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Number 13
Volume 109
March 27, 2014

Local Equalization Board met on March 17
by Laurie Hindman
The Local Board of Equalization
met on Monday, March 17 at the
Wall Community Center meeting
room. Mayor Dave Hahn called the
meeting to order with board members: Gale Patterson, Dan Hauk,
Jerry Morgan and Mike Anderson
present. Chamber Director Carol
Steffen was also present for the
meeting.
Grievances were heard from 11
appellants whose recent 2014 assessed values have jumped from
$1,700 to as much as $18,000.
The board determined it to be
fair for many of the homeowners to
accept if possible only a two percent increase on their 2014 total
assessed value. Appellants felt this
was an acceptable increase knowing the county could reject their requests.
A home owner who has purchased an adjoining lot next to
their property was approved to
have their taxes lowered to what
the lot was appraised for.

Don Kelly owner of Kelly Sub
#5, Block l, Lot Lots 1-4 and Kelly
Sub #2, Lot 5 informed the board
these lots meet all the categories
for property used for ag purposes.
The board approved to classify the
property as ag land and evaluated
each lot at $500.
The board approved to de-annex
the Crown Country Estates family
members from the city.
Hahn stressed to each appellant
that the county may not accept the
Local Equalization Board suggested value and to watch their
mail closely for any correspondence from the county.
After the equalization meeting
was over several issues were discussed by the mayor and council
members.
For several years there has been
an odor issue near Motel 6. Upon
further investigation the odor
was found to be coming from
human waste. Garbage and a cot
have also been seen near this site.
The council will address this prob-

lem at their April meeting.
Hahn and council members discussed the half burned Wounded
Knee building. The owner has attended several council meetings in
the past and repeatedly said he
was ordering the rafters and the
work would be completed right
away. It has been over a year and
a half and the council is feed up
with no action being taken to repair the building and will decide at
the April meeting on what action
they will take to get this issue resolved.
Hahn and the council agreed the
city should take part in the Rushmore Railroad Authority meetings.
In order to complete the sewer
project, waste from cell one needs
to be pumped into cell three. The
city does not own a pump large
enough to do the job and agreed
they should rent a pump which
would have the project completed
in a week.
With no other discussions the
meeting was adjourned.

From the Governor of South Dakota
Upholding Obligations To
South Dakota’s Pension Fund
Nebraska’s well-known and
successful investor, Warren Buffett, mentioned public pension obligations in his annual letter to
Berkshire Hathaway shareholders:
“Local and state financial problems are accelerating, in large
part because public entities promised pensions they couldn’t afford.
Citizens and public officials typically under-appreciated the gigantic financial tapeworm that
was born when promises were
made that conflicted with a willingness to fund them.
Unfortunately, pension mathematics today remain a mystery to
most Americans.”
Buffett recognized that some
governments create an illusion of
a balanced budget by failing to
fund their pensions. If governments don’t have enough revenue,
or if they want to spend in other
areas, they underfund the needed
contribution to the pension fund.
Warren Buffett’s comment reminds us that many public bodies
fall prey to that temptation. They
don’t have the willingness to fund
pensions, because a failure to
fund has no immediate consequences.

With a few exceptions, virtually
all government employees in
South Dakota, if they have a pension plan, are under one plan –
The South Dakota Retirement
System.
This includes all public school
teachers in our state, all public
university professors and employees, all state employees, and
many county and city employees
– all under the S.D. Retirement
System.
Third grade teachers in Canton, snowplow drivers in Mobridge, social workers in Winner,
university professors in Madison,
policemen and firefighters in
Rapid City – all on one plan.
Last November, the Milliman
2013 Public Pension Funding
Study evaluated the top 100 pension funds in the nation, judging
their condition as of the end of
June, 2012.
At that time, with a market
value of $7.8 billion in assets,
South Dakota’s plan was 93 percent funded.
The South Dakota Retirement
System tied for third best funded
of those 100 top plans in the U.S.
Many pension plans were grossly
underfunded – Arizona at 49 percent, Chicago Municipal Employees Pension at 38 percent, Con-

necticut State Employees at 37
percent, Illinois Teachers at 41
percent, Indiana Teachers at 44
percent and the worst – Ky., Employees Retirement Fund at only
29 percent funded.
After last year’s strong investment returns, our plan, the South
Dakota Retirement System, is
again over 100 percent funded.
This month, I signed Senate
Bill 152, which also fully funded
the Cement Plant Retirement
Plan.
This plan was frozen when
South Dakota sold the state cement plant in 2001. It still provides benefits to over 350 former
employees, and, for a variety of
reasons, the frozen plan had become underfunded.
The now fully funded plan will
be consolidated into the South
Dakota Retirement System. This
will reduce administrative burdens, provide more investment
flexibility and create a permanent
solution to the funding of this
plan.
It’s one more area where South
Dakota has improved our financial condition. Consequently, it’s
also a “tapeworm” that South
Dakota won’t need to worry about
anymore.

Short takes from the State Capitol

Courtesy Photo

By Elizabeth “Sam” Grosz
Community News Service
Here’s a brief review of some of
the S.D. Legislature’s recent action:
•An amended version of a bill
that creates a study commission
on autism went to the Governor
for his signature. This version
provides seven areas to be studied, said Rep. Brock Greenfield,
R-Clark, and was a “fine display
of compromise.”
•Mountain pine beetles beware. More money has been approved in the fight against the
bug that has been decimating
Black Hills trees. Final approval
was given March 12 to SB28, allocating $1,950,000 to the battle:
$350,000 for work in Custer State
Park and $1.6 million for work on
private and other lands. Since it
is an emergency bill, it will go into
effect as soon as the governor
signs it.
•Four projects funded in a single bill narrowly was accepted by
both houses, despite objections
that they should have been handled separately. The four are $1

million to the Lewis and Clark
pipeline extension to Madison;
$500,000 to the Ellsworth Air
Force Base authority; $464,000 to
a shale research program at S.D.
School of Mines; and $500,000 to
the state aeronautics fund, replacing money removed five years
ago.
•A change in how the $41.3 million construction of the state veteran’s home, Hot Springs, will be
funded was approved and sent to
the governor, who had proposed
the change. Instead, a $23.6 million federal grant and $16.4 million appropriated by the legislature last year is expected to fund
most of the project.
•Final approval was given by
legislators this past week to
HB1041, which provides $7.2 million for railroad line from Chamberlain to Lyman, as well as repair to the bridge over the Missouri River. If the track is rebuilt,
a $40 million grain/fertilizer facility is expected to be built by
Wheat Growers at Lyman. The
rail line is state-owned. The
money, said Rep. David Lust, R-

Rapid City, is one-time money
that will be invested in the state’s
infrastructure.
•Funding for a research park in
Sioux Falls as part of the University of South Dakota was given
final approval and HB1175 was
sent to Daugaard for his signature. This will help graduate programs, as well as business. “This
is for everybody,” said Rep. Anne
Hajek, R-Sioux Falls.
•A swine teaching and research
facility to be built at South
Dakota State University, Brookings, under HB1112, was sent to
the governor for his signature. It
is widely regarded as a state of
the art research facility for students,” said Rep. Fred Romkema,
R-Spearfish.
•Final approval was given to
SB85, concerning police logs
being open for inspection. Rep.
Isaac Latterell, R-Tea, said this is
an open government bill, which
seeks to ensure police logs are automatically open to the public and
the media. Currently, most are,
he said, but this clarifies the
process. No personal information,
just location and type of call, are
on the log. The bill passed 70-0 in
the House and was sent to the
Governor.
•Teach for America failed to receive its $250,000 funding from
the state this year. An attempt to
obtain the money through a lastday amendment to the general
appropriations bill also failed.
However, there was discussion
about studying the matter and
providing funding in the future,
along with funding for the Jobs
for America program. Both programs seek to keep at-risk students in school.

S.D. Health Department highlights health
pioneers for 125th anniversary
As South Dakota celebrates 125
years of statehood this year, the
Department of Health is highlighting health pioneers and
health-related milestones at a
new website, doh.sd.gov/news/hea
lthpioneers.aspx.
The site offers a chronology of
significant health events from the
date of the last reported smallpox
case in the state (1952) to the
H1N1 influenza outbreak in
2009-2010.
The listing of health pioneers at
the site includes such notables as:
•Dr. Charles Eastman, the first
licensed American Indian physician to practice in the state.
•Dr. Julie Gerberding, South
Dakota native and former director of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
•Dr. Abbie Jarvis, 1854-1931,
the first woman licensed to practice medicine in South Dakota,
was honored with a U.S. Postal
Service stamp commemorating
her contributions to the medical
profession.
•In 1877, more than 10 years
before statehood, the first hospital in what would become South
Dakota was established in Lead.
•In 1891, the South Dakota legislature made its first appropriation to the State Board of Health,
the department’s precursor – a
total of $1,000.
•In 1892 the State Board of
Health began licensing physicians and licensed 82 physicians.
•The most dangerous contagious diseases, named in the
order of importance as causes of
deaths, were diphtheria, scarlet
fever, smallpox, typhoid fever,
whooping cough and measles.
•Sixty-seven diphtheria deaths
were reported.
•The importance of vaccinations against smallpox was recognized.
•In 1898 the State Board of
Health had a discussion at their
May meeting regarding the prosecution of quacks, but the small
appropriation made by the state
made it practically impossible to
take initiative steps.
•In 1900 the average lifespan
in the state was just 33 years.
Information and photos for the
site were obtained from the South
Dakota State Historical Society,
the South Dakota Hall of Fame
and the University of South
Dakota Library Archives.
From now until November the
department will also be featuring
highlights from the site on its
Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/SDHealthDepartment.

•Dwight “Bill” Hustead - Pharmacist, 1927 - 1999. Bill provided
the direction to make Wall Drug
the largest drug store in the
world.
He helped codify the laws pertaining to pharmacy while serving in the South Dakota Legislature. Gave testimony at the
Lyman-Jones-Oglala Sioux-West
River Rural Water System hearing in Washington, D.C., resulting
in the Mni Wiconi Water System
in western South Dakota.

•Dr. George Mangulis - Medical
Doctor, 1922 - 2009. Served in the
Philip community for more than
50 years with 30 of those years
being the only doctor in the area.
George established clinics in
several area towns. Trained
physician assistants in the towns
of Murdo and White River. He
pursued the goal of expanding
medical coverage for the entire
area.

•Dr. Robert Hayes - Medical
Doctor and Administrator, 1921 1991. Served as secretary of the
South Dakota Department of
Health, 1970-1975.
Robert worked to improve rural
health care in South Dakota.
Served as the program coordinator for the South Dakota Division
of the Nebraska-South Dakota
Regional Medical Program.
He was instrumental in getting
legislation passed to be one of the
first states to create the physician
assistant (PA) as a health occupation in the 1970s.
Robert served as a professor of
clinical medicine and as the director of the Physician Extender Program at the University of South
Dakota School of Medicine

•Theodore Hustead - Pharmacist, 1902 - 1999. Started Wall
Drug in 1931, along with his wife
Dorothy, which would become the
largest drug store in the United
States.
Ted served on the State Board
of Pharmacy.

