not too burdensome. his children.) and tell them. Know them he ." (Ps. xxii. slaves. like heathenish Laban. yet far beyond what This is beguiling of them. But 1. where he saith. Take heed that thou neither circumvent him at his coming to thy service. their work if is so small and so easy. then. like those against whom God 5. thou dost -in conscience to God and love to their souls (4. 3. and the. Your servants cannot be guilty of so many miscarriages against you. being the way all that God deals with his. Second. they care not how cheap they serve their masters. xxix. Thus God If thou art driven to the rod. 25. is See if fair words God's way with telleth ci. such as 27. Take heed thou carry not thyself to thy servant as he of whom it is said. it is against thy heart thus to deal with them and that what thou dost.) how much . I have proved it. may be beguiled in two ways. and leave the will fetch it issue. First. like.) : Servants. pity. This is God's way. 14. 3. Take heed thou smile not upon them. because you also have a Master in heaven. xxxi. 4. likely to accomplish its end. If possibly they can. 14 17.) . will be a means to afflict their hearts as well as their bodies and it (3." (1 Sam. that his servants could not speak to him. then such as Rev. Take heed that the misdeeds for that correctest thy children be not thee. (Gen.

iii.) — But yet.) In a word. this is abominable this is making a gain of godliness. thou must first shun these evils. learn in silence with all subjection . 9. and to do all she doth. I shall speak a word or two to those that are under him. vii. 5. That she look upon him is her head and so The head of the woman Sarah called Abraham lord. and merchandise of the . Take heed of affecting immodest apparel. he will therein be such an ordinance of God to her. But this stinketh : Jacob said concerning the cruelty of his so may I say of such masters." (Prov. as becometh women ii. professing Second. that if the husband doth walk towards his wife as becomes him. so let the wives be to their own husbands in everything. and in her tongue is the law of . to the wife. and of wearing gold. . first. who trusted in* God. if a master or mistress should take this opportunity to make a prey of their servants. But passing the master of the family. And. as to the Lord. iii." (1 Pet.) a 3." their own husbands' business " Let . keepers at home. as 1. " Whose adorning. 30. which she ought conscientiously First. to be like parrots." And as it is said again. learn of the and as two sons. as I said before. she shall preach the obedience of the church to her husband. And husband. v.) godliness with good works. 18. it will not only give ill example. But now. or gold. as the church is under Christ " Now she openeth her mouth in wisdom. Servants are goers as well as comers take heed that thou give them no occasion to scandal the gospel when they are gone. the figure of a church. (Tit. wander and gossip abroad. obedient to their. convenient for the word. or pearls^ or costly array. The wife is bound by the law to her husband. 6—9. not ranging. their flesh and their boneB ." (1 Pet. either in maids or wives. (Gen. besides the relation of a husband. even the ornament . Lord Jesus to carry yourselves well to your servants. (1 Tim. chaste. and is over her. and authority trom him. as husbands. " She is loud and stubborn. so long as her husband (Rom." And why word of God will that the things of God are the one thing necessary. as at home . (1 Tim. the man. Wives should be about at home as the Apostle saith. and is evil also in a wife. abroad. than be with him in the faith and practice of his and meddling with the things of Satan . and lasciviousness and at home it will give an offence to a godly &c. Christ loveth to have his spouse keep at home . which is in the sight of the carriage of Christ to his church. and of putting on of apparel but let it be the hidden man of the heart. do not think that by the subjection I have here mentioned that I do intend women should be their husbands' slaves. own abide not in her house. Wherefore. in that which is not corruptible. Let women's apparel be modest.) 2. they make religion stink before the inhabitants of the land. You know that Prov. if she walk with her God of great price. or wanton gait this will be evil both abroad and . that her husband is her lord. vi. Now for thy performing of this work. her feet among professors.. and be cankering to ungodly children.) Wherefore she also hath her work and place in the family. time the holy women also. the master is commanded to do the same things unto them. that your servants also may learn something of the kindness of Christ by your deportment to them. but I suffer not a woman to teach. this is evil in the church. that " the wife should submit herself to her husband. iii. as saith the Apostle. . their singleness of heart. Therefore as the church is subject to Christ. This also is odious. 11 saith. being in subjection to their own husbands. talking. not bridling their tongue whereas the wife should know. let it not be that outward adorning of plaiting the hair. 1. She should therefore be subject to him. 2. that shall preach to her with broidered hair. saith the Apostle. Christ is over the church. xxxiv. spirit . 174 CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. and he is not a man that hateth his own The evil of a wandering and a gossiping . I have heard some poor servants say. even to be under him. ought the wife to carry it towards her husband. 5. for what they observed thee unrighteously Then masters to do when they were with thee. is who to things of God. that in some carnal families they have had more liberty to God's things.) and of the soul of thy brother. The Apostle saith. 3 5. here is her glory. adorned themselves. rest Now there are these things considerable in the to observe. ? Because otherwise the be blasphemed. and to look to his laws rather than her own fictions ? Why so. saith Paul. 26. no more should wives be given to things.) THE DUTY OF WIVES. Let the woman. Do you think it is seemly for the church to parrot it against her husband ? Is she not to be silent before him. their do touchdoing what they do as to the Lord. 22. carry it rightly toward their servants. that is. kindness. 10. carriage of a wife towards her husband. Women are their husbands' yoke-fellows. that the wife. Eph. That which servants ing their are commanded to fear. Take heed of an idle. . ii. or brangling tongue. them be discreet. vii. good. as well as the liveth. It is an unseemly thing to see a woman so much as once in all her lifetime to offer to over-top her husband she ought in everything to be in subjection to him. xxxi. but also tend to tempt to lust. And now I say also. as having her warrant. nor to usurp authority over the man but to be in silence.) "not I told you before. when they labour both in word and life to convince them. (Eph. vi. and more fairness of dealing. For after this manner in old husband becomes her. . and not to men . as is fit in the Lord. lord. And indeed licence. of a meek and quiet spirit. Col.

Indeed there are some wives in great and slavery by reason of their ungodly husbands as such should be pitied and prayed for . in his presence she is to guide the house. so know not how to speak to him. it is to observe There is " a time to keep silence. (e) Still keeping thyself in a holy.) 3. faithful to him in all him. and one that hath not wit 7 . . and virtue than vice be not overcome with his vileness. with all that is thine. (a) Let thy words ( Judg. so they should be so much the more watchful and circum. and when he showeth tokens of love and delight in thee. 29. and do still. xxv. Yet then. all this be true. though in truth thou mayest have more discretion than he. to this dealt Manoah's wife with her husband. by thy dexterity and prudence. as the wise man saith. 1. (1 Tim. and is to rule all in his absence yea. 7. Obj. xiii. and so little effected. by a carriage full of meekness. ii. Ans. yet thou oughtest to know that thou. 16 is an unbeliever . and a time to viction. xii." and guideth her affairs . If so.) It is a shame for those that are gracious. and prevailed. Thy husband's salvation or damnation lieth 1. xxxi. and holiness. . as those that are " They that are slow to wrath are of graceless : she that causeth shame. know he froward. therefore. as Peter saith.) gracious For her price is far above rubies ? woman retaineth honour. 36. v." 3. 8. Obj. but they that are hasty in (Prov. &c.) Take him at those times when he hath his are thy afflictions. Now touching thy carriage to thy children and life. 4 xxxi. 2. all their ways.) Now (1. speak. (Eph." . 13." (1 Pet. (Rom. 3. seek.) Therefore act. convenient times and seasons. but overcome that with thy virtues. xiv.) . carrying all things so. heart taken Ans. and he in a sober temper. provided she so do it as the adversary have no occasion to speak reproachfully. 4. and to rule over thee. bowels of affection after his good. Thy husband being in this constronger. while they behold yoi. 4. xi.) The wife is master next her husband.CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. v. with thee. enough to follow his outward employment Ans.. 175 or that let is bitter against it. woman. " Who can find a virtuous woman ? v. but lavishing in their words. He will be apt to make the worst of every one of thy words. wherefore. all the days of her bones. 6 (3. Observe when convictions seize his conscience. to be watchful to take thy slips and throw them as dirt in the face of God and thy Saviour. Thus did Esther with the king her husband.) . every man. if there be in thee any fear of God.) Wherefore. Wherefore. that what thou dost goes not in thy name. and inflamed in thy (d) And soul with desire after his conversion. either good or evil. vii. and the wife see that she reverence her husband. 23. shall I But do ? my husband (Pro v. Therefore be thou very life. &c. or love to thy husband. be in subjection to your own husbands that if any obey not the word. thy lord. 1.) spirit. but his . . peevish. 21. things of this 2. not to thy exaltation. (6) And none of them savouring of a lording it over him but speak thou still as to thy head and lord. 12. therefore. carriages. and testy. and modest behaviour before him. (1 Sam. v." (Eccles. 2. and then follow them with sound and Somewhat like grave sayings of the Scriptures. to be as . that not one of thy husband's weaknesses be discovered to others by thee " : A virtuous woman is a crown to her husband . if at any time thou hast a desire to speak to thy husband for his con- (Prov. modesty. yet thou must thy head. 1 Cor. art to be used as under thy husband even " every thing. Consider his is and take him when he word to farthest off of those filthy passions that A with discretion. then what I have said before lieth upon thee with an engagement so much the For. (c) And that in such a spirit of sympathy. 12. love his wife as himself. chaste. he is dead thou art principled with grace. prejudice. in the world. .) verted behaviour Bear with patience his unruly and unconthou art alive. 29. dition.) he will infirmities. as being under the power and authority of thy husband. But my husband is not only an unbeliever. spect in 1. 2. w hat T Abigail would not speak a her churlish husband till his wine was gone from him. salvation. 2. how love of his own salvation knowest thou. by way of entreaty and beseeching. Now then. 37. a fool. 1. that the manner of thy speech and behaviour in speaking may be to him an argument that thou speakest in love. (Esth. (Eph. husband ? Obj. they may also without the word be won by the conversation of the wives. disposition . but to be thy husband. v. or behave myself before him.) much in thy deportment and behaviour before him . Thy wisdom. (1-Tim. 3. as being sensible of his misery. Take heed. 33. and .) for the right timing thy intentions. that I but one very froward. (2. xii. 10." (Eph. And all this doth tend to the possessing his heart with more hardness. that is. and gestures. seeing grace is stronger than sin. is as rottenness to his For then. but his ." great understanding. to win him to the and by thus doing. follow thy words and behaviour with prayers to God for his soul. and a humble behaviour before him. yea. coupled with fear. flesh.r chaste conversation. " ye wives. but thou shalt save thy and opposition to his own . 3. for thee to have dominion over for thee Though is . 10 xi. iii.) be few. But my husband is a sot. and not evil.) The want of this observation is the cause why so much is spoken. 24. 22. Therefore thou must take heed of desiring He was not made to usurp authority over him. concerning any thing. iii. . and thy husband. exalt folly. Wherefore. he with sin. xii. "she will do him good. to bring up the children.

