TIMELESS

REDEMPTION:
THE EVER-PRESENT
MESSIAH
By Russell N. Redden
PREPUBLICATION RELEASE
TWO FREE CHAPTERS
TIMELESS REDEMPTION:
THE EVER-PRESENT MESSIAH
PREPUBLICATION RELEASE
Copyright © 2007 by Russell Noel Redden.
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced,
stored, or transmitted in any form or by photocopy,
recording, electronic, mechanical, or by any other means,
except for brief quotations in printed or Internet texts or
reviews, without the prior permission of the author and
publisher.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise noted, are taken
from the King James Version of the Bible.
Printed in the United States of America
First released December 2007
TIMELESS
REDEMPTION:
THE EVER-PRESENT
MESSIAH
By Russell N. Redden
PREPUBLICATION RELEASE
TWO FREE CHAPTERS
Copyright © 2008 by Russell Redden.
All Rights Reserved.
This PDF may be shared,
but for non-profit purposes only
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1—
2—
3—
4—
5—
6—
7—
8—
9—
10—
11—
12—
Introduction
God is the Beginning and the End
Preeminence Through the Resurrection
The Messiah Abides Forever
The Hidden Mystery
The High Priest
Before the Foundation
The Kingdom Delivered
The Rock That Followed
The Image in the Beginning
The Metatron
Exalted to the Right Hand
Conclusions
..........................................…..7
.............11
.…39
.....................59
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................................…....111
............................107
...........................127
.............…..........139
....................139
.................................………165
..........….…......177
.........................................…207
Chapter One:
God is the Beginning and Ending
of Creation
God is greater than the ability of mortal man to comprehend.
Regardless of the intellect, human beings cannot perceive
even a fraction of God’s omnipotent and omniscient nature.
The Bible teaches that God’s ways are “past finding out”
(Romans 11:33.) There is no philosophy, science, or even
Biblical knowledge, which can tell us all there is to know
about God.
Even more incomprehensible is the fact that God is
“timeless.” The Bible teaches that God knows the end from the
beginning, dwelling in a place that transcends time itself. The
Bible teaches that God is “everlasting”:
“But now is made manifest, and by the scriptures
of the prophets, according to the commandment of
the everlasting God, made known to all nations for
the obedience of faith: To God only wise, be glory
through Jesus Christ for ever. Amen.” (Romans
16:26-27
In the Greek, the word “everlasting” comes from aivw,nioj
[aionios.] The root of this word is aivw,n [aion], originally defined
by the Greeks as: “without beginning or end.
1
” It was a word
used for something that has always existed, and will always
exist. “Aionios” was the perfect Greek word to describe the
timeless existence of the eternal God. God never had a
beginning or an ending; He has always existed.
God is Forever the Same
The fact that God is immutable (does not change) is also
proof that God has a “timeless” existence. In Malachi, we find
this foundational passage:
“For I am the LORD, I change not…” (Malachi 3:6)
Creatures that are subject to time age and change, God
does not. The passing moments of time mean nothing to Him,
because God’s habitation is outside of what scientists call the
“space-time continuum.”
The book of Psalms also teaches the concept of God’s
“immutability.” In Psalm 102, we read:
“But thou art the same, and thy years shall have no
end.” (Psalm 102:27)
God continues to be the same from eternity to eternity.
This is not true of human beings. In this universe, the laws of
physics govern our existence (unless God alters them.) We
experience life moment-by-moment, hour-by-hour, and year-
by-year. For this reason, it is difficult for humans to grasp the
concept of a God who exists outside of time and space.
However, our inability to grasp this concept does not mean
that it is not the truth.
1
aivw,n was defined later simply as “eternity.”
The “timelessness of God” is a revelation YHWH
2
gave to
His people. In Judaism, we find this concept repeated many
times in both Biblical and non-Biblical texts. For instance,
long before the book of Revelation was ever written, the
“Sibylline Oracles
3
” recorded words similar to those written by
John on the isle of Patmos. We read:
“There is one sovereign God, ineffable, whose dwell-
ing is in heaven, self sprung, unseen yet seeing all
himself alone. No mason’s hand did make him, nor
does some model formed from gold or ivory by the
varied skill of man represent him. But he, himself
Eternal, hath revealed himself as One who is and
was before, yea and shall be hereafter.” (Sibylline
Oracles 1:11-16, From: The Pseudepigrapha of the Old
Testament. Robert Henry Charles)
This text describes a God who exists in all periods of time,
simultaneously. God is the one who “IS” now, “WAS” before
time existed, and will exist “HEREAFTER.” Between 100-200
years later, God spoke to the Apostle John and said:
“I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending,
saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is
to come, the Almighty.” (Revelation 1:8)
These words written by John: “which is” “which was” and
“which is to come” are similar to those in the Sibylline Oracles.
Thus Ancient Jews almost universally believed that God
dwells in the past, present and future at the same time. This
is a great truth of God’s nature, yet we must ponder what this
doctrine really means.