Kindergarten class wins ice cream sundae party

Laurie Hindman Photo

Children Mircacle Network ...The Wall Middle School/High School Student Council challenged all classes
to “Change Wars” to raise money for the Children’s Miracle Network. The Wall School students raised a total
of $1043.83! The Wall Student Council will present the Children’s Miracle Network donation at their state convention in Pierre, March 30th - April 1st. The winning class receives an ice cream sundae party. Winning first
place was the kindergarten class - $235.69; second place went to the second graders - $212.81; third place winners
were the fifth graders - 144.19 and in fourth place were the first graders - $105.18. The rest of the classes did
awesome too! Pictured back row: from l to r ... Kyler Kjerstad, Morgan Miller, Bria Buhmann, Brand
Hilgenkamp, Emmet Dinger, Austan Kjerstad, Jace Mohr and Libby Diedrichs. Middle row: from l to r ... Trevor
Schulz, Jaiden Fauske, Hadley Bryan, Athena Simons, Jaxon Arnio, Nash Delger, Talon Anderson and Dawson
Handcock. Front row: from l to r ... Cayne Merrill, Braydn Rubio, Younger Amiotte, Taylor McDonnell, Jeremiah
Lange and Maranda Poor Bear. (Not pictured Mrs. Marlie Trask.)

Community

Conservation Corner
Pollinators….IT’S WHAT’S
ABUZZZ!
Pollination is the process in
which pollen is deposited from the
flowers reproductive parts to a
different flower and then the
flower uses the pollen to produce
a fruit or a seed. Many plants cannot reproduce without pollen
being carried to them. That is
why they rely on the pollinators.
When we think of pollinators
we think of bees. Then some people think bee stings, pollen, and
allergies. Truth is we all depend
on pollinators in the production of
most fruits and vegetables that
we eat and in the regeneration of
many forage crops used by livestock.
It is estimated that one out of
every three bites you eat, you

should thank a bee, butterfly, bat,
bird or other pollinator. We all depend on pollinators!
Pollinators depend on us!! You
may have heard that bees are disappearing and bats are dying.
One quarter of all managed honey
bee colonies have been lost since
1990.
The most severe decline the
U.S. has ever experienced. There
are fewer bee hives in the U.S.
today than at any time in the last
50 years. The demise has been
brought on by the spread of disease, parasitic mites, invasion of
Africanized honey bees, exposure
to pesticides, loss of habitat, and
climate to name a few.
What can you do to help increase the number of native
honey bees?

You can start by planning windbreaks with a variety of flowering
trees and shrubs. Such as Dogwood, Cherry, Plum, Willow and
Poplars which provide nectar
and/or pollen in the early spring
when bee food is scarce.
Use less pesticides and herbicides if possible. Use them sparingly and responsibly
Minimize your tillage by only
turning over the soil you have to.
Most pollinators live underground for most of the year.
Provide undisturbed habitat. A
range of native plants blooming
at different times during the
spring, summer and fall.
Together let’s try to provide better habitats for our pollinators!
Honey Bee Pollinator applications are due by April 18, 2014.

Ranch brings record prices at auction
The Seven Blackfoot Ranch drew
a huge crowd to the tiny community of Milesville, S.D., for the St.
Patrick’s Day auction of 12,000
acres.
This was the largest ranch ever
sold by auction in Haakon County.
This scenic ranch was owned by
Dave and Sandy Solberg and their
family.
This ranch had a nice cross section of grassland, draws, and
breaks, with acres of prime farmland and three homes situated
throughout the nine tracts. Bidders
arrived from seven different states.
After very spirited bidding, the

nine tracts sold to six different individuals at an average price of
$1,238 per acre. Prices ranged from
$850 to $2,000 per acre.
Tract One, 600 acres of farmland
with some growing wheat, sold for
$2,000 per acre.
Tract Three was 625 acres of
mostly level pasture land with good
water, and it brought $1,200 per
acre.
Tracts Two, Four, and Six were
considered farm ground, and sold
at $1,750, $1,675, and $1,550 per
acre.
Tracts Five, Seven, and Eight
were mostly pasture with some hay

and possible farm ground.
These larger acreages, from
2,128 acres to 2,604 acres, each
had a home and a few outbuildings. Their prices were $1,050,
$1,030, and $850 per acre.
Tract Nine was an 18.5 acre site
set up with four camping lots. It
had electricity, rural water, and a
commercial septic system. It sold
at $1,975 per acre.
Auctioneers were Dan Piroutek
of Piroutek Auction Service,
Milesville, and Lonnie Arneson of
Arneson Auction Service, Elm
Springs.

Rabies cases drop in 2013
After two years of increasing
cases, rabies numbers in South
Dakota dropped to 28 in 2013.
There were 60 cases of animal
rabies in 2012 and 40 in 2011.
“Rabies is a cyclical disease,
with high case numbers one year
and lower numbers the next but
the fact is that it is a risk every
year in South Dakota,” said Dr.
Lon Kightlinger, state epidemiologist for the Department of
Health. “It’s important to make
sure your pets are vaccinated to
protect yourself and your animals.”
Twenty South Dakota counties
had rabies detections in 2013.
Those detections included
seven domestic animals – five cattle, one dog and one cat – as well
as 16 skunks and five bats.
South Dakota’s last human rabies case was reported in 1970.
Infected wild animals can pass

rabies to pets or livestock, which
can then expose humans.
A non-vaccinated pet bitten by
a rabid animal will likely have to
be put to sleep, noted Dr. Russ
Daly, state public health veterinarian. “Rabies vaccinations for
pets are widely available and not
expensive,” said Dr. Daly. “Getting your pet vaccinated not only
protects people, it may save the
life of your pet as well.”
Dr. Daly said rabies vaccination
should also be considered for
other animals such as horses and
show animals that have frequent
contact with people.
Individuals can also reduce the
risk of rabies with these precautions:
•Do not handle, adopt or attempt to feed wild animals. Teach
children to avoid animals they
don't know and to tell you immediately if they are bitten or

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scratched by any animal.
•Avoid any animal, wild or domestic, that behaves strangely
and immediately report it to your
local veterinarian, animal control
or law enforcement office.
•Do not handle dead, sick or injured animals. If you must, use
heavy gloves, sticks, or other tools
to avoid direct contact. Wear
gloves and protective eyewear
when treating sick animals to
prevent exposure to saliva.
•Close outdoor trash containers
tightly to avoid attracting skunks
and raccoons.
•Clear wood or junk piles from
homes to deter wild animals from
moving in.
•Do not handle bats. If bats are
found in a room with children or
sleeping people, call the department, your physician or local animal control officer.
Contact a veterinarian immediately if you suspect rabies in a
wild animal, pet or livestock, or if
your animal has been bitten by a
possibly rabid animal.
If you have a potential exposure
to rabies, wash the affected area
with soap and water right away
and call your doctor or the Department of Health at 1-800-5921861. Contact your veterinarian
for instructions on how to handle
the animal.
If the animal is dead, save the
carcass for testing, being careful
not to damage the head.
If it is alive, contact your local
animal control authorities so it
can be captured for examination
or observation.
If you are bitten or scratched by
a rabid animal, rabies vaccination
can prevent human disease.

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Pennington County Courant • March 27, 2014 •

Pierre Week in Review
By District 30 Representative Lance Russell
The budget approved this past
week by the South Dakota Legislature increased government by
adding 124 new state employees
and $161 million in additional
spending over the previous year’s
budget.
In the three years since the
2011 ten percent cut of $127 million, the number of state employees has grown by 319 and the
state budget has exploded by
$300 million.
Although the Legislature’s increased spending over the past
four years has more than doubled
the amount of the ten percent cut,
the K-12 per-pupil allocation from
the state is still less than before
the ten percent cut. Because I do
not believe the priorities of the
budget are sound and fair, I voted
against this year’s budget.
The priorities for the $300 million of spending since 2011 in-

Publisher:
Don Ravellette
General Manager of
Operations:
Kelly Penticoff
Office Manager/Graphics:
Ann Clark
Staff Writer:
Laurie Hindman

Subscription Rates: In Pennington
County and those having Kadoka,
Belvidere, Cottonwood, Elm Springs, Interior, Philip, Midland, Milesville, and Cedar
Pass addresses: $35.00 per year; PLUS
applicable sales tax. In-State: $42.00 per
year; PLUS applicable sales tax. Out-ofState: $42.00 per year.
Periodicals Postage Paid at Wall, SD.
Postmaster
Send change of address notices to:
Pennington Co. Courant
PO Box 435
Wall, SD 57790-0435.
Established in 1906. The Pennington
Co. Courant, an official newspaper of Pen-

clude the allocation of $30 million
in this year’s budget to fund the
Build South Dakota Program for
the next three years.
Build South Dakota includes
money to pay for English as a second language for schools where
industries encouraged by state
government over the past twelve
years attract large immigrant
communities.
Build South Dakota is also designed to building low income
housing, which will be largely directed to the same communities.
Another budget priority includes the hiring of additional parole and probation officers to handle the increasing population of
convicted felons who will be supervised in the local communities
as a result of the Governor’s
Criminal Justice Initiative.
There is also additional money
in the budget to hire the state em-

ployees necessary to comply with
Obamacare.
On a positive note, money that
the state agencies did not spend
from last year’s budget was allocated for the coming fiscal year in
special appropriation bills for the
construction of the State Veterans
Home without any borrowing of
money; the cutting of pine beetle
infested trees; improvements at
the Black Hills Playhouse; and to
pay down debt.
I commend the Governor for
using unobligated, one time
money to pay down the South
Dakota’s bonded indebtedness.
Thank you for the opportunity
to serve you in the House of Representatives and please do not
hesitate to contact me at 7453228 or Rep.Russell@state.sd.us
at any time.

Wall Library news
By Asst. Librarian
David Jones
You don’t really realize how
small this library is until you get
new books to put on the shelves.
There is no free space, no gaping holes to be filled in. It requires
astute consideration of what can
be delegated to storage and what
needs to be on the shelf.
And of course you can’t put
mysteries in the romance section
and vice versa.
How long is a book “new” so
that it can go on the carousel before it is moved to regular shelv-

ing?
What further complicates the
process is popularity. That cannot
be the sole criteria for shelf space.
There has to be room for the classics, for regional history and literature, for local favorites.
And of course, local authors we have a few and they deserve to
be on our shelves.
Children’s books are somewhat
easier, especially if they select
them! Big and colorful wins the
day! Which takes up even more
shelf space, complicating the
process.

Don’t think I’m complaining.
This is the process that makes
working in a library interesting.
And we don’t rely on our brains
alone - we try very hard to get the
books you request. That, too, is
part of the fun of working in the
library.
Come in and see what we’ve
got! We’re at 407 Main Street and
open on Wednesday from 12:00
p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Thursday from
9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and 1:30
p.m., to 5:00 p.m. Friday from
8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

USDA encourages early registration for FSA Programs
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Farm Service
Agency (FSA) Administrator
Juan M. Garcia recommends that
farmers and ranchers who plan to
participate in FSA programs register in advance.
Producers are encouraged to report farm records and business
structure changes to a local FSA
Service Center before April 15,
2014.
Enrollment for the disaster programs authorized by the 2014
Farm Bill, including the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP)
and the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) will begin by
April 15, 2014.
"We expect significant interest
in these programs,” said Garcia.
“Early registration should help
improve the sign-up process and
allow us to expedite implementation of the programs. I strongly
encourage producers to complete
their paperwork ahead of time.”
Examples of updates or
changes to report include:

•New producers or producers
who have not reported farm
records to FSA.
•Producers who have recently
bought, sold or rented land. Those
producers need to ensure that
changes have been reported and
properly recorded by local FSA
county office personnel. Reports
of purchased or sold property
should include a copy of the land
deed, and if land has been leased,
then documentation should be
provided that indicates the producer had/has control of the
acreage.
•Producers that have changed
business structures (e.g. formed a
partnership or LLC) need to ensure that these relationships and
shares are properly recorded with
FSA. Even family farms that
have records on file may want to
ensure that this is recorded accurately as it may impact payment
limits.
Farm records can be updated
during business hours at FSA
Service Centers that administer

the county where the farm or
ranch is located. Producers can
contact their local FSA Service
Center in advance to find out
what paperwork they may need.
In addition, bank account information should be supplied or updated if necessary to ensure that
producers receive payments as
quickly as possible through direct
deposit.
While any producer may report
farm records and business structure changes, it is especially important for producers who suffered livestock, livestock grazing,
honeybee, farm-raised fish, or
tree/vine losses for 2011, 2012,
2013 or 2014, and may be eligible
for assistance through one of the
four disaster programs.
For further information about
our disaster programs and
USDA’s Farm Bill implementation plan, visit FSA’s 2014 Farm
Bill Web page. FSA Service Center locations can be found on the
FSA website.