20. hearken to the law of thy father. as thou art. iv. Gal. 30. I tell thee thou arguest like an atheist and gift. and the Lord prosper your proceeding. and I am rich. clothed thy nakedness What care have they taken that thou mightest have wherewith to live and do well when they were dead and gone They possibly have spared it from their own belly and back for thee." And again. otherwise I might. and thou wicked." (Prov. thou wilt not be sensible of the pains. There parents. " Chil- dren. that she mayis woman For their care to preserve thee when thou wast helpless. immediately under God. that they have gone under to bring thee up. the great God to be their enemy " They hearkened not to the voice of their father. to nourish and instruct her children and servants as the church. 1. They from them. by a willingness oughtest to show thy honour to thy to help them with such Thou As. if thou hast not a second work or birth from God upon thee. that thou mightest live like a man.) necessaries and accommodations to which they need. xli. to be considered by thee . and like a man. For the pains they have taken with thee to bring thee up. the ravens of the valley shall eat it. and the king- parents. little . for as I may say.) Though thy parents be never so low. they are apt to look over and to have slighting and scornful thoughts of them. and forsake not the law of thy mother bind them continually upon thy heart. 39—4:4. at his father. to God awe upon those that have been thee. " Children. with thy heart. for refusing the good counsel of their provoked father. and there be none but dogs and beasts that their parents." (Prov.) 2. thy father and mother? "A wise son maketh a glad but a foolish son despiseth his mother. Therefore show. and care ought to be taken on ings. (1. 9—14. xviii. she ought. It is . How often have they sustained thy hunger. This is worse than heathenish such an one hath got just the heart of a dog or a children. remember the love of thy parents. iii. among thy part to requite them. and that with God's approbation. . xlvii. " My son. and that despiseth shall to obey pick his it That this hath been the practice always of . 51.) 2. &c. For thy being in this world.) Now. Thus much for obedience to parents in general.) Absalom was hanged. and to requite thrust out of his father's inheritance. and standest in this Son of God. lieth also a duty upon children to their which they are bound both by the law of God and nature conscientiously to observe . : as long as thou thou wilt be a debtor to thy parents. yet he is thy father. ! ! than themselves. Whereto allude to that of Solomon. them learn their good carriage of and mother.) (2) HopmSi and Phinehas. because the Lord would slay them. : some deny it. of Christ himself to Joseph and Mary. a beast. ii. though he himself was next the king in Egypt." (Eph. fore. himself.— 176 servants. And truly. They are they 23 — 25. for but mocking at one his father " If any have nephews or children. let them "requite There are three things for which. consider 1. or at least a hindrance to me. livest. the wife being always at home.) dom Joseph observed to his poor father. 17. and honour to. . seeing a figure of the church. vi. 9 — full flat against the 13." (1 Sam. it. and that is. and so from whom. father. (2 Sam. fears. she hath great advantage that way wherefore do it. 1. Again. 21. 12 . Thou art a parent. (Luke ii. by like carriage. that all humble and son- beast. v. reason saith so. thou oughtest to demean thyself. and it will be a disparagement. couldst neither care for nor answer in that particular also. then thou art to consider. and they must be in thy eye in great esteem " The eye that mocketh : and instructors in the way of righteousness".) (3. watch- OF CHILDREN TO PARENTS. 4. by God rebelling against his dost thou father. but as godly parents . and her them forth. and regard thyself. .) their parents. xxi.) Besides. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR." those that are and have been obedient children and the young eagles (Prov. mother. All these things ought duly. as the church. though he himself was God blessed for ever. and have also impoverished themselves. let Ishmael. 3. " for that is good and acceptable before God. and when thou knowest it." But mark. (Mark vii. yea.) There are these general things in which children should show forth that honour that is due to their parents First. for this is right. to provoke thee hereto. out. obey your parents in the Lord. that thou art more strongly engaged to respect and honour thy parents. But my father. the believing And besides. of heaven. should always count them better I observe a vile spirit and affliction. Until thou hast children of thy own. Third. 20. and a mistress. for this is well-pleasing to the Lord." saith Paul. that thou hast recompensed them for thy favour to. xxx. if thy parents be godly. thee. Am. 9. make thee that thou shalt not do for. The Scripture saith so. that will bite those that begot them." And this rule (1 Tim. was both show pity at home. xv. hast also the severe judgments of disobedient. not now only as a father in the flesh. thy father and mother are now made of God thy teachers and she thy mother. obey your parents in all things vi. Thou parents. (Gen. Col. and thou thyself never so high. lay up for their children the duty of parents to and the duty of children to requite their parents. and tie them about thy neck. to show that respect to him as that brought Obj. thou wilt not easily yield. 20. sorrow. is now poor.) Must a and a little of the glory of the butterfly. thou didst receive 2. (Gen. thou dost to this day.

1. ! reigneth. 2. and humbly do for them faithfully with. 32.) heed of giving thy sweet parents one snappish word. It is . vi. that the same faith should dwell both in . meekly. or one unseemly carriage. 3. Consider.) Let therefore the consideration of this. 5. know that thou shalt receive of . Observe a 1. is . but thy master's. as . my own bowels hath God converted The Lord.) his son. the gospel. and as acceptable to him. with fear and trembling. is and for four which it cannot bear : one a servant when he Thy conversion. (Gen. thy place and station. Servants also. nor a wife . that thou dost and there iii. either to talk or do as one that reigneth. 35.) serve the Lord Christ. 21. the word of . as to the Lord. so now I say to thee Take heed of a parroting tongue speak to them wisely. in its kind. God to servants. thou wherefore count thyself under " For them.CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR.) Lastly. saith the Apostle to servants. And can any imagine. Third. and bear. poor parents." saith Paul. engage thy heart bo much the more to honour. I will in general show you the duty of servants. possibly. and obey them. first com- knowing that the place in which they now are. (Col. because they are godly. that thou being a servant. increase of thy torments in hell. be godly. vi. and care that thy friends have been at. Again as often 1. II. and not for man and indeed then servants do'their business as becomes . is God for and that thou preaching. Servants must have their eye on the Lord. The froward master. knowing that of the Lord ye shall receive the reward of inheritance for ye . 1. iii. That their that obedience Let thy bowels yearn towards them. in this service is the will and ordinance of From which I conclude.) Take not with eye-service. The believing master. 24." saith he to Abraham groan for Ishmael !" " that Ishmael might live before thee God. and in which he expecteth they should be faithful. them. then. falls it sadly out. if it is his will. are there wrung from their hearts upon this account. And how who bitterly did died in his David mourn for wickedness! (2 Sam. ! three things the earth is disquieted. xxx. . • whatsoever ye do. " Servants.) Wherefore. 33. their railing." (Luke xv. Apostles assert masters under a threefold First. may be the chil- CONCERNING SERVANTS. under thy hand '? Now. 23. grieved for the miscarriage of Esau ! Second. Thou art better able now to consider the pains Touching thy work and employment. and thou also. : oughtest to be faithful.) How was Isaac and Rebecca (Gen. what is it . How shouldst thou how happy a thing is this rejoice. How many prayers. in singleness of heart as unto Christ the will of • 2. should take an occasion thereat How did to shut thee up in hardness for ever. 24. 2. that thy work in As I said before to the wife. and because thou must be in glory with them. and not to men. xxxix. thy parents and thee is the fruit of thy parents' groans and prayers for thy soul and they cannot choose but rejoice. that thy parents have grace. with to all childlike modesty. which is mentioned in " the parable This my son was dead. and evil speaking. thy parents that are going to hell. or any other work. all xviii. 8. not a child. and is alive again was lost. for fear ! God in their place and among men. as he that hangs or is burnt for Wherefore. and tears. . thou art to do it as unto the Lord. touching her : unbelieving husband. 25. " Oh. when they do bnt suppose thou may est be damned. Not with that will serve man only." And now touching the three sorts of masters mentioned before. xxvi. Do thou rejoice with them It is true in the salvation of a natural son. 3. wherefore do not neglect a double sin in a gracious son not to remember the commandment. it is Servants must be obedient yet." (Prov. yea. the mandment with promise. Love them because they are thy parents. " be obedient to them that are your masters. as men-pleasers. But before I speak in particular to any of these. doing God from little the heart. 9. how happy a thing would be God ! faith should use a child to beget his father to the Then indeed might the father say.) It is out of thy place. convert our (Col. . carriages of thy godly parents will be to thee the that as a servant. With thy labour. and is found and they began to be merry. but that if these demeaning of themselves under each of them. heart. 22. Thou hast strength to answer in some . The unbelieving master. For all which servants are furnished with counsel and advice in the word. with dren of Cod. Thou art to look upon thyself as thou art. sighs. but as the servants of Christ. Every miscarriage of thine goeth to their they have a work to do station for God. the fruit of my soul. is as really God's ordinance. The consideration. 18. for the 34. reverence. . sins notwithstanding ? thou die in thy art inferior to these : Again if thy parents." (Eph. 2. their reproaches. is with God for the wrong God no respect of persons. as thou art a servant. (Eph. because to dispose of it not thy own. xvii. (Gen. it is the place where Christ hath put them.) But if thou do otherwise. and thy parents wicked. for art as sure to receive a reward out repining . Watch if fit opportunities lay their condition it before them. 171 us. that they. when they do as all in obedience to the Lord. Thus it was with Joseph. 6. and be content with that station is. VOL. do it heartily. know how heart-aching a consideration it is to thy parents. in the work they do for their masters. work God. Oh. measure the command it. is not thy own thou oughtest not but because it is thy master's thou : . as well as thee. both for thy body and soul wherefore strive to requite them. if thou be godly.

