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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • March 27, 2014 • Vol XIII, Edition 190
LATEST CLUES
WORLD PAGE 28
PROTECT YOUR
DOG AND HOME
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 19
FLOATING OBJECTS SEEN IN FLIGHT 370
SEARCH AREA
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Agents from the IRS and FBI removed boxes from a home at 608 42nd Ave. in San Mateo Wednesday morning.
Senator arrested
Yee asked
to resign
Reaction to arrest
sparse but pointed
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The state Senate will vote Friday
to suspend indicted Sen. Leland
Yee if he refuses to voluntarily
resign, said Sen. Jerry Hill who
chairs the
D e m o c r a t i c
Caucus.
“His future is
very limited in
the Senate,”
said Hill, D-San
Mateo. “He’s
not guilty yet
but the indict-
ment reflects on
issues that are
painful to read
like gunrunning
and we just feel
it warrants this
type of action.
He should never
step foot on the
Senate floor
again.”
S e n a t e
President Pro
Tem Darrell
Steinberg, D-
S a c r a me n t o ,
asked Yee to
simply “leave”
and Hill said
they will simul-
taneously vote
to suspend him
along with Sen.
Ron Calderon
and Sen. Rod
Wright who are
both fighting
legal battles.
“There is a
very high level
of upset and dis-
appointment in
these members
and we need to
make it clear
their actions in
no way reflect
on the stature or
reputation of
the Senate,”
Hill said.
On the other
side of the
L e g i s l a t u r e ,
Assembl yman
Kevin Mullin, D-South San
Francisco, said he was “shocked
and saddened” by the news.
By Paul Elias
and Sudhin Thanwala
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — ACalifornia
state senator who authored gun con-
trol legislation asked for campaign
donations in exchange for introduc-
ing an undercover FBI agent to an
arms trafficker, according to court
documents unsealed Wednesday.
The allegations against State Sen.
Leland Yee were outlined in an FBI
criminal com-
plaint that
names 25 other
d e f e n d a n t s ,
i n c l u d i n g
R a y m o n d
Chow, a one-
time gang
leader with ties
to San
F r a n c i s c o ’ s
Leland Yee accused of
guncharges,wire fraud
By Angela Swartz
and Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Araid of a house at 608 42nd
Ave. in San Mateo
We d n e s d a y
morning was
p a r t
of the FBI’s numerous raids and arrest
warrants throughout Sacramento and
the Bay Area the federal agency exe-
cuted in relation to the arrest of state
Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San
Mateo, and 25 others.
Agents from the FBI and Internal
San Mateo home raided in
relation to investigation
Residents unknown, boxes removed from house
Jerry Hill
Kevin Mullin
Dave Pine
Carole Groom
Quentin Kopp
See REACTION, Page 8
See page 5
Opinion page 9
Inside
• Yee known for
transparency bills
• Excerpts from affidavit
Yee should leave Senate
See YEE, Page 20
See HOME, Page 8
KEEPING THE
DREAM ALIVE
SPORTS PAGE 11
San Diego County spelling
bee nearly left wordless
SAN DIEGO — David Hay had no
words for what was about to happen.
And that’s sort of important when
you’re running a spelling bee.
Hay was the bee master Tuesday at
The 45th Annual U-T San Diego
Countywide Spelling Bee, which was
halfway through its tense, two-student
final round when Hay realized he was
about to run out of spelling words.
Hay says it hasn’t happened in his
33 years as master. His 500-word sup-
ply is usually plenty, but the 92 mid-
dle-schoolers exhausted them, from
“macaroni” to “obnuliate.”
He had to call a recess and scrounge
up some spare words to finish.
Allison Grygar won by correctly
spelling “prostrate” and “gurgle” when
her opponent botched “scrimmage.”
She’ll compete in May’s Scripps
National Spelling Bee, where presum-
ably words will be plentiful.
Phone scammers
pretending to be police officers
FONTANA — Fontana police are
warning of phone scammers pretend-
ing to be officers who are calling resi-
dents and requesting immediate pay-
ment to clear up outstanding warrants.
The Riverside Press-Enterprise
reported Tuesday that the scammers are
even using technology that shows the
Fontana police headquarters number on
Caller ID.
Spokeswoman Martha Guzman-
Hurtado says residents have received
calls demanding a fee between $1,000
and $5,000. The victims are directed to
send the payment via wire or prepaid
credit card — to an overseas location.
If the victim challenges the demand,
the caller becomes irate.
Guzman-Hurtado reminds residents
that police never notify people by
phone of an arrest warrant.
Woman faces sentence
for man-on-car murder
LOS ANGELES — Asubstance-abuse
counselor who drove 2 miles through a
Los Angeles suburb with a dying man
on her windshield faces a maximum
prison term of 45 years to life at her
sentencing scheduled for Wednesday.
Ajury last month found Sherry Lynn
Wilkins, 52, guilty of second-degree
murder, drunken driving and hit-and-
run for the incident that killed 31-year-
old Phillip Moreno in Torrance in
November 2012.
Wilkins has also has two previous
felony convictions that are considered
serious and make her eligible for
California’s three strikes law.
Prosecutors at the time of the trial
said Wilkins’ blood-alcohol level was
nearly twice the legal limit, and that
what she did to Moreno “struck at
human dignity. ”
“We do not tolerate someone who
does not pull over when they see some-
one on their windshield,” Deputy
District Attorney John Harlan said
after the verdict.
Burger King Baby finds
birth mom, feels ‘pure joy’
A woman who, as a newborn, was
abandoned in the bathroom of a
Pennsylvania fast-food restaurant said
she has found her birth mother just
three weeks after launching a search
that garnered worldwide attention, and
as her mother prepared to look for her.
Katheryn Deprill, 27, said Tuesday
she felt “pure joy” when she met her
biological mother for the first time
Monday at an attorney’s office. And,
after she learned the sad details of her
conception and abandonment, she said
she understood why her mom did what
she did.
“She is better than anything I
could’ve ever imagined. She is so
sweet and amazing. I’m so happy, ”
said Deprill, who has become known
as the Burger King Baby.
The woman had decided about six
months ago to launch her own search
for the daughter she gave up.
Deprill began her quest on March 2
by posting on her Facebook page a
photo in which she held up a sign that
said, “Looking for my birth mother. ...
She abandoned me in the Burger King
bathroom only hours old, Allentown
PA. Please help me find her by sharing
my post.”
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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Singer Mariah
Carey is 44.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1964
Alaska was hit by a magnitude 9.2
earthquake (the strongest on record in
North America) and tsunamis that
together claimed about 130 lives.
“A sheltered life can be a daring life as well.
For all serious daring starts from within.”
— Eudora Welty, American author (1909-2001)
Director Quentin
Tarantino is 51.
Hip-hop singer
Fergie is 39.
Birthdays
REUTERS
The Washington Monument seen from a National Park Service helicopter in Washington, D.C. The Monument will reopen
on May 12 after a lengthy closure for earthquake damage, the National Park Service said.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. A sl i ght
chance of showers. Highs in the upper
50s. South winds 5 to 15 mph.
Thursday ni ght: Mostly cloudy. A
chance of rain. Lows around 50. South
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. Achance of rain.
Highs in the lower 60s. South winds 10 to
20 mph. Chance of rain 40 percent.
Friday night: Cloudy. Achance of rain. Lows in the lower
50s. South winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 50 percent.
Saturday: Showers. Highs in the upper 50s.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. A chance of showers.
Lows in the upper 40s.
Sunday and Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. A slight
chance of showers. Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1513, Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon sighted
present-day Florida.
I n 1625, Charles I acceded to the English throne upon the
death of James I.
I n 1794, Congress approved “An Act to provide a Naval
Armament” of six armed ships.
I n 1884, the first telephone line between Boston and New
York was inaugurated.
I n 1912, first lady Helen Herron Taft and the wife of Japan’s
ambassador to the United States, Viscountess Chinda, plant-
ed in Washington the first two of 3,000 cherry trees given as
a gift by the mayor of Tokyo.
I n 1933, Japan officially withdrew from the League of
Nations.
I n 1942, American servicemen were granted free mailing
privileges.
I n 1958, Nikita Khrushchev became Soviet premier in
addition to First Secretary of the Communist Party.
I n 1968, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, the first man to
orbit the Earth, died in a plane crash.
I n 1977, 583 people were killed when a KLM Boeing 747,
attempting to take off, crashed into a Pan Am 747 on the
Canary Island of Tenerife.
I n 1980, 123 workers died when a North Sea floating oil
field platform, the Alexander Kielland, capsized during a
storm.
I n 1998, the Food and Drug Administration approved the
drug Viagra, made by Pfizer, saying it had helped about two-
thirds of impotent men improve their sexual function.
Ten years ago: Nearly half a million people surrounded
Taiwan’s presidential office and blocked major streets to
protest their country’s disputed presidential election.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
ABATE FOCAL COUPLE FERVOR
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When the instructor didn’t charge for the
parachute lesson, it was a — FREE FALL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CHIDT
RIREV
LACAAP
TAYREE
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Ans.
here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are California
Classic, No. 5, in first place; Lucky Star, No. 2, in
second place; and Solid Gold, No. 10, in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:41.48.
2 1 0
19 26 51 57 73 15
Mega number
March 25 Mega Millions
28 33 41 44 59 21
Powerball
March 26 Powerball
1 3 28 32 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 8 1 8
Daily Four
1 1 4
Daily three evening
3 8 26 37 46 18
Mega number
March 26 Super Lotto Plus
Dance company director Arthur Mitchell is 80. Actor Julian
Glover is 79. Actor Jerry Lacy is 78. Hall of Fame racer Cale
Yarborough is 75. Actor-director Austin Pendleton is 74. Actor
Michael York is 72. Rock musician Tony Banks (Genesis) is
64. Rock musician Andrew Farriss (INXS) is 55. Jazz musician
Dave Koz (kahz) is 51. Rock musician Derrick McKenzie
(Jamiroquai) is 50. Rock musician Johnny April (Staind) is
49. Actress Talisa Soto is 47. Actress Pauley Perrette is 45.
Rock musician Brendan Hill (Blues Traveler) is 44. Actress
Elizabeth Mitchell is 44. Actor Nathan Fillion is 43. Actress
Megan Hilty is 33. Actress Emily Ann Lloyd is 30.
3
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
FOSTER CITY
Traffic hazard. Officers assisted in clearing
Canada geese that were crossing the road at
East Hillsdale Boulevard before 5:27 p.m.
Monday, March 24.
Found propert y. Two wallets, a cellphone
and keys were found in the grass at a park on
Turnstone Court before 7 p.m. Monday,
March 24.
Robbery. Aperson took $400 from a cash
register of a store on Metro Center
Boulevard and drove off in a maroon Kia
SUV before 1:21 p.m. Sunday, March 23.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstance. A report was
made about four people smoking marijuana
on a balcony at Bounty Drive before 5:13
p.m. Sunday, March 23.
SAN CARLOS
Burglary. A home was burglarized on the
1400 block of Laurel Street before 2 p.m.
Tuesday, March 25.
St ol en vehi cl e. A car was stolen on the
100 block of Sunnydale Avenue before 1:45
a.m. Tuesday, March 25.
Driver under t he i nfluence. A man was
cited for driving under the influence on the
2400 block of Melendy Drive before 2:16
a.m. Tuesday, March 25.
Police reports
Criminally unkempt
A person reported a man for being
scraggly and creepy looking on the
1500 block of California Drive in
Burlingame before 11:53 a.m.
Wednesday, March 19.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Francisco woman banned from
San Francisco International Airport for try-
ing to sneak on Hawaii-bound planes multi-
ple times was arrested again Wednesday
when she turned up at baggage claim.
Airport police arrested Marilyn Jean
Hartman, 62, around 4 p.m. in Terminal
Three baggage claim with the same luggage
as she always brings, said Sheriff’s Office
spokeswoman Rebecca Rosenblatt.
There is no sign she tried to board any
plane this time, Rosenblatt said.
She was arrested on charges of violating a
court order and trespassing — the same
charges on which she was arraigned exactly
one week prior before being scheduled for
an Aug. 4 jury trial and
released on her own
recognizance.
Hartman is prohibited
from SFO unless she is
legally ticketed to fly.
Wednesday’s arrest
marks her third in the
past month after three
times trying to board
planes — and once suc-
ceeding — and two vio-
lating her prohibition. She received time
served for two misdemeanor burglary
charges and the airport ban for trying to
board flights on Feb. 15, 18 and 20. The
first time she got onboard but was discov-
ered when the actual ticket holder arrived at
the seat. The next two times, including once
when she used a discarded boarding pass,
she was stopped at the security gate. After
her arrest following the third attempt to
sneak through security, Hartman reportedly
told authorities she has cancer and wanted to
go somewhere warm.
On March 18, a Transportation Security
Administration manager recognized
Hartman in a food court beyond the security
checkpoint and she acknowledged who she
was and that she wasn’t supposed to be
there.
She also reportedly had her probation
paperwork in her purse but no boarding pass
in her name or adequate funds to purchase a
ticket, according to the Sheriff’s Office.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
SFO trespasser back at airport again
Marilyn
Hartman
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Keveen Quintanilla’s flirting with a San
Mateo restaurant worker prior to robbing
the business has him facing a date with jail
for three months although a judge will con-
sider a drug program.
Quintanilla, 31, of Burlingame, pleaded
no contest Wednesday to felony counts of
commercial burglary and methamphetamine
possession. He was immediately sentenced
to 90 days jail with credit of eight days,
including credit for good
behavior, but a judge will
consider entry into the
Bridges program and
restitution at an April 4
hearing.
Quintanilla reportedly
flirted with a 22-year-old
female employee of Curry
Up Now, on the 100
block of B Street, on
Saturday night. At about
1:30 a.m. the next morning, employees
called police about an interrupted commer-
cial burglary and the female employee rec-
ognized the suspect they found stacking
property by their rear door as the same man
who had given her his name and phone num-
ber.
Officers used the contact information to
set up a date via text message and arrested
him when he arrived at an arranged spot near
Burlingame Avenue and California Drive at
about 10:30 p.m., according to police.
‘Flirty’ burglar has date with jail
Keveen
Quintanilla
4
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Man arrested after
being identified by tattoo
A man who carjacked a victim at knife-
point in San Mateo Monday evening was
arrested after he was recognized by his tat-
too, according to San Mateo police.
Miguel Angel Cisneros, a 27-year-old San
Bruno resident, approached a 41-year-old
man near Tilton and Railroad avenues and
stole his car and possessions, according to
the police. The victim contacted police
around 6 p.m. and was able to give a
description of his car and Cisneros. Apatrol
sergeant recognized the distinctive tattoo
from a recent police flier and Cisneros was
quickly identified, according to police.
The stolen vehicle was located on the 900
block of Skyline Drive in Daly City and,
after an extensive search of the area,
Cisneros was located near San Bruno’s Ritz
Inn shortly after midnight, according to
police.
Cisneros was charged with carjacking,
robbery, assault with a deadly weapon and
drug charges, according to police.
Woman arrested for DUI, kicking
deputy, child endangerment
A San Francisco woman was arrested in
the coastal town of El Granada over the
weekend after she allegedly drove drunk and
kicked a deputy, according to the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office.
On Saturday around 9:10 p.m., deputies
responded to a call reporting that a woman
who appeared to be intoxicated was about to
drive away with a child in her vehicle, the
Sheriff’s Office said.
The woman, who was later identified as
43-year-old Abby Christine Sherwood, was
parked in the 100 block of Avenue Portola.
The child in the vehicle was Sherwood’s
10-year-old daughter.
Arriving deputies contacted Sherwood,
who allegedly became argumentative and
refused to perform field sobriety tests, the
Sheriff’s Office said.
Sherwood eventually admitted to driving
to the location and pulling over because she
was too drunk, the Sheriff’s Office said.
During questioning, Sherwood spit in a
deputy’s face and kicked him several times,
the sheriff’s office said.
She was arrested and booked into San
Mateo County Jail for DUI, child endanger-
ment and battery on a peace officer.
Police report jury duty scam
Scammers are continuing to pose as sher-
iff’s deputies and threatening arrest if the
victims fail to send money by purchasing a
prepaid “green dot card,” according to the
San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office.
Residents have reported receiving unso-
licited phone calls from a man who claims
to be a deputy sheriff stating the individual
failed to show for jury duty and must send
money or face arrest. No law enforcement
agency would ever contact a member of the
public over the phone demanding they pay
fines or be subject to arrest, according to the
Sheriff’s Office.
Individuals should never provide personal
information such as Social Security num-
bers and credit card information unless they
themselves initiated the phone call.
Anyone who has information or feels they
may have been victim of a similar scam
should contact their local law enforcement.
Groundbreaking for Cañada
College solar panel project April 10
The San Mateo County Community
College District is holding a ground-
breaking ceremony for a new solar proj-
ect at Cañada College on 10 a.m. April
10 at the college.
This is the first renewable energy project
undertaken by the district. The $4.5 million
project is expected to cut the school’s ener-
gy costs of nearly $600,000 by about half.
The brief groundbreaking ceremony will
include district personnel and industry part-
ners using ceremonial shovels to turn dirt at
the site. Aribbon cutting ceremony will be
held upon completion of the project some-
time this summer.
Bay Area employers to
underwrite commute costs
San Francisco Bay Area businesses with
more than 50 full-time employees are going
to have to start offering commuter subsidies
as a way of encouraging their workers to use
public transportation or other alternatives
to driving alone.
The Metropolitan Transportation
Commission on Wednesday approved a plan
requiring larger employers to make at least
one of four permitted transportation bene-
fits available to their workers by Sept. 30.
Most companies are expected to choose
an option that calls for them to let employ-
ees discount $130 a month in public transit
or van pool costs from their taxable
income.
Local briefs
5
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Before his
arrest Wednesday on federal corrup-
tion charges, Sen. Leland Yee was
best known for his attempts to
strengthen California’s open
records, government transparency
and whistleblower protection laws.
Yet he was regarded somewhat
warily by his colleagues in the
Legislature, where he was known
for his sometimes chilly relation-
ship with Democratic leaders when
he refused to follow their lead.
The 65-year-old San Francisco
Democrat was arrested Wednesday
during a series of raids by the FBI in
Sacramento and the San Francisco
Bay Area. He was arraigned later in
the day on charges that alleged ille-
gal dealing in firearms, wire fraud
and trading the influence of his
office for money in an apparent
attempt to repay a $70,000 cam-
paign debt from a failed bid for San
Francisco mayor in 2011.