Robocallers target consumers in credit card scam
Attorney General Marty Jackley is warning South Dakota consumers to be cautious of robocalls
targeting consumers with a scam
that implies that their Mastercard has been locked or suspended.
The automated phone message
prompts the consumer to press a
number one to unlock the card.
Once the number one is pressed
the consumer is prompted to

enter their card number. The
number that is showing up on the
caller ID is 832-328-3283, which
is an insurance business in Houston, Texas. The owner of that
business has been inundated with
calls from South Dakota consumers and is not associated with
the caller.
Consumers should refrain from
giving out any personal information and to hang up without

Ravellette
Publications,
Inc. Call us for
your printing
needs!
859-2516

pressing any numbers.
If you believe you are a victim
of this scam or need any additional information contact the
South Dakota Consumer Protection Division at 1-800-300-1986 or
consumership@state.sd.us.
Anyone who has given out personal
financial
information
should contact their financial institution immediately.

8,.. %( 12(0
$ / 51

Pennington
County Courant

$ / $0'

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U.S.P.S 425-720

nington County, the towns of Wall, Quinn
and Wasta, and the school district in Wall,
SD, is published weekly by Ravellette Publications, Inc. The Pennington County
Courant office is located on the corner of
4th Ave. and Norris St. in Wall, SD.

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Telephone: (605)279-2565
FAX: (605)279-2965
E-mail Address: courant@gwtc.net
Copyrighted 1982: Ravellette Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may
be reprinted, photocopied, or in any way reproduced from this publication, in whole or
in part, without the written consent of the
publisher.

2

Got a story?
Are we missing anything? ... Let us know about it!
Call us 279-2565 or e-mail us at courant@gwtc.net

School
Senior projects for 2013 - 2014

Laurie Hindman photos

“Mural Making”... Renetta Lanfear created a mural using spray cans and
air brushing techniques. She wanted a project that would expand and
stretch her art knowledge and give the viewer a painting that would direct
their eye to different scenes in her mural. Lanfear plans to attend either
University of South Dakota or Washburn University in Kan., to become a
Graphic Designer.

Pennington County Courant • March 27, 2014•3

All-conference
girls’ basketball
The high school girls’ all-conference basketball teams have been
selected for the Western Great
Plains Conference for the 20132014 season.
The most valuable player recognition went to Madison Mathew –
Jones County. The conference
champion team was also Jones
County.
On the all-conference first team
the selected players are Mathew,
Brianna Philipsen – New Underwood, Tania Risse – Bennett
County, Jaye Bear Heels – White
River and Chesney Garnos –
Lyman.
Selected on the second team, the
players were Monica Bielmaier –
Wall, Rachel Buxcel – Jones

MS Student of the Month

County, Kiyana Martin – Stanley
County, Madison Hand – Philip,
and Brooklyn Halverson – Lyman.
The third all-conference team
consisted of Taylor Brindley –
New
Underwood,
Autum
Kamerzell – Bennett County,
Anna Flitner – Lyman, Carlee
Johnston – Wall, and Bailey
Tibbs – Stanley County.
The conference records for the
girls’ teams during the 2013-2014
season were: Jones County – 10-0,
Bennett County – 7-1, Lyman – 62, Wall – 6-4, New Underwood – 45, White River – 4-4, Stanley
County – 2-7, Philip – 2-8, Rapid
City Christian – 1-4, and Kadoka
Area – 0-10.

BH Financial Services
Student of the Month

Laurie Hindman Photo

Cash Wilson ... is the Wall Middle School Student of the Month for
March 2014. Cash is in the seventh grade and is a great student! He is very
involved in many extracurricular activities and is a dedicated athlete. He
participates in activities such as football, wrestling, track, and Student
Council (is the S.D. Middle School Student Council Vice President). He
is the son of Kevin Wilson and Ronda Wilson. Janet Lurz from First Interstate Bank presented Cash with a First Interstate Bank sweatshirt and
bag. Congratulations Cash!

March 2829-30-31
Divergent
***
April 4-7:
Son of God

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“Management”... Tucker O’Rourke did a management internship with
the Two Bit Steakhouse for his senior project. He worked every aspect of
the business from start up to closing. O’Rourke plans to attend college at
University of Minnesota, Morris, to test out the Business Management
courses.

Courtesy Photo

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April 11-14
&
April 18-21:
Rio 2

Fri: 8:00 p.m.
Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m.
Mon: 7:00 p.m.
For updates on movies, call:

Black Hills Financial Services ... located at Black Hills Federal Credit
Union, is pleased to announce that Katy Bielmaier has been selected as
March’s Student of the Month. Katy is a very active freshman at Wall High
School. She is on the basketball, volleyball, and golf teams. She is also involved in the Future Farmers of America, Family Career and Community
Leaders of America, Youth to Youth Services and is the vice-president of
her freshman class. In her spare time she keeps extra busy working and
going to various sport camps. She really enjoys helping out her community and does so by volunteering at the Country Cupboard Food Panty
and participating in Wall Trash Day. After graduating from High School,
Katy plans on going to college and earning her degree in the Medical field.
Katy is the daughter of Kevin and Jody Bielmaier of Wall, SD. Congratulation to Katy from Black Hills Financial Services!

courant@
gwtc.net

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“Wildlife Management” ... Kelly Green has worked at the Badlands
National Park on the Burrowing Owl project for the last couple of years.
Green said she has learned a lot about wildlife and plans to major in
Wildlife Management at B.H.S.U.

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For Sale Private Treaty
Yearling Angus Bulls

Sires: •Upward •Hoover Dam •CC7 •Matrix

Dartt Angus

Dan 279-2242 • Daryl 441-7408 • Wall, SD

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Subscription Rates: Local: $35 plus tax; Out-of-Area: $42
plus tax; Out of-State: $42 or subscribe online at:
www.RavellettePublications.com

Social News
Wasta Wanderings

Wall News
Gathered by Frances Poste
Lyle Williams has been in the
Regional Hospital at Rapid City
for over a week — went in on the
17th. But the good news is that he
is improving and may get to come
home on Wednesday. His granddaughter, Mindy Halverson of
Dell Rapids, and her girls came to
visit over the weekend.
Esther Wolford fell from a step
stool in her kitchen last Monday
and is nursing a sore upper left
arm. X-rays didn’t show a break,
but it was hard to read, so in the
meantime she has it in a sling,
taking it easy and will check with
the doctor again this week. I understand Gerald is doing very
well as a nurse. Their daughter,

Amy and Terry Beers of Howard,
came to Wall and spent last weekend. Mend quickly, Esther!
Senior Citizen’s potluck supper
took place at Prairie Village last
Thursday evening. Only eighteen
people were in attendance but
food was plentiful! You should
have seen the dessert table — at
least eight pies and one cake! Almost looked like a pie social. See
you next month on the third
Thursday.
On Sunday, the Methodist
Church was promoting camping.
Ashley Wilsey from the staff at
Storm Mountain gave a review of
camps available and for different
age levels. Our District Superintendent Randy Cross gave the
message. After services, a bounteous lunch was held downstairs.
Sounds like Josh and Shasta
Geigle had a wonderful trip to attend workshops (training to develop leadership) sponsored by
Partners in Agriculture Leadership. Besides New Jersey, New
York and Washington, D.C., in the
USA, the trip also included
Brazil. Our congratulations to
them!
Trudy (Schreiber) Storkel of
Stilwell, Kan., passed away on
March 17th. She was preceded in
death by her parents Anna and
Henry Schreiber, two brothers

QUILT CLASS
Taught by
Lu Ann Garland

Saturday, April 5
8:30 am
Wall Community Center
Board Room

Space Limited
Call 279-2458

Moving? …

Please join us for an evening of
friends, fun, food and
firewater to celebrate

80th Birthday!
April 5, 2014

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Richard Wahlstrom
www.edwardjones.com
If you’re like many travelers,
you get a little nervous when your
airplane goes through some turbulence. And if you’re like a lot of
investors, you may get somewhat
jumpy when the financial markets are volatile. Yet flight turbulence probably isn’t as scary as it
seems, and the same may be true

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TUrBULENCE...AS A
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4:00 p.m. • The Clubhouse,
1801 Golf Course Road,
Wall, SD.

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Submitted by
Lloyd & Margee Willey
Early last week, I was hearing
the “fee-be” call and while I did
smile at the sound I made no effort to find a viewing spot and
watch for a “sighting”. By golly,
there came into view an industrious little group looking for whatever says Phoebe’s find tasty —
bugs, seeds — poking under
leaves and fallen bark. I think I
smiled all day!
Seeing the W.R.E.A. trucks and
workers out and about is a good
reminder to be mindful how long
and tirelessly they all worked last
October to help every patron get
up and running so quickly. They
probably still are completing
work, there was so much to do!
Our thanks to all of you — many
times over.
April “doings” in Wasta:
Annual Pancake Supper, Wasta
Methodist Church, April 3
(Thursday), starting 5:00 p.m. to
? (until everyone is fed! Goodwill
donation. Fresh, hot pancakes,
sausage and eggs. Maybe there
will be a little singing there as
well, if there should be a need.
Wasta’s annual Easter Egg
Hunt and games: Saturday, April
19th, Lurz Memorial Park, 1:00
p.m. Bring your baskets or bags
or grandpa’s hands and pockets to
hold eggs.
Getting back on track, congratulations to all the fifth graders on
their graduation from D.A.R.E.
class. Brody Carter and “adopted”
grandkids, Cameron Ausmann
and Katy Humphrey were partic-

ipators and, all learned some
hugely important information.
Good job guys!
And, thank you Wall School for
putting this on and Deputy
McPherson for giving his time to
teach.
Thank you Rapid City reader
for taking the time to send us the
very nice letter regarding the
1940 Wasta High School Annual,
the Wastoka. You made our day!
We’re not quite at the end of the
“Athletics” section and a few
pages of Activities will finish the
book. It has given us such pleasure to read it and to share with all
of you. The hours the senior class
must have spent getting it put together is a giant task in itself —
especially in this day and time of
practically instant mass produced
everything! This treasured book
was all hand done!
An after in Elm Springs:
Friday was W.T.L. club meeting
at president Jean Linn’s home.
Present were two additional
‘Linn’ women, Kellie and Emily,
three Trask women, RoseMary,
Celine and Maria, Margaret
Nachtigall, Dorothy Anderson
and Margee Willey. Everyone
seemed ready for a gathering and
a bit of fun so after business was
attended to, a couple of silly
games and refreshment —Kellie
and Celine made a delicious
birthday cake for Jean, Maria
helped serve, candles on the cake
were lighted and blown out, a bit
of the old traditional birthday
wishes song was enthusiastically
and loudly belted out, the cake

for market volatility — if you
know how to respond.
Let’s look at some positive responses to market movements:
•Don’t overreact to turbulence.
Turbulence happens on most
flights, but passengers are well
aware that they can’t “bail out” at
30,000 feet, so they generally
don’t panic. As an investor, you
also need to avoid panicky behavior — by not taking a “time out”
from investing. Over a period of
decades, if you were to miss just a
handful of the market’s best-performing days, your returns could

Now I belong to
Jesus;
Jesus belongs to
me—
Not for the years
of time alone,
But for eternity.
—Clayton

Byron, until we
meet again.
6-27-72 — 3-29-10

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Wall, SD

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and ice cream polished off, gifts
and cards opened, and then, well
what next? We sat around the
table and had a good visit! It is always good to be with these
women. It’s impossible not to talk
about weather and gardens, will
it be a wet or dry summer, prom
and graduation coming up — ALREADY! Just a good day.
John summed up his feelings “I
just am ready to get out and get
to work”. AMEN to that!
A good afternoon with good
company and good food — can’t
hardly beat that!
Now — I’m ready for SPRING
too — in the meantime.
wasta High School 1940
yearbook — The wastoka
Athletics
KiTTENBALL
Four victories and four defeats
was the high school boy’s kittenball record for the year. The team
was coached by Mr. Berry and Mr.
Glenn. The victories were over
Quinn, 14-7 and 26-10; Owanka,
13-7 and 13-4. Underwood defeated Wasta, 14-4 and 12-7; Scenic defeated Wasta, 13-9 and 2219. Wasta won consolations at
Quinn, September 30.
LiNE UP: Pitcher, Woelz, Coleman; Catcher, Grotzke; First
Baseman, L. Darnall; Second
Baseman, Reiser; Third Baseman, Meiners; Utility, Woelz;
Rover, Woelz; Short Stop, Masterson; Left Fielder, Hawkey; Center
Fielder, Stone; Right Fielder, Trople, Hawkey, Stone, Coleman.
Happy Trails!