" if a before : man for conscience . . as nicate. Third. xviii. that have believing masters. he shall adorn the doctrine of God. parroting answers. this acceptable with God. and upon thy doings. though I dis. yet let them take heed of thy place as a ser- for well-doing. as with the most pleasant and rational master in the world " Servants. master evil for the consideration of the condition of their he being unbelieying. wise.178 First.) Second.) Third. that they will forget the relation that is between them Now. I say. use it rather. and recompense thee for thy faithful. I shall now at last speak. and partakers. tinguish him from the unbeliever. Wherebe patient. if not save his master by so doing but if he doth otherwise. will the servants. even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ. do thy work for : . (1 Sam. will have an much eye upon thee. and strife of words whereof cometh thee are brethren. there are these things to be considered and practised. and the doctrine which is according to godliness. work an unbeliever's family doth his God's ordinance. let them not but despise them because they are brethren " They . . (Job ties. that they may adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things." saith the benefit Apostle Paul." not giving in the world. Thou must be always humble and meek among them. he shall both stumble the unbeliever. Thou art engaged because of the profession thou makest of the word of God . dishonour God. with all fear. Wherefore Paul bids Titus. " be subject to your masters. 3 5. and harmless. evil surmisings. for by thy profession thou dost lay both God and his word before thy master. that the word of God and his doctrine be not blasphemed.) voking. place and station. as also grave and gracious not light and frothy. " as in thy place and calling. touching good neighbourhood. because he is a master faithful and beloved. and partaker of the heavenly " If any man teach otherwise. and godly behaviour. the sons of God. railings. vi. ii. so of their temporali- . and destitute of is godliness from such withdraw thyself." (Phil.) Right good neighbourhood is. rather do them service because they are faithful and beloved. 9. as truly as if thou wert called upon forgetting the other. knowing nothing.) 2. not answering again. toward for faults. not art to servo as faithfully for the : Now only to the good and gentle. or to remember the one. if thou wilt be found in the practical part of good neighbourhood. or to inquire after their condition. " exhort servants to be obedient to their own masters. be made free." saith he. 10. 18. as on Jacob in the family of Laban and will rig-lit all thy wrongs. in the service of thy froward master." Pet. he is proud. among whom ye ii. 15. suffering wrongfully what glory ye take when ye be buffetted for your patiently ? But it ii. 2. shine as lights things. before. is with this froward and peevish fellow. From . and with meekness. OP NEIGHBOURS EACH TO OTHER. raiment. Wherefore Peter adds this encouragement to servants. and bring guilt upon his own soul." (1 Tim. in who As persons must be of good behaviour home. in a word or two. For the unbelieving masters. and fore. the stage of this world before men for the matters of thy faith." Servants living with unbelieving masters are greatly engaged to be both watchful." (Tit. Saith Paul." (1 Pet. thou to the utmost of thy power labouring faithfully. if they have not a care of their hearts. while thou considerest that thy master and him faithfully and humbly.) And if thy peevish master be so much in the consideration of the relation that betwixt their masters and they. perverse disputings of men of corrupt minds. vi." with " of the heavenly benefit. you take (1 patiently. as . if it grief. 37. yet it is not because he may not be such. 36. or such as are cross or pro" not purloining. 20. and suffer for it. if when you do is well. but because every unbeliever doth not properly go under that name. if thou behave thyself unworthily. 8. I say. ii. and then draw towards a conclusion. 9. count their own masters worthy of all honour. thou time thou standest bound. but showing all good fidelity. but also to the froward. till God make a way for thy escape from this place and when thou mayest . xxxi.) That servant. for men readily to commuSecond. strife. supposing that gain — 19. as brethren. be under the yoke. and help to those that <have need to be giving to the poor as thou seest them go by thee. for of them Paul speaks in the first verse of the 6th of . 1. Touching neighbourhood. without rebuke in the midst of a crooked and : Having thus Engaged. For the believing master. (Luke x. to the exhortation he gave them " This is thankworthy. envy. faithful. either out of spite to* thy rebecause he is without reason concerning thy labour.good and sound conversation in thy own family. &c. in few words showed you what is duty under your several relations. so they must be full of courtesy and charity to them that have need about them. and he hath no other wit but to blaspheme them. 16. at before God. 15—17. God endureth is it.) Wherefore be comforted concerning thy condition. and abound in faithfulness Timothy : " Let as many servants. though they ought as masters and servants. but doting about questions. showing to all the power that the gospel and the " That' things of another world hath in thy heart ye may be blameless. with considering that God looks upon thee. and trusty. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR." saith he." (1 Tim. " and consent not to wholesome words. offend the faithful. and to please them case of Saul well in all perverse nation." saith Peter. and so the more because thou professest as in the . be froward. Know vant. as of their spirituals. First. For the froward master. and David. &c. food. that will be good neighbours. the truth. Thou must be of a.) Servants. God then reckoneth thee a sufferer will still ligion. but by thy words and carriage minis. and according to thy capacity to send unto them.

and undented before God and the Father. . Thy wisdom will be rightly to dis- not those things that are necessary to the body^ what doth it profit ?" (James ii.) And the second is as bad. but the profit of many. and talkers.) Fourth.) and they are. " If a brother or a sister be naked. 2. nor his man-servant. When I say a headstrong and stiffnecked I mean. Again .) denying thyself in some things. and a christian conversation among men. so is a contentious man I do (Prov. and destitute of daily food. (Job xxix. a great deal of tattling gion. though possibly it goeth to those that have more . when and prodis- fessors are great prattlers. ears. and giveth to every sin its call. 7. xiii." (Heb. xxvi. is like a dog by the coals. vi. to wit. yet covetousness. 1. (Lev.) It is through covetousness that men think much of that which goeth beside their own mouth. I would speak a word to them in this place. there appears no sin. weak conscience is of a brother or neighChristian.) and that which i. should be and and seek to " Giving please others rather than themselves none offence to the Jew. both to move and act." (Prov. every fool will be meddling. 17. " Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's wife. (1. . xix.) (2. and the other and talk about reliif any thing. in too great a measure. to the provoking of him to anger. before I go any farther. nor anything that is thy neighbour's. and to reprove thy neighbour for the same. That thou with it give no offensive language to thy neighbour. xx. a half-faced religion " Pure religion.CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. then. by tale -bearing and a gossiping " He that passeth by and meddleth with spirit : As lust known the Apostle also saith. (1 Cor. If : For Covetousness. which hinder good works. Thou shalt not covet. First. or evil desire." (1 Cor. To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction. : wherever they are harboured. is to be and abhorred. nor his maid-servant." observe fessors spirit. Now this base. and one of you say unto them. many professors in this day (Rom. or covet. as I mayAs was said before. be a vii. for where there is no desire to sin. the first and wood two to kindle strife. that puts him to say of his traffic. comfortable livelihood. 16. in all Now. that and covetousness it prompts him to say worse of . say. I will here take an occasion to touch a that are so rife in little upon those sins j countenance sin.) That is.) things very odious in many pro- to fire — mover.) Joh honoured God. " yet if you give them Solomon condemns. and uncleanness. .) And again. nor to the Greek." (Prov. covets. though their. This is that which the Apostle forbids under the name of " defraud. and that for an abatement of a reasonable price.) It is covetousness in the seller. the Apostle had not known sin except the law the one is a headstrong and stiffnecked its had said. (3. and but a very little. they are for pleasing themselves and their own fancies. the rather because they are they which spoil both christian brotherhood and civil neighbourhood. that thou mayest please him for his edification. Some people think religion is made up of words is ." (Exod. be warmed and filled. 5. And as thou shouldst take heed that thou be not the original of contention and anger. 17 21. is this." intrench not the matters of faith full eight notes of covetousness. he that desires.) Covetousness will meddle with 3. 2. it is strife belonging not to him. but do little of any thing that bespeaketh love to the poor.) When men. take heed of thy tongue upon two accounts. 19. 15. nor to the church of God not seeking their own profit. so doing be as the very slaughterknife to the Therefore covetousness carrieth in it every (we speak of sins against the second table). I will never leave thee nor forsake thee. own way neighbour. belly.) a thing than he thinks in his conscience it is. and to keep thyself unspotted from the world. there are in my mind at present these bour." (James 27. so also take heed that thou be not an instrument to beget it between parties." which are very fine words. is called " desire " in Deut. puters. lust to sin. sin any thing. are yet not content therewith. "Iliad except the law had said. and be content with such things as ye have for he hath said. covetousness. though lawful desires are xii. whether the thing he desires : Wherefore that which is called be evil or good. x. 21. not not v. " coveting " in Exod. (1 Cor. of those christian deeds that carry in them the cross of a Christian in the doing thereof and profit to my that will have . terlng grace to the hearers. Bear much. xx. 29. as commonly understood. as of the devil. pride.) spirit. where it saith. I known it. " He loveth transgression that loveth strife. : Words without deeds but in the buyer. he may heighten the price of a very wide mistake. 17.) 2. even as a serpent carrieth her young ones in her This the Scripture affirms. (Eph. Wherefore. (1. As one that taketh coals are to burning Covetousness. among his neighbours. nor his ass. Thou shalt not desire. 17. of self-denial. where he saith. A such things as worship. fled from. nor his ox. to whom God hath given a - . that . 33.) Now. 31). is. thou wouldst be a good neighbour. put up wrongs. in things of no weight. it is better than it is. or self-denial in outward things. " Let your conversation be without covetousness. and say little " It is but an honour for a man to cease from strife Fifth. xx. 6—12. 8 . that they may be saved.) (2. and to be commended. This is against the Apostle. unless the law had had forbid good. Covetousness it is all one with desire . 3. also 179 Thus iv. xvii. xv." (Rom. 32. for the preventing an injury to thy neighbour. 1. Depart in peace.