At the state Capitol, where Yee
has worked since his election to the
Assembly in 2002, the FBI
searched his Senate office. After
eight years, Yee will be termed out
of that office this year and is run-
ning for secretary of state, the office
that oversees elections and cam-
paign finance reporting.
He has been lauded by numerous
open records advocates over the
years for his efforts to promote
government transparency. That
included legislation to close a loop-
hole in state public records laws
after the California State
University, Stanislaus Foundation
refused to release its $75,000
speaking contract with former vice
presidential candidate Sarah Palin
in 2010.
Just last week, he was honored by
the Northern California chapter of
the Society of Professional
Journalists, which gave him its
public official award for his efforts
last year to maintain the require-
ments of the California Public
Records Act.
The SPJ recognition cited Yee’s
“courage to oppose his own
Democratic Party leaders and the
governor” for their efforts to weak-
en the law. Yee’s clashes with his
fellow Democrats are a hallmark of
his reputation in the state capital.
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell
Steinberg of Sacramento, for exam-
ple, stripped him of his rank as
assistant pro tem after Yee voted
against the Democratic budget plan
in 2011.
“I am more than willing to relin-
quish this title if that is the price for
voting my conscience on the state
budget and standing up against
severe cuts to education, social
services, and health care,” Yee said
in a letter to colleagues following
his ouster.
Arrested senator known
for transparency bills
REUTERS
An investigator with the FBI removes bags from the Ghee Kung Tong
building, which houses the Chinese Freemasons, in the Chinatown
neighborhood in San Francisco.
The FBI on Wednesday filed a 137-
page affidavit outlining a detailed
corruption case against a California
state senator who is accused of ask-
ing for campaign donations in
exchange for introducing an un-
dercover agent to an arms trafficker.
The affidavit names Sen.Leland Yee
and 25 others, including Raymond
Chow, a onetime gang leader with
ties to San Francisco’s Chinatown
known as “Shrimp Boy,” and Keith
Jackson, Yee’s campaign aide. Jack-
son is accused of multiple counts of
fraud and conspiracy to commit
fraud.
Pg.24: In connection with efforts to
retire the mayoral campaign debt,
Senator Yee and Keith Jackson
agreed that Senator Yee would
make a telephone call to a manager
with the California Department of
Public Health in support of a con-
tract under consideration with (the
undercover agent’s) purported
client,and would provide an official
letter of support for the client,in ex-
change for a $10,000 campaign
donation.Senator Yee made the call
on Oct. 18, 2012, and provided the
letter on or about Jan. 13, 2013.
Pg.94-95:Yee said,“People want to
get whatever they want to get. Do I
care? No, I don’t care. People need
certain things.”
Yee told the undercover agent that
he believed the more people in-
volved in the weapons deal, the
greater the chances he would be im-
plicated.
The agent told Yee he had just as
much to lose if he was caught. The
agent told Yee he had a great life and
would not do anything to jeopard-
ize his lifestyle.
Yee said he was unhappy with his
life and said,“There’s a part of me
that wants to be like you.You know
how I’m going to be like you? Just
be a free agent there.”
Yee told the agent that he wanted to
hide out in the Philippines. Jackson
reiterated the importance of having
the agent meet with the arms dealer.
Yee said he would arrange for the
agent to meet with the arms dealer.
Pg. 97: At a restaurant Yee told the
undercover agent that he appreci-
ated his support and said,“I can be of
help to you for eight years. I think
eight years is a lot better than 10
months.”Yee said that if he lost in his
bid for secretary of state he wanted
to move into the private sector and
exploit all of the relationships he had
in Asia for various kinds of activities.
Pg. 98-99: (The undercover agent)
asked about the availability of shoul-
der fired missiles or rockets.Senator
Yee responded “I told him about
rocket launchers and things like
that.”Senator Yee asked (the agent)
to provide an inventory list of de-
sired weapons and he would see
what they can do.
Pg. 101: On March 11, 2014, the
agent met with Yee,Jackson and Lim
(the alleged weapons trafficker) at
a restaurant and Yee said no
weapons deal could take place until
after the secretary of state election
in November. Yee and Lim also en-
couraged the agent to deal in
smaller amounts of weapons to
avoid unwanted attention in the
Philippines.
Yee also said he wouldn’t go to the
Philippines until November.Yee said,
“Once things start to move,it’s going
to attract attention. We just got to
be extra-extra careful.”
On March 14, 2014, the agent met
again with Yee, Jackson and an as-
sociate at a restaurant. Yee and
Jackson discussed how they would
break up the large sum of cash pro-
vided by the agent into legitimate
campaign donations.
Excerpts from FBI affidavit
6
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
Senators concerned by Secret Service allegations
WASHINGTON — The Democratic chairman of the
Senate Homeland Security Committee and a senior
Republican senator expressed concern Wednesday over an
alleged incident involving a drunken Secret Service agent
in connection with President Barack Obama’s overseas
trip to the Netherlands.
On Sunday, the agency called three agents home from
the Netherlands just before Obama’s arrival for talks with
foreign leaders in The Hague. One agent had been found
inebriated inside a hotel, according to reports.
Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., the Homeland Security
Committee chairman, said Wednesday he is “troubled by
the reports regarding the behavior of a few Secret Service
agents serving on the president’s detail in the
Netherlands,” according to a statement. His office said
he’s asked the Secret Service for more information about
the episode.
Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, the ranking member of
the Senate Judiciary Committee, said in a statement that
the incident “shows that the agency has to deal with some
in its ranks who fail to respect the important job the
agency is tasked with.” While he said that he appreciated
“swift action” by Secret Service Director Julia Pierson,
the senator added that “it looks like she’s still got work to
do to regain the trust of the American people.”
The latest embarrassing incident involving a drunken
Secret Service agent comes a year into the term of a new
agency director who already has been confronted with a
handful of incidents since the Colombia prostitution
scandal nearly two years ago. In that episode, 13 agents
and officers were accused of partying with female foreign
citizens at a hotel in the seaside resort of Cartagena,
where they were staying before Obama’s arrival.
L.A. airport police chief agrees with TSA findings
LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles Airport Police Chief
Patrick Gannon says he agrees with the recommendations
in a Transportation Security Administration report to
improve airport security after a deadly shooting last year.
Gannon says he has read the report issued Wednesday
and airport law enforcement officials agree with recom-
mendations including posting armed police at security
checkpoints and ticket counters during peak hours.
The airport changed its policy months before the Nov.
1 shooting, allowing officers to roam terminals instead
of remaining at checkpoints. Gannon has said he didn’t
want to revisit stationing officers at checkpoints because
it’s important to be flexible.
Agunman targeting TSA officers killed one and wound-
ed three other people in the Nov. 1 shooting.
The 25-page report to Congress obtained by the
Associated Press makes 14 recommendations after a
review of security at nearly 450 airports nationwide.
By Sandra Chereb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CARSON CITY, Nev. — As support-
ers of the federal health care reforms
push for final signups, a handful of
states are trying to press the reset but-
ton.
They have botched their handling of
the process so badly that they already
are looking beyond Monday’s enroll-
ment deadline to the next enrollment
period starting in the fall.
Many states and the federal govern-
ment experienced technical problems
with the enrollment websites, but
implementation of the federal
Affordable Care Act has been a relative
disaster in Maryland, Massachusetts,
Nevada, Oregon and Vermont.
Rather than focusing on meeting
enrollment targets, officials in those
states find themselves consumed with
replacing top officials, cancelling
contracts with software companies,
dealing with state or federal investiga-
tions, and spending tens of millions
of dollars on fixes and new contrac-
tors. The core of the problem has been
the difficulty in building an online
health insurance marketplace that
syncs up with myriad state and federal
databases.
Early projections for those five
states were to sign up a combined
800,000 Americans for private health
insurance coverage by March 31, 11
percent of the Obama administration’s
original target for national enrollment.
Yet with just days to go before the six-
month enrollment period ends, achiev-
ing 25 percent of that target would be
considered a success.
Overseers of Nevada Health Link
have called that state’s program a “full
failure” and a “catastrophe.” Some offi-
cials have suggested dumping Xerox,
which was awarded a $75 million con-
tract to develop the system.
While Xerox remains on the job, a
state board earlier this month approved
up to $1.5 million to hire another tech
firm, Deloitte Consulting, to assess the
Xerox system and recommend fixes.
Last month Nevada officials cut their
target enrollment from 118,000 to
50,000 and conceded that meeting even
the lower goal would be a challenge.
Bungling mars health care
deadline in number of states
Around the nation
REUTERS
Conestoga Wood Specialties founder Anthony Hahn delivers a brief statement to
the press standing on the steps of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., after
arguments were presented to challenge the Affordable Care Act's requirement that
employers provide coverage for contraception as part of an employee's health care.
NATION 7
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — House Democrats
deployed a little-used legislative move
Wednesday to force a vote on a comprehen-
sive immigration bill, an effort doomed to
fail but designed to increase the election-
year pressure on Republicans to act.
“It is time for us to have a vote,” said Rep.
Xavier Becerra, D-Calif., who joined with
dozens of Democrats, advocates and actress
America Ferrera to mark 273 days since the
Senate passed a bipartisan bill. They insist-
ed that House Republican leaders act.
Standing on the east steps of the Capitol
in a light snow and biting wind, proponents
argued that they had the necessary votes in
the House for a bill that would provide a
path to citizenship for the estimated 11 mil-
lion immigrants living in the country ille-
gally and tighten border security.
“We’re tired of the House of
Representatives leaders and their refusal to
act,” Ferrera said.
Democrats introduced a discharge petition
that requires the signature of 218 for leg-
islative action, an effort that stands little
chance of success as Republicans, even
those supportive of immigration legisla-
tion, are unwilling to defy their leadership.
By the end of Wednesday’s House session,
149 of the chamber’s 199 Democrats had
signed the petition.
House Democrats trying to
force vote on immigration
By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A small study that examined brains from
children who died found abnormal patterns
of cell growth in autistic children. The
research bolsters evidence that something
before birth might cause autism, at least in
some cases.
Clusters of disorganized brain cells were
discovered in tissue samples from brain
regions important for regulating social
functioning, emotions and communication
— which can all be troublesome for children
with autism.
The abnormalities were found in 10 of 11
children with autism, but in only one of 11
children without the disease. The children’s
brains were donated to science after death;
causes of death included drowning, acci-
dents, asthma and heart problems.
The authors said the clusters, detected with
sophisticated lab tests, are likely defects
that occurred during the second or third
trimesters of pregnancy.
“Because this points to the biological
onset in prenatal life, it calls sharply into
question other popular notions about
autism,” including the scientifically
debunked theory that childhood vaccines
might be involved, said lead author Eric
Courchesne, an autism researcher at the
University of California, San Diego.
Experts not involved in the latest study
called the results preliminary and said larger
studies are needed to determine if the unusu-
al brain development found in the study
causes problems, and if it is truly common
in autism or even in people without the dis-
order. What causes the unusual structure isn’t
known, Courchesne said, adding, “It could
be gene mutations and environmental fac-
tors together. ”
Scientists have been working for decades
to find the cause of autism, and they increas-
ingly believe its origins begin before birth.
In addition to genetics, previous research
suggests other factors might include infec-
tions during pregnancy, preterm birth and
fathers’ older age at conception.
Study: Autism may be tied to
flawed prenatal brain growth
REUTERS
Immigrants rights supporters rally outside the U.S. Immigration Customs Enforcement
Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma,Wash.
LOCAL/NATION 8
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Tom Hays and Larry Neumeister
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Osama bin Laden’s son-in-
law was convicted Wednesday for his role as
al-Qaida’s fiery chief spokesman after 9/11
— a verdict prosecutors said vindicated the
Obama administration’s strategy of bring-
ing terror suspects to justice in civilian
court.
A federal jury deliberated six hours over
two days before finding 48-year-old
Sulaiman Abu Ghaith guilty of charges that
included conspiracy to kill Americans and
providing support to al-Qaida.
Abu Ghaith, a Kuwaiti-born imam who
married bin Laden’s eldest daughter about
five years ago, is the highest-ranking al-
Qaida figure brought to trial on U.S. soil
since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
Prosecutors said he played a leading role
in the terror organization’s post-9/11 prop-
aganda videos, in which he and others
gloated over the destruction and he warned
of a “storm of airplanes” to follow.
He could get life in prison at sentencing
Sept. 8.
In a statement, U.S. Attorney Preet
Bharara said he hopes the verdict brings
some comfort to al-Qaida victims.
Feds praise verdict against bin Laden son-in-law
“I was unaware of the ongoing investiga-
tion. I am withholding judgment on Senator
Yee’s case and until more facts are known
and the legal process unfolds,” Mullin said
in a prepared statement.
News of the early morning raids in San
Mateo County and Yee’s apprehension sent
San Mateo County buzzing but publicly
those who know and work with him locally
were pretty tightlipped.
Yee’s office, known for sending out near-
daily press releases about the senator’s
accomplishments and events, was silent —
in part, no doubt, to the federal raid of it
Wednesday while Yee himself was arrested.
His press secretary did not respond to
queries which is pretty much the same reac-
tion of other longtime Yee associates.
Dave Pine, president of the San Mateo
County Board of Supervisors, called Yee’s
situation “something you only expect to
see in a made-for-TV movie.”
Board Vice President Carole Groom said
she was “shocked” when she and several
others at a Police Activities League function
Wednesday morning received the same news
alert on their phones simultaneously.
Groom called the situation a “tragedy”
whether true or not but said frankly “he was
never a big representative for San Mateo
County. ”
Yee represents District Eight which is pri-
marily San Francisco but does include a
northern swath of San Mateo County.
Redistricting also moved Yee’s district out
of the area but his seat remains until the end
of the year. Hill’s district includes most of
San Mateo County and state Sen. Mark Leno
represents San Francisco.
Yee, who is currently a candidate for
California secretary of state, was first elect-
ed to the San Francisco Board of Education
in 1988 and served stints as a San Francisco
supervisor, two terms as assemblyman
before winning a hotly contest three-way
race with Mike Nevin and Lou Papan for
Jackie Speier’s vacated Senate seat in 2006.
In 2010, his run for San Francisco mayor
finished poorly.
Yee has made a name for himself with leg-
islation battling lifetime no-parole sen-
tences and solitary confinement for juve-
niles and governmental transparency. He
also proposed firearms legislation concern-
ing trigger locks and assault weapons.
In 2008, he butted heads with local prose-
cutors and former senator Quentin Kopp,
whose seat Yee holds, over a bill protecting
domestic violence victims who do not want
to testify against their accused abuser from
contempt charges and jail time.
Kopp said he is “not surprised at all” by
Yee’s arrest because, in part, of other brush-
es with the law which include a 2000 arrest
in Hawaii on suspicion of shoplifting sun-
tan oil and 1999 questioning twice by San
Francisco police who suspected he was
looking for prostitutes. Kopp said he also
believes Yee was suspected of submitted
false invoices to Santa Clara County as a
contract employee and played loose with
San Francisco Board of Supervisors residen-
cy requirements. Yee was never charged in
any of the cases.
“I haven’t had anything good to say about
him since before he was a supervisor with
his shoplifting and the hooker,” Kopp said.
While not taken aback by the arrest,
Kopp said he was surprised by the scope of
the allegations and the number of people
involved.
Kopp predicts Yee will take a leave of
absence like Calderon which allows him to
continue collecting a paycheck.
“That is an insult to taxpayers,” Kopp
said, adding that the Yee allegations are “the
most appalling” affront to voters and tax-
payers in his experience.
Continued from page 1
REACTION
Revenue Service, with support from local
police, carried out boxes of items from the
home and an FBI agent said the residence was
linked to the ongoing criminal investigation
involving Yee.
“I can actually confirm at this time that the
FBI is conducting multiple search warrants
and arrest warrants throughout the San
Francisco Bay Area,” said Special Agent with
the FBI Greg Wuthrich. “I can also confirm
that state Sen. Leland Yee is also a part of the
ongoing investigation that’s taking place at
this time. [The investigation has] been ongo-
ing for quite a while and that’s all I can say.”
Yee is being accused of conspiracy to deal
firearms and wire fraud. Also arrested was
Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow, who has a
prior criminal history dating back to the
1970s.
Agents said they couldn’t disclose the name
of the home’s residents, but a neighbor named
Tuck, who asked her last name not be used,
said the people who lived in the home being
raided moved in about a year ago. Early
Wednesday morning, she was awakened by the
agents’ raid. Around 6 a.m. Wednesday, search
and arrest warrants were issued in relation to
the case, said FBI Special Agent Peter D. Lee.
“I walked around the house and turned the
lights on and saw flashlights,” she said. “It
was alarming, but I was told they are FBI and
the IRS.”
She believes it was a family of Asian
descent living in the home. She said she
believed a car that had been parked across the
street for quite some time belonged to them.
They also have a Porsche in the garage, she
said.
“I just greeted them from time to time,” she
said. “There was quite a few. Lots of cars out in
front.”
Although there’s no name attached to the
parcel on the San Mateo County Assessor’s
Office website. It listed the billing address for
the home as 1594 44th Ave. in San Francisco,
a property listed as being owned by Xiaohui
Chen and Jinming Yan.
Continued from page 1
HOME
OPINION 9
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Memories at Pete’s Harbor
Editor,
After years of costly postpone-
ments, maneuvering and delays by
some, the decision by the Redwood
City Council on March 24 will allow
the development at Pete’s Harbor to
move forward (“Pete’s Harbor appeal
denied” in the March 26 edition of the
Daily Journal). Now may be the time
to take a deep breath and remember the
Pete’s Harbor we all knew rather than
what has been said in recent years.
Over time, there have been so many
wonderful memories made and shared
at Pete’s Harbor. Generations upon
generations have enjoyed not only
the harbor, but the people they met
there. Pete Uccelli shared his dreams
with so many of us and we are all
thankful that he did. Now we can
watch another dream of his come true
as the harbor moves toward a new
future.
There are those who never had the
opportunity to experience what the
harbor really was and therefore never
understood the meaning of it all. For
those of us who were fortunate to have
a taste of such a wonderful place, we
should never let the memories of Pete,
Paula and the harbor be tainted by
anyone. Keep the wonderful memories
close to your heart. Don’t let them be
ruined and carry them with you wher-
ever you go.
Jack and Deidre Bartkiewicz
Pawleys Island, S.C.