Is God timeless because: (a) He dwells inside of this
present creation (dwelling inside of the universe—
consequently— dwelling in the past, present and future
simultaneously), or (b) is God “timeless” because He dwells
beyond or outside of creation? If the latter (b) is true, God
2
¬·¬· Yahweh, or Yehovah
3
Non-Biblical texts are quoted in this book to provide historic proof of
the existence of certain beliefs among early Christians and Jews, and
add to the context of many New Testament passages.
inhabits an eternal, timeless place where He observes the
entire universe as a whole, from the beginning until the end
of time.
This concept is taught in the Thanksgiving Hymns, a text
found in the Dead Sea Scrolls:
“What could I speak that is not recognized, and
proclaim what is not told? All things are engraved before
you with the ink of remembrance for all the seasons of
eternity, designed for the numbered epochs of eternal
years at their appointed seasons. Nothing is concealed,
nor does anything exist separate from your presence.”
(The Thanksgiving Hymns, 1QHodayot Col 9 23-25)
The writer of this text believed that God looks at “all
seasons” eternity at the same time. The “timelessness of God”
is a great truth of God’s holy nature that was given to the
children of Israel. God is a timeless being, inhabiting the place
where the past, present and future occur simultaneously
before Him.
The Universe will End
Many believe that heaven (God’s domain) is part of the
created universe. If this were true, the universe must be
eternal, because it is not possible for an “eternal Heaven” to
exist in a temporary universe. Once the universe ends, heaven
would cease to exist.
However, it is not Scriptural to believe in an “eternal
universe.” The Bible teaches unequivocally that the universe
will end. Almost everyone is familiar with these words spoken
by the Lord:
“Heaven and earth shall pass away: but my words
shall not pass away.” (Luke 21:33)
Heaven will pass away, according to the Word of God. Of
course, this “heaven” is not the holy habitation of God. Jesus
was referring to either the “heaven” of the earth’s sky, the
“heaven” of the universe, or both.
There is a passage from the Book of Psalms that teaches
that both “heavens” will perish. We read:
“I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of
my days: thy years are throughout all generations.
Of old hast thou laid the foundation of the earth:
and the heavens are the work of thy hands. They
shall perish, but thou shalt endure: yea, all of
them shall wax old like a garment; as a vesture
shalt thou change them, and they shall be
changed.” (Psalm 102:24-28)
The Bible declares that the “heavens (plural)” shall
“perish.” The plurality of the word “heavens” in this passage
is proof that both the “heaven” of the earth’s sky and the
“heaven” of the stars will pass away. Therefore, if the “heaven”
of God’s domain were a component of this universe, it would
also cease.
The words “change” and “changed” (as translated in the
English) leads one to believe that God will merely alter this
present universe. However, both of these words in the Hebrew
mean, “to pass away
4
.” Many translations correctly render
this word, including the English Standard Version:
“They will perish, but you will remain; they will all
wear out like a garment. You will change them like
a robe, and they will pass away.” (Psalm 102:26;
English Standard Version)
In the New Testament, the writer of Hebrews paraphrases
this Psalm, and adds a powerful depiction of the end of time.
We read that creation will be “folded up” at its demise:
“And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the
foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the
works of thine hands: They shall perish; but thou
remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a
garment; And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up,
4
·¬· Halap or Chalap
and they shall be changed: but thou art the same,
and thy years shall not fail.” (Hebrews 1:10-12)
In the Greek language, “fold up” means, “to roll up” or “fold
together
5
.” Consider how Young’s Literal translation renders
this passage:
“…and as a mantle Thou shall roll them together,
and they shall be changed, and Thou art the
same, and Thy years shall not fail.” (Hebrews
1:12, Young’s Literal Translation)
The Bible teaches that after creation is folded up in the end
of time, it will “perish.” From this passage, we can conclude
that creation has a beginning and will come to an end. For
this reason, God must exist outside of this present creation.
The “Big Bang” and “Big Crunch”
The theory of the “big bang” asserts that all matter in the
universe began at one point in space, with a tremendous
explosion. By observing the light of the stars, Edwin Hubble
was the first to discover that the universe was expanding.
Since that time, scientists have proven that Hubble’s
observations were correct.
The expanding universe gives credence to the “big bang”
theory, because all matter in the universe is moving away
from one specific location—the site where the initial explosion
occurred (the theory of the “big bang” does not in any way
discount the existence of God —because someone had to light
the fuse!)
If there was a “big bang” at the beginning of time, there
may be a “Big Crunch” in the end. The “Big Crunch” is a
theory that proposes that as the universe expands, it will
eventually begin to collapse under the weight of its own
gravity. As a stretched rubber band snaps back under the
stress of it’s own tension, the universe could collapse and
reverse direction— folding itself up in the same place where it
began (it could be more accurate to state that the universe is
5
helisso
expanding like a balloon away from the “breath” of a person,
and contracts back to the same location when the air is
sucked out.)
The “Big Crunch” is one of several competing theories of
the demise of the universe. There is also the theory of the “Big
Freeze” (that proposes that as the universe expands, it will
eventually use up all of its heat and light, causing it to freeze.)
Additionally, the “Multiverse” and “the Big Rip” theories also
propose what will occur at the end of creation.
Among these competing theories, the Word of God
supports the theory of the “Big Crunch.” Consider the passage
we have examined in the book of Hebrews. It teaches that God
will “fold up” or “roll up” creation at the end of time— identical
to the theory of the “Big Crunch!”