itself in therefore God's people should be so far from being taken with it. to learn the lesson which Paul had got by heart to wit. where they should not be. that rejecteth the providence of God. which should be on God . iii. and taking away whereas the Holy Ghost saith.) For. . iii. that gave me my bread and my water. it puts our affections out of heaven. 5. because of their greatness in this world. loveth a cheerful giver. naming of it one among another. and is condemned by Christ. when men that can go by.) that which engageth the heart. man and his things which causeth a above what is (Isa. so let (7. : — then in his heart to repent. 1G. botb« for the keeping what we have and for getting more. iv.. and hence ariseth all discontents about God's dealing with us. when it is in the power of thy hand to do it. "Say not then to thy to the necessities of those in : neighbour.) &c. (Mark vii." man 2. and covetous. draweth away the heart and soul from the true God. (James ii. and setteth it on that on which it should not.) and carrieth in it two evils. murders. gracious for their that look over them. v." 3. ment 5.) this is called idolatry. blesseth the Lord abhorreth. and it is that which. Phil. 31. nor the churl said bountiful:" things. and shut up their bowels and compassions from them.) under the name of partiality to — . 1. that above sins in the New TestaCol. Covetousness never yet said. to speak a word of Pride.) Now 18. iii. This was Israel's idolatry of old. as he purposeth in his heart. x. and it CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. then. you is.) It argneth covetousness. where they should be. and you will learn to condescend to mev.) written. and come again to-morrow. Because to it engageth the very heart of . xix. whom and. that they should be much it And showeth (1.) greedy mind also.) its Now sin. and those under them. hath done shamefully for she said. why is covetousness called idolatry? Ans. 7. secondly. lest should. it is due from thee to the poor. "the fountain of branch of pride floweth from ignorance of the creature. (4. " Every one. and for breaking with God upon these terms." Now." 2. we fly continually. after minds what to give. xii. away the time. xxxii. and providence of God towards us. for." and causeth him to hew to himself " cisterns. in the second place.) argueth a filthy greedy heart when a man. and loftiness of heart and life. living water. will give. "the liberal liberal deviseth liberal Pride. after he hath done any good. of low degree. (Ezek. (Hos. This is forwant. or hear of the poor. 3. (8. let him do what he pleaseth but is ever objecting.) Also when men to are convinced it . 19. iii. all (1 Cor. It spoileth the work done : boasteth of his heart's desire. 8. fornications. 21 23). 11.) Thus it changeth the object on which the heart should be set.xxxiii. if they want. in general. and sets them on earth. that possibly are less gracious. they then from that will be pinching and clipping. government. yet they defer it. (Jer.) iii. and of the worth of a gracious heart wherefore get more of the knowledge of these two. this poisonous It hath seat in the heart among these observe." (Ps. (1 (o. 1G Now. and this sprig will be nipped the head. It is the Lord. First. Second. like a god. 22. not of necessity. by the command of God. and I (Prov. Go. to whom. then. and secretly wish that he had not so done. like a god. " The vile person be no more called liberal. " In whatsoever state you are. when. or at least. 1_3. — and When . which can hold no when men water. for more of this world. 6. 3. my oil and my drink.) doing any more so. (Eph. have argueth covetousness. when thou hast it by thee. not grudgingly. iv.is their duty to communicate yet linger need. " And he went away sorrowful for he had great possessions. ii. deceit. enormities. 5. lasciviousness. slight this or that person. This the Apostle James writes against. prive themselves. 17. instead of God.) afraid of the Quest. as adulterous thoughts.) It it John (6." 27. and upon the fruits of a puffed-up heart is to deal ill this poor empty creatures. broken cisterns. that he had not done so much this is to be weary of well-doing (I speak now of communicating .) It argueth a men have cast in their . of the privileges of the gospel. 6." (1 Cor. to dissuade all from (Eph. is idolatry " The wicked and all these do covetousness. ii. It rejecteth the care. him give. It disalloweth of God's way of disposing his creatures. to think of it is that and by things he shall stand. adulteries." Lastly. I come. I will go after my lovers. and that is for ordering and disposing of things contrary to God. committed idolatry: "she that conceiveth them. and the original of all her idolatrous practices. (Rom. bidden by the Holy Ghost " Withhold not good from them to whom it is due.) vanity of the : m . for it. 5 :) " For their mother hath played the harlot." (Phil. and thou hast it. spoileth the heart shall to be content. iv. is. man in it mind earthly things set it gets our love. and would have them ordered and disposed of otherwise than to his heavenly wisdom seemeth meet. and shun though them But 1. against everything that goeth against it . my wool and my flax. infect the heart by the talking of it. Col. these following particulars. and choose rather have converse with others." (Matt. 11 — 13. also that better deserve will de- than they. if entertained. sets it poverty in this world. 1 1 makes a man forsake God. and causeth us to make of our care and industry a god. as being loth to distribute such and such that have and if not quite forget it. for (2 Cor." that is. ix. v. 180 need than themselves. . and his Son Jesus Christ. manner with this Christians. therewith to be the .) Now the way to remedy this disease. " for indeed 1 3.) It God also. . 28.

so they may have their (2. and edifieth neither fear. the fruit of sin ? and art thou afflicted with that disagreement that is between God and thy heart.) It argueth pride also. Now I come. xxi. " that whosoever looketh on a woman to lust or desire after her. xii. and give ear. Is thy heart ever the sounder for thy fine gait. 2 Pet. (Ps. 17. i. Adultery. to . (Obad. 4. and of what continually in my heart opposeth God. and setting a carnal gloss upon a castle of his Thou art but making gay the spider. and a heart greatly out of frame. It is better here to make a . 5. in the last place. and an affecting the toys and baubles that Satan. it hath its place in the heart. vi. Heb. that is. doth not this argue that thy heart is a rotten. 3. (1 Cor. 21.CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. 6.) — weep in secret you will not hear. (1 Cor. hear the reproofs of God for your sins. tickled with thoughts of their secretly lust after it . easy to overtake the sinner. when persons are own praise that ." (Prov. 19.v. direction of God in this matter through the pride of his countenance. 16. but that rather thou snuffest. 1 Cor. it (Isa. and kttest them run whither they will ? " Be not deceived. v. layeth down a catalogue of wickednesses. they " walk with stretched-out necks. or Uncleanness and then to draw towards a conclusion. Gal.) It argueth pride of heart. of what I have deserved.) (3. and that use to come before God to confess their sins. (Prov." (1 Tim. 12—15. and uncleanness in the as that in but such kind of people have forgot the exhortation. that is ready to offer itself on all occasions to break better than themselves.) A sense of my vileness. 21. ii.) And also. argues pride of heart. that layest the reins on the neck of thy lusts. vii. and thy lofty looks ? nay. 1 Thess. x. that they may.) and that they . cankered. " but in lowliness Be not desirous of vain-glory. that pride has got so much up into self-love and self-pleasing. (Rom. . mincing as they go. 16\) very unhandsome carriage for people that profess godliness.) (5. whoredom is in the midst of them they have not known the Lord and the pride of the spirit of : ! Israel doth testify to his face/' &c. 17." saith David. 28." (Phil. Wherefore. 1. (G. he hath already committed adulThis tery with her in his heart. he layeth who do is not acknowledge that man in his best estate down front vi: 9. and making a tinkling with their feet. when a reproof or admonition will not down as well from the poorest saint as from the greatest doctor and it argueth a glory in men. pride ariseth from ignorance of these things.) : thou takest to mortify sin ? " An high look. iv. even so soon as a man hath but looked upon a woman " I say unto you. xi. As God speaketh of the daughters of Zion. for the good and profit of their neighbours. 11. : virtues in the day of God ? or. word or two of Adultery. having objects for to look on in every corner wherefore there. be not proud. 10. which those do. among two the rest of those filthinesses I mentioned before. and to retain prejudice against those that thus reprove thee. and wanton carriage.) Third. but altogether vanity Mark vii. and to bemoan A most natural. iii." Pride viour. " Hear ye. thou whited wall. (1 Tim. as thou hast others to behold thy outside thou painted sepulchre. adultery." <fec. thou wilt then see there a carriage ? are other things to mind than to imitate the butterfly. way. How can a sense of thy own baseness. I observe that this sin is committed unawares many. light.) It argueth pride of heart. (Hos. is a is very taking sin . 22 ." saith Christ. fornication. 4. iii. and break . 3. a made carriage. and givest way to thy spirit to be peevish. is this the way that would that their faith should stand in their wisdom. Gal. cannot stand with a foolish. for your pride. So also in Hosea. wanton eyes. 3. to touch a . them off by repentance. "They not frame their doing to turn unto their God (Jer. of the vileness of thy heart. is sin. : sin of uncleanness.) the law of God. so it wants not tempting occasions. 3— 5. as being one of the first 16. and of the holiness of God. 26. James 11. ii. " Be not Irgh -minded. for the Lord hath spoken " that is. iii.) of which sin I observe that think of themselves and is That almost in everyplace where the Apostle others above what : written . ii. stand with such Dost thou see the vileness of thy heart. Saith the prophet. 21. when sober reproofs for sin. and besotted heart ? Oh that God would but let thee see a little of thy own inside. v. which is odious for Christians to be tainted with and this pride is discovered by mincing words. when a man that hath this or that in his heart to do in reference to God.) 181 It themselves for what they have done. will these things be found ! will for . v. and the ploughing of the wicked. that there is a knowledge that puffeth up. will not down with thee. is need of a double and treble watchfulness natural above all sins to mankind as it is : in the soul against it. will not seek after God. to such the Apostle saith." (Matt. 1 Pet. and every lights headed fool bringeth into the world.) This argueth great senselessness of God. all these kind of things are but a painting the devil.) 2. ." themselves nor others. vi. Rom. ii. Eph.) It argueth pride of heart. also there is in outward carriage. 10. when men will not deny themselves in things. and not in the power of God.) Pride is the ringleader of the seven abominations that the wise man nameth. 4. From this I gather that the sin of uncleanness is a very predominant and master sin. thy mincing words. that they little care who they grieve or offend." of mind " let each esteem others ii. behaand gesture. v. and unbeseeming carriages. And it argueth now. . I say. a proud heart. of naked truth. (4. 4. but yet will slight a sober asking counsel and " The wicked. 5. " But 15 my soul shall xiii. 29.) and is that above all that causeth to fall into the condemnation of the devil. (Mark things. if Alas.