Vietnam Veterans Day
Editor,
Saturday, March 29 is recognized as
a commemoration for and reflection
on veterans who sacrificed so much
during the Vietnam War. Millions of
young men served our country (many
of whom were drafted), over 58,000
lost their lives and hundreds of thou-
sands came home wounded in action.
Both my husband and my oldest
brother served their country during
this time and both came home to a
less than positive reception. Instead
of receiving a welcome home fitting
to a soldier who sacrificed for his
country, they were greeted with hostil-
ity and criticism.
This Saturday, please recognize a
Vietnam Veteran and finally welcome
them home.
Phyllis McArthur
Foster City
Bring back my rink
Editor,
I am in agreement with Mary Ryan
of Menlo Park (Letter: “Bridgepointe
Ice Rink” in the March 26 edition of
the Daily Journal).
When they closed [the ice rink at]
Bridgepointe, a piece of me died with
it. I loved playing ice hockey at
Bridgepointe because natural sunlight
would trickle in through the glass and
illuminate the rink during the morn-
ing stick-and-shoot sessions. You just
don’t get that kind of atmosphere any-
where else around here. Bring back my
rink.
Brad Rosinski
Redwood City
Suffering the
consequences of your actions
Editor,
Art Kiesel’s guest perspective
“Unfunded pension liabilities — The
unspoken,” in the March 24 issue of
the Daily Journal, is way off base on
who to blame for the unfunded pen-
sion liabilities from which local
cities and county government is suf-
fering. The local city government
officials started this problem back in
the 1980s and 1990s, and no one
else. Kiesel is fast to blame the gov-
ernor, the state Legislature and the
unions. This is one of the most irre-
sponsible and ignorant things I have
ever read in the Daily Journal.
The governor, the state Legislature
and the unions didn’t hire the local
city and county employees, the local
city and county government officials
did. The local city councils estab-
lished and approved the hiring prac-
tices, including the compensation
packages and pensions. No one else
did. The local city and county offi-
cials had the opinion that “we need to
offer the best compensation and pen-
sion packages to attract and hire the
best candidates for our cities.” Now,
the local cities and county are suffer-
ing the consequences of their past
actions.
There was a similar guest perspec-
tive from a former North County
councilman a few years ago in the
Daily Journal, where that ex-council-
man clearly stated that, basically,
“We, the local city officials, caused
this problem, and we don’t know how
to solve it.” Mr. Kiesel needs to stop
blaming everyone else and start fix-
ing the problem. There are answers
out there, maybe answers he may not
like, but they are out there. Handle it.
Michael R. Oberg
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
T
he indictment itself was
shocking, a state senator
accused of conspiracy and
arrested. As details of the case around
state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San
Francisco/San Mateo, unfolded, it
became more and more shocking.
If true, it reveals an extreme lack of
judgment and character. Though
everyone is innocent until proven
guilty, the evidence seems pretty
damning. Astate senator trading influ-
ence and making connections for
those involved in arms dealings,
drugs and other crimes in exchange
for campaign donations is a shocking
situation.
Yee is termed out at the end of the
year and represents District Eight,
which was to be moved at the end of
his term elsewhere. Both San
Francisco and San Mateo County have
representatives in the state Senate in
Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, and
Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo. Yee’s office
is an appendage because of redistrict-
ing so his removal from the Senate
will be no loss for his constituents. If
any of his legislation has merit, it
can be picked up by other legislators,
and Yee himself told the Daily Journal
last month he is spending about half
his time campaigning for California
secretary of state.
Two other state senators have
recently taken leaves of absence, Ron
Calderon for a federal corruption
indictment and Rod Wright for his
conviction of voter fraud and perjury
charges. The Senate needs no further
distractions. Yee should resign imme-
diately.
He won’t be an effective office hold-
er in his time remaining and will only
serve as a distraction. Besides, the
weight of the charges against him
will likely take up all his time.
Furthermore, the Senate needs a
reality check if its members are to be
continually investigated and charged
with major crimes. Once is an anom-
aly. Twice is a trend. Three times is a
situation, an extremely serious one.
And it is a situation that must be
addressed if we are to have confidence
in the body. The first step would be
the immediate removal of Yee from
office if he does not remove himself
first.
Leland Yee should leave Senate
Game changer
R
ules are made to be broken, but changed?
That’s a whole different game. And, if Hasbro
has its way, that game is “Monopoly. ”
Starting this fall, the board game publisher will issue a
special edition incorporating suggested “house rules”
used by players. In other words, under the new rules,
maybe you can still pass go and collect $200 on your
way to jail. Maybe
you can even go half-
sies on Boardwalk or
sublet Park Place.
The company is
jump-starting its pub-
licity stunt by post-
ing 10 popular rules
on its Facebook page
for dissection with
plans to winnow it
down to five for the
final special set.
This brings to mind
one question: Why?
House rules aren’t a
bad idea, especially
mandates that drop the
luxury tax or make my
get out of jail card eternal. But the fun in house rules is
that they aren’t sanctioned by the included paper
instructional manner. House rules are like the secret
menu at In-N-Out Burger. Animal-style isn’t as fun if
just anybody can see it printed in black and white.
Neither are those special rules tailor-maid for specific
players.
This isn’t the first time Monopoly has tried shaking
up sales by shaking up tradition. Last year, much to
my chagrin, Hasbro again turned to the public to kill
off one token and add a new one to the roster. The iron
hit the chopping block and a kitty cat set up shop.
Then there is the “electronic banking” edition so that
new generations of bankers can hit an ATM rather than
flex their monetary math skills. With all of these
tweaks, life went on just as it will regardless of this
house rule nonsense. Those who abide by the letter of
the gaming law will continue to insist on stringent
adherence to the official rules created back in the ’30s.
Those who prefer skirting established regulations will
keep on letting development run amuck on the board
and bid-rigging the bank auctions of unpurchased prop-
erties.
If the Monopoly rule change makes purists bristle,
the proposed change in scoring for Scrabble points
will really push them over the edge. This idea would be
awesome if blank tiles were suddenly worth 3,000
points when in my possession and my possession
onl y. House rules! But alas, no. Aresearcher is arguing
that language changes in the last half-century or so
mean those Qs and Zs are much more commonly used
and therefore should be decreased in value. Can you
spell L-A-M-E? Six points, by the way. N-E-E-D-L-E-S-
S, slightly better with nine points unless one can hit a
triple word square.
If the proposed scoring system changes, chances are
hard-core players will continue using the original
point assignments. Call it vintage house rules.
Speaking of Scrabble, the official players dictionary
is getting its first official revamp in nine years. Word
is, thousands of new terms will join the ranks in the de
facto bible of challenging and at least one will be cho-
sen from player suggestions fighting it out bracket-
style for inclusion. Any coincidence Hasbro publishes
Scrabble as well as Monopoly? Its “house rules” pro-
motion and “new word” competition are pretty similar
attempts to get the public jazzed again about games
that don’t feature warfare, mythological creates or any-
thing digital. One fear, though, is exactly what those
new additions will be. Selfie? Twerking?
And while all is fair in love and war the same should
not be true when it comes to turning fan favorites on
their head. Next up, Go Fish will include other ani-
mals. Chutes and Ladders will find room for elevators.
Candy Land will go sugar-free. Yahtzee will start using
12-sided dice stolen from Dungeons and Dragons sets.
The possibilities are endless and endlessly makes one
wonder what brilliant makeover is up next. The mind
boggles — at least at until Boggle, too, decides it
needs a new way of playing.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send
a letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 16,268.99 -98.89 10-Yr Bond 2.70 -0.03
Nasdaq 4,173.58 -60.69 Oil (per barrel) 92.74
S&P 500 1,852.56 -13.06 Gold 1,304.50
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Movado Group Inc., up $4.28 to $46.31
After topping Wall Street expectations for the fourth quarter,the jeweler
issued a full-year forecast that wowed analysts.
International Game Technology, down $1.23 to $13.62
The slot machine maker cut its outlook and said that it is “taking actions
to realign its cost structure”for earnings growth.
Steelcase Inc., up $1.70 to $16.28
Wall Street analysts are increasingly optimistic about the prospects for
the furniture maker after a strong quarter.
Nasdaq
Garmin Ltd., up 90 cents to $55.36
Citigroup upgraded the stock on what it sees as big potential for the
GPS company’s new sports-oriented technology.
Facebook Inc., down $4.50 to $60.38
Investors question whether the social network’s $2 billion acquisition of
virtual reality company Oculus will deliver real-world dollars.
Five Below Inc., up $4.34 to $42.34
The discount retailer’s profit and revenue surpassed Wall Street
expectations for the fourth quarter.
Panera Bread Co., down $15.77 to $170.05
Wunderlich downgraded the restaurant chain’s stock,citing expectations
for “lumpy”earnings performance through next year.
Insmed Inc., down $2.39 to $15.90
The company’s lung disease treatment, the inhaled antibiotic Arikayce,
fell short of its main goal in a mid-stage study.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market
continued its recent pattern of one step
forward, one step back.
After starting the day higher follow-
ing an encouraging report on orders
for manufactured goods, stocks drifted
lower in afternoon trading Wednesday
and gave up their gains from a day ear-
lier. Facebook led the technology sec-
tor lower as investors gave the compa-
ny’s latest acquisition the thumbs-
down.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
the most in two weeks and is now flat
for the year. Investors are waiting for a
catalyst that will either push the mar-
ket higher or cause a sustained sell-off.
Many anticipate that the stock market
will resume its upward trajectory later
in the year as the economy strength-
ens following an unusually harsh win-
ter.
“We’re going through this back and
forth, I would call it a consolidation
phase, digesting the huge gains we’ve
had,” said David Lafferty, chief market
strategist at Natixis Global Asset
Management. “Most of the movement
in stocks will tend to be in the latter
half of the year. ”
The S&P 500 fell 13.06 points, or
0.7 percent, to 1,852.56. The index is
up 0.2 percent for the year, after rising
almost 30 percent in 2013.
The Dow Jones industrial average
lost 98.89 points, or 0.6 percent, to
16, 268. 99. The technology-heavy
Nasdaq composite fell more than the
other indexes, giving up 60.69
points, or 1.4 percent, to 4,173.58.
Facebook was one of the biggest
losers.
The social media network slumped
$4.51, or 6.9 percent, to $60.38 after
announcing a $2 billion acquisition of
virtual reality company Oculus late
Monday. It was Facebook’s second big
acquisition in as many months. Last
month the company announced that it
would pay $19 billion for messaging
startup WhatsApp.
Investors may be questioning
whether the returns on those invest-
ments will ultimately justify the big
outlays, said Lawrence Creatura, a
portfolio manager at Federated
Investors.
Another loser in the technology sec-
tor was King Digital Entertainment.
The online games company, which
makes the popular “Candy Crush
Saga,” slumped on its first day of trad-
ing. The company raised $499.5 mil-
lion in an initial public offering. The
company’s stock fell $3.50, or 15.6
percent, to $19 on its first day of trad-
ing.
The stock market opened higher
after a report showed that orders to
U.S. factories for long-lasting manu-
factured goods rose in February by the
largest amount since November, 2.2
percent. Demand for airplanes and
automobiles drove the gains, accord-
ing to the Commerce Department
report. Last month’s rise in durable
goods orders followed a 1.3 percent
drop in January.
“The bigger issue right now is
whether or not growth in the United
States is going to reaccelerate as the
year goes on,” Paul Karos, portfolio
manager at Whitebox mutual funds.
“We are assuming a bounce back after
this weak first quarter. ”
Health care companies bucked the
downward trend and were the only
industry sector to rise. The sector is
rebounding after getting caught up in a
brief sell-off of biotechnology stocks
on Friday and Monday. Biotech com-
panies slumped after lawmakers raised
concerns about the prices of some
drugs.
Tenet Healthcare rose $2.03, or 5.2
percent, to $40.93. Quest Diagnostic
rose $3.05, or 5.6 percent, to $57.99.
Hospitals and medical device compa-
nies are attractive because they have
steady revenue streams.
Bond prices rose. The yield on the
10-year Treasury note fell to 2.69 per-
cent from 2.75 percent from late
Tuesday.
Tech stocks lead a broad market decline
By Barbara Ortutay
and Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Facebook’s latest multi-
billion dollar acquisition of virtual reali-
ty headset maker Oculus is prompting
some people to wonder if CEO Mark
Zuckerberg is already living in an alter-
nate reality.
Longtime technology analyst Roger
Kay wonders whether Zuckerberg “is nuts”
for agreeing to pay $2 billion for Oculus
less than five weeks after inking a deal to
buy WhatsApp for $19 billion.
Oculus, which got its start on the crowd-
funding site Kickstarter, doesn’t have a
consumer product on the market, just the
promise of bulky virtual reality goggles
that have generated huge buzz in the video
gaming community.
Zuckerberg, for his
part, sees long-term
implications in the
technology, for commu-
nication, entertainment
and beyond. He was
right about mobile, and
he’s created the world’s
biggest online social
network.
So, is he looney, or
visionary?
“Mobile is the platform of today and
now we’re starting to also get ready for
the platforms of tomorrow. To me, by far
the most exciting future platform is
around vision or modifying what you see
to create augmented and immersive expe-
riences,” Zuckerberg said on a conference
call Tuesday discussing the deal. “Today’s
acquisition is a long-term bet on the
future of computing. I believe Oculus can
be one of the platforms of this future.”
Facebook’s investors seem to think
Oculus’s promise is too far off. The Menlo
Park-based social networking company’s
stock fell 7 percent on Wednesday to
close at $60.38.
Beyond sticker shock, the WhatsApp
and Oculus deals — along with the
Facebook’s spurned offer to buy SnapChat
for $3 billion— have raised questions
about Facebook’s ability to innovate on
its own. Some of the company’s most
high-profile products, such as the
SnapChat-like Poke, the messaging serv-
ice Facebook Messenger and Home, have
flopped. The jury’s still out on Paper, a
stand-alone app that lets users read news,
Facebook feeds and more.
“Facebook I don’t think has the best
innovation strategy,” says Gartner ana-
lyst Brian Blau. “So far it’s been ‘move
fast and break things.’ Move fast is good,
but break thinks, may not be.”
Blau calls the Oculus acquisition “kind
of out of left field.”
“We have always thought about experi-
ence as a focus of virtual reality,” he says.
“Certainly it can be social, but we have
not thought about it as a core social expe-
rience.”
That’s not to say it can’t work. There
were questions about Facebook’s acquisi-
tion of Instagram back when it offered $1
billion for the photo-sharing app (the
final purchase price was $715 million) in
April 2012 — and Instagram “turned out
fine,” Blau points out. Facebook said
Tuesday that Instagram has 200 million
users, up from 30 million at the time it
agreed to buy the company.
Visionary or looney? Zuckerberg on spending spree
Mark
Zuckerberg
Under fire, Zohydro
maker touts drug safety board
WASHINGTON — After months of criti-
cism over its recently launched painkiller
Zohydro, the maker of the powerful narcotic
is highlighting an unusual oversight board
that it’s assembled to try and prevent abuse
of the drug.
Zogenix’s president and director, Stephen
Farr, told the Associated Press that the out-
side group of seven medical, addiction and
law enforcement specialists will be able to
spot early signs of misuse using data from
sources that include prescribing statistics,
addiction center reports and law enforce-
ment records.
“We will be monitoring patients, pre-
scribers, pharmacists, supply chains and
abusers, so all the populations that would
potentially touch our product,” Farr said in
the interview.
The comments come as Zogenix tries to
move past negative publicity surrounding
Zohydro, the first single-ingredient
hydrocodone drug ever approved for U.S.
patients. Critics say the pill — which con-
tains up to five times more hydrocodone
than Vicodin — will add to the epidemic of
opioid drug abuse that is blamed for about
16,000 overdose deaths a year.
The Food and Drug Administration
approved Zohydro last October and the drug
began shipping to pharmacies this month.
Now, Zogenix is publicizing its efforts to
make sure the drug is used safely.
Dish, DirecTV shares rise
on reported merger talk
LOS ANGELES — Shares of satellite TV
companies Dish and DirecTV surged in mid-
day trading Wednesday after a report said
that Dish Chairman Charlie Ergen had con-
tacted DirecTVCEO Mike White about merg-
i ng.
Bloomberg News reported Ergen initiated
the discussion in response to Comcast
Corp.’s pending $45 billion acquisition of
Time Warner Cable Inc., which was
announced last month. The news service
cited several unnamed sources.
Dish Network Corp. spokesman Bob
Toevs declined to comment. DirecTV
spokesman Robert Mercer said the company
doesn’t comment on speculation.
The companies last tried to merge more
than a decade ago, but the Federal
Communications Commission killed the
deal in 2002 because it would eliminate
competition. While Ergen has long sup-
ported the two companies coming together,
White has been less vocal about the matter.
White told an investors conference earlier
this month, however, that the video indus-
try has changed in the last decade, gotten
more competitive because of the entry of
telecommunications companies, and
expects it to change more in the next five
years.
Business briefs
<<< Page 13, Stanford women
enjoy comforts of home in Sweet 16
Thursday, March 27, 2014
GRAY APPEARS READY FOR REGULAR SEASON: OAKLAND’S OPENING-DAY STARTER IN MID-SEASON FORM >> PAGE 12
By Michael Tarm
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — In a stunning ruling that could
revolutionize a college sports industry worth
billions of dollars and have dramatic repercus-
sion at schools coast to coast, a federal
agency said Wednesday that football players
at Northwestern University can create the
nation’s first union of college athletes.
The decision by a regional director of the
National Labor Relations Board answered the
question at the heart of the debate over the
unionization bid: Do football players who
receive full scholarships to the Big Ten
school qualify as employees under federal law
and therefore can legally unionize?
Peter Sung Ohr, the NLRB regional director,
said in a 24-page decision that the players
“fall squarely” within the broad definition of
employee.
Pro-union activists cheered as they learned
of the ruling.
“It’s like preparing so long for a big game
and then when you win — it is pure joy,” said
former UCLA linebacker Ramogi Huma, the
designated president of Northwestern’s would-
be football players’ union.
An employee is regarded by law as someone
who, among other things, receives compen-
sation for a service and is under the strict,
direct control of managers. In the case of the
College athletes can unionize, federal agency says
By David Brandt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Matt Kavanaugh has
watched over the past several years as mid-
major programs like Butler, VCU and George
Mason have made runs to the Final Four.
The 6-foot-10 Dayton center said the
Flyers would be a good addition to that list.