FINANCIAL FOCUS

Stan Mettler's

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and three sisters. She is survived
by her husband, John; sons, John
Jr., and Steven; daughter, Peggy;
and grandson, Cody. We offer our
condolences to her family and
friends.
Florence Dean of Philip fell on
Saturday, the 15th, coming out of
the United Church after Memorial Services for Patsy Freeman.
She was taken to the Rapid City
Regional Hospital where she had
surgery as the femur of her left
leg was fractured. Since then, she
has come back to Philip as a patient at the Philip Hospital. We
wish for her a quick recovery!
Our congratulations go out to
Dorothy Urban of Philip as she
celebrated her 100th birthday on
March 22nd. What a long life she
has lived!
Jess Williams was home from
Sioux Falls last week on spring
break from the University.
Having the calendar say it is
now “Springs” hasn’t made it so.
Snow seems to come sifting down
a lot of the days of the past week
— it hasn’t built up for which we
are thankful. Next seven day forecast has some nice temperatures
some days — we’ll keep hoping.
“When everything seem sot be
going against you, remember that
the airplane takes off against the
wind, not with it.” ~Henry Ford

Good Gravy Stan's 80!

Please notify the
Pennington County
Courant with
your change of
address two weeks
before moving,
or as quickly as
possible, so as
not to miss a
single issue.

)..

Pennington County Courant • March 27 2014 • 4

)

Born:
November 21, 2013
Weight:
8 lbs. 7 oz. 21”
Parents: Jordon & Rachel Kjerstad, Quinn
Big Brother & Big Sisters:
Kyler, Karmyn & Karley
Grandparents: Ron & Linda Parsons,
New Underwood
Clayton & Charlene Kjerstad, Wall
Great-Grandparents:
Marcella Parsons, Custer
Mary Kjerstad, Quinn;
Beatrice Ramsey, Spearfish

be dramatically reduced. And the
best days often follow some of the
worst. So if you’re not invested in
the market, you could miss out on
the beginning of a new rally,
which is typically when the
biggest gains occur.
•Balance your “cargo.” The
ground crew properly positions an
airplane’s cargo to maintain the
plane’s center of gravity and reduce the effects of turbulence.
When you invest, you also need to
achieve balance by owning a variety of vehicles, including stocks,
bonds, government securities and
certificates of deposit. You’ll want
your investment mix to reflect
your risk tolerance, goals and
time horizon. While this type of
diversification can’t guarantee
profits or protect against loss, it
can reduce the effects of “turbulence” — that is, market volatility
— on your portfolio. Over time,
your “cargo” (your investments)
may shift, becoming too heavy in
stocks or bonds relative to your
objectives. Consequently, you’ll
need to periodically rebalance
your portfolio to ensure it’s meeting your needs.
•Match your “transportation
method” with your goals. If you
are flying from New York to Los
Angeles, you may experience delays or some changes in the flight
plan — but your goal is still to
reach Los Angeles as quickly and
efficiently as possible. Consequently, you wouldn’t scrap the
idea of flying and head to the
West Coast on foot. When you invest, you will also encounter
events, such as market downturns, that you feel may be slowing you down in your progress toward your long-term objectives,
such as a comfortable retirement.
But if your objectives haven’t
changed, neither should your
“transportation method” of reaching them. In other words, don’t
abandon your long-term strategy
in favor of quick fixes, such as
chasing after “hot” stocks that
may not be suitable for your
needs.
•Maintain perspective on your
“flight path.” When you’ve flown,
you’ve probably observed (perhaps with some envy) some of
your fellow passengers sleeping
through periods of turbulence. In
the investment world, these types
of people are the ideal long-term
investors — they know that turbulence, in the form of market
fluctuations, is normal, because
they’ve experienced it many times
before. Their perspective isn’t on
short-term events, such as volatility, but rather on the voyage toward their “final destination” —
i.e., the achievement of their longterm goals.
So when you fly, fasten your
seatbelt and relax. And when you
invest, don’t overreact to shortterm events. By following these
basic guidelines, you will be a
calmer traveler and a better investor.

annc@
gwtc.net

Religious

Pennington County Courant • March 27, 2014 • 5

Dispelling six common lawn care myths
The lawn is the backdrop to the
home and essential to curb appeal.
While keeping a healthy lawn
may seem straightforward (mow,
water, fertilize, etc.), don’t be
fooled by some common lawn care
myths.
Myth #1: All grass is created
equal.
Truth: Grass and their seeds
come in many different varieties,
all with various maintenance, climate and mower requirements.
While some varieties require more
sunlight, others may be prone to
certain diseases.
The type of grass and scope of
land you need to mow will determine how powerful of a lawn
mower you’ll need. Large lawns
with thicker, tougher grass will require a mower with higher horsepower and bigger, taller wheels.
Varieties of grass that have thinner blades and slower growth, or
a small backyard space, can be
maintained easily with a lower
horsepower machine. Riding mowers like the John Deere 100 Series
come in a variety of models to fit
different needs.
Myth #2: The shorter i cut
the grass, the less often i need
to mow.
Truth: For the best quality turf,
only remove one-third of the grass
blade with each mow. Shorter clippings break down more easily, al-

lowing some of the natural nitrogen to return to the soil. If you cut
too much at one time, the long
clippings can cause stress on the
grass, inhibiting healthy growth.
Myth # 3: Bagging it is best.
Truth: Although bagging grass
clippings is a common practice,
mulching is much more beneficial
to your lawn. Mulching returns essential nutrients, such as nitrogen, back to the soil.
As noted above, removing only a
small amount of the grass blade
each time you mow produces
shorter clippings that can decompose more quickly and discourages
the development of fungal diseases. If you do decide to bag, be
sure to compost your clippings and
reuse on site. Look for a lawn tractor, like the John Deere X300 Select Series, which comes with a
mulching feature on the mowing
deck, to help return the clippings
to the soil.
Myth #4: Focus on the green.
Truth: While grass is what we
see and tend to, the soil is the
most essential component for a
healthy growth year-round. Soil
supplies the roots with necessary
nutrients, which in turn yield a
beautiful lawn. Consider taking a
soil sample to your local university extension program or landscape supplier for soil analysis.
This will help determine the best

type of fertilizer to use throughout
the year.
Myth #5: Keep a consistent
mowing pattern.
Truth: It’s easy to fall into a
mowing routine, but frequently
cutting grass in the same direction can mat down the turf and inhibit growth. By varying the mowing pattern, you will reduce strain
on the turf and encourage a
healthier, more beautiful lawn.
Myth # 6: You’re off duty in
the winter.
Truth: Many people think grass
“dies” off in the winter so you can
take a break from lawn care; however, this is the best time to care
for your equipment. Complete
mower maintenance such as
adding fuel stabilizer, blade
sharpening and replacing missing
or damaged parts and your mower
will be prepped and ready come
springtime.
Aside from practicing the proper
mowing techniques, having the
right equipment is one of the most
important factors in maintaining
a green and vibrant lawn. The
proper type and size for your lawn
and lifestyle will help you mow
more efficiently so you can spend
more time enjoying and less time
maintaining your lawn. Visit
www.johndeere.com/residential to
learn which type of riding lawn
equipment is right for your yard.

Find Your Funny Bone
Laugh at yourself and the negative situations in life. We sometimes take things in life way to serious. Find your funny bone. Yes,
we all have a funny bone. It is connected to your, well your, well I
just know it is connected. They
say laughter is a good medicine. I
love to laugh. When the pressures
are starting to get to me I make a
serious effort to find something
funny to make me laugh. I need to
laugh.
Watch a funny movie, read some
good clean jokes, recall something
funny from your life that happened to you. These are just a few
of the things that we can do to get
a chuckle. Talk to a friend who
makes you laugh. Get around chil-

dren as soon as possible they will
always be saying something
funny.
Whenever I know that I know
that I need a good laugh to take
the pressures off one of my favorite things to do is sing songs
with my grandchildren. Not that I
can sing, but when they come over
they have their favorite songs on
the computer and we all sing them
together. There singing kind of
drowns me out. The Simple Life
and the Lion Sleeps Tonight are a
couple of their favorites. When
Alexis sings and she gets into her
real deep voice and purses her lips
and begins singing the lower notes
it just knocks me over. I cannot
help but laugh. It restores my joy

and lightens my load. It is absolutely amazing how this simple
act of hanging out and singing
with my grand kids can change
my attitude.
Keep looking for your funny
bone, you will find it I promise.
Look under the sofa. Maybe it is
there. Look under your bed maybe
you left it there. Or how about up
in the kitchen cupboards? Just
keep looking!
"The human race has only one
really effective weapon and that is
laughter." -Mark Twain
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands of people in highly motivational seminars each year. Call
Bob for more details at 800-4379715 and be sure to check out
Bob’s website at: www.mrattitudespeaks. com

annc@
gwtc.net

Fire safety tips for your family
No one wants to believe a house
fire could impact their family, but
house fires occur more often than
people think. According to the
NFPA, home fires kill an average
of seven people every day and
caused $11.6 billion in property
damage during 2010. One of the
most important tools in keeping
your family safe is a working fire
alarm.
In a recent survey by Omnibus,
more than 50 percent of people reported removing the batteries
from their home’s smoke alarms. A
working smoke alarm can make
all the difference in whether a
family has the critical time to es-

cape a home fire.
On average, families have less
than three minutes from the time
the first smoke alarm sounds to escape a fire. That’s why it’s so important to keep a working smoke
alarm on every level of your home
and outside each sleeping area and
to have an escape plan in place for
your family.
Other essential home fire safety
guidelines include:
•Test alarms once a month.
•Keep extra Energizer batteries
on hand for fire alarms and carbon
monoxide detectors.
•Install a fire extinguisher in or
near kitchen.