Scientists call the location where the universe began— and
will collapse—“singularity.” According to the theory of “the Big
Crunch,” all matter, space and time will be “compressed
together” at “singularity.”
In nature, scientists have observed similar phenomenon.
Stars collapse under the weight of their own gravity, and
become “black holes.” A “black hole” is also a “singularity.” If
“singularity” of the entire universe does exist— God created it
for His own purpose.
God Dwells Beyond Creation
As previously stated, since God existed prior to creation, it
is logical that He dwells outside of this universe. And, if
“singularity” exists, God must dwell outside or beyond it.
This does not mean however, that God does not have the
ability to instantly move within His creation through the Holy
Spirit. The Scriptures teach that God “fills heaven and earth”
(Jeremiah 23:34,) that “in him we live, move and have our
being” (Acts 17:28,) and that heaven is God’s throne, and
earth is his footstool (Isaiah 66:1.) These passages do not
imply that God is like a liquid, filling the entire universe with
his essence like water fills the ocean. Instead, they teach that
the eternal God— who dwells outside of time and space—can
move instantaneously inside of this creation (and the time
that exists within it) as He pleases.
The Expanding Universe
A concept difficult for mere mortals to understand is the
creation of space itself. As the universe expands, it must
expand into something. In the book of Genesis, we read that
when God made the world, nothing existed except a “void”:
“In the beginning God created the heaven and the
earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and
darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the
Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And
God said, Let there be light
6
: and there was light.”
(Genesis 1:1-3)
In the Hebrew language, the word “void” means:
“emptiness,” “formlessness,” or “vacuum
7
.” All matter in the
universe, including the earth, was created in a formless
vacuum. Therefore, as the universe expands, it expands into
this same “nothingness.”
Similarly, scientists today theorize that the universe is
expanding into a “void.” This is a concept difficult to
understand. How is it possible that God created something
where nothing existed? How is it possible that this universe
is expanding into “nothingness”? The answer to these
questions God alone knows. Likewise, the mechanics of time
as it exists in this finite universe is a mystery that only God
can completely understand.
God Dwells in Heaven
Seventeen times in the Gospels Jesus taught that the
Father was in heaven (Matthew 5:16, 45, 48; 6:1, 6:9; 7:11,
21; 10:32-33; 12:50; 16:17; 18:10; 18:14, 19; 23:9; Mark
11:25-26; 13:32; Luke 11:1.) Paul wrote that every good and
perfect gift comes “down from the Father of lights” (James
1:17.) It is a Jewish concept that God’s dwelling place is in
heaven, even though He moves within His creation.
6
If the “Big Bang” theory is correct, a massive amount of heat and light
would have been released. Genesis 1:1-3 could easily describe this event.
7
·¬z bohuw
Ancient Jews believed that all power from God originated
from heaven. Since heaven is located outside of time and
space, would exist beyond “singularity.” When God moved
with His Spirit to create in the book of Genesis, He “breathed”
His Spirit from heaven (outside of creation,) through
“Singularity” (if “singularity” exists,) into the universe at a
specific point in time.
All Things were Created “Out Of” God, and will
Return “Into God”
There is a passage in the New Testament that appears to
validate the theories of the “big bang” and “big crunch.” In the
book of Romans, Paul wrote that the universe came into
existence “out of” God, and will return “into” Him. In the King
James Version we read:
“For of him, and through him, and to him, are all
things: to whom be glory for ever. Amen.” (Romans
11:36)
In the Greek, the word translated “of” is from [ek], which
means: “out of” “from” or “away from.” This word describes
something moving out of or away from another location. The
word translated “to” is from [eis], which means, “into” or
“towards.” “Ek” is outward motion; “eis” inward motion.
Therefore, according to the original language, Paul wrote:
“For out of him, and through him, and into him,
are all things: to whom be glory for ever. Amen.”
Or
“For away from him, and through him, and towards
him, are all things: to whom be glory for ever. Amen.”
The New American Standard Version translates this verse
similarly:
“For from Him and through Him and to Him are all
things. To Him be the glory forever. Amen.”
(Romans 11:36, New American Standard version)
Consider for a moment modern scientific theory. Scientists
propose that the universe is expanding “away from” the place
called “singularity,” and will return to the same location. Paul
used almost identical language in the book of Romans.
Creation is moving away from God and will return to Him. If
God does dwell outside or beyond “singularity,” Paul’s
description of creation is accurate.
Take note of the tense of this passage. Paul wrote that all
things “ARE” “out of” God, and will return “into Him.”
Consider, we do not read:
“out of Him …were all things”
Or
“…into Him will be all things”
The “present tense” of this passage demonstrates the
timelessness of God. God is “ever-present”; He timelessly
exists as the “eternal beginning and ending” of creation. For
this reason, Paul’s assertion that all things “are” (present
tense) out of God had a specific theological purpose.
The Theological Dictionary of the New Testament
teaches this about God’s “timelessness”:
“As the Creator and Consummator God is the eternal
One. His eternal being stretches beyond the time of the
world. He is from eternity to eternity (
, ø 89, 2). Before the world was created, He was
(ø 89:2); and when heaven and earth have vanished, He
will be (ø 101:26 ff., quoted with reference to Christ in Hb.