But another upstart double-digit seed
stands in the way of that dream.
No. 11 Dayton (25-10) faces No. 10
Stanford (23-12) on Thursday in the Sweet
16 of the South Region with the winner earn-
ing a shot at playing for a spot in the Final
Four.
“Every year there’s that one team in the
like final eight, Final Four that no one
expected to be there, and that’s been our
mantra like ‘Why can’t that be us this
year?”’ Kavanaugh said.
Both have reached this point by winning
games against favored opponents. Dayton
toppled Ohio State and Syracuse. Stanford
foiled New Mexico and Kansas.
Now they’re into the second weekend of
the tournament and ready to prove the early
upsets were no fluke.
Stanford forward Josh Huestis says his
team has never considered itself a long shot.
The Cardinal have had plenty of big wins
this season — even before the NCAAtourna-
ment — beating teams like UConn, Oregon
and UCLAduring the regular season.
“Coach (Johnny Dawkins) always tells us
that there are only a handful of teams that
come into this tournament thinking they
have a chance to win,” Huestis said. “The
rest of them are just happy to be here. We
pride ourselves on being a team that believes
we can win this whole thing.”
Stanford certainly looked capable when it
stunned Kansas last weekend. The Cardinal
defense held the Jayhawks’ freshman phe-
nom Andrew Wiggins to just four points on 1
of 6 shooting.
Dawkins said the postseason has brought
out the best in his veteran team, which starts
three juniors and two seniors.
Keeping a dream alive
SCOTT ROVAK/USA TODAY SPORTS
Stanford’s Dwight Powell takes the ball strong to the basket during the Cardinal’s 60-57 upset
win over No. 2 Kansas in the second round of the NCAAtournament Sunday.
C
rystal Springs golfer David
Madding played quite the joke on
coach Ed Larios following the
Gryphons’ West Bay Athletic League
match at Poplar Creek Golf Course in San
Mateo Tuesday.
“I came over to get his scorecard and he
said, ‘Coach, I really screwed up,’” Larios
recounted. “I said, ‘What happened?’ He
said, ‘I shot a 68.’ I said, ‘What?’”
Turns out he was just pulling Larios’
leg. Not only did Madding not shoot a
68, he fired a new
school and high
school record at
Poplar Creek with a
5-under par 31.
“Two years ago,
Ethan Wong from
Menlo shot a 34 and
that was an outstand-
ing score,” Larios
said. “There have
also been some 33s.”
But none lower
than Madding’s score Tuesday. Madding
played a bogey-free round on the front-
nine of Poplar Creek, draining five
birdies. The amazing thing is, Madding
could have gone even lower.
“He was putting for eagle four times,”
Larios said. “David’s not even our No. 1
golfer. Our No. 1 (Rashad Jaymes) shot
[an even-par] 36 after being 3-over for
the first three holes.
“[Jaymes, who played in the first group
with Madding] said David was on fire. He
said it was real exciting to watch.”
Making the score even better is the fact
Madding is not a golfer by trade. He’s a
soccer player. He was named the WBAL’s
Midfielder of the Year and Larios said he
will be attending Williams College in
Massachusetts this fall to play soccer.
“I didn’t expect this. I expected it from
[Jaymes] because he’s a much better
golfer and he puts in the time,” Larios
See STANFORD, Page 14
Madding
goes low
See LOUNGE, Page 14
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Royal & Ancient Golf Club, exclu-
sively for men since it was founded 260
years ago at St. Andrews, will vote in
September on whether women can join the
club.
“It’s an exciting day for the club,” R&A
club secretary Peter Dawson said
Wednesday. “There will be quite a bit of
internal discussion between now and the
September vote. It’s a matter for the mem-
bers to determine. All indications are very
supportive.”
A statement from club said that all com-
mittees were “strongly in favor of the rule
change” and asked members to go along.
The move was hailed by British sports
minister Helen Grant, who was hopeful a
favorable vote would encourage other sin-
gle-sex golf clubs to follow suit.
Dawson, however, said the vote would
have no bearing on whether the British
Open is played on links courses that exclude
women as members — Royal St. George’s ,
Royal Troon and Muirfield, where Phil
Mickelson won last year. The Open returns
to Troon in 2016.
“I don’t want you to think there’s any
connection between this vote and these
issues,” Dawson said. “What other clubs
choose to do in the UK is not connected to
this. ... To be entirely honest, we’re not
here to put pressure on other clubs that have
supported The Open Championship and
other R&Achampionships.”
The Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St.
Andrews has about 2,400 members from
around the world and dates to 1754. The
clubhouse is among the most famous build-
ings in golf, overlooking the Old Course at
St. Andrews.
Augusta National for years was the sym-
bol of men-only golf clubs because it hosts
The Masters every April. The club
announced in August 2012 that it had invit-
ed women to join for the first time — former
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and
South Carolina financier Darla Moore.
Oldest golf club will vote on adding women members
See GOLF, Page 14
See UNION, Page 15
An employee is regarded by law as someone who,
among other things, receives compensation for a service
and is under the strict, direct control of managers. In the
case of the Northwestern players, coaches are the
managers and scholarships are a form of compensation.
Stanford and Dayton both seeking more tournament magic
SPORTS 12
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — C.J. Wilson and Sonny Gray
allowed a run each in their final spring train-
ing starts in the Los Angeles Angels’ 6-2 win
over the Oakland Athletics on Wednesday.
Wilson, slated to start the second regular-
season game for the Angels, allowed an
unearned run on four hits in seven innings,
striking out seven and walking two in his
final tuneup.
“C.J. looked great,” Angels manager Mike
Scioscia said. “He worked ahead and it’s a
great outing for him to get seven innings.”
Gray, set to be the A’s opening day starter,
allowed a run on one hit with a walk and
strikeout in five innings.
“The most important thing is to continue
with the routine that I’ve done all spring
training and I feel really good, especially the
last two or three times out,” Gray said.
Angels second baseman Grant Green hit a
two-run home run in the seventh and is bat-
ting .360 as he makes a final push for a big-
league roster spot. Brennan Boesch also
homered for the Angels.
Reliever Kevin Jepsen struck out the side
with a walk in the ninth to close out the
game.
Wilson threw 99 pitches in his start and
heads back to California after posting a 1.88
earned run average in six starts.
Gray was going to start in a minor-league
game until manager Bob Melvin saw the
Angels’ backups-and-minor-leaguers lineup.
Gray ended spring training with a 3.48 ERA
in six starts. “Fun week,” he said of the next
five days until the opener. “I’m ready.”
Billy Burns is trying to win a roster spot as
a reserve outfielder, with his top competition
Sam Fuld and Michael Taylor also in the out-
field with him on Wednesday. Burns was the
only one of the three to get a hit and led the
A’s in hits with 22 this spring (.310 aver-
age).
All four catchers currently on the Oakland
roster got into Wednesday’s game. Jaso was
the starter and Derek Norris opened at desig-
nated hitter. Chris Gimenez replaced Jaso and
Stephen Vogt came on as the new DH in the
sixth.
Angels outfielder Collin Cowgill is com-
peting for the major-league roster as a back-
up, and he might have helped his cause with
a diving catch of sinking fly ball that turned
out to be Burns’ sacrifice fly.
Matt Long also stated his case on defense.
He sprinted in from deep right field into foul
territory and slid near the A’s bullpen mound
to catch a fly ball from Burns in the sixth.
Long doubled and drove in a run with a sacri-
fice fly and is batting .426 in spring train-
ing.
The A’s played their final spring training
game at Phoenix Municipal Stadium on
Wednesday and will move to Hohokam
Stadium in nearby Mesa for at least the next
20 years starting next spring. Oakland was
in Phoenix from 1982 to this year. Three
team employees including original equip-
ment manager Steve Vucinich were honored
before the game, and Vucinich, who joined
the club after their relocation from Kansas
City in 1968, threw the first pitch.
“It was a great spot for us, but now we’re
going to a place that’s going to have better
upgrades for us, especially inside, which is
what we need,” Melvin said.
Pitcher Dane De La Rosa will start the sea-
son on the disabled list due to a forearm
injury, but will throw in a minor-league game
on Thursday.
Outfielder Craig Gentry went 2-for-6 in a
minor-league game Tuesday as he returns
from a back injury. He’ll play again
Thursday. Infielder Nick Punto is out until
Friday with a hamstring injury.
The Angels head back to Southern
California for the annual exhibition Freeway
Series, with Hector Santiago slated to pitch
against the Los Angeles Dodgers on
Thursday. Friday’s starter was to be Joe
Blanton, but the Angels granted him his
release on Wednesday. Blanton will cost the
Angels $8.5 million to get rid of his con-
tract.
Gray sharp in final spring start for A’s
Girls’ lacrosse
Redwood 16, Menlo-Atherton 8
The Bears fell behind 4-0 and not even a
seven-goal performance from Amanda
Wiseman could prevent them from falling to
the Giants.
M-A(3-5-1 overall) allowed 11 goals in the
first half, but stiffened in the second half,
allowing just five goals. Hannah Wilson had a
strong defensive performance for M-A.
Boys’ lacrosse
Sacred Heart Prep 9, Los Gatos 7
the Gators pulled out a close win over the
Wildcats Tuesday, behind a four-goal perform-
ance from Sean Mayle.
Will Kremer and Frankie Hattler added two
goals apiece for SHP, with Noah Kawasaki
adding one. Hattler also finished with a pair of
assists.
Gators goalkeeper Jack Wise finished with
10 saves to preserve the victory.
Baseball
Serra 5, Riordan 4
The Padres picked up their first West
Catholic Athletic League win of the season
Tuesday, but it wasn’t easy.
Serra needed a walk-off single from Angelo
Bortolin to prevent the Padres from falling to
0-4 in WCAL play. It was the second RBI of
game for Bortolin, who drove in a run with a
first-inning double.
Sean Watkins had a busy day on the mound
and at the plate. Watkins pitched three
innings, giving up just one hit and allowing
no earned runs. Offensively, he had a pair of
doubles.
Matt Blais earned the win with two shutout
innings of work.
Softball
Menlo-Atherton 9, El Camino 8
For the second time in a week, the Bears
outlasted a team from South San Francisco.
After beating South City 1-0 last Thursday,
M-A(2-0 PAL Ocean, 4-2 overall) outslugged
the Colts Tuesday.
The Bears earned the win on an Erin Goode
RBI single to center in the bottom of the sev-
enth inning, driving in Lili Huerta, who had
reached on an error and moved to third on an
Emily Katz single. This after El Camino had
tied the score with three runs in the top of the
inning.
Katz picked up the win in the pitcher’s cir-
cle, allowing just one earned run. The other
seven Colts’ runs were all unearned.
After M-Atook a 2-0 lead in the bottom of
the second, El Camino rallied for four runs in
the top of the fourth, but M-Acam back with
three in the bottom of the frame for a 5-4 lead
and added three more in the sixth for an 8-5
advantage.
Sacred Heart Carthedral 4, Aragon 3
The Irish scored three times in the top of
the first and then held off the Dons in a non-
league game Monday.
Aragon out-hit SHC 8-4, but could not
translate those hits into runs. The Dons
scored two runs in the bottom of the third, but
SHC got one of them back in the top of the
fifth. Aragon closed the gap to one run by
scoring in the bottom of the fifth, but could
not complete the comeback.
Local sports roundup
SPORTS 13
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Stanford coach Tara
VanDerveer vowed she was done hosting the
NCAAtournament a few years ago, viewing it
more as a headache than an advantage.
With few other viable West Coast options
available, VanDerveer was persuaded to do it
again but with a different approach. The play-
ers won’t stay in their dorm rooms, there will
be a generic NCAA court at Maples Pavilion
and the second-seeded Cardinal will prepare
for Sunday’s Sweet 16 game against No. 3
seed Penn State just like they did on the open-
ing weekend halfway across the country in
Ames, Iowa.
“You don’t want your players to feel like
this is a home game,” VanDerveer said
Wednesday. “It’s not. We’re staying in a hotel
just like the other teams are staying in a
hotel. We’re going through all the same
things like credentials that the other teams
do.”
The big difference is the Cardinal (30-3)
don’t need to get on a plane to travel and will
have thousands of cheering fans on hand to
help them get back to the Final Four after hav-
ing a five-year streak snapped last season.
“We’re just excited to play in Maples,” star
forward Chiney Ogwumike said. “It was a
great focal point for us in the first and second
rounds that we want to get back so bad. The
challenge for us as a team is what are we going
to do when we’re back? How are we going to
approach this game?”
Stanford easily won the first two games of
the tournament in Ames, beating South
Dakota 81-62 in the opener and then knock-
ing off 10th-seeded Florida State 63-44 in the
second round. The Cardinal caught a break
when the Seminoles knocked out host Iowa
State in the first round, eliminating the hazard
of playing a true road game in the tournament.
The Cardinal won all 15 home games this
season and are 28-4 at Maples in NCAAtour-
nament play. They last lost a tournament
game here in 2007 in the second round to
Florida State, having won the past eight.
“At the end of the day you want to play well
in front of your fans,” Ogwumike said. “You
don’t want to put pressure on yourself. I think
we learned that by watching Iowa State play
Florida State. You don’t want to put too much
pressure on yourself to win because of the
home crowd.”
If the Cardinal are able to beat the Nittany
Lions (24-7) on Sunday, they will host the
winner of the game between top-seeded South
Carolina (29-4) and No. 4 seed North Carolina
(26-9) for a berth in the Final Four in
Nashville, Tenn.
This is the only regional where all four top
seeds advanced to the second weekend, giving
the Cardinal a difficult path to navigate if they
are to return to the Final Four.
But after three losses in the national semifi-
nals and two championship game defeats dur-
ing a five-year run, getting back to the Final
Four is not enough to satisfy the Cardinal.
“What’s the elephant in the room? We want
to win a national championship,” Ogwumike
said. “This year we said every drill we’re try-
ing to do at national championship caliber.
When you use that language, national cham-
pionship, that sets your expectations high-
er.”
The two coaching staffs know each other
well as Penn State coach Coquese Washington
and one of her assistants have visited
VanDerveer at her summer home in Western
New York the past two years to talk basketball
strategy.
“They’ll probably know what we’re doing
pretty well and we’ll probably know what
they’re doing pretty well,” VanDerveer said.
“It will come down to the players on the court
getting the job done.”
Stanford women return home for NCAA regional
Giants 2B Scutaro says
he’ll open on disabled list
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — San Francisco
Giants second baseman Marco Scutaro says
he will begin the season on the disabled
list.
Scutaro has been sidelined for most of the
spring with back problems.
The Giants didn’t make an official
announcement before their game against
Colorado on Wednesday. But the 38-year-old
Scutaro says he is likely to remain in
Arizona for more treatment when the team
breaks camp.
Scutaro was plagued by back stiffness for
most of the 2013 season. He had a couple of
epidural injections earlier this spring and
recently had a cortisone injection.
Scutaro’s situation likely will leave
Joaquin Arias as the starting second base-
man. Arias started at third base on
Wednesday, with Pablo Sandoval nursing a
small cut in his hand.
Sharks sign forward Ryan Carpenter
SAN JOSE — The San Jose Sharks signed
unrestricted free-agent forward Ryan
Carpenter to an entry-level contract
Wednesday.
The 23-year-old Carpenter, from Oviedo,
Fla., had eight goals and eight assists in 15
games this season for Bowling Green. He
had 37 goals and 42 assists in 100 games in
three seasons for the Falcons
Carpenter will report to Worcester of the
American Hockey League.
Sports briefs
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORLANDO, Fla. — The NFL will place a
heavy emphasis on enforcing its player con-
duct rules, something Rams coach Jeff Fisher
calls “a front-of-the-book issue.”
As the league’s spring meetings wrapped up
Wednesday with Commissioner Roger Goodell
saying expansion of the playoffs next season
is possible, sportsmanship — and lack thereof
— was the prime topic.
“We’re going to clean the game up on the
field,” said Fisher, co-chairman of the influen-
tial competition committee. “The in-your-face
taunting, those types of things, the language.
It’s all in the (rule) book. It’s all under
unsportsmanlike conduct. There’s no change in
our rule. We’re going to enforce the current
rule.”
That includes abusive and racist language.
“It includes everything, yes,” Fisher said
with emphasis.
He noted that everyone is fed up when a lack
of sportsmanship occurs: owners, coaches,
fans, players.
“The NCAAis hoping for us to do something
about it and we’ve got to take the lead,” Fisher
said, “and we’re going to do that.”
The Miami Dolphins were plagued by a bul-
lying scandal last season after tackle Jonathan
Martin left the team. NFL investigators found
that guard Richie Incognito and two teammates
engaged in persistent harassment directed at
Martin, another offensive lineman and an
assistant trainer. Incognito was suspended for
the final eight games of the season and no
longer is with the Dolphins.
Taunting penalties also were up last year,
Fisher said, from “nine to 12 or 13.”
“In the past, taunting, sportsmanship was in
the back of the book under points of empha-
sis,” he said. “It is now in the front of the book.
It falls in our book right after all the statistical
things which were good about our game last
year. It is now a front-of-the-book issue. And
what we want to do is we want to be able to put
it back in the back of the book.”
While the owners voted or tabled a dozen
rules or bylaw changes, expanding the playoffs
from 12 to 14 teams — one in each conference
— was discussed. Goodell is optimistic that’s
coming, and he will discuss it with the players
union April 8. Avote could come as early as the
owners’ May meeting in Atlanta.
Could two extra wild-card games be imple-
mented for 2014?
“It’s not out of the question,” Goodell said.
“We have more work. I wouldn’t rule it out, but
I wouldn’t say that’s the direction we’re head-
ing.
“I think there’s a tremendous amount of inter-
est in this, possibly even to the point of sup-
port. But there also are things we still want to
make sure we do right.”
He believes expanded playoffs would make
late-season division and wild-card races more
compelling.
And two more postseason games would
increase TVrevenues.
Also on Wednesday, the owners:
— Approved experimentation with extra-
point kicks from the 20-yard line for two weeks
in the preseason, but implementing longer
PATs for the regular season has been tabled.
— Adopted proposals to extend the length of
the goalposts 5 feet to 35 feet to better deter-
mine if kicks are good; to no longer stop the
clock on sacks; and to allow video reviews on
plays with a recovery of a loose ball on the field
even though the play had been whistled dead.