Club Notes
wALL ArT GUiLD CLUB
The Wall Art Guild met March
20th at Prairie Village. Nola
Price, Lorna Moore, Dorothy
Jones and Marilyn Ivers attended
the meeting.
Business was to prepare and
mail out entry forms for the Open
Art Show at Wall Drug Store,
April 12th and 13th.
Lorna had talked to LaVern
Terkildsen about some repair on
the peg board flats and he said he
would look at them.
Jamie Harrison, Belle Fourche,

will be this year’s Guest Artist.
Nola will buy the show ribbons
from Vanway Trophy in Rapid
City. Set up Day will be Friday,
2:30 p.m., April 11th to receive
and hang the art work.
The Wall Art Guild appreciates
Wall Drug Store allowing us to
have the annual Art Show there.
Anyone wanting entry forms for
the April Art Show can contact
Lorna Moore, PO Box 38, Quinn,
SD 57775 or call 386-2120.
Wall Art Guild
Lorna Moore Sec.

Wasta Methodist
Church

•Keep flashlights with fresh
batteries at your bedside for help
in finding the way out and signaling for help in the event of a fire.
•Develop and practice emergency escape plan.
•Participate in the “Change
Your Clock Change Your Battery”
campaign. Each year when you
change your clocks for daylight
saving time, change the batteries
in your home’s smoke and carbon
monoxide detectors.
When you change your clocks for
daylight-saving time, change the
batteries in your smoke alarms
and carbon monoxide detectors,
and remind your friends, family
and neighbors to do the same. To
download your escape grid or get
more information, visit facebook.
com/energizerbunny.

Email your social news, obituaries,
wedding & engagement
announcements to: annc@gwtc.net

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Badlands Cowboy Ministry
Bible Study • Wednesdays
Wall Rodeo Grounds • 279-2681
Winter 5:30 p.m. • Summer 7 p.m.

St. Margaret Church • Lakeside
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. even number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. odd number months

Evangelical Free Bible Church
Wall • Ron Burtz, Pastor
279-2867 • www.wallfreechurch.com
Sundays: Adult Bible Fellowship, 9 a.m.,
Sunday Worship Service, 10:30 a.m.;
Mondays: Women’s Bible Study, 7 p.m.

5:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Wasta
Services Sundays at 8:30 a.m.

Free Will Offering • See you there!

#$ +

.

Wall United Methodist Church
Pastor Darwin Kopfmann • 279-2359
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.

Pancakes, Sausage, Eggs

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Pancake Supper

Thurs., Feb. 11, 2014

- *$(#-

New Underwood Community Church
Pastor Wes Wileman
Sunday School 9 a.m.; Adult & Children Service 10 a.m.;
Youth Fellowship: Wed. 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Holy Rosary Church • Interior
Mass: Saturday 7 p.m. odd number months or
Sunday 10 a.m. even number months
First Baptist Church
New Underwood • Pastor James Harbert
Bible Study, 9:00 a.m.;
Sunday Services, 10:00 a.m.
St. John's Catholic Church
New Underwood • Father William Zandri
Mass: Sundays at 11:00 a.m.;
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. at
Good Samaritan Nursing Home;
Reconciliation before Sun. Mass

First Evangelical Lutheran Church
Wall • Pastor Curtis Garland
Sunday Service, 9 a.m.
Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Creighton
Services 11:00 a.m. Sunday morning.
Dowling Community Church
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Service 10:00 a.m.
Interior Community Church
Highway 44 East
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.;
Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Scenic Community Church • Pastor Ken Toews
Services - 2nd and 4th Sundays 9:00 a.m.;
Sept. through May.
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
Wall • Rev. Leo Hausmann
Masses: Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.
Weekdays refer to Bulletin

wall Bldg.
Center
279-2158
Wall, SD

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De's Tire
& Muffler
279-2168
Wall, SD

Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush

www.rushfuneralhome.com

Hustead's

Wall
Drug
Store

279-2175

School

Pennington County Courant • March 27, 2014•6

Fifth grade D.A.R.E. class essay winners
On Thursday, March 13 parents
and school administration gathered in the Wall School fifth grade
room for D.A.R.E. graduation.
Featured is the third through
sixth place winning essays.
Third place winner
D.A.R.E. was one of the funest
things I have ever done. I am so
happy that we had a chance to be
in it. It made me feel amazing.
Our class learned so much in
D.A.R.E. We learned a lot about
what not to do and what to do in
sticky situations. I have used
some of the tips I learned in it already! D.A.R.E. was the best thing
ever!
We learned a lot in D.A.R.E. In
lesson one, we learned about responsibilities. In lesson two, we
learned about health effects. In
lesson three, we learned about
consequences. In lesson four, we

learned about how it can be difficult to say no to a friend. In lesson
five, we learned about stress and
how to handle it. In lesson six, we
learned how to communicate confidently. In lesson seven, we
learned about nonverbal communication. The lessons were very
easy to understand.
I never lost interest in D.A.R.E.
I listened and learned as much as
I could. The thing I remember
about D.A.R.E. the most is the
stress lesson. The stress lesson
taught me a lot. We learned how
to deal with stress and how not to
deal with stress. Those tips
helped me a lot and they will help
me in the future. I loved it when
the whole class had to act out a
scene. I loved it so much because
I love acting.
All of the lessons were great.
The lessons never got boring. The

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videos were very creative. The
lesson quizzes in the book were
not confusing, but you have to
think a lot when you do them. If
you paid attention a lot, listened
and did not mess around you
should have learned a lot. Our
teacher was a very fun person. He
was one of the best teachers I had
ever had.
I had a great time in D.A.R.E. I
will always remember doing this
class. I never got bored. I never
lost interset. I always paid attention. I am very glad I got to be in
it. I hope the next two lessons will
be the most fun we have had yet.
I pledge I will never smoke,
chew tobacco, drink or do drugs.
Samuel Swanson
Fourth place winner
The first day in D.A.R.E. was
amazing. Deputy McPherson is
our teacher. He is funny, surprising and fun. We introduced ourselves and got our books. He wasn’t able to remember our names
so we had name tags. We acted
out problems and defined all
kinds of words. In D.A.R.E. we
did all kinds of things. When we
defined words some of them we
didn’t know so he just told us. We
learned all kinds of words. Some
of them we knew, but didn’t know
the definition.
In lesson one, we practiced our
D.A.R.E. decision making model.
In lesson two, we learned about
alcohol and tobacco. In lesson
three, we made safe and responsible choices. In lesson four, we responded to pressure. In lesson
five, we discussed signs of stress.
In lesson six, we practiced confident communication. In lesson
seven, we communicated effectively. In a while we got used to
Deputy McPherson and we
laughed a lot with him.
I didn’t know that there are
over 200 harmful chemicals in tobacco or that nicotine is a very addictive chemical. We learned
many things about the harmful
chemicals and other substances in
alcohol and tobacco. We can get
many types of cancer such as lung
and mouth and tobacco interferes
with the amount of blood that

flows to the brain. We didn’t know
that there are 75,000 alcohol related deaths each year. Alcohol
can slow the brain down, weakens
the heart and can lead to coma
and death.
D.A.R.E. teaches you a lot
about the ways that tobacco and
alcohol can affect your body. It can
educate you a lot about tobacco
and will help you to prevent yourself from taking alcohol or drugs.
Cigars and cigarettes can have
many types of tobacco and can
cause heart disease. They have a
yellow tar in them that covers the
cilia and air way for the lungs. It
can cause lung and mouth cancer.
It will cause your teeth to turn
yellow and causes wrinkles.
In D.A.R.E. I learned a lot of
useful information and facts. I
know that smoking and drinking
can cause many deaths. If I used
them I would quit. They are very
harmful and interfere with the
way your body works. There is a
myth that says when you quit
smoking you get ten more years of
life.
I pledge to not do drugs, use alcohol or tobacco. I will say no to
drugs.
Katy Humphrey
Fifth place winner
In D.A.R.E. I learned how to do
a lot of things. Like when I would
get into a fight you could talk to
the person instead of yelling at
them. You could hurt somebody’s
feelings and not even know it. But
you always want to talk to people
even if you don’t like them or you
might not know them. You should
always try to be friends with
everybody. If you see a person
being bullied you should stand up
for them and if you don’t want to
stand up for someone then go and
tell a teacher or a parent about it
and they will fix the situation.
People get bullied every day
and you can help them just my
standing up for them or telling
someone. Another way to get
friends is to trust someone and be
100 percent honest with everybody even if you don’t want to get
hurt or in trouble. Then just say
it in your head and the good thing

is that you know that you did
something wrong then you know
not to do it again. Then just tell
the person that you disobeyed and
say that you won’t do it again and
mean it. Try not to yell or scream
at anyone even if you are really
mad at them or you are just
stressed out.
We learned a lot about stress.
We get it a lot and you might
want to just take a nap or tell the
person how you feel.
We learned a lot in D.A.R.E. We
had a nice and entertaining
teacher and that always helps.
We learned how to make friends
and deal with sticky situations.
We learned how to standup for
ourselves and others around us.
We learned how to say no to someone nicely. How to be nice to
everyone even if they are not your
friends.
We did situations in groups and
acted them out in front of the
class. That was fun. And we
talked about fear and saying no to
strangers and other people to
doing drugs and alcohol and
things that you don’t want to do
or things that you know are bad
for you. We talked about stress
and things to do to solve stress.
We learned a lot.
The first time of D.A.R.E., I did
not know what D.A.R.E.. was or
what it stood for. We did a lot of
activities and we did acting. We
talked a lot about D.A.R.E., and
how fun it is and I hope that other
kids feel the same way.
D.A.R.E. was a really fun experience that I will never forget. We
had loads of fun, thanks Deputy
McPherson.
We will miss you and wish that
we could do it all the time. We had
fun and I bet it was even more fun
that you were our teacher. We will
miss doing all the things about
D.A.R.E. and watching those
videos. The videos helped us learn
a lot. I will try to do all the things
that we learned in the book.
I promise to pledge to never
smoke or do drugs.
Marissa Lanfear
Sixth place winner
D.A.R.E. means define, Assess,
Respond, Evaluate. Define means
describe the problem, challenge or
opportunity. Assess means what
are your choices. Respond means
make a choice. Use the facts and
information you have gathered.
Evaluate means review your decisions. Did you make a good
choice? In D.A.R.E., I learned to
say no to people that do drugs. I
learned about how to deal with
stress, pressure, peer pressure, to
not bully and a lot of other things.