that cannot Isa. Take heed that while thou instructest them This wanton eye should take heed that which the most holy saints have God hide his face from him for the iniquity of his covetousness.) And though wanton and immodest talk such as that brazenfaced whore in the 7th of the Proverbs had. "named among " Let will us as becometh saints. or named among us. by nature." &c. and our own discomfort. is (Luke hard continuing believing. that the lusts of uncleanness are devilishly taking. and immodest apparel. (Job xxxi.) Mark. yea. of the heart the mouth speaketh . we are subject to be weary of well- doing (Gal. resisting all continuing loving. 5 — ! them it for fruitless hearers. lvii. is of. seeing many (Acts xyii. v. 6. lust of thou thyself be not corrupted with the thy eye. . and say. but why are they proud ? Is it not to trick . naked breasts. v. and so for the present do them. and through with every word. (2 Pet. God's ways. is rather a continue the work. such as they in Peter. for we are justified by his grace. three of 8. and also. continually fore. to fly those . that eye. both by the like to own hearts. to is no pleasant thing to . those who were clean escaped from them who live in " Out of the abundance error. xlii. and do them.! . 9. so to Man. but should carefully study to maintain them that is. 20. ii.) IIL Every believer should not only take heed that his works be good.) Walk. and persuading you hindrances to them plainness it things that are .) devil. (Isa." This implies.) can he that carrieth himself basely in the sight of men. 5. 1. 22. that after Christ had divided his hearers into four parts.) and we know their by their outsides. vi. yet thy righteousness may profit the son of man as also saith the text but if thou shalt be so careless as to say. according to the hope of eternal life yet our sins and evil works will lay us obnoxious to the judgments both of God and man. hearty. be not whores. As. which shall hear of all these statutes. listening after some new thing.) This cease from sin.) observable. to keep in a continual exercise of them. 16. 20. He that walketh not upstrike us . in our The attire of an harlot is too frequently day the attire of professors. (3. continuing that And why do they with pride trick ? up the body." (2 Pet. I do not treat of good works as if the doing of them would save us. iy. and doth defile those who are not very watchful over their rightly. and Peter. there is not so much of a Christian's cross in* the beginning of a work. be once heed. or lusts of the flesh. a made speech. is (Mark vii. Athenian-like. let us take our tongue. It is things. Doth a wanton eye argue shamefacedness ? doth wanton talk argue chastity ? and doth immodest apparel.) : woman it is Another thing that bespeaks a man or inclining to wantonness and uncleanness. 8. 1—3. if it be not to provoke both themselves and others to lusts? Cod knoweth thenup the body opposeth . 1. When Paul bids Timothy beseech the young women to walk as becomes the gospel. is (Rom. they both take the heart with eyes and tongue " Let it not be once named among you. the law. he con- demned viii. 3. who should say. pluck out right eyes. If those that give way to a wanton wanton words. 17. so of not the lust of uncleanness. when I speak against sin. ii. Oh.) Oh. think he yet well behaveth himself in the sight of in How man God ? and if so dim a light as is to holiness. that the love of God is not in thee. with stretched-out necks. covenant with our eyes. in . hearts without their outsides hearts . like Job. 14 is that also which Christ calleth an evil eye.) these things argue pride as well as carnal lusts well. &c. how thy sins be hid from him whose eyelids try the children of It is j men ? without works is souls in the day of God will curse the day that ever they gave way to a wanton eye (2. according to like to the truth of the gospel. It is an easier matter to begin to do good. I am here treating of good works. (Job xxxv. and mincing gaits. " This great nation is a wise and understanding people. death. 16. There are these three things which discover a man or woman too much inclining to the uncleanness of their (1. who allured. My friends. as of our eye. but observing nothing. as there is in a continual. . is have his peace assaulted often. as to be pressed to do good. iv.) than to let them wander to God's dishonour. the lust of the flesh. how many shall can justly count thee a transgressor. there- we be saints. in their hearts. and hell. 28 . John. 18. 1 Cor. conscientious practice thereof. would strike The first is a wanton eye. an adorning themselves in light and wanton apparel. Isa." (Deut. &c. a vile thing. than it is to continue therein and the reason is. an eye of adultery. because it is apt to seize upon them also. 17.) true. he bids him do it with all purity. and argueth much wantonness and vileness of affections. much inclining to the lusts of uncleanness. 182 CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR." (Eph. 2. (1 Tim. hearer than a doer. " through the through much wantonness. James ii. . 18. I know not what to say. and let of adultery. iii. and of the eyes. xiii. or an eye that with such objects as are tickling of the heart with the thoughts of immo= doth secretly affect itself desty and uncleanness. Therefore Christians have need. faith justifies us before God yet that faith that alone will be found to The second thing that discovereth one it leave us sinners in the sight both of God and man. it not be once named. argue mortification of lusts? If any say.) To cut off right hands and feet. for this is your wisdom and your understanding in the sight of the nations. 1 John ii. " wherefore if 1 John iii. wherefore bear with I my own hearts.) thou addest nothing to that which saveth thee by what thou canst do. because else it would through with many sorrows. What care I for being righteous to profit others ? I tell thee. iii. Isaiah calls this a full wanton eye .

9 viii. and is kept green. that those which have believed in God might be careful to maintain good works. and rich in The whole Bible good works. to will it is walk like a Christian indeed. " I long to see you. and believing it ourselves. since we heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus.) I need say no more but this. xxiv. 8. 23. because they were not of us for had they been of us. that Christians should be often asserting the things of are you my disciples " indeed. . (Rom. to wit. (1 Pet. i. both to animate these lusts. to rich in faith be rich in good works and the way to be rich in is to be faith. corruption. that the best way : Apples and flowers are not made by the garbut are an effect of the planting and dener Plant in the sinner good doctrine. both to works.) " they would have continued with us. saith he.) Now then." . and bringing forth fruit. iii. and "if you continue the end. was given for this very end. the destroyer. (Matt. John The doctrine of the gospel dew and the small rain that distilleth upon the tender grass. i. 30. that have (Rom. upon each of them which being shaken with the Not that their continuing in the way . To be constantly affirming it to others. as the good ground receiveth the rain which being done." (no doubt. and to join with them in every assault against every ap. this. 17. so they should live in the power of it themselves they should by faith suck and drink in this doctrine. . viii. . xviii. pearance of God in our souls. of iii. 21 —26. as it is also in all the world." in the faith . that thou mayest be indeed fruitful 1. righteous before God . one to another. as there is that in our own bowels that opposeth goodness. by the mutual faith both of you and me. iii. the wicked one. which . 13. 14. nourishers of one another for Christians to and become com- mune it is as if they savourly of God's matters one with another. 25. 8. Thus Paul tells Timothy.) It is the ordinance of God. Second. then heirs . vi. iv. 11. may be estabe comforted together with you.) like the And hence it is that 31. and these ourselves. by which free of the doctrine of justification both agree fore. 3 — 6. flesh and blood . And hence it is that he is called the devil. but should be nourished up in the words of quickened. and maketh him to be fruitful in them is to be much in the exercise . business to study such a life. praying always for you." (Rom. things I will that thou affirm constantly. and the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. then in their souls . i. (Heb. if you be sons. and therefore there is infused a prin- so the doctrine of grace animates faith.) is dew of heaven. that good works must flow from faith and now I tell you." (Col. they let fall their dew . and Good the end everlasting life. and that by their one another. i. the end you blished that is. 16. . forthwith there is proclaimed good works. . Now then to help in here fitly comes Paul to the Colossians saith thus. for as faith by grace and they animates to good works. Col. . 19. whereby it is both the way . so his continuing therein will be fore he will continue therein." saith he. for the support of thy faith. that if he put the brethren in mind of the truths of the gospel. : faith and of good doctrine. and seeing faith is nourished by an affirming of the doctrine of the gospel." (Tit.) you find so many " ifs" in the Scripture about " men's happiness as. and justification by it. if therehe must make it his oppose those that oppose therein. First. whereof ye heard before in the word of the truth of the gospel. As John saith in another place. so God each to others doing they should edify is x. 8. " We give thanks God.) doctrine is the doctrine of the gospel. being right causeth the continuance therein. the cause of the work being right but the work whereby they are jointly nourished.. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR.) Christians shoiild be often affirming the doctrine of grace. &c. and look that against these opposites they maintain a continual course of good works among men. and him that seeks continually to devour us. 12. at each other's roots.6. " They went out from us." (1 John ii. 22. gift the sinner is made because he is so.Therefore should Christians take heed. 24. and yet none but these shall have the promise of life because none but these will be found to have the effectual work of God's grace " If ye continue in my word. as requisite that he continue in he shall find good works. there are the fruits of holiness. 2 Cor. the Christians are like the several hold the beginning of our confidence steadfast to flowers in a garden. (Deut. IV. take here these few considerations from the doctrine of the gospel. the enemy.) to be often affirming to others the doctrine of justification by grace. v." and "if we Heb. he himself should not only be a good minister of Christ. opened to each other's nostrils boxes Saith Paul to the church at Rome. wherewith it doth 2. . which is come unto you. God wind. 1 Cor. of perfume. is to be conscientiously affirming the doctrine of grace to others. his benefits over to them . seeing good works do flow from faith. to .) But I say. and love to all the saints for the hope which is laid up in heaven for you. Whereit ciple of grace into the heart. and watering. even there is flesh. " and knew the grace of in the last observation. that I may . and bringeth forth fruit.) flourish. (1 Tim. (Rom. John i. some spiritual gift. showeth with all to men that God clotheth them with the righteousness of his Son freely. as it doth But how long ago ? Why " since also in you. and to believe it " This is a faithful saying. He that v. Besides." the day ye heard it. . and as let it be watered with the word of grace the effect of that.) I told you before. and the body of death to oppose it. xxxii. that he how to may continue opposed. 21. it That the provoke ourselves and others is best to way good God in truth. so there is the tempter. As they should be thus doing. where the work of God indeed is . that I may impart unto you savingly begun.

Thy inward man with such troubles. i. either in 5. as there is a body of death and sin in every one that hath the grace of God in this world and because this body of death will be ever opposing that which is good.) 3." (Ps. that believing is which good works is the mercy of God extended to thee. your adversary. : that thou shouldst both believe this doctrine. will make notable work in the heart of a sinner. for faith. where these purposes. that not to will . x. (2 Pet. If thou deny to do that good which thou oughtest with what thy God hath given thee. And this is the meaning of Peter. hope. 7. . and that this will provoke thee continually to bless God for Christ. Hag. bless The . (James ii. or else will hinder thee in the doing thereof for evil is present with thee for both . the love of God is kept with warmth upon the heart.) 6. v. walketh safely . " Be sober. Consider. Matt. 8.) For. which thou shouldst have spent (Rom. to strengthen. Acts xx.) But I say. Consider. that you present your bodies a living sacrifice to God. The righteous shall be had in everlasting remembrance. on the contrary. acceptable. virtue to virtu^. but deny. 18. say they. 31—33.) 4. and thy heart quickened and sweetened. that doth ii. iv. God hath had mercy on thee. 12. 17. The heart that is fullest of good works hath in it at least room for Satan's temptations. that a life full of only way on thy part to answer the . " for the devil. 32. That therefore every promise in the Bible is thine. either to or from him things are naked and bare before the eyes of him with whom we have to do. that all thou gettest shall be put in a bag : .) And set the case he should license but one thief among thy substance. that can so please pleasure in God as believing " The Lord them takes them that fear him. salt without savour. and as lifeless as a sounding brass and a tinkling cymbal. xv. Saith Paul.) to thee further. and seeth every secret " All turning of thy heart. (Ps.) This is the man also that provoketh others to good . his Spirit." that is. 1. which is your reasonable service. and against thy will. but for the trial of thy faith . that we through patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope. Prov. xi. &c. and they that add to faith. " I beseech you therefore by the mercies of God. (John xv. that all the withdrawings of God from thee are not for the weakening. James iv.*31— 35. Rom." 10. how quickly might that be spent ill." (Heb. when thine is taken from thee. lxxxix. he shall neither be barren " but so an nor unfruitful he shall never fall entrance shall be ministered to him abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. if thou walk as becomes thee who art saved by grace.) . vi." and that abounds therein. (Judg. that whatever he it is suffers Satan or thy faith. ear that heareth such a man shall a fruitful 1. xiii.) therefore take these few particulars further. And can also so blow upon thy outward man. 16. . i. 27. that though he love thy soul. and also.1S4 CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. Consider that there is nothing that thou dost : God's glory. 9. 4. that thou do not any time. seeking whom he may devour. though with much struggling. to bring forth good works. xi. in his mercy. thou shalt be judged a withered branch. 4. (Heb. then thou wilt witness in every man's conscience that thou now thou leavest guilt on the art a good tree heart of the wicked. 3. listen to that at then. (Rom. sin weakened. 24. for we cannot see your hearts." saith David. and hath saved thee from all thy distresses God hath not stuck to give thee his Son. 16. 13. were written for our learning. weaken 5. . Take heed. Eph. 11." with holes. xxiv. in that hope They please him. knowledge to knowledge. Again. accompany 1—3. that God's eye is upon thee. a wording professor. or one spark of fire among thy barns. " he shall witness to him never be moved. vation. Consider. that thy life shall be restless and comfortless secondly. 1 Cor. 14. yet he can chastise first. Job xxix. and the eye that seeth him shall bear " Surely. Let this be continually before thy heart. 1. xiii. (1 Sam." (Rom. holy. thou mayest want comfort in such things thyself from others. (2 Cor. But forasmuch . Keep a continual watch over the wretched- not to be discouraged at the sight of thy vileness. By believing.) because they embrace his righteousness. xii. show us your faith by your works. be vigilant . works. 2.'xviii. 13. Consider. temperance to temperance.) now thou takest off occasion from them that desire occasion and now thou art clear from the blood of all men. 2. doctrine of the forgiveness of sins received by faith.) sal- Third. 6. life." (1 Pet. xv. quicken. 33.) " He that walketh uprightly. 26. — x. power hold of thy heart — of God's things hath taken I speak to them that hold the God The or thee. own heart to do. ciii. See Matt. for grace." (Heb. that this that the is the way to convince all men . 9.) Lastly. then ((insider. keep in thy view the things of heaven and glory and that at which the devil will be discouraged. 7. cxlvii. . 6. : him for that will labour either to hinder thee from doing good works. 1 Pet. vii. and " For live in the comfort and sweetness of it whatsoever things were written aforetime. Ps. and to these charity. v.) 2. be busying thyself in faith and holiness. but to prevent its wickedness . goeth about like a roaring lion. i. as the Apostle saith. (2 Cor. brotherly kindness. 2. and encourage thy heart in believing. 6. and all those things. he saith. ness of thy own heart. and with thy will? And I tell if thou want a heart tb do good when thou hast about thee. the workings of sin to the contrary. 5 . . 21. for the suppressing that which will hinder head and say what thou wilt. and the kingdom of heaven. . Ps. cxii. if thy faith be not accompanied with a holy life.