— Rejected proposals to move kickoffs to
the 40-yard line; to allow more than one play-
er to be placed on injured reserve, then return to
the roster during the season; to subject person-
al foul penalties to video review; to permit
coaches to challenge any officiating decision
except on scoring plays or turnovers, which
automatically are reviewed; and to eliminate
the first preseason cutdown to 75 players.
— Tabled proposals to raise the number of
active players for games not played on a
Sunday or Monday, except for opening week,
from 46 to 49; to raise the practice squad maxi-
mum from eight to 10 players; to eliminate
overtime in preseason games; to allow trades
after the Super Bowl and before the new league
year begins in March; to permit teams to test at
their facilities 10 players who attended the NFL
combine; to place fixed cameras on the goal
lines, sidelines and end lines to aid replay
reviews; and to call pass interference in the area
1 yard or less from the line of scrimmage,
where it does not apply now.
On Tuesday, the owners approved allowing
referees to consult with the officiating depart-
ment in New York on replay challenges, and
they voted to ban blockers from rolling up on
the side of the legs of a defender. The league
also barred players from dunking the ball over
the crossbar in celebration.
NFL to emphasize player conduct rules
SPORTS 14
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
$5 0har|ey's º 8|||'s hoIbra0 º Sports 0||ps º Stee|head
0r|g|oa| h|ck's P|zzer|a aod
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The Narch Nadoess
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8es0|ts reßect the F|8ST F008 800h0S oI o0r cootest
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4. Lori Hartmann ............................................ 49 points
6. Matthew Claybrook .................................... 48 points
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6. Joseph Cotchett ......................................... 48 points
6. Dan Baldini ................................................ 48 points
6. Kirk Mcleland ............................................. 48 points
11. Joan Zatopek ........................................... 47 points
11. Robert Fasukener .................................... 47 points
11. Jeff Weaver .............................................. 47 points
11. Rich Bassi ................................................ 47 points
11. James Aponte .......................................... 47 points
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“What we’ve done very well the last sever-
al games is we defended at a high, high level
every possession,” Dawkins said. “We
always talk about the importance of defend-
ing every possession. It’s one thing to say
that — it’s another thing to go out and exe-
cute it.”
Dayton hopes to use its deep bench to
wear down Stanford. Flyers’ coach Archie
Miller uses an 11-man rotation to keep play-
ers fresh for the team’s aggressive defense,
which smothered Ohio State and Syracuse
during the opening weekend.
Dayton’s balanced offense is led by 6-4
guard Jordan Sibert, who is averaging 13.1
points and shooting nearly 51 percent in
March. But the Flyers’ production is liable
to come from anywhere — 11 different play-
ers have scored in double figures this season.
Stanford is heavily reliant on just a six-
man rotation. Chasson Randle, the
Cardinal’s star 6-foot-2 guard who scored 23
points against New Mexico and 13 against
Kansas, has played all 40 minutes in both
games.
But Miller said NCAA tournament games
— with their frequent TV timeouts — would
mitigate much of that advantage.
“I’m not sure if depth’s really an issue,”
Miller said. “I think, once you get late in the
year, you’re fresh. You’re not talking about
it a lot. When you’re on this stage, it is
adrenaline.”
Stanford’s main advantage over Dayton is
its size. Of the Cardinal’s six most-used
players, five of them stand at least 6-6 and
three are 6-10 or taller. Miller acknowledged
Stanford would present some matchup prob-
lems, but was confident his team could han-
dle it.
Dayton is the Atlantic 10’s lone represen-
tative in the Sweet 16 after six teams
received a tournament bid. The Flyers have
won 12 of their last 14 games.
“Ohio State was big. Syracuse was really
big,” Miller said. “We’ve played Gonzaga
and Cal and Baylor. They were big. It’s not
really about playing against big people. It’s
about executing your system versus the dif-
ferent styles you play against.”
Continued from page 11
STANFORD
Even though Augusta National went 80
years without a female member, it had no
policy that barred women from joining. The
R&Ahad such a policy, and that’s what will
be voted on in September.
Dawson said he did not think Augusta
National’s decision had any bearing on the
R&AGolf Club.
“We noted what happened at Augusta,” he
said. “They have their own procedure of
doing things. We are doing this because of
our governance role.”
He also said the R&Adid not feel pressure
from any of its corporate sponsors, who
were subjected to the debate at the British
Open.
“You can always ask that question: ‘Why
now? Why not 10 years ago?’ The R&Ahave
been considering this. It’s been on our
agenda, on our radar, for quite some time,”
Dawson said. “The feeling is as society
changes, as sport changes, as golf changes,
it’s something the R&A needs to do, and is
doing now as being forward-looking as we
can.”
The 2,400-member club and the group
that runs The Open are separate entities.
For years, the men-only Royal & Ancient
was in charge of the Rules of Golf for every
country in the world except for the United
States and Mexico, which are governed by
the USGA. And it operated the British Open,
the oldest championship in golf.
Ten years ago, the administrative duties
were split off into a corporate structure that
is called “The R&A,” of which Dawson is
the chief executive. That’s the group in
charge of the Rules of Golf and organizing
The Open and other R&Achampionships.
And while “The R&A” has female employ-
ees, its committee and board roles are popu-
lated by members of the Royal & Ancient
Golf Club. So there are no women in leader-
ship roles when it comes to rules and cham-
pionship golf.
That likely will change with a favorable
vote in September for female members.
“This is welcome news from the Royal &
Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, and I urge
its members to follow their committees’
recommendations and vote ‘yes’ for women
members,” Grant said in a statement. “It
would mark a step in the right direction for
the sport and I would hope encourage the
remaining golf clubs that still have
anachronistic single-sex member policies
to follow suit.”
While the members have access to the
R&A clubhouse behind the first tee at the
Old Course, R&Amembers belong to a club,
not a golf course. The seven golf courses at
St. Andrews are open to the public.
Continued from page 11
GOLF
said. “David is a great athlete. If he dedicat-
ed himself to golf the way he is dedicated
to soccer, he could be a great golfer. ”
Not that Madding doesn’t have any golf
experience. Larios said Madding and his
family are members at Burlingame Country
Club and that Madding told him last week
he played Olympic Club in San Francisco
and shot a 92 on that challenging course.
Poplar Creek is a walk in the park com-
pared to Olympic Club.
“Poplar is a course you can do that (go
really low),” Larios said. “There’s not a lot
of trouble there.”
Given Madding’s go-for-it style, Larios
said he wouldn’t have been surprised if
Madding did shoot a 68.
“The last time we played [Poplar Creek],
he had a 48,” Larios said. “He just goes and
attacks. [He plays] high risk, high reward.
He’s that kind of kid.”
So, did Larios have to add up Madding’s
score several times to make sure it was
accurate?
“The one thing I don’t have to worry
about is if [the Crystal Springs players]
can add,” Larios said. “They have to check
my addition. I don’t check theirs.”
***
The series of “firsts” continues at the
revamped El Camino athletic facilities.
With a new all-weather field and track
installed last summer/fall, the Colts hosted
their first-ever “Bell Game” football game
against rival South City in November,
while the boys’ soccer team hosted its first
Central Coast Section playoff game in
nearly 30 years in February.
Thursday will be the latest first for the
Colts, as for the first time in 20 years, they
will host a track meet when Oceana,
Jefferson and Woodside travel to South
City.
“[The kids] are really excited. It’s big
time. We have close to 80 track athletes
alone because (of the facilities),” said El
Camino athletic director Jeff Cosico. “I
was a student at El Camino in 1994 and as a
senior, we held one. Twenty years ago,
everyone had dirt tracks so it wasn’t a big
deal. But it got to the point where every-
one else was getting these new tracks and
we stopped hosting [meets].”
Cosico said the facilities have sparked a
renewed interest in El Camino athletics by
the student body. He expects to see more
athletes turning up to try out for teams
because of it.
“(Longtime El Camino student, coach,
teacher and administrator Eric Jacobson)
and I are both PE teachers and we both see
the difference,” Cosico said. “(Before the
new facilities) a lot of the local kids were
going elsewhere to play sports. Back with
the old facilities, a lot of kids were turned
off. Now, hopefully we get kids wanting to
come our way to play. ”
In addition to hosting track meets this
season, El Camino will looking to set
another first at the end of the school year:
the plan is to host, for the first time, gradu-
ation ceremonies outside on the field.
Cosico said graduation ceremonies had
always taken place in the gym previously.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by phone: 344-5200
ext. 117 or by email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com.
You follow him on Twitter@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
SPORTS 15
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Boston 72 49 17 6 104 230 153
Montreal 74 41 26 7 89 190 184
Tampa Bay 72 39 24 9 87 214 193
Detroit 72 33 25 14 80 191 204
Toronto 74 36 30 8 80 216 231
Ottawa 72 29 29 14 72 205 243
Florida 73 27 38 8 62 178 237
Buffalo 72 20 44 8 48 138 212
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 72 46 21 5 97 224 180
N.Y. Rangers 74 41 29 4 86 197 179
Philadelphia 72 38 27 7 83 206 204
Columbus 72 37 29 6 80 204 196
Washington 73 34 27 12 80 212 218
New Jersey 72 31 28 13 75 175 187
Carolina 72 31 32 9 71 181 205
N.Y. Islanders 72 28 35 9 65 202 243
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-St. Louis 72 49 16 7 105 233 163
Chicago 73 42 16 15 99 244 188
Colorado 72 45 21 6 96 221 198
Minnesota 73 37 25 11 85 182 183
Dallas 72 34 27 11 79 203 207
Nashville 73 31 31 11 73 177 218
Winnipeg 73 32 32 9 73 202 213
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-San Jose 74 47 18 9 103 227 177
x-Anaheim 71 46 18 7 99 228 180
Los Angeles 73 42 25 6 90 182 155
Phoenix 73 35 26 12 82 202 207
Vancouver 74 34 30 10 78 181 198
Calgary 72 30 35 7 67 183 211
Edmonton 73 25 39 9 59 180 241
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
Wednesday’sGames
Vancouver 5, Minnesota 2
N.Y. Rangers 3, Philadelphia 1
Anaheim at Calgary, late
Thursday’sGames
Chicago at Boston, 4 p.m.
Phoenix at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Detroit, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Carolina at Florida, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Buffalo at Nashville, 5 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 40 31 .563 —
Brooklyn 37 33 .529 2 1/2
New York 29 42 .408 11
Boston 23 48 .324 17
Philadelphia 15 56 .211 25
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 48 22 .686 —
Washington 36 35 .507 12 1/2
Charlotte 35 37 .486 14
Atlanta 31 39 .443 17
Orlando 20 52 .278 29
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
y-Indiana 52 20 .722 —
Chicago 40 31 .563 11 1/2
Cleveland 29 44 .397 23 1/2
Detroit 26 45 .366 25 1/2
Milwaukee 13 58 .183 38 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 55 16 .775 —
Houston 48 22 .686 6 1/2
Memphis 42 28 .600 12 1/2
Dallas 43 29 .597 12 1/2
New Orleans 31 40 .437 24
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 52 19 .732 —
Portland 45 27 .625 7 1/2
Minnesota 35 35 .500 16 1/2
Denver 32 40 .444 20 1/2
Utah 23 48 .324 29
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 50 22 .694 —
Golden State 44 27 .620 5 1/2
Phoenix 43 29 .597 7
Sacramento 25 45 .357 24
L.A. Lakers 24 46 .343 25
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Wednesday’sGames
Phoenix 99,Washington 93
Charlotte 116, Brooklyn 111, OT
Toronto 99, Boston 90
Cleveland 97, Detroit 96
Minnesota 107, Atlanta 83
New Orleans 98, L.A. Clippers 96
Indiana 84, Miami 83
San Antonio 108, Denver 103
New York at Sacramento, late
Memphis at Utah, late
Thursday’sGames
Portland at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 5 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
AmericanLeague
W L Pct
Tampa Bay 15 6 .714
Cleveland 18 8 .692
Los Angeles 17 10 .630
Baltimore 13 8 .619
Seattle 17 11 .607
New York 15 12 .556
Detroit 13 12 .520
Oakland 13 13 .500
Toronto 13 13 .500
Kansas City 11 15 .423
Chicago 9 13 .409
Houston 10 15 .400
Texas 10 15 .400
Minnesota 8 14 .364
Boston 9 16 .360
National League
W L Pct
Giants 17 10 .630
Pittsburgh 14 9 .609
Miami 17 11 .607
Arizona 12 9 .571
Colorado 14 13 .519
New York 14 13 .519
Washington 14 13 .519
St. Louis 11 12 .478
San Diego 10 12 .455
Milwaukee 12 16 .429
Atlanta 12 17 .414
Cincinnati 12 17 .414
Chicago 12 18 .400
Los Angeles 6 10 .375
Philadelphia 9 16 .360
Wednesday’sGames
Atlanta 9, Miami 2
Pittsburgh 2, Minnesota 1
Toronto 10, N.Y.Yankees 6
Detroit 1, Philadelphia 0
Baltimore (ss) 5, Boston 4
St. Louis 3,Washington 2
San Diego 9, Kansas City 5
L.A. Angels 6, Oakland 2
Texas 5, Seattle 3
Chicago White Sox 9, Cincinnati 5
Cleveland 10, Milwaukee 3
San Francisco 8, Colorado 6
Arizona 14, Chicago Cubs 4
Houston 9, N.Y. Mets 6
Baltimore (ss) vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
late
Thursday’sGames
Washington vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 9:10
a.m.
Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m.
Toronto vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 10:05
a.m.
Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m.
N.Y.Yankees vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 10:05
a.m.
Arizona (ss) vs. Cincinnati (ss) at Goodyear, Ariz.,
12:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (ss) vs.Milwaukee at Phoenix,12:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
12:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. Arizona (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz., 1:10
p.m.
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 4:05 p.m.
SPRING TRAINING GLANCE
THURSDAY
Badminton
South City at Aragon, Sequoia at Carlmont, Mills at
El Camino, San Mateo at Jefferson, Terra Nova at
Hillsdale,Woodside at Crystal Springs, Burlingame
at Capuchino, 4 p.m.
Baseball
Wilson-Oregon at Serra, Menlo School at Menlo-
Atherton, El Camino at Woodside, Hillsdale at
Sequoia, King’s Academy at Aragon, San Mateo at
Jefferson,South City at Harker,Westmoor at Crystal
Springs, 4 p.m.
Softball
Sequoia at Capuchino, Woodside at Hillsdale,
Aragon at Carlmont,Burlingame at Half Moon Bay,
4 p.m.
Boys’ tennis
Mitty vs. Serra at CSM, 3 p.m.; Crystal Springs at Sa-
cred Heart Prep, Menlo School at Harker, 3:30 p.m.;
Menlo-Atherton at Hillsdale, Aragon at Woodside,
San Mateo at Burlingame, Mills at Carlmont, Ca-
puchino at Westmoor, El Camino at South City, 4
p.m.
Swimming
Carlmont at Menlo-Atherton, Aragon at Sequoia,
Mills at Burlingame, El Camino at Jefferson, Half
Moon Bay at San Mateo, Westmoor at Capuchino,
Hillsdale at South City,Serra/Notre Dame-Belmont
at Menlo School, 3:30 p.m.
Trackandfield
Westmoor at Sequoia, Menlo-Atherton at Aragon,
Terra Nova at Carlmont, Half Moon Bay/South City
at Burlingame, Capuchino/Hillsdale at Mills,
Oceana/Jefferson/Woodside at El Camino, 3 p.m.
Boys’ lacrosse
Serra at Bellarmine, 5 p.m.
FRIDAY
Baseball
Serra vs. Sacred Heart Cathedral at Big Rec, 3:30
p.m.; Burlingame at Menlo School, Terra Nova at
Carlmont, Half Moon Bay at Sacred Heart Prep, 4
p.m.; Mills vs. Capuchino at San Bruno Park, 7 p.m.
Softball
San Mateo at Jefferson, South City vs. El Camino at
Terrabay, Menlo-Atherton at Terra Nova, KIPP at
Crystal Springs, 4 p.m.; Notre Dame-Belmont at
Napa tournament,TBA
SATURDAY
Softball
Notre Dame-Belmont at Napa tournament,TBA
WHAT’S ON TAP
Northwestern players, coaches are
the managers and scholarships are
a form of compensation, Ohr con-
cluded.
The Evanston, Ill., university
argued that college athletes, as stu-
dents, do not fit in the same catego-
ry as factory workers, truck drivers
and other unionized workers. The
school announced plans to appeal
to labor authorities in Washington,
D.C.
Supporters of the union bid
argued that the university ultimate-
ly treats football as more impor-
tant than academics for scholarship
players. Ohr sided with the players.
“The record makes clear that the
employer’s scholarship players are
identified and recruited in the first
instance because of their football
prowess and not because of their
academic achievement in high
school,” Ohr wrote. He also noted
that among the evidence presented
by Northwestern, “no examples
were provided of scholarship play-
ers being permitted to miss entire
practices and/or games to attend
their studies.”
The ruling described how the life
of a football player at
Northwestern is far more regiment-
ed than that of a typical student,
down to requirements about what
they can eat and whether they can
live off campus or purchase a car. At
times, players put 50 or 60 hours a
week into football, Ohr added.
Alan Cubbage, Northwestern’s
vice president for university rela-
tions, said in a statement that
while the school respects “the
NLRB process and the regional
director’s opinion, we disagree
with it.”
Continued from page 11
UNION
16
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY
After what seems like the worst winter
ever, my garden has started to wake up. In
the past week, temperatures in my backyard
have fluctuated between the low 60s and the
high teens with gusty winds, thanks to yet
another blast of Arctic air.
Swings like this are naturally frustrating
for gardeners (and non-gardeners as well),
but for the plants in my zone 6 garden these
temperature changes are all part of a normal
spring awakening process. A few days of
warmth followed by a few days of cold
ensures plants emerge from dormancy slow-
l y. From a plant’s perspective, growing too
quickly during a spell of warm weather could
be dangerous. Tender new growth or precious
newly forming flower buds might easily be
damaged by sudden drops in temperature.
Slowly emerging from dormancy is a
much safer strategy for most plants. There
are exceptions to this rule. Some of the
plants blooming now in my garden, despite
the ups and downs of the thermometer’s mer-
cury, are so perfectly adapted to temperature
fluctuations that they seem not to notice.
While the popular small bulb Galanthus
nivialus, commonly called snow drops, are
often the first spring flowers to appear in
many gardens, they are not the first in mine.