1:10). Thus the unending eternity of God and the time
of the world, which is limited by its creation and
conclusion, are contrasted with one another. Eternity is
thought of as unending time—for how else can human
thought picture it? —and the eternal being of God is
represented as pre-existence and post-existence
8
.”
God has eternal “pre” and “post” existence. The
immutability of God proves that this theology is correct. If God
does not change, He must eternally exist both before and after
creation and time. Therefore, He witnesses the beginning and
ending of creation—and everything in between—
simultaneously. He is “the eternal beginning and end.”
The First and The Last
Paul’s understanding that creation came “out of” God and
will return “into God” echoes a familiar Old Testament
passage. The Prophet Isaiah declared that God is “the first
and last” and “the beginning and end”:
“Who hath wrought and done it, calling the generations
from the beginning? I the LORD, the first, and with the
last; I am he.” (Isaiah 41:4)
“Thus saith the LORD the King of Israel, and his
redeemer the LORD of hosts; I am the first, and I am the
last; and beside me there is no God.” (Isaiah 44:6)
“Hearken unto me, O Jacob and Israel, my called; I am
he; I am the first, I also am the last.” (Isaiah 48:12)
And, on the isle of Patmos, the Apostle John wrote these words:
“I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending,
saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is
to come, the Almighty.” (Revelation 1:8)
“And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and
Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him
that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.”
(Revelation 21:6)

I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the
first and the last.” (Revelation 22:13)
Did God call Himself the “beginning and end” and the “first
and the last” because He had a beginning and will have an
ending? Since the Word of God declares that God is eternal,
these passages cannot describe “the beginning and ending of
God,” but must portray God as dwelling in the location
where creation began and will end.
If God exists beyond “singularity,” He is literally the
“beginning and ending” of all things. He is the unchanging
God who witnesses the entire extent of human history from
outside of His creation.
This is how the Jewish historian Josephus interpreted
Isaiah’s words. In “Antiquities,” we read:
“Yet certainly there is no strength at all in an
army of many ten thousands, when the war is
unjust; for we ought to place our surest hope of
success against our enemies in righteousness
alone, and in piety towards God; which hope we
justly have, since we have kept the laws from the
beginning, and have worshipped our own God,
who was not made by hands out of corruptible
matter; nor was he formed by a wicked king, in
order to deceive the multitude; but who is
workmanship, and the beginning and end of all
things.” (Josephus Antiquities 8:280, 1828 Whiston
translation)
Josephus interpreted Isaiah according to his Jewish
understanding of this passage. He knew that God has no
beginning and end, but is “the beginning and ending of all
things.” Similarly, the apostle Paul wrote that all things came
“out of God,” and will return “into God.” Many Greeks also
believed this concept—creation forms a circle, and God dwells
at the beginning and end.
The “Circle”
Anaximander was a Greek philisopher who lived between
610 and 546 B.C. He taught the docrine of the “Apeiron”— the
Greek word for “timelesness.” He proposed that outside of
creation only the “limitless” or “infinite” exists. The “Aperion”
or “the timelessness” is the beginning of all things.
Unfortunately, none of Anaximander’s own writings have
survived. There are however, reports of his philosophy from
his contemporaries. Neoplatonist Simplicius wrote this about
Anaximander’s view of creation:
"Whence things have their origin, there they must
also pass away according to necessity; for they
must pay penalty and be judged for their injustice,
according to the ordinance of time
9
."
Anaximander taught that creation will return to the same
place where it originated. Heraclitus of Ephesus (535-474
B.C.) described Anaximander’s philosophy of creation as a
“circle,” which:
“…gathered in itself, the beginning and end of the
circle is the same
10
.”
Anaximander taught that time and space will end where
it began. Consider, 2,500 years prior to the twenty-first
century, He believed the same theory proposed by many
scientists today! If combined, the theories of the “Big Bang”
and “Big Crunch” teach that creation forms a circle, as
Anaximander taught.
Anaximander’s “Circle” Was First Taught by Isaiah
Paul confirmed Anaximander’s “circle of creation” when he
wrote:
8
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 201-202.
G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
8
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 201-202.
G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
8
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 201-202.
G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
8
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 201-202.
G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
8
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 201-202.
G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
8
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 201-202.
G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
8
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 201-202.
G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
8
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 201-202.
G. Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
9
Martin Heidegger, Early Greek Thinking, trans. David Farrell Krell and
Frank A. Capuzzi (New York: HarperCollins, 1984), p.13.
“For from Him and through Him and to Him are all
things. To Him be the glory forever. Amen.” (Romans
11:36, New American Standard version)
However, Paul’s doctrine did not originate with
Anaximander. More than one hundred years before
Anaximander’s birth, the prophet Isaiah wrote this passage:
“Hearken unto me, O Jacob and Israel, my called; I am
he; I am the first, I also am the last. Mine hand also
hath laid the foundation of the earth, and my right hand
hath spanned the heavens: when I call unto them, they
stand up together.” (Isaiah 48:12-13)
The English translation makes it appear that God merely
upholds all things through His Word. Certainly, this is a
Biblical concept, yet a closer look at the Hebrew language
reveals that the same “circle of creation” taught by
Anaximander was first taught by Isaiah.
