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Rebecca L.

Kenner EDUC 5545

Student Analysis
Connie demonstrates that she is a strong math student. She appears to comprehend the mathematical concept of subtracting 3-digit numbers. On page 1 she did not have any errors. Her work is neat and legible. She has regrouped appropriately and clearly shows her work. On page 2 she makes very few errors. Page 2 is separated into several sections. Section 1 includes problems 1-20 which are 3-digit subtraction problems. Connie misses only one in this section where she omitted the hundreds column subtraction. In section 2 the problems are mixed review. Connie misses only 1 problem in this section as well where she appears to have inadvertently added a 1 into the hundreds column which should have only been added to the tens column. The last two problems are word problems; one asking for an estimate and the other asking for the sum of two numbers. It would appear that Connie would benefit from vocabulary review. Juan seems to struggle with subtracting 3-digit numbers and has a difficult time with re-grouping. On page 1 he has several errors missing 3 out of 8 problems, which is a score of 37%. He may also struggle with the basic concepts of subtraction as it appears that he often “ignores” the subtraction required to solve the problems correctly. On page 2 Juan misses the majority of the problems; scoring a 23%. In section 2 there are a few review problems that did not require re-grouping; Juan was able to complete these problems free of error. Juan will need extra help in order to establish a sense of numbers and an ability to re-group numbers accurately. Working one on one with an adult such as a teacher, teacher’s aide or parent volunteer with re-grouping concepts would benefit Juan. He may enjoy working with some number games as well in an effort to build confidence in working with 3-digit numbers. Steve appears to grasp the concept of 3-digit subtraction quite well. He uses an interesting method in order to solve the problems. His method is different than the other students (or that of a “standard method”). On page 1 Steve completes 5 of the 8 problems correctly; scoring a 67%. He made a few simple errors but overall appears to understand the concept. On page 2 has only 1 incorrect answer in the first section of 2-digit
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Rebecca L. Kenner EDUC 5545

subtraction. His alternative method appears to work quite well. His method may consume too much time; in an effort to teach time management skills it may benefit Steve to attempt to use the standard method of subtraction. Steve scores a 94% on page 2. Karen writes neatly and legibly. She pays close attention to writing her numbers in the appropriate number column. Karen greatly struggles with 3-digit subtraction. On page 1 she is able to answer only 1 problem correctly and scores a 12%. On page 2 she continues to struggles and answers only 13 of the 34 problems correctly receiving a score of 38%. It appears that Karen is struggling with the concepts of borrowing. She will need extra review and support in order to understand the concept before moving on. Working one on one with an adult with re-grouping concepts may be necessary in order to provide her with necessary support. Genara also appears to struggle with 3-digit subtraction. She was only able to answer ½ of the problems correctly on page 1 for a score of 50%. On page 2 she continues to struggle answering only 15 of the 34 problems correctly for a score of 44%. Genera appears to interchange functions. This may be a result of “rushed work” or it may be from a lack of understanding of mathematical functions. Further review and one-on or small group work would benefit Genara. It is also difficult to understand where Genara struggles as she is often not showing her work. Overall the students in the class appear to need further review of 3-digit subtraction before moving on. The overall score for the students would be averaged as 4.2 for page 1; or 52%. This score does not reflect an understanding of the concept. The overall score for page 2 would be averaged as 19.4; or 57%. This score again does not reflect an understanding of the concept. The students need more opportunities to practice the algorithms before mastering the concept. Group work such as collaborative projects may assist in gaining understanding. It is important to provide students with an opportunity to talk about the math. Perhaps a “math meeting” should be held were

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Rebecca L. Kenner EDUC 5545

students can discuss what they are struggling with or vise versa share what they feel confident with. “…allows her students to think further about their strategies and gives them a chance to “stretch” mathematically from wherever they are developmentally. By constructing their own strategies and defending them, all the children are immersed in an investigation that involves mathematizing … Mathematizing is content. (Young Mathematicians, page 9) Considering the overall averages of these two assignments are less than satisfactory I would find a way to make the content more accessible. Allowing students more time to explore the concepts in ways that are meaningful to them will ensure student success. “When children are learning about the operations of addition and subtraction, it’s helpful for them to see the connection between these processes and the world around them. (ATM page 196) Collectively the scores show that the students need more time and more opportunities to explore the concepts before moving forward. Grouping the students with high ability mixed with low ability would benefit the students. The higher scoring students will have an opportunity to explain their methods to lower scoring students. The lower scoring students will have an opportunity to learn from their peers. Using manipulatives may help the lower scoring students such as Karen and Juan to gain a deeper understanding of the mathematical concept. The students will need to focus on 3-dgit subtraction. Playing games will be an enjoyable learning opportunity for all. One particular game the students could play would the card game where the students draw a card and choose where to place the card according to a number column (ones, tens and hundreds columns). This game will allow the lower ability students to deepen their background knowledge of working with 100’s. Further games regarding borrowing will also assist these students.

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Rebecca L. Kenner EDUC 5545

Incorporating a story will assist the students in deepening their background knowledge as well. Having a story to follow may also allow students to feel more connected with the concepts of borrowing. Making as many connections as possible to real life experiences will assist all students in reaching success. Throughout the many different teaching techniques informal assessments such as “thumbs up or thumbs down” or using the “chin it” method with white boards will need to be used to monitor students’ understanding of mathematical concepts. Once it is apparent that the students are making growth a formal assessment should be used to assess the students’ readiness to move on. A formal assessment using both a written and oral method would be preferable so that each student has the opportunity to explain their thinking. Steve appears to have developed a very interesting formula (that works) to solve 3-digit subtraction problems. It is difficult to assess if he understands the concept and will be able to apply his method in future more complex problems. It is also difficult to assess the amount of time that his method requires. He may benefit from using the standard method of subtraction and borrowing – it may take less time. An oral assessment would allow him to explain his method and to determine what changes if any he should take before moving forward and applying his method to future problems.

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Rebecca L. Kenner EDUC 5545

Page 1
% Missed

Problem #8 Problem #7 Problem #6 Problem #5 Problem #4 Problem #3 Problem #2 Problem #1

80% 80% 60% 40% 60% 20% 20% 20% Connie

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X X X X X X X Karen

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Rebecca L. Kenner EDUC 5545

#19 Problem #20 Problem #21 Problem #22 Problem #23 Problem #24 Problem #25 Problem #26 Problem #27 Problem #28 Problem #29 Problem #30 Problem #31 Problem #32 Problem #33 Problem #34

60% 40% 40% 20% 20% 0% 0% 60% 60% 40% 20% 20% 20% 40% 100 % X X Connie X Steve X

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X Genara

X Juan

X Karen

Connie Steve Genara Juan Karen

Page 1 Ranked Scores 8/8 5/8 4/8 3/8 1/8

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Rebecca L. Kenner EDUC 5545

Steve Connie Genara Karen Juan

Page 2 Ranked Scores 31/34 30/34 15/34 13/34 8/34

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