Before my snow drops begin their long-
awaited March show with cheery displays of
green-tipped white flowers, small drifts of
bright yellow winter aconites, Eranthis cili-
cica, have already covered my woodland gar-
den with their buttercup shaped flowers for
over a week.
Another early bulb, Crocus tommasini-
anus, also makes its late winter debut in my
garden before most other plants have even
started to stir. The flowers of this prolific lit-
tle bulb may be smaller in size than their
larger hybrid cousins which bloom in
another month or so, but what they lack in
size they more than make up for in numbers.
When sited properly in a location that is
both well drained and sunny, this little cro-
cus with its slender lavender flowers will rap-
idly reseed to form colonies that produce
hundreds of flowers.
This year perhaps more than most, these
early bloomers are a welcomed sight.
Fortunately, they are as tough as they are
pretty. The day after hundreds of crocus
began blooming in my front garden, tem-
peratures dropped into the teens and were
accompanied by an inch and a half of snow.
The crocuses, the snow drops and the
aconites seemed not to care; they simply
folded up their flowers and waited. Two days
later, when temperatures rose into the low
40s, they reopened.
Along with the bulbs, one of my favorite
deciduous shrubs is also an early bloomer.
Lonicera fragrantissima is a medium- to
large-sized shrub native to China and hardy
into zone 4. Its flowers begin opening as
soon as temperatures rise slightly above
freezing. Its small, highly fragrant flowers
are an important food source for honey bees
foraging for food on days warm enough for
them to leave their hives.
The kick off to spring in my garden actu-
ally begins in late winter. Although there are
not a lot of plants waking up early, the ones
that do make this season one of the most
anticipated of all. Carefully selecting plants
for your garden that are adapted to a variety
of conditions will ensure you have some-
thing interesting to look at all year long.
Crazy weather no problem for early bloomers
Winter aconite (Eranthis cilicica) is an early flower seemingly impervious to the cold and snow.
18
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Culinary herbs are enjoying a revival
thanks to new varieties, stronger flavors,
health concerns and more discerning
palates. Their low cost, attractiveness and
easy-to-grow attributes are making them
popular, too.
“Herbs can add a lot of flavor to cooked
dishes and lead to reductions in fat, salt and
cholesterol,” said Gary Gao, a horticulturist
with Ohio State University Extension.
These days, he said, “people tend to spend
more time at home and less time traveling.
Cooking meals at home also saves a lot of
money.”
Food safety concerns are another reason
that many people plant herbs, he said.
“Gardeners feel much better about their gar-
den-fresh herbs than what they buy. ”
New varieties have been introduced for
use with ethnic cooking, said George Ball,
chairman of W. Atlee Burpee & Co. Sales
have jumped 15 percent per year since
Burpee and its Cook’s Garden sub-
sidiary launched their Pinnacle
Herbs Collection in
2012, he said.
“Home cooks are
exper i ment i ng
with recipes out-
side the
standard or
c u s t o ma r y
menu,” Ball
said. “There
is an unbe-
lievable number
of more subtle
variations of taste of
single herbs and, par-
ticularly, combos of
herbs.”
The Pinnacle Herbs line is made up of 50-
plus varieties planted in the porous “com-
post pile” soils of mountainous western
Pennsylvania.
“Free of air pollution,
unfiltered light shining
down on the herbs
induces, fairly
quickly, higher
oil content pro-
d u c t i o n , ”
Ball said in
an email.
“Even dur-
ing pre-
shi ppi ng,
the smells
are drifting
off the
plants. Really
unique.”
The differ-
ence between a good cook and
a great cook often comes down
to the use of culinary herbs — how much to
use and how to pick them for optimal flavor,
Ball said.
“Herb flavor declines and changes once
plants begin and continue flowering,” he
said. “The best way to extend the harvest is
by pinching (back) the plants often to keep
them from flowering and, worse yet for fla-
vor, from growing seed stalks.”
Culinary herbs make a good alternative
cash crop for small-scale growers, Gao said.
Their market ranges from home gourmet
cooks to restaurant chefs, health food and
grocery stores, farmer’s markets and food
processing companies.
Basil, cilantro, parsley, rosemary, tar-
ragon, sage and mint are the most common-
ly grown herbs for commercial use, Gao
said.
Herbs are inexpensive, whether sold as
seeds or plants. Try a taste test if undecided
about which herb to buy, suggests Rose
Marie Nichols-McGee, president of Nichols
Garden Nursery in Albany, Ore.
“Go to a nursery and taste a little (leaf)
sample from one of the plants,” she said. “If
it doesn’t have the flavor you like, then it’s
obviously not a plant you want to buy. ”
Gourmet herbs: Tasty, attractive and easy to grow
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Shirley Salemy Meyer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
We bought food bowls, borrowed a crate
and dusted off baby gates. But soon after
we adopted our 13-week-old puppy, we dis-
covered the house really wasn’t ready.
Clove, a Labrador retriever mix, chewed
wires we thought were hidden and investi-
gated stairs we thought she’d ignore. She
rummaged through deep plastic bins hold-
ing smelly shin guards and plucked snow-
soaked mittens from our warm radiators.
Within a week of her arrival, we had to
block off power strips, reorganize our
mudroom, devise a new plan for drying
winter gear and gate the staircase.
“It’s a lot like having an infant in the
household,” said Pamela Barlow, animal
behavior counselor at the American
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty
to Animals’ adoption center in
New York City.
Barlow says puppies need
constant supervision and a
safe environment to explore.
She cautions against confining
them so much that they don’t get outside
experiences. It is hard to go back and
socialize puppies if owners miss the win-
dow of opportunity to do so.
Puppies are drawn to things they can
chew on and are stimulated by things
that move, said Dr. Carlo Siracusa,
director of the Penn Vet Behavior
Service at the University of
Pennsylvania.
“Many times we think that we should
protect our home from a new puppy, ”
Siracusa said, because the puppy could
potentially cause damage. But more
important is the opposite: making sure
that puppies are safe in their new home.
Most essential is to create a safe haven
— a place where the puppy can rest and
sleep when there is too much excitement
or stimulation, such as when kids have
friends visiting, Siracusa says.
For the Sullivan family of South
Orange, N.J., a crate has proven to be
more useful for keeping their puppy,
Angus, safe than his exercise pen has.
Angus, a Bichon Frise-poodle mix now 5
months old, learned how to get out of the
pen the first day, said Elie Sullivan. She
keeps the door of his crate, located in her
sons’ room, open.
“He’ll go in there and have a nap,” she
said as Angus, as soft as a skein of cash-
mere, cuddled in her lap.
Sullivan blocked stairs, moved low bas-
kets into closets and bought tall hampers
to prevent Angus from raiding the laundry.
“I like my house,” she said. “I didn’t
want it torn up.”
She also ensured
that her house
plants are safe
for dogs.
Al e xi s
S h i e l d
w a s
p r e -
p a r e d
w i t h
p u p p y
gear and
h o u s e -
t r a i n -
i n g
research before
bringing home Teddy, an Australian
Labradoodle, when he was 9 weeks old.
Thanks to her planning and consistency
with Teddy, she has been amazed at how
fast he learned.
What she didn’t expect, says Shield,
who lives in a Vi rginia suburb of
Washington, D.C., was how hard it would
be to prepare her three young sons and
supervise them with the puppy.
She has Teddy’s crate in the kitchen, a
safe place for him amid the household hub-
bub. Initially, Shield would occasionally
put Teddy in the crate when she needed to
do something and couldn’t watch him;
now a bit older, he’s just in the crate when
she leaves the house and at night, when he
sleeps.
Puppy-behavior experts
recommend these steps to
protect your puppy in your home:
• Gate off rooms where you don’t want
your puppy to roam. For instance, one of
Barlow’s clients is an artist with a studio
in her house. The artist
ga t e d
o f f
the studio
so the puppy couldn’t run around the
easels, paint and chemicals.
• Let puppies earn their freedom. Give
them one space or room at a time. That
way, owners can actively supervise them
and limit any bad behavior.
• Create a safe confinement area — a
crate or exercise pen, for instance —
where the puppy can stay when you are not
home. There should be enough space for a
sleeping area and a potty area when pup-
pies are very young. Also essential are a
non-spill water bowl and safe, enriching
toys. Toys that are not safe for this area
when you are gone include tennis balls,
rope toys, toys that are shorter than
about double the length of the puppy’s
snout, and stuffed toys that have glass or
plastic eyes and noses, Barlow said.
• Tape loose electrical cords. Use outlet
covers.
• Store cleaning chemicals out of reach.
Use baby latches on cabinet doors if need-
ed.
• Move breakables and valuables out of
the puppy’s reach. Roll up new or valuable
rugs until the puppy is house-trained.
In your yard:
• Do not leave a puppy unsupervised,
and be sure to fence in your yard before
letting the puppy off leash.
• Fence off the garden.
• Use pet-safe gardening products,
and be sure any lawn service you
use does the same.
• Store grill utensils
out of the puppy’s
reach.
• Make sure a
swimming pool is
fenced.
• Check the ASPCA’s
list of poisonous plants.
• As soon as puppies are old enough,
start training them, especially the “drop
it” and “leave it” commands.
Puppy-proofing? Protect your dog and your home
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, MARCH 27
Why do bad things keep happen-
ing? Finding hope against all
odds. 9:15 a.m. Bethany Lutheran
Church, 1095 Cloud Ave., Menlo Park.
Lifetree Café Menlo Park hosts an
hour-long conversation discussing
how to remain hopeful while facing
difficulties. Participant will experi-
ence an hour of encouragement and
hope. Complimentary snacks and
beverages will be served. Free.
Presentation: Scams Targeted at
Seniors. Noon to 12:30 p.m.
Magnolia Center, 601 Grand Ave.,
South San Francisco. Learn how to
protect yourself from becoming a
victim of scams targeted at seniors.
For more information and to reserve
seats, call 829-3820.
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Explore interactive
science exhibits and more than 50
native animals. For more information
call 342-7755.
Movies for school-age children:
‘Smurfs 2.’ 3:30 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, Oak Room, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Rated PG.
105 minutes. Free. For more informa-
tion call 522-7838.
Free eBook and eAudiobooks
workshops. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. South
San Francisco Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
These free workshops will help you
download eBooks and eAudiobooks
to put on your device. Program con-
tinues until March 30. For more infor-
mation call 829-3860.
Immigration 101 — Know Your
Rights as an Immigrant. 6 p.m. San
Mateo County Law Library, 710
Hamilton St., Redwood City. Free. For
more information go to
www.smclawlibrary.org.
Investing in Real Estate: A discus-
sion by Ron Ricard, IRA Services
Trust Co. 6:30 p.m. Meeting Room A
of the Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. For additional information
please contact Lee Ginsburg at 358-
3959.
Energy Efficiency Rebates and
Incentives for Homeowners. 6:45
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Burlingame Main
Library, Lane Community Room, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. RSVP at
http://www.eventbrite.com/e/ener-
gy- upgr ade- cal i f or ni a- home-
upgrade-homeowner-workshop-in-
b u r l i n g a me - r e g i s t r a t i o n -
10678944009?aff=es2. For more
information go to
https: //www. bayareaenergyup-
grade.org/ or call 363-4125.
Meet the Kohl Family: Live histori-
cal improv. 7 p.m. Kohl Mansion,
2750 Adeline Drive, Burlingame.
Performed by the Burlingame
Historical Society’s ‘Living History
Presenters’ team. $15. For more infor-
mation go to
www.kohlmansion.com.
Free Homeowner Workshop on
Energy Rebates. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Burlingame Main Library, Lane
Community Room, 480 Primrose
Road, Burlingame. For more informa-
tion call 363-4125.
‘Lend Me a Tenor.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. Tickets are $23 to $38 for adults
and seniors. Students 17 and
younger (with current student ID)
call 349-6411 for ticket prices. For
more information and to purchase
tickets go to hillbarntheatre.org.
FRIDAY, MARCH 28
‘Hetch Hetchy Water System
Improvement Program.’ 7:30 a.m.
Crystal Springs Golf Course, 6650
Golf Course Drive, Burlingame. $15
with breakfast included. For more
information call 515-5891.
WordPress Lounge: Beyond the
basics. 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Bayshore Corporate Center, 1710 S.
Amphlett Blvd., Suite 126, San
Mateo. Bring all of your questions.
$27. For more information and to
register go to
http://www.meetup.com/WordPress
- F o r - B u s i n e s s - o r -
Pleasure/events/171303502/.
Free eBook and eAudiobooks
workshops. 10 a.m. to noon. South
San Francisco Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
These free workshops will help you
download eBooks and eAudiobooks
to put on your device. Program con-
tinues until March 30. For more infor-
mation call 829-3860.
Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more informa-
tion call 523-0804.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. Paperbacks
are six for $1, trade paperbacks are
two for $1 and hardbacks are two for
$2. All types of books will be avail-
able for purchase. Proceeds benefit
Belmont Library. For more informa-
tion go to www.thefobl.org or call
593-5650.
Just Between Friends Children
and Maternity Consignment Sale.
Noon-9 p.m., San Mateo County
Event Center, Redwood Hall, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Sales
event where communities come
together to buy and sell the best in
gently-used children’s and maternity
items at huge savings. $3 admission,
or request free admission pass. For
more information call Angela (415)
710-3973
Afterschool Special at
CuriOdyssey. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CuriOdyssey, 1651 Coyote Point
Drive, San Mateo. Let your child
explore interactive science exhibits
and more than 50 native animals. For
more information call 342-7755.
Youth Art Show. 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
South San Francisco 2014 Art Gallery
Program, Municipal Services
Building, 33 Arroyo Drive. For more
information call 829-3800.
March Beer Friday at Devil's
Canyon. 4 p.m. 935 Washington St.,
San Carlos. Free. For more informa-
tion go to www.devilscanyon.com.
Ahane Bauer, Sarah Shourd and
Joshua Fattal, authors of ‘A Sliver
of Light: Three Americans
Imprisoned in Iran.’ 7 p.m. Eagle
Theater at Los Altos High School, 201
Almond Ave., Los Altos. Presented by
the Commonwealth Club. Tickets are
$12 for members, $20 for non-mem-
bers and $8 for students with a valid
ID. For tickets call (800) 847-7730 or
go to www.commonwealthclub.org.
For more information contact
Georgette Gehue at ggehue@com-
monwealthclub.org.
Many Dances. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
$5. For more information call 747-
0264.
‘Lend Me a Tenor.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. Tickets are $23 to $38 for adults
and seniors. Students 17 and
younger (with current student ID)
call 349-6411 for ticket prices. For
more information and to purchase
tickets go to hillbarntheatre.org.
SATURDAY, MARCH 29
Ninth Annual Compassion
Weekend. Menlo Park Presbyterian
Church, 950 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo
Park. Continues through March 30.
For more information call 796-7275.
Community Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. to
11 a.m. The American Legion San
Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. There will be eggs,
pancakes, bacon, French toast,
omelets, juice and coffee. $8 per per-
son, $5 for children under 10.
Tree Walk. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sequoia
High School, 1201 Brewster Ave.,
Redwood City. Learn about the
native trees, introduced species, his-
tory of the school property and see
the planting of some new trees. Free,
but donation suggested. For more
information email
info@citytrees.org.
Just Between Friends Children
and Maternity Consignment Sale.
9 a.m.-5 p.m., San Mateo County
Event Center, Redwood Hall, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Sales
event where communities come
together to buy and sell the best in
gently-used children’s and maternity
items at huge savings. Free admis-
sion. For more information call
Angela (415) 710-3973.
Free eBook and eAudiobooks
workshops. 10 a.m. to noon. South
San Francisco Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
These free workshops will help you
download eBooks and eAudiobooks
to put on your device. Program con-
tinues until March 30. For more infor-
mation call 829-3860.
Historic Site Welcomes Families to
Spring Fling Fundraiser. 10 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. 86 Cañada Road, Woodside.
For more information email
csyrett@filoli.org.
Youth Art Show. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
South San Francisco 2014 Art Gallery
Program, Municipal Services
Building, 33 Arroyo Drive. For more
information call 829-3800.
San Bruno Mountain ecology hike.
10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 44 Visitacion
Ave., Suite 206, Brisbane. Limited to
15 participants — you must sign up
in advance by contacting san-
bruno@mountainwatch.org.
Belmont Sidewalk Fine Arts
Festival. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Carlmont
Village Shopping Center, Ralston
Avenue at Alameda de las Puglas,
Belmont. There will be 25 profession-
al artists. This event will continue on
Sunday, March 30.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Chinatown known as “Shrimp Boy,”
and Keith Jackson, Yee’s campaign
aide. The affidavit accuses Yee of con-
spiracy to deal firearms without a
license and to illegally import firearms.
Yee is also accused of accepting tens
of thousands of dollars in campaign
contributions and cash payments to
provide introductions, help a client get
a contract and influence legislation. He
or members of his campaign staff
accepted at least $42,800 in cash or
campaign contributions from undercov-
er FBI agents in exchange for carrying
out the agents’ specific requests, the
court documents allege.
Yee discussed helping the agent get
weapons worth $500,000 to $2.5 mil-
lion, including shoulder-fired missiles,
and explaining the entire process of
acquiring them from a Muslim sepa-
ratist group in the Philippines to bring-
ing them to the U.S., according to the
court document by FBI agent Emmanuel
V. Pascua.
Yee said he was unhappy with his life
and told the agent he wanted to hide out
in the Philippines, according to the
affidavit.
“There’s a part of me that wants to be
like you,” he told the undercover agent,
according to the affidavit. “You know
how I’m going to be like you? Just be a
free agent there.”
The introduction with the trafficker
took place at a San Francisco restaurant
earlier this month, according to the
documents. Yee said he wouldn’t go to
the Philippines until November.
“Once things start to move, it’s
going to attract attention. We just got
to be extra-extra careful,” he said,
according to court documents.
Chow and Yee were arrested
Wednesday during a series of raids in
Sacramento and the San Francisco Bay
Area.
Jackson, a former San Francisco
school board president and well-known
political consultant who raised money
for Yee’s unsuccessful mayoral run in
2011 and his current bid for secretary of
state, was also in custody.
Jackson, 49, did not enter a plea
Wednesday as the FBI accused him of
being involved in a murder-for-hire
scheme and trafficking guns and drugs.
He was denied bail and is due back in
court Monday.
Yee wore handcuffs and was shackled
at the waist when he appeared in court
Wednesday afternoon with 20 other
defendants. His demeanor was down-
cast, and he looked nervously into the
packed gallery of about 100 reporters
and other observers.