The word “spanned” in the Hebrew means “to stretch,”
“expand” or “to spread out
11
.” This is similar to Romans,
which taught that all things are “out of” or “away from” God.
The word “call” cames from a word that means “to summon
12
.”
“Together” is from a word that means, “one” “united” or
“unified
13
.” Thus this passage can be translated:
“Hearken unto me, O Jacob and Israel, my called; I am
he; I am the first, I also am the last. Mine hand also
hath laid the foundation of the earth, and my right hand
hath spread out the heavens: when I summon them,
they are unified.”
The Jerusalem Bible translates this passage similarly:

My hand laid the foundations of earth and my right
hand spread out the heavens. I summon them and they
10
Heidegger on Heraclitus, Maly and Emad, eds., p.44
11
·ez taphach
12
s·· qara'
13
··· yachad
all present themselves together.” (Isaiah 48:13, New
Jerusalem Bible)
Isaiah’s depiction of God “spreading out the heavens”
14
and
then calling them back to Himself is identical to
Anaximander’s philosophy of the “circle of creation.”
Furthermore, Isaiah predicted that in the end of time all
things will become “unified.” Thus, the same principle is
found in Isaiah as in Hebrews, that all matter in the universe
will be folded up at its conclusion.
The words of Isaiah and the Apostle Paul (both written
under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit) validate
Anaximander’s philosophy. The “circle of creation” is a truth
from God. Is it possible that Anaximander through human
intellect understood the birth and death of the universe? The
likely scenerio is that Anaximander borrowed his philosophy
from a people who were in communication with God—ancient
Israel.
Anaximander may have read or possessed a copy of
Isaiah’s scroll. In any case, the Bible proves that Isaiah taught
the “circle of creation” before Anaximander. And, the prophet
wrote these words under the inspiration of God’s Holy Spirit.
God gave ancient Jews an understanding of creation that
scientists today are only beginning to understand. There is an
eternal location where creation began and will come to an
end. The Word teaches God is the source of all things, and all
things will return to Him at the end of time.
The Eternal “Age”
In conjunction with the philosophy of the “circle of
creation,” Greek philosophers theorized that time only exists
inside of the “circle” of this present universe. Consider this
passage written by Plato in 360 B.C.:
14
Another passage that teaches GOD “stretched out” or “spanned” the
universe is Isaiah 42:5:
“Thus saith GOD the LORD, he that created the heavens, and
stretched them out; he that spread forth the earth, and that
which cometh out of it; he that giveth breath unto the people
upon it, and spirit to them that walk therein.”
“For there were no days and nights and months and
years before the heaven was created, but when he
constructed the heaven he created them also. They are
all parts of time, and the past and future are created
species of time, which we unconsciously but wrongly
transfer to the eternal essence; for we say that he "was,"
he "is," he "will be," but the truth is that "is" alone is
properly attributed to him, and that "was" and "will be"
only to be spoken of becoming in time, for they are
motions, but that which is immovably the same cannot
become older or younger by time, nor ever did or has
become, or hereafter will be, older or younger, nor is
subject at all to any of those states which affect moving
and sensible things and of which generation is the
cause. These are the forms of time, which imitates
eternity and revolves according to a law of number.”
(“Timaeus” by Plato, Translated by Benjamin Jowett)
Consider, Plato and many Greek philosophers defined
time as something that occurs only within this universe, as
Albert Einstein more than 2,500 years later! The Hellenist Jew
Philo also embraced this concept:
“Moses says also; "In the beginning God created the
heaven and the earth:" taking the beginning to be, not
as some men think, that which is according to time; for
before the world time had no existence, but was created
either simultaneously with it, or after it; for since time
is the interval of the motion of the heavens, there could
not have been any such thing as motion before there
was anything which could be moved; but it follows of
necessity that it received existence subsequently or
simultaneously. It therefore follows also of necessity,
that time was created either at the same moment with
the world, or later than it--and to venture to assert that
it is older than the world is absolutely inconsistent with
philosophy.” (From: The Works of Philo Judaeus:The
contemporary of Josephus, translated from the Greek
By Charles Duke Yonge London, H. G. Bohn, 1854 1890
Public Domain.)
Philo taught an established Jewish tradition—as proven by
this passage from the Babylonian Talmud:
“Jehudah: "Happy is He who with His words did create
the heavens, and with the breath of his mouth, all their
hosts, to these he gave order and time, that they should
not change His command; and they rejoice and are glad
in accomplishing the will of their creator.” (Babylonian
Talmud, Masechet Sanhedrin Chapter 5,)
Since God dwells outside of creation, He exists outside of
the time that occurs within it. God is static—without
change—as Plato taught. God identified Himself as the “I AM
that I AM”— as Plato wrote that God simply “IS.”
The “Aeon”
Plato’s concept of God emulates the original meaning of the
Greek word “aion” which means, “age.” The Greeks used this
word to describe the “age” that exists in this present world,
and the timeless “age” that exists outside of time and space.
This present life is made up of many “temporary ages.” As one
“age” ends, another one begins, until the “consummation” of
all things.
The context of the Scripture determines whether the
“temporal age” of this universe or the “timeless age” of God is
the subject of the passage. The “aeon of God” is located
outside of this universe, and thus outside of the time that
occurs within it.