time was when his dew rested all night upon my branches. God reputes thee still but wicked. the smiles of the king. yet no fruits of these things manifest themselves in him indeed his tongue is tipped with a tall?: and tattle of religion. thou shalt have of God when thou comest to glory a reward for everything thou dost for him on earth. receiveth but that which beareth briars blessing from God and thorns is rejected. and her god is proved a devil God hath cast her out of his presence.: CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. Heb. alas now it thine . . Let no man therefore deceive you with vain words. 1 — 10. Matt. She pleads her profession. 0.) Lastly. and bringeth forth herbs meet for them by whom it is dressed. all 20. provoke thee to look with all diligence to. and when I could with desire. in that you have ministered to his saints. and hath grace. 1—3. he deceiveth. If this be true. . thy lamp will out at the first sound the trump of God shall make in thine ears thou canst not hold up at the appearance of the Son of God in his glory his very looks will be to thy profession as a strong wind is to a blinking candle. and Mark : Thy first work is to enter into a serious vol. 7. that I cannot find any heart to do any work for God in this world? Indeed.vi. vi.3. 5." (Matt. and the like. with earnest desire. 185 The man who and is fullest of : good works. ii. iii. he convinced he is not fit and to live.) In a word. . fittest to die "lam to die . he is not fit " Cut him down. iv. xxv. 26. let the disappointments that do and shall most surely befall the fruitless professors. " if a man any time. after this. thy salvation thou glory. Thus. *N . in his soul. thy case is sad. Her heaven she when the time of grace is over thought of is proved a hell. This is not all an eternal disappointment in the day of God for it must be.) and the longest time it Arts. and that she should have received happiness with those that were right but behold the contrary her lamp is at the heart going out.) but look thou certainly for 3. hope. 1 Cor. slothful. Consider. . whose end is to be burned. . rewarded for every work that proves good for God is not unrighteous to forget your work and labour of love. justified and renewed by the .) Take heed. x. heaven. . thou art therefore disappointed.) but now being saved. lie at stake . he is brass instead of gold. workmore exceeding and eternal weight of I tell thee.) Obj. (Luke xiv. . " eth out for us a far which is but for a moment. For. and thou shalt be left only to smoke. himself . for because of these things cometh the wrath of God upon the children of unbelief. thou shalt b^. then all is lost. and the like." saith Christ. and . (Heb. be doing and working for God but. for a short .) Alas in all thy gladness and content with thy religion. 25." at that which will go for current coin. it is but a scripture-moment. . ! 1. or the loss of a hair of your head. 6. and do minister. I say. as faith. and whose though he lean trust shall be the spider's web upon his house." (Gal. eternity. 1o provoke thee to good works. 5. Job xi. Luke xiii. (Heb. 1 Cor. xiii. poor empty man Faith without works is dead thy hope shall be as the giving up the ghost thy gifts with which thy soul is possessed. and the hypocrite's hope shall that forget God perish whose hope shall be cut off. however thy hopes and expectations are to the contrary " For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth anything. Job viii. and repent. (Job xx.) thy joy and comfort must needs fall short of saving comfort. (James suffering with the people of — . neither is fit to live. of greater worth than the treasures of Egypt. (Mark vi. 35. . but faith which worketh by love. Paul. . though thou comest and goest to the place of the Holy.) he is think himself to be something when he is nothing. 1. But what shall I do. out its reward. ." and so all other pieces of self-denial. 7. and she hath for her answer " So are the paths of all repulses from heaven. which you have showed to his name. 3—6. 20. Pharisees. v. nor fit . thou art to And for thy recobe pitied the Lord pity thee very out of this condition I would give thee no other counsel than was given to Ephesus when she had lost her first love. ! is otherwise. For the earth that drinketh in the rain that cometh oft upon it." (Gal." or disappoints " himself.) works." &c. ii. . fast. Such an one is but deceived and disappointed touching the work of grace he supposeth to be in his heart he thinks he is a Christian. 17. from a right principle and not a bit of to a right end. God himself saith. Holy Ghost.) and thy gladness as that of Herod. they turn either to thee or from thee right. xi. yea. and is nigh unto cursing. she is now to seek for saving grace. (2 Tim. shall in that day go withLittle God will . 25 27. and so leave thee in the suds notwithstanding thy joy is the joy of the Therefore . thy standing. therefore thy soul. n. but it shall not endure. : . 7. it shall not stand he shall hold it . Oh. are but such as are common to reprobates. without works. " ready to be offered up. 14. why doth he cumber the ground ?" (Luke xiii. ! ! . "Remember. the alteration that will befal a foolish virgin! She thought she was happy." saith fruitful Whereas he that is barren. ii. iv. 20 . (John v. be hast freely by grace through (Eph. or the honour of his kingdom. 19. (2 Cor. to die.) but rich in good works. upon the hinge of thy faith. and claps the door upon her. not a draught of water to the meanest of them that belong to Christ. nor uncircumcision. is done for him here bread to the poor. now." Christian. 2. 13—15. 42. Poor man. 13. and thou shalt have more than salvation . 8. who am so cold. vi. thou art but like the boy that plays with ! thou art fallen. 14. do the people of God consider how richly reward what. 8 — 10 Christ.) " For this light affliction. (Rev. "from whence do thy fust can last. and heartless. all is God. If it be if wrong. ! .) Moses counted the reward that he was to have. and as the fruits hereof. Eph. v. and with counters instead of fittest to live. 10.

temptations to drive thee to despair. Consider what hath been said and the Lord give you understanding in all things. though God doth someit is . Indeed." As there should be a remembering and a repenting.) &c." (Job xxxiii. lines have taken this opportunity to present these few unto you for your edification. and if any say. large. xxii. the tune .) 3. and strong. it is. and know further. (Deut. This also brings to mind how the case is altered with thee. and forsaking of him and next. ii. Thus have I. . dust and of thy heart will. that tarrieth but for a night. the blood of Christ. he in justice flings up them and their souls * (Prov. as he served Lot's wife. of Christ and the greatest honour thou canst bring to the blood ." (Zech. 28. I have sinned. . that thou mightest first see the difference me between sticking close to God.) God are terrible to Now God never visits greatest piece of service thou canst do for him. comfort. yet. yet in short time thy hair will grow again that is. doth snatch away souls in the very nick of their backsliding. "Remember from whence thou art fallen. 3." (1 Ghron. and would none of him. Ixxvii. 10. that are for thy encouragement recorded in the Scriptures of truth and remember. fallen. and perverted that which is right. dost remain a backslider 1. also." saith he. Then remember that thou must die . now 16. always so. . or strength. v. I say. " for i. the promise of grace. that turning to God after backsliding is the (Psa. and the Lord will be with thee for he hath not despised the day of thy small things.) is God to thee. comfortably believe. (Job xxix. and say. " I my first husband. written to you. xxviii. so there should be a hearty doing our first works a be. thee he doth it is but as a wayfaring man. Instead of which.) hath been said. rusty. there will be sad work that soul this is the hell. that sometimes God. . turned as at the first . heaven at thy conver7. and it were. sorrow. . lieving as before. To conclude. 2—6. " He looketh only he will have it in his own way down upon men. yet it is not there.) He taketh no pleasure in thy forlorn condition he had rather thou shouldst have him in thy bosom. 5. not knowing I must do you good. forced to whereby I be will while death cutting the thread of his that bemoan to go and return better with my condition. If thou yet. .) A sad condition the remembrance . that when in the terrors of God. 32. as also filth when thou first beginnest God. receive backsliders. but here. the shortness of my life. considering and remembrance from whence thou Remember tbat thou hast left thy art fallen. and him without whom there is no stay. (Hos. trouble thee from that clear beholding the grace of thy of this. even while she was looking over her shoulder to Sodom. And though thou maycst. a laying hold of the things of heaven and glory. xxxiii. the first thou wilt find all the wheels of thy soul Farewell. 7. and the thoughts of thee. 10. for certain. and godly heaviness. and do thy first works.) an example that every backslider should remember with — - . for thee either to do or suffer any thing in this world. (Luke xvii. I . 27. (Luke xv. like smoke. that hangeth is tilting over the mouth of life.) And believe it.) in few words. word of . for the right remem- brance of this doth bring to mind what loss that soul hath sustained that is in this condition. " Without me.how it hath lost its former visits. that thy faith may the tookest was. is the first step to the recover- ing a backsliding heart." These are together lost for a solid considering of words well put what I have and a backslidden meet together. iv. that thou mightest indeed acknowledge thy offence. 14—19. 24 28. notwithstanding : what hang 2. and the examples of God's goodness to the backsliders. when thy conscience was suppled with when every step thou the blood of thy Saviour . therefore from whence thou art member death. and though thou findest thyself as unable to do any thing as thou formerly coulds^. in doubt before thee. and it profiteth me not then he will deliver his soul from going down into the pit. : Some draw back into perdition for. 15.) for ever. . God. I have observed. . 65. But against all them set thou God. and be doing. when he turned her into a pillar of salt. Though there I shall rest from my labours and be in Paradise. be faint. Isa. thy former experience will in short space be as long. when I am deceased. with Samson. 66. be weak at the first. as through grace I astonishment. for then it Remember. that his willing reception of so saith. 26. there shall be joy in God." (John xv. because they have flung up God. often. a word to provoke you to faith and holiness. yet not than now. Wherefore. as before. through the loss of thy locks. and his love to thy soul but yet wait. xix. as in the former times. and repent. to show unworthy a creature. Zech. before I die. " you can do nothing. nor the hinderance that hereafter I may have of serving my God and you. as it were in revenge for injury done him.ISO CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR. touching thy confidence in God for thy future happiness how uncertain thou now art of thy hopes for heaven how much this life doth or if . of heart. and love one another. and his life shall see the light. " up. the stay of thy soul. and repent. and all the strings of thine heart out of to stir. as when thy fort. yea. i. the reason of God's standing off from giving thee comfortable communion with himself. in my declining will provoke in my heart a shall man 2. hardness of heart." (Hos. at . and seek his face. smiles.) I know thou wilt be afflicted with a thousand . (Gen. and re- " Remember .) sion to him again. and go on. was times. and consolations of God. because I desire that you may have the life that is laid up for all them that believe in the Lord Jesus. 16. thou feelest darkness. in honey and butter heart could meditate terror with com.