Yee was charged with six counts of
depriving the public of honest services
and one count of conspiracy to traffic in
guns without a license. He did not enter
a plea. He was being held on $500,000
bail, and his passport has been confis-
cated.
If convicted on all the counts against
him, Yee faces up to 125 years in
prison.
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell
Steinberg, D-Sacramento, who was
flanked by 14 other Democratic sena-
tors at a news conference in his Capitol
office, called on Yee to resign from the
Senate or face suspension.
“Don’t burden your colleagues and
this great institution with your trou-
bles. Leave,” he told reporters. “Absent
that, we are prepared to go to the floor
immediately and suspend him, and we
will do so if necessary.”
Yee’s Senate spokesman, Dan
Lieberman, declined to comment and
said he did not know if Yee had an attor-
ney. Yee’s chief of staff, Jordan Curley,
did not respond to a message left on her
cellphone.
According to court documents, Yee
performed “official acts” in exchange
for donations from undercover FBI
agents, as he sought to dig himself out
of a $70,000 debt incurred during a
failed San Francisco mayoral bid in
2011.
Yee is also accused of accepting
$10,000 in January 2013 from an
undercover FBI agent in exchange for
making a call to the California
Department of Public Health in support
of a contract it was considering.
The agent who discussed arms with
Yee presented himself as a member of
Ghee Kung Tong, a fraternal organiza-
tion in San Francisco’s Chinatown that
Chow reportedly headed. It was among
the sites searched Wednesday.
Firefighters were seen going inside
with a circular saw and later said they
had cracked a safe. FBI agents exited
with boxes and trash bags full of evi-
dence that they loaded into an SUV.
Chow is accused of money launder-
ing, conspiracy to receive and trans-
port stolen property, and conspiracy to
traffic contraband cigarettes.
He was denied bail because he was
deemed a flight risk and a danger to the
public. The Department of Homeland
Security has been trying to deport
Chow, who is not a U.S. citizen, since
he was released from prison in 2005.
Yee is the third Democratic state sen-
ator in California to face charges this
year. Sen. Rod Wright was convicted of
perjury and voter fraud for lying about
his legal residence in Los Angeles
County, and Sen. Ron Calderon has
been indicted on federal corruption
charges. Wright and Calderon are tak-
ing a voluntary leave of absence, with
pay, although Republicans have called
for them to be suspended or expelled
from the Legislature.
Yee, 65, represents western San
Francisco and much of San Mateo
County. He is best known for his efforts
to strengthen open records, govern-
ment transparency and whistle-blower
protection laws, including legislation
to close a loophole in state public
records laws after the CSU Stanislaus
Foundation refused to release its
$75,000 speaking contract with former
vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin
in 2010.
Chow ran a Chinese criminal organi-
zation with ties to Hong Kong and was
convicted of gun charges. But he had
recently been held up as an example of
successful rehabilitation and was
praised for his work in the community.
Yee’s arrest came as a shock to
Chinese-Americans who see the senator
as a pioneering leader in the communi-
ty and a mainstay of San Francisco pol-
itics, said David Lee, director of the
Chinese American Voters Education
Committee.
“People are waiting to see what hap-
pens, and they are hoping for the best,
that the charges turn out not to be true,”
said Lee, whose organization just held a
get-out-the-vote event with Yee and
other officials last week.
For his efforts to uphold the
California Public Records Act, Yee was
honored last week by the Northern
California chapter of the Society of
Professional Journalists for his efforts
to maintain the requirements of the
California Public Records Act.
Yee has at times clashed with fellow
Democrats for casting votes of con-
science, refusing to support the
Democratic budget proposal in 2011
because of its deep cuts to education,
social services and education. He also
opposed legislation by a fellow
Democrat, Assemblyman Paul Fong of
Cupertino, that banned the sale of shark
fins used for Chinese shark fin soup,
saying that it unfairly targeted the
Chinese-American community.
Yee is among three Democrats run-
ning this year for secretary of state, the
office that oversees elections and cam-
paign finance reporting.
A man was charged last year for
threatening Yee over legislation that he
proposed to limit rapid reloading of
assault weapons. Lee also authored leg-
islation that that would have required
the state to study safe storage of
firearms.
Chow acknowledged in an unpub-
lished autobiography that he ran pros-
titution rings in the 1980s, smuggled
drugs and extorted thousands from busi-
ness owners as a Chinatown gang mem-
ber, KGO-TVreported two years ago.
In 1992, Chow was among more than
two dozen people indicted on racketeer-
ing charges for their alleged involve-
ment in crimes ranging from teenage
prostitution to an international drug
trade mostly involving heroin.
Continued from page 1
YEE
COMICS/GAMES
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
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Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Grinding tooth
6 Provide capital
11 Go swimming
12 Arboreal Aussie
13 Really enthusiastic
15 Eagles’ homes
16 Traditional sayings
18 Dip in gravy
19 Spanish hero El —
21 Part of UCLA
22 Low voice
23 Sufficient, to Shelley
25 Matter, in law
28 Like spinach
30 It banned DDT
31 Dublin’s loc.
32 — de mer
33 Flow back
35 Armless sofa
37 Whichever
38 Bedouin
40 Plover’s dwelling
41 Road hazard
42 Sault — Marie
43 Moose kin
46 Short sock
48 Exclaiming over
50 Made an outline
54 Barely enough
55 Hostile look
56 Watches over
57 Of the past
DOWN
1 Wall Street deg.
2 Paddle cousin
3 British inc.
4 In front (2 wds.)
5 Tear apart
6 Just scrapes by
7 Choice word
8 Speaker’s platform
9 Butter substitute
10 Stinging insect
14 Bedtime story
15 Early moralist
17 Returned (2 wds.)
19 Sparkling
20 Gondolier’s land
22 — mater
24 Gob of bubblegum
25 Steel beam fastener
26 Clear
27 Faxed, maybe
29 Affirmative vote
34 Fetch
36 Hook up
39 Orion feature
43 Sunrise direction
44 Add some brandy
45 Kublai —
46 Aardvark’s diet
47 Reasoner’s word
49 Where Terre Haute is
51 Rogue
52 Afore
53 Lair
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Your involvement
in a charitable organization will have unexpected
benefits. In addition to helping others, you will
make a new acquaintance who will play an
important role in your future.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Your trusting nature
could tempt others to try to take advantage of you.
Make sure you read the fine print before agreeing to
any new venture. Love is in the stars.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You will be on the losing
end if you get involved in someone else’s argument.
Reserve judgment, don’t meddle, and have the
confidence in others to solve problems without your
help. Focus on personal gains.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — The future looks
bright. An investment opportunity should be
considered. Staying active mentally and physically
will keep you in top shape for the exciting times
ahead. Participation will lead to good times.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Face up to your problems.
The sooner you begin the process, the better you will
feel. Keep your emotions under control and make
strategic practical choices.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Follow your intuition
to discover an unusual way to improve your financial
future. You should also take steps to resolve any health
issues that have been concerning you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Do something to lift
your spirits. A new look will lead to compliments.
Plan a social event with people you find stimulating.
Brainstorming could result in a profitable idea.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Dealing with past
disappointments is the most critical step in
moving forward. Your loved ones will offer support
if you are receptive. Let go of negativity and focus
on the good things.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Remaining honest
will be essential in all of your relationships. Success
in financial matters will depend on diligence and
patience. You will come out ahead if you take control.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Take a second
look at your commitments. It’s possible that you
may have overlooked an important detail that will
cost you emotionally or financially. Someone from
your past will surface.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You have more
to offer than you think. Your financial future
will improve if you increase your knowledge. An
important friendship will develop if you follow
through with a joint venture.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Make time for love and
romance. Plan a trip to a musical or sporting event. A
shared interest in a charitable organization will result
in a rewarding friendship and long-term commitment.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • March. 27, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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On the job training provided!
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Atria Hillsdale
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104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
Limo Driver, Wanted, full time, paid
weekly, between $500 and $700,
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110 Employment
NOW HIRING
Kitchen Staff &
Housekeeping Staff
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or
email resume to
info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
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desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
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If you possess the above
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Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
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Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
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110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259681
The following person is doing business
as: Bankers Preferred, 1819 Trousdale
Dr., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ameri-
can Pacific Mortgage Corporation. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 1/6/14.
/s/ David Mack /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259892
The following person is doing business
as: Leanos Brothers Company, 501 S.
Fremont St. #4, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Pedro Leanos Leanos, same ad-
dress, and Panfilo Leanos, 10879 San
Pablo Ave., Cerritos, CA 94530. The
business is conducted by Copartners.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Pedro Leanos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260077
The following person is doing business
as: TLM Service, 640 Serramonte Blvd.,
#13, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Vic-
torino P. Guillermo, & Consuelo Saquing,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Victorino P. Guillermo /
/s/ Consuelo G, Saquing /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/17/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 527284
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Darren Villanueva
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Darren Villanueva filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Angel de Casa
Propsed Name: Angel Villanueva
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 9, 2014
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/20/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/19/2014
(Published, 03/27/14, 04/03/2014,
04/10/2014, 04/17/2014)
23 Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
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EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
203 Public Notices
AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
GERALDINE SMITH MOORE, aka
GERALDINE S. MOORE
Case Number: 124218
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Geraldine Smith Moore,
aka Geraldine S. Moore. A Petition for
Probate has been filed by Chinere Egu
in the Superior Court of California, Coun-
ty of San Mateo. The Petition for Pro-
bate requests that Cinyere Egu be ap-
pointed as personal representative to ad-
minister the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: April 8, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal au-
thority may affect your rights as a cred-
itor. You may want to consult with an at-
torney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Barbara Farnum (CSB# 151608)
1570 The Alameda Ste. 200
SAN JOSE, CA 95126
(408)297-2942
Dated: March 11, 2014
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on March 13, 20, 27, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259672
The following person is doing business
as: Major Dry Cleaners & Alterations,
390 El Camino Real, BELMONT, CA
94002 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Rungnapa Srisad & Chalao-
luke S. Santino, 1316 E. El Camino Real,
Belmont, CA 94002. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Chalaoluke S. Santino /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/18/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 527284
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Dianne Katherine Salem
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Dianne Katherine Salem filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Dianne Katherine Salem
Propsed Name: Dhyan Salem
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 6, 2014
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/20/ 2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/10/2014
(Published, 03/27/14, 04/03/2014,
04/10/2014, 04/17/2014)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259813
The following person is doing business
as: Lou’s Auto Repair, 124 Highland
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Luis F. Alfaro, 844 N. Mayfair Ave., Daly
City, CA 94015. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Luis F. Alfaro /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/28/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259674
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #3474, 2411 El
Camino Real, Redwood City, CA 94063
is hereby registered by the following
owner: O’Reilly Auto Enterprises, LLC,
DE. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259675
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #3138, 3541 Call-
an Blvd., South San Francisco, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: O’Reilly Auto Enterprises,
LLC, DE. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259676
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #2608, 7283 Mis-
sion St., Daly CIty, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owner: O’Reil-
ly Auto Enterprises, LLC, DE. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259677
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #2743, 1059 El
Camino Real, South San Francisco, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: O’Reilly Auto Enterprises,
LLC, DE. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259682
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #3468, 2640 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
O’Reilly Auto Enterprises, LLC, DE. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259683
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #3562, 133 Man-
or Dr., Pacifica, CA 94044 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: O’Reilly
Auto Enterprises, LLC, DE. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259684
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #3639, 400 S.
Norfolk St., San Mateo, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
O’Reilly Auto Enterprises, LLC, DE. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259685
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #2581, 1200 El
Camino Real, Millbrae, CA 94030 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
O’Reilly Auto Enterprises, LLC, DE. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259687
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #3535, 1272 El
Camino Real, San Carlos, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
O’Reilly Auto Enterprises, LLC, DE. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259686
The following person is doing business
as: O’Reilly Auto Parts #3476, 5 Skyline
Plaza, Daly City, CA 94015 is hereby
registered by the following owner: O’Reil-
ly Auto Enterprises, LLC, DE. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2014.
/s/ Tom McFall /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/14, 03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259912
The following person is doing business
as: Taqueria Apatzingan Restaurant,
3205 Middlefield Rd., MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Ernesto Santoyo, 727 Leong
Dr., Mountain View, CA 94043. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Ernesto Santoyo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259961
The following person is doing business
as: Tutoring Club of Millbrae, 1395 El
Camino Real, Unit D, MILLBRAE, CA
94030 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Leadership Education, LLC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Arya Askari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259969
The following person is doing business
as: CrashCart IT, LLC, 1447 El Camino
Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
CrashCart IT, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on March
10, 2014.
/s/ Marc Shoolman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259850
The following person is doing business
as: Taiko Trove, 806 Murphy Dr.. SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Edwin Takashi
Uramoto same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Edwin Takashi Uramoto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259690
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Health & Acupuncture, 327
N. San Mateo Dr., Ste. 15, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Diane Au, 445 Portola Dr.,
San Mateo, CA 94403. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Diane Au /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/19/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259898
The following person is doing business
as: Finoutsource, 18 Madera Ave., 18
Madera Ave. SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Alex Nayberg, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Alex Nayberg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259947
The following person is doing business
as: IQvideography, 224 Fox Sparrow Ln.,
BRISBANE, CA 94005 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Alexander
Kon, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Alexander Kon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/14, 03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260086
The following person is doing business
as: Yes Deisgn Shop, 821 N. Delaware
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Alisa
Wittkop, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Alisa Wittkop /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/18/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259798
The following person is doing business
as: SAVA Labs, 32 Amberwood Cir.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Asaf Ashirov, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2014.
/s/ Asaf Ashirov /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/27/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/14, 03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260172
The following person is doing business
as: Gold Leaf Naturals, 1441 Rollins Rd.
, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Gold
Leaf Dressings, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporatinon. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Linda D. Lowe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14, 04/17/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260141
The following person is doing business
as: Hit Creative, 333 N. Ellsworth Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Wing Yiu
Tsoi, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/21/2014.
/s/ Wing Yiu Tsoi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14, 04/17/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260139
The following person is doing business
as: Chef Chirp, 404 Carlos Ave., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Wendy
Leung, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on Jan. 1 2014.
/s/ Wendy Leung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14, 04/17/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #260186
The following person is doing business
as: ATU Landscaping, 877 6th Ave.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Samiuela
Taunga, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Samiuela Taunga /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14, 04/17/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #259896
The following person is doing business
as: Mobile Ed, 7 W. 41st Ave. #127, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Danetta Marcus,
4000 S. El Camino Real, #127, San Ma-
teo, CA 94403. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Danetta Marcus /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/14, 04/03/14, 04/10/14, 04/17/14).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Jean C. Tollini
Case Number: 124202
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Jean C. Tollini. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by James
C. Sturdevant in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that James
C. Sturdevant be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are availa-
ble of examination in the file kept by the
court
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: March 21, 2014 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal au-
thority may affect your rights as a cred-
itor. You may want to consult with an at-
torney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
James C. Sturdevant (SBN 94551)
Sturdeveant Law Firm, APC
354 Pine St., 4th Flr.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94104
(415)477-2410
Dated: Feb. 20, 2014
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on March 22, 27, April 2, 2014.
24
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
File No. 7233.25448
Title Order No. 348536
MIN No. APN 108-720-060
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/07/05.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY
BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF
YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF
THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale
to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's
check drawn on a state or national bank,
check drawn by state or federal credit
union, or a check drawn by a state or
federal savings and loan association, or
savings association, or savings bank
specified in §5102 to the Financial code
and authorized to do business in this
state, will be held by duly appointed
trustee. The sale will be made, but with-
out covenant or warranty, expressed or
implied, regarding title, possession, or
encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation
secured by said Deed of Trust. The un-
dersigned Trustee disclaims any liability
for any incorrectness of the property ad-
dress or other common designation, if
any, shown herein. Trustor(s): HEIDI Y.
F. YEUNG AND JAMIN W. C. YEUNG,
WIFE AND HUSBAND Recorded:
11/22/05, as Instrument No. 2005-
204492, of Official Records of San Mateo
County, California. Date of Sale:
04/02/14 at 12:30 PM Place of Sale: At
the Marshall Street entrance to the Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center., Redwood
City, CA The purported property ad-
dress is: 711 S BAYSHORE BLVD #8,
San Mateo, CA 94401 Assessors Parcel
No. 108-720-060 The total amount of
the unpaid balance of the obligation
secured by the property to be sold
and reasonable estimated costs, expens-
es and advances at the time of the initial
publication of the Notice of Sale is
$109,476.30. If the sale is set aside for
any reason, the purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled only to a return of the
deposit paid, plus interest. The pur-
chaser shall have no further recourse
against the beneficiary, the Trustor or
the trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL
BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding
on this property lien, you should under-
stand that there are risks involved in bid-
ding at a trustee auction. You will be bid-
ding on a lien, not on the property itself.
Placing the highest bid at a trustee auc-
tion does not automatically entitle you to
free and clear ownership of the property.
You should also be aware that the lien
being auctioned off may be a junior lien.
If you are the highest bidder at the auc-
tion, you are or may be responsible for
paying off all liens senior to the lien being
auctioned off, before you can receive
clear title to the property. You are en-
couraged to investigate the existence,
priority and size of outstanding liens that
may exist on this property by contacting
the county recorder's office or a title in-
surance company, either of which may
charge you a fee for this information. If
you consult either of these resources,
you should be aware that the same lend-
er may hold more than one mortgage or
deed of trust on the property. NOTICE
TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date
shown on this notice of sale may be
postponed one or more times by the
mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the
California Civil Code. The law requires
that information about trustee sale post-
ponements be made available to you and
to the public, as a courtesy to those not
present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been post-
poned, and if applicable, the rescheduled
time and date for the sale of this proper-
ty, you may call 877-484-9942 or 800-
280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site
www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auc-
tion.com using the file number assigned
to this case 7233.25448. Information
about postponements that are very short
in duration or that occur close in time to
the scheduled sale may not immediately
be reflected in the telephone information
or on the Internet Web site. The best
way to verify postponement information
is to attend the scheduled sale. Date:
March 10, 2014 NORTHWEST TRUST-
EE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Jeffrey
Mosher, Authorized Signatory 1241 E.
Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA
92705 866-387-6987 Sale Info website:
www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auc-
tion.com Automated Sales Line: 877-
484-9942 or 800-280-2832 Reinstate-
ment and Pay-Off Requests: 866-387-
NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING
TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY IN-
FORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. File #
7233.25448:
3/13/2014,3/20/2014,3/27/2014
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #250400
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Trini-
ty Home Care Staffing, 100 Mclellan Dr.,
Apt. 1115, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. The fictitious business name
was filed on 05/15/2013 in the county of
San Mateo. The business was conducted
by: Ray Oliver Milano 51A John Gleen
Cir., Daly City, CA 94015 and Alex San-
tos, 861 Gary Lee Common, Fremont,
CA 94536. The business was conducted
by a Limited Liability Company.
/s/ Ray Oliver Milano /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 03/03/2014. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 03/06/2014,
03/13/2014, 03/20/2014, 03/27/2014).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14. Call 650 490-
0921 - Leave message if no answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
210 Lost & Found
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3 each (650)341-1861
TRAVIS MCGEE (Wikipedia) best mys-
teries 18 classic paperbacks for $25.
Steve (650) 518-6614
295 Art
"AMERICAN GRIZZLEY" limited print by
Michael Coleman. Signed & numbered.
Professionally framed 22x25.. $99. 650-
654-9252
5 prints, nude figures, 14” x 18”, signed
Andrea Medina, 1980s. $40/all. 650-345-
3277
6 CLASSIC landscape art pictures,
28”x38” glass frame. $15 each OBO.
Must see to appreciate. SOLD!
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
DISHWASHER SAMSUNG Good Condi-
tion fairly new $100.00. (650)291-9104
HOOD, G.E. Good condition, clean,
white.. $30. (650)348-5169
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, SOLD!
MINI-FRIG NEW used i week paid $150.
Sell $75.00 650 697 7862
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROTISSERIE GE, IN-door or out door,
Holds large turkey 24” wide, Like new,
$80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
THERMADOR WHITE glass gas cook-
top. 36 inch Good working condition.
$95. 650-322-9598
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
297 Bicycles
SCHWINN 20” Boy’s Bike, Good Condi-
tion $40 (650)756-9516
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
4 NOLAN RYAN - Uncut Sheets, Rare
Gold Cards $90 (650)365-3987
400 YEARBOOKS - Sports Illustrated
Sports Book 70-90’s $90 all (650)365-
3987
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
BOX OF 2000 Sports Cards, 1997-2004
years, $20 (650)592-2648
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FRAMED 19X15 BARBIE USPS Post-
mark picture Gallery First Day of issue
1960. Limited edition $85.
FRANKLIN MINT Thimble collection with
display rack. $55. 650-291-4779
HO TRAIN parts including engines, box-
cars, tankers, tracks, transformers, etc.
$75 Call 650-571-6295
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
RUSSIAN MEDAL Pins for sale, 68 in
lot, $99 SOLD!
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., SOLD!
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
299 Computers
1982 TEXAS Instruments TI-99/4A com-
puter, new condition, complete accesso-
ries, original box. $99. (650)676-0974
300 Toys
14 HOTWHEELS - Redline, 32
Ford/Mustang/Corv. $90 all (650)365-
3987
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE DOLLHOUSE 3-Story, $35.
(650)558-8142
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35 650-558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL table lamps, (2),
shades need to be redone. Free. Call
(650)593-7001
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65 (650)591-
3313
302 Antiques
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $55., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BATTERY CHARGER for Household
batteries $9, 650-595-3933
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
COMPUTER MONITOR Compaq 18" for
only $18, 650-595-3933
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PANASONIC 36" STEREO color TV re-
mote ex/cond. (650)992-4544
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE SET, round 42" glass table,
with 4 chairs, pick up Foster City. Free.
(650)578-9045
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call
(650)558-0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call
(650)558-0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
KITCHEN TABLE, tall $65. 3'x3'x3' ex-
tends to 4' long Four chairs $65. 622-
6695
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - NEW $80
RETAIL $130 OBO (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN SIZE Mattress Box Spring
$100.00 (650)291-9104
RECLINER CHAIR brown leather exc/
cond. $50. (650)992-4544
RECLINER LA-Z-BOY Dark green print
fabric, medium size. $65. (650)343-8206
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SMALL VANITY chair with stool and mir-
ror $99. (650)622-6695
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO
(650)345-5644
SOFA PASTEL color excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
SOFA SET of two Casual style, Good
condition 62" long. $85.00 Hardly used..
650 697 7862
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
SOLID WOOD oak desk $50 (650)622-
6695
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
TABLE 4X4X4. Painted top $40
(650)622-6695
TEA/ UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CABINET T/V glass door/
drawers on roller 50"W x58"H ex/co.$60.
(650)992-4544
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, (650)345-5502
BBQ, WEBER, GoAnywhere, unused,
plated steel grates, portable, rust resist-
ant, w/charcoal, $50. (650)578-9208
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CALIFORNIA KING WHITE BEDDING,
immaculate, 2 each: Pillow covers,
shams, 1 spread/ cover, washable $25.
(650)578-9208
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS(2) stainless steel, tem-
perature-resistent handles, 21/2 & 4 gal.
$5 for both. (650) 574-3229.
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
306 Housewares
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
COSTUME JEWELRY Earrings $25.00
Call: 650-368-0748
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
13" SCROLL saw $ 40. (650)573-5269
2 TON Hydraulic floor Jack with Air com-
pression(250psi) new in tool box $60.
(650)992-4544
BLACK & Decker 17" Electric Hedge
Trimmer. Like new. $20. 650-326-2235.
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1/2" drill press $40.50.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN CIRCULAR skill saw7/4
blade heavy duty new in box. $60.
(650)992-4544
CRAFTSMAN10" TABLE saw & stand,
$99. (650)573-5269
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
PANASONIC FAX machine, works
great, $20. (650-578-9045)
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 San Bruno
(650)588-1946
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
GREEN CERAMIC flower pot w/ 15
Different succulents, $20.(650)952-4354
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
25 Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Gp. co-founded
by Victor Herbert
6 Bonkers
10 Harbinger
14 Cheri of “Scary
Movie”
15 “... __ the
dreadful thunder /
Doth rend the
region”: “Hamlet”
16 Gossipy Barrett
17 Specific gravity
20 Vietnamese
observance
21 Hitch
22 Vintage cars
23 Onetime Kenny
G label
25 Play with robots
26 Linebacker
Manti __, 2012
Heisman Trophy
finalist
29 Publicly traded
investment
company with a
limited number of
shares
33 Wagner works
34 Do a hitch in the
military
35 Put away
38 Dove competitor
40 Slangy
turnarounds
41 Settings for
Manet
43 Finished a flight-
training
requirement
45 Mad man?
48 Agnus __
49 Auction ending?
50 Take out
53 1977 medical
novel
55 Time of jour
57 Baa maid?
58 Classic
children’s novel,
and what to look
for in this
puzzle’s three
other longest
answers
62 __ of Sandwich
63 “This can’t be
happening!”
64 Script parts
65 Additionally
66 E or G, e.g.
67 A bit daft
DOWN
1 Angiogram
image
2 Take the helm
3 Irish musical
ensemble __
Woman
4 Altar constellation
5 Road trip
refresher
6 __ lamp
7 Universal donor’s
type, briefly
8 Food fish
9 Successful
squeeze play
result
10 “... __ they say”
11 What humidity
measures
12 Forest friend of
Frodo
13 Dissenting vote
18 “Hold your
horses, I’m
coming”
19 Unhip types
24 Like right-lane
traffic, usually
25 Goodwill store
transaction
27 Green condition?
28 Laudatory verses
30 Helpful tip for a
puzzle solver?
31 “Behind the
Candelabra”
co-star
32 Like the Middle
Ages
35 Large quantity
36 Account
37 Company bigwigs
39 “Get it, daddy-o?”
42 Note next to a
red F, maybe
44 Green shade
46 Church VIP
47 “You __ worry”
51 “Rockin’ Robin”
chorus word
52 Itty
54 Peace Prize city
55 On its way
56 Platte River tribe
58 Leaves in a bag
59 Kubrick’s out-of-
control computer
60 Sigma preceder
61 2016 Olympics
host
By Pancho Harrison
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
03/27/14
03/27/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
HONEYWELL HEPA Filter $99
(650)622-6695
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
NALGENE WATER bottle,
$5; new aluminum btl $3 650-595-3933
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10.00 (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
KAMAKA CONCERT sized Ukelele,
w/friction tuners, solid Koa wood body,
made in Hawaii, 2007 great tone, excel-
lent condition, w/ normal wear & tear.
$850. (650)342-5004
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM,” MARINA Cool 10”, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
INDOLENT, AMIABLE Toyger cat,
brown. Good health. Free. Call
(650)-364-3403.
PET TAXI, never used 20 by 14 by 15
inches, medium dog size $20. SOLD!
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LARRY LEVINE Women's Hooded down
jacket. Medium. Scarlet. Good as new.
Asking $40 OBO (650)888-0129
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
SOLD!
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
MANS DENIM Jacket, XL HD fabric,
metal buttons only $15 650-595-3933
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK JACKET faux, hip length, satin lin-
ing. Looks feels real. Perfect condition
$99 OBO 650-349-6969
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S GRECIAN MADE
DRESS SIZE 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WESTERN HAT brown color large size 7
5/8 never worn weatherproof $50 obo
(650)591-6842
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
318 Sports Equipment
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BAMBOO FLY rod 9 ft 2 piece good
condition South Bend brand. $50
(650)591-6842
BASEBALLS & Softballs, 4 baseballs 2
softballs, only $6 650-595-3933
BASKETBALL HOOP, free standing
$100. New Costco $279. (650)291-9104
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50. (650)637-
0930
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMAN'S BOWLING ball, 12 lbs, "Lin-
da", with size 7 shoes and bag, $15.
(650)578-9045
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
HUGE BABY
& KIDS
CONSIGNMENT
SALE
San Mateo Event Center
(San Mateo Fairgrounds)
MARCH 28-30
Fri, 3/28: 12pm-9pm
Sat, 3/29: 9am-5pm
Sun, 3/30: 9am-2pm
(50% off sale!)
Just Between Friends
has over 35,000 gently
used children's items in-
cluding baby and kids
gear, clothing,toys,
books, games, furniture
& so much more!
Sunday
is the 50% off sale
when many already
great deals go half
price! Join us!
www.sanmateo.jbfsale.com
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
335 Garden Equipment
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $79
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, hardly
used. Paid $950. Asking $350 orb est of-
fer. (650)400-7435
SWIFT ORTHOPEDIC BED, flawless ex-
cellent condition. Queen size. Adjustable.
Originally paid $4,000. Yours for only
$500. (650)343-8206
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
CIMPLER
REAL ESTATE
Cimpler Real Estate - Reinventing
Home Buying
To Buy Smarter Call Artur Urbanski,
Broker/Owner
(650)401-7278
533 Airport Blvd, 4th Flr, Burlingame
www.cimpler.com
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedrooms, new carpets, new granite
counters, dishwasher, balcony, covered
carports, storage, pool, no pets.
(650)591-4046.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY ‘00 Impala, 58K miles, Very
clean! $6,000. Joe, SOLD!
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE ‘99 Van, 391 Posi, 200 Hp V-6,
22” Wheels, 2 24’ Ladders, 2015 Tags,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBILE ‘99 Intrigue, green, 4
door sedan, 143K miles. $1,500.
(650)740-6007.
SUBARU ‘98 Outback Limited, 175K
miles, $5,500. Recent work. Mint condiit-
ton. High Car Fax, View at sharpcar.com
#126837 (415)999-4947
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
VOLVO ‘85 244 Turbo, automatic, very
rare! 74,700 original miles. New muffler,
new starter, new battery, tires have only
200 miles on it. $4,900. (650)726-8623.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
FORD ‘98 EXPLORER 6 cylinder, 167K
miles, excellent condition, good tires,
good brakes, very dependable! $2000 or
best offer. Moving, must sell! Call
(650)274-4337
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
DODGE ‘90 RAM PASSENGER VAN,
B-150, V-8, automatic, seats 8, good
condition, $1,700. (650)726-5276.
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
MA'S AUTO
REPAIR SERVICE
Tires • Service • Smog checks
***** - yelp!
980 S Clarem’ont St San Mateo
650.513.1019
704 N San Mateo Dr San Mateo
650.558.8530
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $40
We will run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Appliance Repair
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Concrete, decks, retaining walls,
fences, bricks, roof, gutters,
& drains.
Call David
(650)270-9586
Lic# 9/14544 Bonded & Insured
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & JANITORIAL
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
$65 call or email for details
(650)918-0354
MyErrandServicesCA.com
Concrete
PROFESSIONAL
CONCRETE, MASONRY, &
REMODELING SERVICES
• Paving • Landscaping
• Demolition
(650)445-8444
Mobile (907)570-6555
State Lic. #B990810
Construction
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot • Decks • Fences
• Handyman • Painting
• Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
MARIN CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialists
* custom decks * Framing * remodel-
ing * foundation Rep.*Dry Rot * Ter-
mite Rep * And Much More
Ask about our 20% signing and
senior discounts
(650)486-1298
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction,
• Remodeling,
• Kitchen/Bathrooms,
• Decks/ Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
THE VILLAGE HANDYMAN
Remodels • Framing
• Carpentry Stucco • Siding
• Dryrot • Painting
• Int./Ext. & Much More...
(650)701-6072
Call Joe Burich ... Free Estimates
Lic. #979435
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Gardening
KEEP YOUR LAWN
LOOKING GREEN
Time to Aerate your lawn
We also do seed/sod of lawns
Spring planting
Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831 Lic #751832
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
The Garden Doctor
Landscaping & Demolition,
Fences, Interlocking Pavers,
Clean-ups, Hauling,
Retaining Walls
(650)771-2276
Lic# 36267
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
SEWER PIPES
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters, Faucets,
Toilets, Sinks, & Re-pipes
(650)461-0326
27 Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
(650)771-5614
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
Champagne Sunday Brunch
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
Food
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650) 726-5727
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
INTERSTATE
ALL BATTERY CENTER
570 El Camino Real #160
Redwood City
(650)839-6000
Watch batteries $8.99
including installation.
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy Coins, Jewelry, Watches,
Platinum, Diamonds.
Expert fine watch & jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave. Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
$29
ONE HOUR MASSAGE
(650)354-8010
1030 Curtis St #203,
Menlo Park
ACUHEALTH
Best Asian Body Massage
$28/hr
Free Parking
(650)692-1989
1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame
sites.google.com/site/acuhealthSFbay
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
HEALING MASSAGE
• Newly remodeled
• New Masseuse
$40/Hr. Special
Expires May 1st
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
ComboMassage $29.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax & Massage
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
www.unionspaand salon.com
Pet Services
CATS, DOGS,
POCKET PETS
Mid-Peninsula Animal Hospital
Free New Client Exam
(650) 325-5671
www.midpen.com
Open Nights & Weekends
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate
Retirement
INDEPENDENT LIVING, assisted liv-
ing, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your life-
long dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10
WORLD 28
Thursday • March 27, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Todd Pitman and Rob Griffith
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — They are
the most tantalizing clues yet: 122 objects
spotted by satellite, floating in the turbu-
lent Indian Ocean where officials believe
the missing Malaysian jetliner went down.
But bad weather, the passage of time and
the sheer remoteness of their location kept
answers out of the searchers’ grasp.
Nineteen days into the mystery of Flight
370, the discovery of the objects that
ranged in size from 3 feet to 75 feet,
offered “the most credible lead that we
have,” a top Malaysian official said
Wednesday.
With clouds briefly thinning in a stretch
of ocean known for dangerous weather, air-
craft and ships from six countries combed
the waters far southwest of the Australian
coast. Crews saw only three objects, one
of them blue and two others that appeared
to be rope.
But search planes could not relocate
them or find the 122 pieces seen by a
French satellite. Limited by fuel and dis-
tance, they turned back for the night.
That echoed the frustration of earlier
sweeps that failed to zero in on three
objects seen by satellites in recent days.
Forecasters warned that the weather was
likely to deteriorate again Thursday, possi-
bly jeopardizing the search for the
Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 that van-
ished early March 8 en route from Kuala
Lumpur to Beijing.
With the search in motion, Malaysian
officials again sought to assuage the angry
relatives of the flight’s 153 Chinese pas-
sengers. But Defense Minister
Hishammuddin Hussein also expressed
exasperation. About two-thirds of the
missing are Chinese, but Hishammuddin
pointedly said Chinese families “must also
understand that we in Malaysia also lost
our loved ones,” as did “so many other
nations.”
Floating objects seen in Flight 370 search area
By Jim Kuhnhenn and Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRUSSELS — The United States plans to
join with other NATO nations in increasing
ground and naval forces in Eastern Europe as
part of the military alliance’s response to
Russia’s incursion in Ukraine, the White
House said Wednesday.
The specifics of the NATO plan were still
being finalized, including the size of the
force increase. Rather than significantly
boosting U.S. military presence in the
region, the move seemed aimed instead at
showing symbolic support for NATO mem-
bers near Russia’s borders.
President Barack Obama’s deputy national
security adviser, Ben Rhodes, said NATO
was aiming to provide “a
continuous presence to
reassure our allies.”
While he would not detail
specific countries where
the additional resources
would be sent, he noted
that the U.S. was particu-
larly focused on efforts to
bolster Poland, Estonia,
Lithuania and Latvia.
Rhodes briefed reporters as Obama trav-
eled to Rome from Brussels, where he met
with NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh
Rasmussen, as well as European Union lead-
ers. In a speech from the heart of Europe,
Obama declared the crisis in Ukraine a glob-
al “moment of testing.”
Egypt army chief says
he will run for president
CAIRO — Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, the
Egyptian military chief who last summer
removed the elected Islamist president,
announced Wednesday that he will run for
president in elections expected next month,
putting him on an apparent track to lead a
nation beleaguered by ongoing turmoil and
violence, a broken political order, a dilapi-
dated economy and concerns over the
chances for building a democracy.
Wearing his military fatigues in a nation-
ally televised speech, el-Sissi announced he
was resigning from the
armed forces — a required
step since only civilians
can run for president. He
declared that it was the
last time he would wear
his uniform because he
was stepping down to run
president and continue to
defend the country. He
said he was “answering
the demand of a wide
range of Egyptians.”
U.S.to commit more forces to NATO efforts
Around the world
Abdel-Fattah
el-Sissi
Barack Obama
REUTERS
Staff at satellite communications company Inmarsat work in front of a screen showing
subscribers using their service throughout the world, at their headquarters in London.

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