In The Aeon
There is one phrase in the Greek that is used many times
for the “eternal age” of God. It is found throughout the
Septuagint, the New Testament, and other Greek writings.
This phrase is:
eivj [in, into] to.n [the] aivw/na [age]
Young’s Literal Translation appears to be the only
translation that renders this phrase literally
15
. The context
determines whether this idiom describes those living “in this
present age,” or the one eternal, timeless “age” of God. This
phrase is used many times to describe the Messiah as the
High Priest, who has ascended into this one, timeless age.
The “Age of the Ages”
In the book of Ephesians, Paul identifies one “age” that is
above all other “ages”:
“to Him is the glory in the assembly in Christ Jesus, to
all the generations of the age of the ages. Amen.”
(Ephesians 3:21, Young’s Literal Translation)
The Bride of Christ will glorify Christ “to all generations”
in “the age of the ages.” Many Versions translate this passage
as “forever
16
.” Young’s Literal Translation however, renders
this passage as found in the Greek:
tou/ [the] aivw/noj [age] tw/n [the] aivw,nwn [ages]
Paul wrote of one specific “age” that is greater than all
other “ages,”— the age of the ages! This emulates Jewish and
Greek thought of that time, which believed that only the
timeless “age” exists outside of creation. This timeless “aeon”
is the “aeon” above all other “aeons.”
The doctrine of the “timeless age of God” was the view of
the early church. The Theological Dictionary of the New
Testament confirms this fact:
“In its view of the two aeons the NT is in essential
agreement with 1st century apocalyptic. The framework
of eschatological notions is broken only by the fact that
the is no longer merely in the future.
15
“...to the age.”
15
“...to the age.”
16
The King James Version mistranslates the Greek as
“world without end.” This translation contradicts many pas-
sages that teach the universe will end.
Believers are already redeemed from this present evil
(Gl. 1:4) and have tasted the powers of the future
(Hb. 6:5).
17

Despite the fact that the doctrine of “two aeons” is taught
in the New Testament, men over time began to believe in an
eternal universe—not temporal as the Bible teaches. This
belief is obviously incompatible with the doctrine of “two
aeons.” It is not possible to believe in an eternal, timeless
“age” that is the beginning and end of creation, if one does not
believe the universe will come to an end.
The “Timeless Age” in Judiasm
As the Greeks, ancient Jews believed in the doctrine of “two
aeons.” Since Isaiah was the first to teach the “circle of
creation,” it is likely that the doctrine of “two aeons” also had
its roots in ancient Judiasm. Jews have two different names
for the “age” of this present life, and the timeless “aeon” of God:
“The Jewish apocalyptic tradition and the rabbinic
tradition were familiar with the distinction between two
times or two worlds (olamim): the olam hazzeh, which
means the time which goes from the creation to the
world’s end, and the olam habba, the coming world,
which will follow the world’s end. In the same way,
Greek-speaking Jews distinguished two aiones or
kosmoi: ho aion touto, ho kosmos outos (this aeon,
this world), and ho aion mellon (the coming world or
aeon).
18

The term “Olam Hazzeh” is a term used for the sequential
“ages” that occur within this universe, and the term “Olam
Habba” for the timeless “age” of God. In my opinion, Greek
philosophers replicated this ancient Jewish belief.
17
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 207. G.
Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
17
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 207. G.
Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
17
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 207. G.
Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
17
Theological dictionary of the New Testament, Volume 1, page 207. G.
Kittel, G. W. Bromiley & G. Friedrich, Editors.
18
From: “THE TIME THAT IS LEFT” By GIORGIO AGAMBEN, the University
of Verona.
In a writing found in the Dead Sea Scrolls, called “The ages
of the world,” the concept of “two ages”—one earthly, and one
eternal in heaven—is clearly taught:
“The interpretation of the oracle concerning the ages
that God has made: one age to complete all that is and
that shall be. Before He made them, He established
their orders [gap] age by age.” (The ages of the world
4Q180 Frag 1 1:3)
The one “age” which concludes the “ages” that occur in this
world is the “Olam Habba.” We cannot separate Paul’s
description of “the age of the ages” from this text. As a learned
Jew, Paul would have read this scroll, and many like it, that
describe the one, timeless age of God.
We also read about the “timeless age” in the “Sibylline
Oracles.” The one, great aeon exists after everything in the
universe has been “dissolved”:
“And the whole firmament in its varied forms shall fall
on the divine earth and on the sea: and then shall flow
a ceaseless cataract of raging fire, and shall burn land
and sea, and the firmament of heaven and the stars and
creation itself it shall cast into one molten mass and
clean dissolve. Then no more shall there be the
luminaries’ twinkling orbs, no night, no dawn, no
constant days of care, no spring, no summer, no winter
nor autumn. And then the judgment of the Mighty God
shall come into the midst of the mighty aeon, when all
these things shall come to pass. (Sibylline Oracles,
Book 3:83-92, From: The Pseudepigrapha of the Old
Testament. Robert Henry Charles)
Consider, this text teaches that the one “mighty aeon”
exists after creation ends. We read, “the firmament of heaven
and the stars and creation itself shall cast into one molten
mass and clean dissolve” and after this, the judgment of God
occurs “in the mighty aeon.”