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In D.A.R.E., you can learn a lot
about poisons in cigarettes and
health effects.
Health effects can be caused by
smoking, doing drugs and drinking. Health effects can also be
caused by second hand smoke.
Smoking can cause lung cancer,
gum disease and heart diseases.
More that 400,000 Americans
die each year from tobacco. Almost 50,000 deaths from second
hand smoke. Health effects of
drinking are loss of coordination,
poor judgement, memory loss,
loss of self-control and slow reflexes. There are 75,000 drinking
related deaths each year in the
U.S. Mixing alcohol with medicine is dangerous.
Pressure can be caused by
peers or someone asking you to do
something you know is wrong.
There are two different types of
pressure. One type of pressure is
peer pressure and the other is
just pressure. Peer pressure is
where someone your age or
around your age asks you to do
something that is wrong. Peer
pressure can cause stress. And
some adults smoke when under
stress. The other type of pressure
can be caused by someone asking
you to do something and not
around your age. An example of
pressure is “Hey I will give you
five dollars if you smoke this cigarette.”
Bullying is someone who makes
fun of, or picks on a kid. I think
some kids bully because they are
broken down inside. Some kids
bully because they think they’re
cool and look good if they pick on
other kids. The kids that get bullied sometimes think that they
don’t belong in the world. Bullies
lie whenever they get in trouble
but sometimes they get in trouble
and pick on kids even more. Kids
that get bullied are sometimes
afraid to tell an adult that they
are getting bullied. Bullies mostly
target nerds and wimpy looking
kids. Stop bulling don’t spread it.
I thought D.A.R.E. was a good
thing. D.A.R.E. can teach kids to
know what is right and what is
wrong. At first I thought D.A.R.E.
was going to be boring but it was
fun. I liked when we had to act
some of the problems in the book.
Officer McPherson is really
good when he explains something
to the class. I had fun in D.A.R.E.
I thought D.A.R.E. class was a
good thing for me. D.A.R.E. was
good for me.
I pledge that I will never do
drugs, drink or smoke.
Taylor High Horse

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Classifieds
Classified Advertising
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter; included in the
Pennington County Courant, the Profit, & The
Pioneer Review, as well as on our website:
www.pioneer-review.com.
CARD OF THANKS: Poems, Tributes, Etc. … $6.60 minimum for first 20
words; 10¢ per word thereafter. Each name and initial must be counted separately. Included in the Pennington County Courant and the Profit.
NOTE: $2.00 added charge for bookkeeping and billing on all charges.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.40 per column inch, included in the Pennington
County Courant and the Profit. $5.90 per column inch for the Pennington
County Courant only.
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised in this newspaper is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, or discrimination on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin, or any intention to make any such preference, limitation,
or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
which is a violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
TIRED OF BATTLING THE COLD to get
to work? We are hiring motivated bookkeepers, customer service/collections
agents and bilingual collectors to work
remotely. $9 to $20 per hour. Questions/resumes Text 605-206-0581
www.facebook.com/ steven.pletan careers@smartsalesandlease.com

EMPLoYMEnT
FULL-TIME PHYSICAL THERAPIST-Excellent Benefit and Compensation Package. Please apply at www.averajobs.org
or provide resume of interest to Phyllis
Ehler, Human Resources, Avera St.
Benedict Health Center, 401 W Glynn
Drive, Parkston, SD 57366. EEO/AA,
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RESIDENTIAL HOME DESIGNER. Proficient with Chief Architect software or
willing to learn. Self-motivated, driven
individual. Unique opportunity in Pierre.
Salary DOE. Contact Design Draft Inc at
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CARPENTER/CRAFTSMAN WANTED for
all phases of construction. Attitude and
motivation is key. $14/hr – $18/hr
DOE. Contact Design Draft Inc at 2247580.

aParTMenTS
avaIlaBle
wall ridge Apts.
in Wall

2 Bedroom
on-site laundry
facility
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605-347-3077
1-800-244-2826

www.metroplainsmanagement.com

THE HURON DAILY PLAINSMAN is seeking a Pressman. Duties include prepress, operating our 7 unit Goss Community press, ordering supplies and
newsprint. Must work evenings and Saturday. This is full time position with
benefits. To apply: email resume to
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MCLAUGHLIN SCHOOL DISTRICT is
seeking candidates for Superintendent of
Schools. Candidate needs proper certification, management expertise, effective
communication and interpersonal skills.
Contact
Dr.
Randall
Royer
rroyer@asbsd.org or 605 773-2500.
Closes April 7, 2014.
SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST,
2014-2015 school year in northwestern
SD: Competitive salary and great benefits. Contact Director Cris Owens, Northwest Area Schools (605)466-2206, christine.owens@k12 .sd.us
NORTHWEST AREA SCHOOLS EDUCATION COOPERATIVE 2014-2015: Early
Childhood Special Education Teacher.
Starting salary $35,000 with great benefits. Contact Director Cris Owens
(605)466-2206, Christine.Owens@k12.
sd.us
NIGHT LINE-HAUL POSITION: Rude
Transportation, Inc. Hiring Line-haul
driver, Monday-Friday run from Redfield
to Sioux Falls, SD and return. Compensation $45-55,000 per year DOE. Benefits after 90 days. Call Nathan Rude 1605-460-0796.
HELP WANTED IN WESTERN NORTH
DAKOTA. Great Northern Ag is a pulse
processing/seed facility in need of staff.
Full details at www.greatnorthernag.
com or call 701/497-3082
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS: LPNs & CNAs,
top weekly pay, direct deposit, & flexible
schedules. Take control of your schedule
with Tri-State Nursing. Apply online
today. www.tristatenursing.com 800727-1912.

FAULK COUNTY HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT accepting applications for FT
Highway Maintenance individuals. Benefit package. Motivated, positive attitude,
work with others. Valid CDL. EOE. For
application call 605-598-6233.
FoR saLE
LONGBRANCH IN PIERRE, SD. We have
lowered the price & will consider contract for deed. Call Russell Spaid 605280-1067.
1999 WILSON TANDEM AXEL grain
trailer. $12,500 OBO Contact Ryan at
605-280-3598
LoG HoMEs
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders representing Golden Eagle Log Homes, building in eastern, central, northwestern
South & North Dakota. Scott Connell,
605-530-2672, Craig Connell, 605-2645650, www.goldeneagleloghomes.com.

GaraGe sales

MoVInG saLE: Computer desk
with 5 drawers and bookcase
top; Captains Bed Queen frame,
has 8 lg. drawers and 3 cubbies
built into frame with heavy duty
tempurpedic mattress; 11 ft.
counter top with blue enamel
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gas weedeater; Jack LaLanne
juicer; Osterizer blender; large
decorator milk style tin cans;
Queen size bed with matching
dresser and bookshelf top; Dell
XPS computer and 20” monitor
with computer desk; floor nail
gun. Call Bonnie 837-2044
evenings.
K16-1tp

noTICEs
ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS statewide
for only $150.00. Put the South Dakota
Statewide Classifieds Network to work
for you today! (25 words for $150. Each
additional word $5.) Call this newspaper
or 800-658-3697 for details.
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DRIVERS WANTED: CDL, owner operators, freight from Midwest up to 48
states, home regularly, newer equipment, Health, 401K, call Randy, A&A
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sERVICEs
FARMERS - IH DISGUSTED! Shifting
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800-808-7885 for details.
RHUBARB – WANTED: RHUBARB
PLANTS. Will pay you $2 per hill to remove or thin. Sanderson Gardens, (605)
693-4871. Leave message with your
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autoMotive

FoR saLE: 2006 Dodge crew
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BusiNess & service

nEED InTERIoR/EXTERIoR
painting or staining done? Summer openings still available. Call
Kevin Kusick, 488-0008, serving
Kadoka and surrounding area.
K16-2tp
HILDEBRanD sTEEL & ConCRETE will do all your concrete
construction jobs. Call us and
we will give you a quote. Office,
837-2621, Rich’s cell, 431-2226,
toll free, 877-867-4185. K25-tfn
o’ConnELL ConsTRuCTIon,
InC., PHILIP: Rock, Sand,
Gravel (screened or crushed). We
can deliver. Dams, dugouts,
building sites. Our 38th year.
Glenn or Trace, 859-2020.
PR11-tfn
WEsT RIVER EXCaVaTIon
will do all types of trenching,
ditching and directional boring
work. See Craig, Diana, Sauntee
or Heidi Coller, Kadoka, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig cell: 3908087, Sauntee cell: 390-8604;
wrex@gwtc.net
K50-tfn

FarM & raNcH

FoR saLE: 1975 John Deere
4230, 5600 original hours, duals
and 3-point, excellent condition,
$15,000. Call 393-1353.
WP31-2tp
FoR saLE: 2004 Featherlite
STL 24’ 5-horse slant load, 5 roof
vents, 4’ short wall, sealed tack
room fully carpeted, 5 saddle
racks, mats, fully reconditioned,
brand new tires, better than
new! $12,500. Contact Austin,
488-0440.
K16-3tc
PasTuRE WanTED: Any size,
20 to 100 pair. Contact Jamie
Willert, 441-4407.
PR30-6tc
FoR saLE: 1949 Farmall M
tractor, wide front end loader,
PTO and tire chains. 669-2507.
PR30-2tc
suMMER PasTuRE WanTED
for 80 pairs. Please call 6853801.
P15-2tc
FoR saLE: Certified Conlon
barley seed. Call 567-3340.
P15-3tp
FoR saLE: JD Model 925 rigid
cutter head, excellent sickle
guards and wobble box, 25’ hydraulic adjustable reel, $4,000.
343-0497 or 209-6030.
P15-2tc
PasTuRE WanTED for 40 to 60
cow-calf pairs. Call 837-2589.
P15-4tc
FoR saLE: Case IH Model 496
32’ cushion-gang tandem disk,
Morris harrows, 21” front
blades, good bearings, $9,900.
343-0497 or 209-6030.
P15-2tc
FoR saLE: 35 fancy purebred
commercial
open
yearling
heifers, 850 lbs., out of registered cows and registered bulls.
These are mates to the bulls that
sell in our annual sale, located
just outside Rapid City. Contact
Grandview Angus, Dan, 3917090, or Jamie, 391-6399.
PR28-tfn
WanTED: Summer pasture for
25-30 cow/calf pairs. Call Steve
Pekron, 544-3202. PR25-16tp
WanTED: Hay, straw or stalks
to put up on shares or purchase
in field or windrow. Call Joel
Deering, 381-0885 or 993-3151.
PR45-tfn

Pennington County Courant • March 27, 2014 • 8
TRaILER TIREs FoR saLE:
12-ply, 235/85/16R. $160,
mounted. Les’ Body Shop, 8592744, Philip.
P40-tfn

HelP WaNted

PHILIP MoToR, InC. currently
has positions available in the
service department. Experience
preferred but not required. Benefit package available. Please
stop by the front desk to pick up
an application or call Craig at
685-3435 for details.
P16-4tc
HELP WanTED: Haakon County
Auditor’s Office is seeking to fill
a full-time deputy auditor position. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. Duties
include, but are not limited to,
assisting the public, clerical duties such as typing, filing, handling of office mail, voter registration and election duties, processing payroll and assisting
with general office duties. Applicants will need to be familiar
with basic office procedures.
Knowledge of Microsoft Word
and Excel is preferred. Position
includes insurance benefits, vacation leave and sick leave. An
application and complete listing
of duties can be picked up at the
Haakon County Auditor’s Office.
Returned applications and resumés can be mailed to: Haakon
County Auditor’s Office, PO Box
698, Philip, SD 57567, or
emailed to: haakon2@gwtc.net.
Deadline for filing applications is
April 1, 2014. Haakon County is
an Equal Opportunity Employer.
PR30-2tc
LIBRaRY DIRECToR PosITIon: Library Director needed
for Haakon County Public Library in Philip, SD, 30 hours a
week with no benefits. Starting
wage is $9.23/hour. This position will manage the day-to-day
operation and finances of a library that serves 2000. Candidates must be proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel, able to
lift 50 pounds, have excellent
management and customer service skills, be willing to commit to
library training over a four-year
period, and be familiar with social media and computer technology. A detailed description of
duties and an application may
be picked up at the Haakon
County Public Library. Resumes
and applications may be sent to
library@gwtc.net or mailed to
Haakon County Public Library,
PO Box 481, Philip, SD 57567.
Deadline for filing applications is
April 1st. Haakon County is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
P15-2tc
HELP WanTED: Cedar Pass
Lodge in Badlands National Park
is hiring for seasonal positions
from April to November. Retail,
Stocking, Front Desk/Reservations, Campgrounds, Maintenance, Housekeeping, Restaurant/Cafe, some supervisory positions available. Fundamental
Requirement - friendly attitude
with high regard for customer
service and the ability to work in
a fast paced, fun environment.
Great opportunity to meet people
from all over the world. Apply on
line at www. CedarPassLodge.
com/badlands-jobs
P15-7tc
HELP WanTED FoR THE 2014
TouRIsT sEason: Manager
and several sales positions
needed for jewelry/gift store in
Wall, SD. Full or part-time available. Hourly wage plus commission. Interested, please call 3488108 or email: jw@bhgolddiggers.com
WP20-tfn
HELP WanTED: Cactus Cafe,
Wall, is now taking applications
for summer help. Stop in for an
application or email to: kellie@
cactuscafe&lounge.com for an
application.
PW15-4tc
HELP WanTED: Full- and parttime positions available. Contact
Kim or Vickie at Pizza Etc.,
Philip.
PR29-tfn