In a season of pleasure and prosperity. by the circumstances under which it is uttered. at oue No man. But there are distresses which weigh men down by their continual pressure." the most unexpected thing that could occur. and welcome." from this greatest benefactor. all courage of soul and all hopefulness of affection. that if men were thoroughly acquainted with Jesus. words then. in the hearts of others the obstinacy of doubt or disbelief. confirms our doubts. this the case of most men. the urgency of Sorrow will strive to grief. and strength. that is. If the existence. The answer will be found in truest friend to the human race. and in proper accordance with the laws of natural sympathy. " Come unto me. answer to the question suggested. therefore. no duty can seem greater than that of removing such hindrances different forms." has an incomparably larger meaning to the heart. Thus viewed in the light which human experience furnishes. can escape from burdens which will bow him. and seen in the light given by heaven. in which " Come. . before his gracious invitation and welcome can be estimated at If a patient and . . is heard with animating delight and nothing gives greater zest to any present success. would accept a preferred alms. in many instances. Distress prevails in a thousand The voice of sorrow is heard throughout the world. wisdom. the happy as ourselves. unto me. will compel us to neglect it. reasonable than an instant inquiry. AND The welcome WELCOME of a friendly voice is sweet in itself. deafening clamour of earthly care." accompanied with a promise of help. and did not cherish dispositions which are at war with his Spirit. the inquiry will end in an assurance that the It is not without inquiry. Our eyes are more open than ever to their looks and even the absence of a smile. the character. So long as the call is regarded as short of divine. the dull. that such an assurance is gained and hence the general want of that consolation and help which might be had with Jesus. imagination is prompt to suggest cases. reach our ears. or without patience and voice heard is the voice of the Son of God. The keener our feelings. The call. Care and suffering have a tendency to make us doubtful of friendship. and ought to meet an echo there no less expressive of admiration than of thankfulness. " Whose voice is that ? what more reasonable than an immediate surrender to the call ? It is in finding the right ' of ourselves. the general reception of his word. but its sweetness may be wonderfully increased.PREFATORY REMARKS COME. There is no man who. than the discovery that our triumph renders us more than ever welcome to the circle of our acquaintance. . obtains commonly so little attention ? that is. what can be more " and if the voice be recognised as divine. to share with friends in some prosperous enterprise. there is nothing either more beautiful His words " Come or more surprising than the compassion of Jesus to the weary and heavy laden. Certain it is. under the present conditions of time or other of his life. of unexpected reverses in life. : their proper worth. To those. that the main difficulty of our trial humble wisdom be exercised. the more apt we are to suspect the willingness of others to hear our complaints. they would as readily embrace his offers of help and consolation as the poorest beggar welcome to others as when we are full of health . Why do they not ? is a reasonable question in How is it that a " Come. vexations and disappointments of worldly existence have this effect. . it is want of knowledge or the minds of some men. in as many more. consists. and they produce the further consequence of rendering a " Come. both to the ear and heart. and welcome. where if allowed it might have been misinterpreted. . the power of Jesus. must all be familiarized to the mind.' dispiriting and disheartening them at the same time The commonest taking from them. will deepen the feeling of joy. to many minds. to the earth. has not been called a sufferer. Thus the name. but it cares for nothing which lies apparently lay hold of any support which seems within its reach beyond it. if they do not crush him. Such is the result." are fitted to penetrate the deepest recesses of our hearts. opposing passions are the great obstacle to every thought of its acceptance. But the slowest All this is well. which renders the ear deaf to the gracious invitation while. and welcome. with all our burdens and perplexities. who to rejoicingly acknowledge Him.

It is that which intervenes between the conviction of sin. endowed with arises all word of Jesus. and the words which he has spoken in the way of welcome to us. No sooner is He recognised as become our deliverer. the offer it. and originates from without. but the pain will be followed by unspeakable content. startling contrast with the difficulties which men create in their minds or hearts to Strange and awful as it may the acceptance of mercy. or refers to it only vaguely. and dissipated the clouds of a vague unbelief. prayerful study. This is readily understood.183 So inestimable is th i PREFATORY REMARKS. the acceptance of the the blessing desired. may not overcome the opposing passions or That may still lie dormant even though it knows that the Lord has spoken. low though it be. no perseverance can be too great for if that blessing be faith in the the attributes of will and power to intimation has he given us of any special interest in our particular distresses?" In reply. when men take the safest way to abridge the amount of human griefs. Jesus says. that whether it be our own case or that of others. they are at liberty to disregard ance must be exercised— that sin must be abjured. and perhaps finally. its meditative. In affecting. will assuredly be represented in that presence. comfort. . That repentis It implied in made by any benefactor. balancing the weight of its griefs and cares against the conditions on which the proferred help is offered. creates no exception of this kind. their treatment of so gracious a proof of the divine benignity. that they must renounce the objects or practices which brought the misery. He will reject no humble. seem. that we must do violence to their plain intention if we Let but the study of the New excluded any case (and why our own ?) from their application. bitter as is the cup of woe which even the world can mix. in all its varieties. prevent its obeying the heavenly invitation. H. and numerously friend. Still. even at the expense of the and so broken as never to be heart's present breaking. so substantial and positive that no effort of thought. of relief to the suffering. his him to the mercy -seat " Welcome !" will sound as addressed to expected guests. . call. is universal. S. . there are many who would gladly avail themselves of an apology for their conduct by disIt would lessen the glaring unreasonableness of covering some limit. could they make it appear that. not only will the wound be healed. "Come to me. or. supplicating mourner. is the largeness and universality of the offer. its wretched and unholy tempers may long. reaches not their case. there is an agony which the world can neither create nor understand. which will assuredly follow in prayer. may be that the distress is worldly. represented. But reason. and multiplied convictions of the truth. is the aid." It tion. dulness of the heart. and so written. or exception to the invitation. means should be taken to change it. Broken it will be by the world eventually healed again but whatever it may suffer as the consequence of accepting the call of Jesus. whatever has brought but to those who approach it in the spirit of a genuine repentance. and the knowledge of Christ. than the question naturally " What Testament. therefore. whether earthly or heavenly. there are the words written. in the presence of the all-powerful Sorrow. There is something so terrible in this choice of the alternative. But. The invitaTo every man in trouble and affliction. as it . will exceed in power of encouragement all that were ever uttered by the greatest of men to the most desolate and degraded. the weariness and wretchedness of the suffering heart gives a title to some place. have brought Jesus close to the apprehension of the mind.

that " All that the Father giveth me. in Capernaum.thee. but because ye did eat of the loaves and were filled. and they shall come to me in truth." Note. 25. Oh. miracles. and with great difficulty but when he joineth himself unto them." Note. not because ye saw the miracles. and in them mediately the ship was at land whither it went. When men shall look for friendly entertainment at Christ's hand. " Be not afraid. When Christ is absent from his people. COME AND WELCOME TO JESUS CHRIST. And they shall come which were ready to perish. Jesus came walking on the sea. AND MANNER OF THE COMING OF A SINNER TO JESUS CHRIST. after much more diswere before terrible to them. " My judgment is with the disciples. Corazin." ness of professors. 87. and im. A people may follow Christ far for base sideration of the little effect that his ministry had " I thank ends. WITH HIS HAPPY RECEPTION. A little makes him approve of them. ." so in the text had found him. As he saith by the prophet. . with and about this people their Lord and Saviour. no wise cast out. and were tion of the dissimulation of some of his followers. Now. . " Babbi. . shall come to me and him that cometh to me. about the fourth watch of the night.! . ! ! . "All that the Father giveth me shall when earnest thou hither?" But the Lord Jesus. oh how resteth himself content. They are not feigning compliments. and in vain. but their to you may read that the Lord Jesus walked on the sea to go to Capernaum.) but gracious intentions. Note again.) But as there he saith. xxvii. as it were. the Lord Jesus shows himself to them in a wonderful manner the which sometimes before. " I his appearance be never so terrible. come to me and him that cometh to me I will in By these words. he saith. xi. AND BLESSED ENTERTAINMENT. . but because ye did eat of the loaves. ye seek me. how willing would Jesus Christ have even those professors that come to him with pretences only. The text therefore may be Note." —Isa. 4. He also thus betook himself to rest under the confilled. 21. it is not the love toil and busihim." called Christ's repose . xlix. is to allay their had bestowed upon him. : . even so. " Lord of heaven and gion yea. He bids them labour for the meat that endureth to eternal life. therefore. in this chapter. received bim into the ship. having sent his disciples before in a ship. am not like to be honoured in your salvation fears and perplexities. as such. that since they were proin that state. fessors in pretence only. I will in no wise cast out. SHOWING THE CAUSE. if their hearts be rotten. have spent my strength for nought.but the Father hath bestowed upon me a people. you will find. The text. come to him sincerely. not because ye saw the rebuke. 37. seeking for Jesus. When providences are black and terrible to God's people. He doth not refuse to give. They were afraid of and it is the wind and the water they were also afraid of course. after much labour and fast they steer their course how soon are they at many sermons spent. and intimateth. in vain. eye of Christ or thus. and hast revealed them to babes for Christ. I their journey's end The people now among whom he last preached. John vi." said he. " Verily. in the fulfilling whereof he they go on but slowly. A PLAIN AND PROFITABLE DISCOURSE ON JOHN VI. they wondering asked. the slighting their compliment. Note. even then will they meet with a check and " Ye seek me. Note again. is. even to these. and Bethsaida A man's belly will carry him a great way in reli. and came to Capernaum. when he appeared to them uttered by the Lord Jesus. that he would Lord Jesus unto bis people. but the wind was contrary by which means the ship was hindered in her passage. it is I." Lord Jesus comforteth himself under the consideraverily. . TRUTH. as they can the things that Yet observe again. That the end of the appearing of the soul could not delight in. Then they. because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent. they also took shipping. for it seemed good in thy sight. And when they Lord. as these went after him beyond sea for loaves. good counsel. ." Luke x. a man's belly will make hini venture far earth. . and overtook them at the sight of whom they were afraid. and therefore such as his But be said." they can as little bear. answered. Father." when they saw that both Jesus was gone and his (Isa. and my work with my God . as the conclusion of the whole. . " I have laboured in vain. that they may be saved ! . will I be satisfied. that crown the work in the (Matt. though the manner of content himself with a remnant that his Father As who should say. Father. . 13.