The tradition of these texts is consistent with the Word of
God and with the beliefs of men throughout the Middle East,
who believed in the concept of the “timelessness aeon.” For
instance, one of the supreme principles of Persian theology
was Zrvan Akarana, which means “unlimited time.”
Without question, the “timeless aeon” was a dominant
belief of many cultures throughout the Middle East. It was a
belief founded upon the nature of God; therefore it was an
important concept.
Another example of the belief in “two aeons” is found in a
book called 2 Enoch or Slavonic Enoch. The Jewish
Encyclopedia dates this book between 50 B.C. and 70 A.D.
The doctrine of “two aeons” is clearly taught in this writing.
We read:
“When all creation visible and invisible, as the Lord
created it, shall end, then every man goes to the great
judgment, and then all time shall perish, and the years,
and thenceforward there will be neither months nor
days nor hours, they will be stuck together and will not
be counted. There will be one aeon, and all the
righteous who shall escape the Lord’s great judgment,
shall be collected in the great aeon, for the righteous the
great aeon Will begin, and they will live eternally, and
then too there will be amongst them neither labour, nor
sickness, nor humiliation, nor anxiety, nor need, nor
violence, nor night, nor darkness, but great light.” (2
Enoch 65:6-9 From: The Pseudepigrapha of the Old
Testament. Robert Henry Charles)
The saints of God will inherit this “eternal age”:
“And I shall put the work of every man in writing. And
now, my children, spend the number of your days in
patience and gentleness, that you inherit the endless
age that is to come.” (2 Enoch 50:1-2, From: The
Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament. Robert Henry
Charles)
If this text was written in the first century, it adds to the
evidence that the doctrine of “two aeons” was widespread at
the time of the apostles. Similarly, a text written about the
same time, called 4 Esdras, also described the one “eternal
age” of God:
“But the day of judgment will be the end of this age
and the beginning of the immortal age to come, in
which corruption has passed away, sinful indulgence
has come to an end, unbelief has been cut off, and
righteousness has increased and truth has appeared.
Therefore no one will then be able to have mercy on
someone who has been condemned in the judgment,
or to harm someone who is victorious.” (4 Esdras,
7:113-115 New Revised Standard Version)
According to this text, the “immortal (or “timeless) age”
occurs after creation “passes away.” This is the “Olam Habba”
of Judaism. Since this concept was a foundational truth of
Judaism, it sheds light on many New Testament passages.
“Time” and Modern Christianity
Although Christians have almost unanimously accepted
the fact that God is “timeless” since the apostolic age, there
are basically two different philosophies regarding the nature
of time. The majority may accept the fact that “timelessness”
exists outside of creation; however, the manner in which
time functions inside of creation is a point of contention. In
order to provide context for the subject matter of this book, I
will briefly examine these two philosophies.
The “Process View”
The first view of time is called the “process” view (or the
“tensed theory”). The “Process View” simply states that time is
the motion that occurs within the universe. According to this
belief, the past is gone forever, and the future has not yet
occurred. Since human beings are ‘creatures of time,’ this is
a logical conclusion. How is it possible that what “once was”
continue to exist?
Nevertheless, this view of time does not explain the
certainty of future events foretold in Biblical prophecy. Once
while on vacation, a Sunday school teacher taught that God
does not know the future, only alternate futures. This
illustrates the inability of man to comprehend why God would
strive with man in the present, if He knows who will reject or
accept salvation in the future.
This imaginary paradox exists in the minds of some
theologians because people tend to view philosophies and
beliefs to an extreme. They have concluded that if the future
is certain, “free will” must not exist. This is a “hyper-
interpretation” of Scripture, science and philosophy. The Bible
declares that prophetic events of the future will definitely
occur, even if the free will of man brings them to pass. For
example, many nations will attack Israel during the Great
Tribulation. The personal choice to attack God’s chosen
people will occur through free will, even though the certainty
of this future event is set in stone. And, the Bible declares that
from God’s perspective, the “future” of the Great Tribulation
occurs at the same time as our “present” and our “past
19
.”
The “Static Theory”
The second view of time is the “tenseless” or the “static”
theory. This is the view Albert Einstein held. According to this
theory, time is a dimension, part of “space-time.” The universe
is a “static” entity, and the past, present and future all occur
simultaneously. Rejecting this view according to human logic
falls short in many ways. It does not take into account the
possibility that phenomenon could exist that makes Einstein’s
theory possible. Furthermore, Einstein’s view of time is
consistent with the Biblical doctrine that God knows the past,
present and future simultaneously. If they do not exist at the
same time, as Einstein theorized, how can God observe them
at the same time
20
?
For human beings, to fully comprehend the created
universe— and the time that takes place within it— is like an
ant trying to figure out an elephant. We must admit to
ourselves that our brains are not big enough. It is possible
19
“Remember the former things of old: for I am GOD, and there is none else;
I am GOD, and there is none like me, Declaring the end from the beginning,
and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, My coun-
sel shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure” (Isaiah 46:9-10)
20
Since human logic cannot comprehend all there is to know about GOD,
this question cannot be answered with any certainty. Yet, this question
must be asked.
that God blessed Albert Einstein with a mind that enabled
him to understand some aspects of creation that are far
beyond the comprehension of most men. As you read this
book, ask yourself this question: Which philosophy of time
agrees with the Word of God?