Misc. For sale

FoR saLE: Rope horse halters
with 10’ lead rope, $15 each.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-tfn

Notices/WaNted

WanTED: Old car bodies and
truck cabs, 1920-1950s. Looking for that old rusty junk on the
tree line and paying good money
… better than scrap! 669-2851.
P15-4tc
noTICE: Haakon County Conservation District is still accepting orders for trees, bushes and
perennials. Call 859-2186, Ext.
3.
PR29-3tc
WanTED: Antlers needed! Buying deer, elk and moose antlers.
Paying cash. 360-3749.
PR28-4tp

real estate

FoR saLE: 1988 Schult 16’x70’
mobile home, to be moved. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths, new roof, appliances included. 685-3317.
K15-tfn
HousE FoR saLE: 4-5 bedrooms, 3 full baths, full finished
basement with fireplace, (2) large
decks, oversized garage, underground sprinkler system, price
reduced, Kadoka. Call 390-2615.
K13-tfn

reNtals

aPaRTMEnTs: Spacious one
bedroom units, all utilities included. Young or old. Need
rental assistance or not, we can
house you. Just call 1-800-4816904 or stop in the lobby and
pick up an application. Gateway
Apartments, Kadoka. WP32-tfn

recreatioN

FoR saLE: 2004 Fleetwood
Cheyenne pop-up camper in
great shape. Furnace, awning,
spare tire, hot water heater,
shower, fridge and large front
storage box. Stored inside off
season. Asking $4,500 OBO.
Call 279-2195 or 441-7049,
Wall, anytime.
WP16-tfn
FoR saLE: 29’ 1993 Excel 5th
wheel camper, one slide-out, license paid until June, winterized, $6,500. Jean Linn, Elm
Springs, 798-2411.
P15-2tc

classiFied Policy

PLEasE REaD your classified
ad the first week it runs. If you
see an error, we will gladly rerun your ad correctly. We accept
responsibility for the first incorrect insertion only. Ravellette
Publications, Inc. requests all
classifieds and cards of thanks
be paid for when ordered. A
$2.00 billing charge will be
added if ad is not paid at the
time the order is placed. All
phone numbers are with an area
code of 605, unless otherwise indicated.

THank Yous

St. Patrick’s Women’s Club
would like to thank everyone
who came and ate at St.
Patrick’s Church March 16,
2014. You made St. Patrick’s dinner a success. Thank you Terri
Harris and the high school class;
Jody Bielmaier and the middle
school class; and the parents of
the classes for decorating, cooking, serving, and cleaning up.
Thank you to everyone who provided a salad or dessert, and
thank you Rick Hustead for providing the rolls and butter. Thank
you to everyone who helped purchase the meat.

Public Notices
NOTICE OF
HEARING
BEFORE THE CITy OF WALL
PLANNING AND ZONING
COMMISSION
Notice is hereby given that the following
petitioners have applied to the City of Wall
Planning and Zoning Commission under
the provisions of the City of Wall’s zoning
ordinance as follows:
Scot D. Eisenbraun, Russell E. Olney and
Grady R. Crew have applied to annex into
the City of Wall a portion of a parcel,
legally described as: E1/2SW1/4 Less
Row, Lot A & B & Wall Southern Addition.
This request is in accordance with Section 17.56.030 of the Wall City Zoning Ordinance.
Notice is further given that said application will be heard by the City of Wall Planning and Zoning Commission in the Wall
Community Center meeting room at
4:15pm on the 31st day of March, 2014.
At this time, any person interested may
appear and show cause, if there be any,

why such requests should or should not
be granted.
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
Published March 27, 2014, at the total approximate cost of $13.36.

At Large – Two Year Term - Mayor
The following offices for the TOWN OF
WASTA will become vacant due to the vacancy and expiration of the present term
of office of the elected officials:
Town Board of Trustees – Three Year
Term – Norman Current

NOTICE OF
VACANCy
MUNICIPALITy OF WALL,
TOWN OF WASTA
AND
WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT 51-5

Also, the following school board positions for the WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT
51-5 will become vacant due to the expiration of the present term of office of the
following school board members:
Member-At-Large – Three Year Term –
Spencer Cordes
Member-At-Large – Three Year Term –
Mary Williams

The following offices for the CITY OF
WALL will become vacant due to the expiration of the present term of office of the
elected officials:

Circulation of nominating petitions may
begin on April 8, 2014.

Alderman Ward I – Two Year Term –
Rick Hustead
Alderman Ward II – Two Year Term –
Stan Anderson
Alderman Ward III – Two Year Term –
Jerry Morgan

Petitions for the CITY OF WALL may
be filed in the office of the finance officer
located at 501 Main Street, Wall Community Center, between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. MST, not later than
the 9th day of May, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

Petitions for the TOWN OF WASTA
may be filed with the finance officer located at 501 Main Street, Wall Community Center, between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. MST, not later than
the 9th day of May, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.
Petitions for the WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT 51-5 may be filed in the office of
the school located at 401 South Boulevard West, between the hours of 7:30
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. MST, not later than
the 9th day of May, 2014, at 5:00 p.m., or
mailed by registered mail not later than
the 9th day of May, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.
CITY OF WALL
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
TOWN OF WASTA
Carolynn Anderson
Finance Officer
WALL SCHOOL DISTRICT 51-5
Niki Mohr
Business Manager
Published March 20 & 27, 2014, at the
total approximate cost of $52.63.

ANNUAL REPORT FOR PENNINGTON COUNTY
AS OF AND FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2013
GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS--MODIFIED ACCRUAL BASIS

General Fund

Road and Bridge
Fund

PCCCE
Capital
Projects Fund

Other
Governmental
Funds

Total
Governmental
Funds

Beginning Balance ......................................................$14,752,806.00 ...............$13,354,315.62 .......................$21,170,492.57 ................$6,080,854.93 ..............$55,358,469.12
Revenues and Other Sources (minor level):
Taxes
Current Property Taxes .......................................$29,678,436.29 ................$1,588,064.45 ................................$0.00 ........................$4,946,575.65 ..............$36,213,076.39
Delinquent Property Taxes ....................................$264,197.36 .....................$26,314.74...................................$0.00 ..........................$46,451.85......................$336,963.95
Penalties and Interest ............................................$88,495.95 .......................$8,209.59....................................$0.00 ..........................$14,806.79 ......................$111,512.33
Telephone Tax (Outside)..........................................$4,483.78 ...........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..............................$4,483.78
Mobile Home Tax....................................................$69,302.62 .......................$6,843.61....................................$0.00 ..........................$12,182.93........................$88,329.16
Wheel Tax ...................................................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .....................................$0.00
911 Telephone Surcharge ...........................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ........................$1,257,965.32 ................$1,257,965.32
Tax Deed Revenue ...................................................$858.28 .............................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 .............................$120.41 ...............................$978.69
Other Taxes ............................................................$19,644.20 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...........................$2,453.42.........................$22,097.62
Licenses and Permits ................................................$343,872.00 .......................$938.18 .....................................$0.00 ..........................$29,790.00......................$374,600.18
Intergovernmental Revenue: ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Federal Grants.......................................................$971,037.42 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ........................$1,286,064.37 ................$2,257,101.79
Federal Shared Revenue ............................................$0.00 ..........................$13,809.68...................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ............................$13,809.68
Federal Payments in Lieu of Taxes ......................$1,356,548.00 ........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................$1,356,548.00
State Grants ..........................................................$444,077.03 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$444,077.03
State Shared Revenue:........................................$1,114,235.54 .................$5,793,926.88 ................................$0.00 ..........................$35,753.99...................$6,943,916.41
State Payments in Lieu of Taxes.................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .....................................$0.00
Other Payments in Lieu of Taxes .........................$16,682.03 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...........................$2,340.37.........................$19,022.40
Other Intergovernmental Revenue ........................$182,378.12 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00..........................$544,114.62 .....................$726,492.74
Charges for Goods and Services: ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
General Government ...........................................$2,030,750.23 ........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ..........................$79,014.42...................$2,109,764.65
Public Safety .......................................................$11,318,608.85 .......................$0.00...................................$13,490.00 ...................$1,509,521.69 ..............$12,841,620.54
Public Works ..................................................................................................$162,516.69..............................................................................................................$162,516.69
Health and Welfare................................................$440,295.85 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$440,295.85
Culture and Recreation ...............................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .....................................$0.00
Urban and Economic Development........................$54,770.00 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ............................$54,770.00
Conservation of Natural Resources.......................$100,929.01 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$100,929.01
Other Charges ........................................................$46,176.75 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ............................$46,176.75
Fines and Forfeits:....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Fines........................................................................$3,800.00 ...........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...........................$1,856.50...........................$5,656.50
Costs ......................................................................$12,517.99 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ............................$12,517.99
Forfeits.....................................................................$1,800.00 ...........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..............................$1,800.00
Miscellaneous Revenue and Other Sources:........................................................................................................................................................
Investment Earnings...............................................$21,198.27 ......................$13,979.34 ...............................$2,539.73 ........................$7,904.41.........................$45,621.75
Rentals ........................................................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .....................................$0.00
Special Assessments...............................................$5,713.46 ...........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..............................$5,713.46
Contributions and Donations .................................$176,470.00 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$176,470.00
Refund of Prior Year's Expenditures.......................$14,099.26 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...........................$2,656.00.........................$16,755.26
Other Miscellaneous Revenue ..............................$143,782.63 ....................$103,286.89..................................$0.00 ..........................$24,060.04......................$271,129.56
General Long Term Debt Issued .................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Insurance Proceeds ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Sale of County Property ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Total Revenue and Other Sources ..............................$48,925,160.92 ................$7,717,890.05............................$16,029.73 ...................$9,803,632.78 ..............$66,462,713.48
Expenditures and Other Uses (subfunction level):
Legislative..............................................................$862,280.09 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ..........................$55,973.50......................$918,253.59
Elections ................................................................$361,122.08 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$361,122.08
Judicial System......................................................$364,377.88 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$364,377.88
Financial Administration .......................................$2,210,723.75 ........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................$2,210,723.75
Legal Services .....................................................$5,197,946.13 ........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................$5,197,946.13
Other Administration ............................................$5,039,480.53 ........................$0.00...................................$10,602.01 ......................$34,778.09...................$5,084,860.63
Law Enforcement ................................................$25,711,174.71 .......................$0.00 ......................................-$0.38 .........................$360,597.81................$26,071,772.14
Protective and Emergency Services.......................$94,979.89 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ........................$3,750,999.14 ................$3,845,979.03
Highways and Bridges..................................................................................$5,524,033.89 .........................................................................................................$5,524,033.89
Sanitation ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Transportation .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Water System ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Other Public Works......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Economic Assistance ...........................................$1,406,115.42 ........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.33........................$1,406,115.75
Health Assistance ..................................................$190,848.00 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$190,848.00
Social Services.........................................................................................................................................................................................$41,996.50........................$41,996.50
Mental Health Services..........................................$660,163.52 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$660,163.52
Culture.....................................................................................................................................................................................................$458,060.00.....................$458,060.00
Recreation ..............................................................$17,446.00 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 .........................$178,295.00.....................$195,741.00
Soil Conservation ..................................................$777,090.68 .....................$30,158.62...................................$0.00 ..........................$89,909.86......................$897,159.16
Water Conservation ................................................$75,000.00 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ............................$75,000.00
Urban Development...............................................$813,161.84 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ..........................$813,161.84
Economic Development..........................................$20,000.00 ..........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 ............................$20,000.00
Intergovernmental Expenditures..................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Debt Service ..........................................................$785,184.94 .........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ........................$4,486,286.55 ................$5,271,471.49
Payments to Local Education Agencies ......................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Capital Outlay ........................................................$494,928.68 ..................$5,005,216.22 .........................$9,554,217.00 .................$2,515,899.00 ..............$17,570,260.90
Discount on Bonds Issued...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Payments to Refunded Debt .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Escrow Agent ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Total Expenditures and Other Uses ............................$45,082,024.14 ...............$10,559,408.73 ........................$9,564,818.63 ................$11,972,795.78 .............$77,179,047.28
Transfers In (Out) ........................................................-$3,079,903.90 ................$2,082,502.66 ................................$0.00 .........................$816,014.24....................-$181,387.00
Special Items (specify) ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Extraordinary Items (specify)...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Changes in Nonspendable ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Increase/Decrease in Fund Balance .............................$763,232.88 ...................-$759,016.02 .........................-$9,548,788.90................-$1,353,148.76 ............-$10,897,720.80
Ending Balance:
Nonspendable ...........................................................$521,482.22 ..................$1,178,235.33 ................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................$1,699,717.55
Restricted ........................................................................$0.00 ........................$1,990,219.04 ........................$11,621,703.67 ................$5,653,181.78 ..............$19,265,104.49
Committed .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$0.00
Assigned ..................................................................$7,893,780.00 .................$9,383,756.87 ................................$0.00 .........................$958,220.39................$18,235,757.26
Unassigned ..............................................................$7,100,776.66 ........................$0.00 .......................................$0.00 ...............................$0.00 .......................$7,100,776.66
Governmental Long-term Debt ............................................................................................................................................................................................................$58,589,519.70
PROPRIETARY FUNDS--ACCRUAL BASIS
Medical SelfInsurance Fund
Beginning Balance ....................................................................................-$219,928.97
Revenues ................................................................................................$5,640,953.90
Expenses ................................................................................................$5,326,071.96
Transfers In (Out) .......................................................................................$181,387.00
Ending Balance:
Restricted ..........................................................................................................$0.00
Unrestricted.............................................................................................$276,339.97