general. the gift in- tended in the text must be restrained to some. but with those that himseff and saints shall rule over in justice and severity. xi. " all Israel." must be restrained. of all and every part of the gift : "All that the Father giveth me." (Rom. to wit." But what must be done with them ? must he save them ah ? No. that some are .: 190 COME AND WELCOME TO JESUS CHRIST." In Psalm xviii. The second all doth also intend the same people but yet only so many of them as God will have mercy upon. to wit. to the same "All that the Father giveth me. II. and then in what sense the if giveth me. no rational : man in be saved. "And I. " are delivered unto me by the -Father." ix. and if." he meant a me shall come to me and him that cometh to me drawing them into the place of glory then The first part of the must he mean by " all men. These things might be spoken to at large.) but yet a greater disparity all and all. by the first all that you find in the words. two alls this to be considered. In his The Father giveth me. The between the all made mention of in the first place. . " they are given to him." The gift then is of persons . Next you have the Son's reception of and that showeth itself in these particu1. "Ask of me. All that the Father This word " all. thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel. Second." (Rom. But The word " giveth." Not all that are given. Christ in the use of it is it here. Here again you have First. his being taken up into heaven by " drawing all men after him. seem. children of the flesh. by being " lifted up from the earth. text. respecteth the Father and his " For God hath concluded gift the other part. will bear. yea. even as the truth or argument." is often used in Scripture. 27. in the largest " sense for they are not all Israel which are of Israel . consists of two parts. you take the gift of the Father to 1. 32. and ourselves and all. he intendeth not all of Israel. you the truth gift in the text of this." (John xii. he saith plainly. " Thou ahalt break them with a rod of iron. that shall in truth be eternally sayed from text. him in the largest is sense.) This. and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession. And in his determining. I will in no wise this gift. but the children of the promise are counted for the Beed. Can any one imagine that by " all. to a gift that is given by way of speciality by the Father to the Son. sonant to the scope of the place ? And if. that he might have mercy that gift. as he should . though sometimes they are taken for the whole family of Jacob. xi. sense there are come unto man y given to him that shall never him yea. must be saved. all First. because the Father hath given some. and that is the gift of certain persons to the Son. cannot be intended in the text." those. " will text must be restrained to some.) By "all Israel." I shall therefore first show explication." The again all also in likewise to be limited to and restrained : to the saved." those. to those that shall come to Christ even to those whom he will " in no wise cast out. (Rev." in this 32. xi. . I." thing shall make him dislike them in their coming "And him that cometh to me." 3. cast out. the world will conclude therefore. 26.) This method he useth not with them that he saveth by his grace. I be lifted up from the earth. taking notice. : him that cometh. if you take the gift of the Father to the Son in the largest sense for in that .) place." (Ps. This word " and readers. for the sake of which it is made tise of." said the Father to him. ii. and is to be taken more largely. even all of them. as the truth and argument for the sake of which it is used will bear." are sometimes to be taken." " neither because they are of the seed of Ahraham. as they are in this method presented to view but I ." Because then. he should mean all and every individual man in the world." here. That that are given to Christ.) yet. : . and only I will in no wise cast out. or more strictly. many to him. all the things " All things. and not rather that all that is conBCriptures. and them only." a gift . : intended in this text are the Jews. if must not be taken for all that in any sense given by the Father to him. all. to be dashed in pieces by him. " And so all Israel shall be saved. . " and I will give thee the heathen for thine inheritance. and hath special respect to the Father and the Son as also to their joint management of the salvation of the people." Therefore the gift intended in the 2. 27 . these are not the children of God . of explication. that he might have mercy upon the text is all. By way of observation. that not any to me. shall come 4. "they who are the . else we shall abuse therefore. after the : limited number." Thus also the words. For the gift of the Father there is upon all. In hia resolution to bring them to himself: "All that the Father giveth me. yea. Father giveth. are they all children but in Isaac shall thy seed be called . shall choose to speak to the words.) must be limited and enlarged. many are given unto him . the Father giveth persons to Jesus Christ. Those " All that the Father giveth . It are Christ. evident." same manner." he means. as is evident. we must consider that the men. all limited and restrained only to those that shall (Matt. I think. I. and that gift shall come " And and that all made mention of in the second. 2G. ii." (Rom. In his hearty acknowledgment of it to be lars " 2. after a solemn manner. he. to a gift that is given by way of speciality by the Father to the Son." or " hath given. " He hath concluded them all in : unbelief." said in the world. as you see." that is." said draw all men after me. the Son and his reception of the wrath to come them all in unbelief. the gift itself. By way of that he will " cast out. in the The . Wherefore that we may the better understand the mind of By way must be taken. G — 8.

dying for us in the . that he by them might bring about some of his high and deep designs in the world. ." &c. Son . therefore. 39 x. These be they that the Father hath given to Christ to keep them those that Christ hath promised eternal life unto those to whom he hath given his word. for those." whom thou hast given me. . . that I might destroy them that hate me. is concerned with the Son in the True. we are. 10. Therefore the Lord Jesus." "those. that the Scripture might be Second. elect. Thus Judas was given to Christ. and none of them is lost but the son of perdition. (Col. And all mine I give unto . even as was determined before.) to be remembered and adored as one having a chief hand in the salvation of sinners. For this is the substance of the text." those that in other places are called " the "the chosen." 3. And them life. 40. is greater than all and no man is able to " As thou pluck them out of my Father's hand. I pray for them I pray not for the world. but do admit of an enlargement or a restricaccording to the true meaning and intent of . in giving yea. even in suffering of Judas so to bring about his Master's death. but should raise day. his acts. and promiseth to be an effectual means " All that the Father of eternal salvation to. as was before determined. he was not capable of doing that. in the word word . and made way for his grace to come to us through the sides. are diverse . ! . and I in am glorified himself to the judgment of his " Keep through thine own name those them. and the "alls" and the " manies." hast given him poAver over all flesh. he might bring about his death." of perdition. and thou gavest them me. are those that are given by covenant to the will bear.) : 191 the will of the Father that hath sent me. " The to be a ransom for us." and his love is manifest in choosing of us." (ver. 9. the So word " all. to words wit. that he by him might bring about his own death. a great hand in our salvation too. : which he has given us to know it by." Mark They shall come that are in special given to me and they shall by no means be rejected." " Father. must not be taken in such sort as our foolish fancies or groundless opinions will prompt us to. ." and "the chil- dren of the promise. even all of them.) Let us then grant that Judas was given to Christ. My Father that gave them me. . Christ saith. such a gift as he accepteth. tion. he must bring about his of him that did it. that he might even fulfil the Scripture . that the Scriptures might be fulfilled.) (John xvii. given to hirn that he might destroy them " Thou hast given me the necks of mine enemies. but not as others are given to him. the All these sentences are of the same import with text. and in giving his Son also of us to his Son Hence he is called. Father of mercies. and the heart-blood of his well-beloved The Father therefore is Son. as that he might by so doing bring about his own eternal damnation also." Christ this in his destruction. but for those that thou hast given me. therefore. 12—14. I have kept." (John vi. . i. " that thou" gavest me thou hast given me may be with me where I am. that they may behold my glory which thou hast given me for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world. 6." For here even the Father hath himself found out. salvation. are the of same with " all the given " in the text : " All that the Father giveth. in these several sayings Christ." " the sheep. " The Father himself loveth you. that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him. The gift. Yea. as that he must lose himself for ever in bringing it to pass. as to our from those of the Son. are thine. as the Son As hand. and the God of all comfort. as well as in the salvation of describeth the person giving the rest. giveth me shall come to me and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out." "they. COME AND WELCOME TO JESUS CHRIST. it up again eternal at the last These therefore cannot he of the number of those that are said to be given in the text. but the son fulfilled. the text. " All that the Father giveth. so the salvation of his elect by his blood. he must bring about his own death. and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. for they are thine. he spilt not blood us. to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in ." that. shall come to him. that of all that he hath given me I should lose is " This nothing. in the text must not be taken in the largest sense.. so shall we be better mind of the Lord. but even as the by which we may learn several useful things 1. in the way that I have mentioned before he was given to Christ. We the meaning of the text. nor as those made mention of in the text for then he should not have failed to have been so received by Christ. who hath made us meet salvation of his people. intended as the gift in the text. and that he will have with him in his kingdom to behold his glory. or those things for he died not. Thine they were. that they may be*one as he had not in that thing done that which was right. Indeed he was given to Christ but he was given to him to lose him. Those. I will that those whom " Those. 28 xvii." said he. as I said before. and Yea. that by him. and that in the overthrow Yea." &c. That the Lord God. if and they never perish neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand. to wit. and thine are mine. . Some are given to Christ. and " he will in no wise cast them out. " We ought to give thanks to the Father. and they have kept thy word. " And none of them is lost. as did the Son but yet he hath a for our redemption. and Judas must so manage this business." as also other words. as was before determined and that in the overthrow of him that did it." By " Father. for . must therefore diligently consult by comparing it with other the sayings of able to find out the God . 24." 1. shall . even in his losing of Judas. . and kept to eternal life.loss of the instrument that betrayed him. . applies Father. 12.

" 102 COME AND WELCOME TO JESUS CHRIST. 1. but that those . saying. first and this respects the time and he giveth her again at the day