Pennington County Courant • March 27, 2014 • 9

WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT

Joseph Hieb,
Chairman
Published March 27, 2014, at the total approximate cost of $26.32.

qUINN TOWN
BOARD OF
EqUALIZATION

MINUTES
FEBRUARy 20, 2014
CALL TO ORDER: The West River
Water Development District convened for
their regular meeting at the West River
Water Development District Project Office
in Murdo, SD. Chairman Joseph Hieb
called the meeting to order at 10:30 a.m.
(CT).
Roll Call was taken and Chairman
Joseph Hieb declared a quorum was
present. Directors present were: Joseph
Hieb, Casey Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl
Prokop and Lorne Smith. Also present:
Jake Fitzgerald, Manager; Amy Kittelson,
Recording Secretary; Jessica Hegge,
Larson Law PC.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA: None
APPROVE AGENDA: Motion by Director
Krogman, seconded by Director Smith to
approve the agenda. Motion carried
unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES: The minutes of
the January 13, 2014, meeting were previously mailed to the Board for their review. Motion by Director Prokop, seconded by Director Matt to approve the
January minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Joseph
Hieb, $55.41; Casey Krogman, $55.41;
Marion Matt, $55.41; Veryl Prokop,
$55.41; Lorne Smith, $55.41; West
River/Lyman-Jones RWS, $1,000.00;
Kadoka Press, $36.06; Lyman County
Herald, $33.07; Mellette County News,
$35.96; Murdo Coyote, $68.53; Pennington County Courant, $30.87; Pioneer Review, $33.46; Haakon County Conservation District, $1,087.50. Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Director Smith to
approve the District bills. Motion carried
unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS REPORT: The financial status of the District
to date was previously sent to the Board.
A copy of the January Financial Report is
on file at the District office in Murdo. Motion by Director Smith, seconded by Director Matt to approve the January Financial Report. Motion carried unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT: Manager
Fitzgerald presented his February report
to the Board. Motion by Director Prokop,
seconded by Director Krogman to approve the Manager’s Report. Motion carried unanimously.
B. OTHER REPORTS: None
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 10:37 A.M.
(CT).
ATTEST:

MINUTES
March 17, 2014
The Quinn Town Board is meeting at
this time, March 17, 2014 at 7 p.m., at the
Quinn Community Center as a Board of
Equalization. Members present were Juston Eisenbraun and Jerry Pabst. Others
present were Joseph Baumann, Francis
Baumann, Don Kelly and Finance Officer
Debbie Bryan.
Juston called the meeting to order.
First appeal: Joseph D. and Francis P.
Baumann, 1S-17E Sec 06 unplatted,
SE1/4 SE less Hwy, parcel number 6406-476-001; presently structure and land
is valued at $74,400. Motion by Juston,
seconded by Jerry to change the value to
$71,400, motion carried.
Appeal #2: Dale Baumann, Original
Town of Quinn, Block 3, Lot 6-7, parcel
number 64-06-180-006; presently the
structure value is $15,900. Motion by Juston, seconded by Jerry to change the
value to $15,600, motion carried.
Appeal #3: Donald Kelly; no legal description, parcel number 64-06-401-002;
presently the structure value is $58,900.
Motion by Juston, seconded by Jerry to
change the value to $41,000, motion carried.
Appeal #4: Jerry and Lana Pabst,
Hildebrandt Addn. Block 2 Lot 4, parcel
number 64-06-176-003; presently the
property is valued at $63,300. Motion by
Juston, seconded by Jerry to change the
value to $20,000, motion carried.
There were no further objections, the
meeting was adjourned at 7:13 p.m.
Debbie Bryan
Finance Officer
Town of Quinn
Published March 27, 2014, at the total approximate cost of $15.92.

Legal
Publication
Deadline is
11:00 a.m.
on FRIDAY

_________________
Amy Kittelson,
Recording Secretary
___________

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Long-term Debt .....................................................................................................$0.00
The preceding financial data does not include fiduciary funds or
component units. Information pertaining to those activities may be
obtained by contacting the County Auditor at (605) 394-2153
*Unaudited 2013 Financial Publication
Published March 27, 2014, at the total approximate cost of $306.22.

CALL 1-800-481-6904
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1-800-877-1113

Pennington County Courant • March 27, 2014 • 10
person straight or change anyone’s mind. The only response allowed is to ask for clarification.
During the second ten minutes
the other spouse will talk. Again,
a request for clarification is the
only response permitted.
At the end of the twenty minutes take a time-out from each
other. Reflect on what your
spouse has said. Does it help you
understand some of the reasons
for his or her feelings?
If your partner still seems intent on avoiding all conflict in
your relationship, you may need
to get assistance from a Christian
counselor who can help the two of
you gain perspective on what’s
happening beneath the deceptively calm surface of your relationship.

FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
with Dr. James
Dobson
Dr. Dobson Answers
your Questions
QUESTiON: Is there something wrong with not wanting to
talk? There are times when I just
don’t feel like conversing with
others including my family. My
spouse understands, but my kids
get upset. Can’t I just be quiet if I
want to?
ANSwEr: If you’re serious
about solving this problem, you’re
going to have to engage in some
intensive self-examination. Why
is it that you “don’t feel like talking?” What is the precise nature
of your silence? You’re part of a
family, and you owe it to the people who live with you to answer
these questions honestly.
Some people are simply “quiet,”
a character trait associated with
a more introverted personality
type. If you fit into this category,
there’s no reason to apologize –
it’s just the way you’re made. But
while you don’t need to feel guilty,
you do need to think about and
consider the way your behavior
affects others around you. If you
tend to be withdrawn, family life
may require that you force yourself to break out of your shell and
speak up more often. Remember,
communication is the heart of
husband-wife and parent-child relationships.
Naturally, there’s an important
difference
between
natural
“quietness” and intentional silence – the kind of silence that’s
designed to manipulate. That
kind of silence can be a powerful
form of communication in and of
itself. Some people use it to “send
a message” to family members.
hey “punish” their spouses and
children by clamming up and
withdrawing affection in an attempt to stir specific responses in
others. It’s easy to think of silence
as something neutral, but in cases
like this the absence of a positive
message can sometimes be as
damaging as the presence of a
negative one.
If your silence is a form of messaging, you can be fairly certain
that your kids will misinterpret
your intentions. This is particularly true of teenagers. Teens will
almost always assign a meaning
of their own to parental silence.
Combined with the insecurities
that usually go with adolescence,
it can suggest anger, condemnation, or lack of love. If you feel you
must be silent, at least try to offer
a few words of explanation so that
your kids will know you’re not
mad at them.
In short, it’s important for you
to be honest with yourself about
your motives. Don’t hide behind
silence. Instead, be direct with
your feelings. If you’re angry and
awaiting an apology, say so.
Avoiding such confrontation only
delays the inevitable, and can actually make the situation worse.
If you need help sorting out these
questions, we hope you won’t hesitate to call and speak with a
member of our Counseling Department.
QUESTiON: What can I do
when my spouse avoids conflict
and seems to want “peace at any
price”? Unresolved issues are boiling beneath the surface, and
we’re growing more emotionally
distant with every passing day.
How can I turn things around before it’s too late?
ANSwEr: Not too many people actually enjoy conflict, especially in marriage. So it’s not surprising that your spouse may prefer to avoid it.
Still, some clashes are inevitable in any marriage. No matter how similar you and your
mate may be in terms of basic interests, values, and personalities,
men and women are wired differently. Many women want to deal
with problems by talking them
out while their husbands prefer to
withdraw – which the wives find
maddening. Occasionally it’s the
opposite, with the wife doing the
avoiding.
This can be explained in a number of ways. A woman may be better with language, better at articulating her thoughts and making
convincing arguments. Her husband may feel overwhelmed by
the onslaught of her verbiage and

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reluctant to “lose” in a straightforward exchange of opinion. It’s
also possible that the avoiding
partner has grown up in a home
where one parent verbally abused
the other, or where the parents
never argued at all, leaving them
without a model of constructive
and honest conflict resolution.
Reduplicating this situation is
undesirable and unhealthy, since
unresolved anger, bitterness, and
fear can have serious medical and
emotional consequences.
Whatever the scenario, it
stands to reason that spouses
won’t always agree. They have
their own expectations and needs.
So when the honeymoon is over
and tensions come to the surface,
how do you handle conflict when
one partner wants to avoid it?
If this is your situation, we suggest you ask your spouse to try an
experiment with you. It will take
just twenty minutes once or twice
a week. During the first ten minutes of that time, one of you will
talk about issues that are bothering you. The other will agree to
listen without argument or debate – no seeking to set the other

CROOKED CREEK
TOWNSHIP
Crooked Creek Township is accepting
bids for a used John Deere motor grader,
with a wing, suitable for township road
maintenance.
Deadline for bids March 31, 2014. We
reserve the right to refuse any or all bids.
Mail bids to clerk: Neva Hamann, 23330
Sage Creek Rd., Wall, SD 57790.
Neva Hamann,
Clerk
Published March 27, 2014, at the total
approximate cost of $6.14.

$ " #$

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is 11:00 a.m. on FRIDAY

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