Time and the Ascension
The following Scriptures teach that Jesus ascended to God
after the resurrection. Jesus said:
“Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me,
the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works
than these shall he do; because I go unto my Father.”
(John 14:12)
“Ye have heard how I said unto you, I go away, and
come again unto you. If ye loved me, ye would rejoice,
because I said, I go unto the Father: for my Father is
greater than I.” (John 14:28)
“Of righteousness, because I go to my Father, and ye
see me no more…” (John 16:10)
“A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a
little while, and ye shall see me, because I go to the
Father. (John 16:16)
“I came forth from the Father, and am come into the
world: again, I leave the world, and go to the Father.”
(John 16:28)
“Jesus saith unto her, Touch me not; for I am not yet
ascended to my Father: but go to my brethren, and say
unto them, I ascend unto my Father, and your Father;
and to my God, and your God.” (John 20:17)
Christ has ascended into the “bosom” of the Father:

No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten
Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath
declared him.” (John 1:18)
In this last passage, the word “in” comes from a word
that means “in” “into” or “inside
21
.” John taught that Christ
has ascended into the bosom of God. God is Spirit, therefore
God’s “bosom” is an anthropomorphic expression
22
, as “the
eyes of God,” “the face of God,” “the hand of God,” and “the
arm of God.” It is not possible to literally press against the
breast of a Spirit, who has no physical form.
The Son of Man—God incarnate—has ascended into the
eternal Spirit of His Father who dwells outside of time and
space. Therefore, when Jesus said, “I go to the Father,” He
made a specific point—His ascension would take Him outside
of creation into the eternal, timeless God, who is Spirit.
Inapproachable Light
Timothy wrote that when Jesus ascended to the
Father, He ascended into the “light of God,” which mortal
man cannot even approach:
“That thou keep this commandment without spot,
unrebukeable, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus
Christ: Which in his times he shall shew, who is the
blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings, and
Lord of lords; Who only hath immortality, dwelling in
the light which no man can approach unto; whom no
man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and
power everlasting. Amen.” (1 Timothy 6:14-16)
Christ dwells in the “everlasting light” that no mortal man
can even approach. For this reason, the glorification was
necessary for Jesus to ascend into this magnificent light of
God. Even though He is God in human flesh, only in a
glorified body could He ascend into God’s timeless abode. In
the Dead Sea Scrolls, a text called “The Inheritance of the
Firstborn” teaches the same concept as Timothy:
“You assigned his inheritance in order that you might
establish Your name there [gap] it is the glory of your
inhabited world and upon it [gap] Your eyes are upon
it, and Your glory appears there for [gap] to his seed
21
eis
through their generations, an eternal possession. And
all [gap] and You tested good judgments from him to
[gap] in everlasting light, and you appointed Him as
Your firstborn son. There is none like him, as a prince
and ruler in all Your inhabited world [gap] the crown of
the heavens and glory of the clouds you have placed
on him [gap] [gap] and the angel of your peace in his
congregation. And he [gap] [gap] You gave him
righteous statutes, as a Father gives a son [gap] [gap]
his love.” (The inheritance of the Firstborn Son 4Q369
Col 2:1-10)
As Timothy wrote about 100 years later, ancient Jews
believed that the Messiah dwelt in the eternal “light” of God.
They would have understood this “light” to be God Himself—
the timeless aeon called the “Olam Habba.”
In the book of Ephesians, we read this place of
“unapproachable light” is outside of the created universe:
“But unto every one of us is given grace according
to the measure of the gift of Christ. Wherefore he
saith, When he ascended up on high, he led
captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men. (Now
that he ascended, what is it but that he also
descended first into the lower parts of the earth? He
that descended is the same also that ascended up
far above all heavens, that he might fill all things.)”
(Ephesians 4:7-10)
Jesus has ascended “far above all heavens.” Since the
word “heavens” is plural, we know that Jesus ascended
beyond the “heaven of the sky,” and the “heaven of the stars.”
Since the Word of God teaches that Jesus has left this
universe—He has left “created time” itself. He now dwells in
the God who is the beginning and ending of creation and time.
Conclusion
The Word of God presents these facts:
1. Creation has a beginning and ending
2. God exists outside of creation, yet He has the
ability to move through the Holy Spirit inside this
universe.
3. God is both the beginning and ending of
creation (and time.) Since He does not change, He
always has and always will have this attribute.
He is the eternal source of all things.
4. Jesus has ascended “far above all heavens” into
God —beyond the heaven of the stars—outside of
the universe and time—as it exists in this creation.
Since the Word of God establishes these truths, it is a
logical conclusion that God has taken the resurrected Christ
outside of time and space into the timeless, eternal “aeon” or
“age” of God. Both God and Christ dwell beyond the location
scientists call “singularity”—the beginning and ending of all
things.
This truth has great theological implications. As the High
Priest, Jesus has taken the blood of His sacrifice into the place
where He can cover men from all ages. Noah was literally
covered by the blood of Christ after he left the ark and offered
sacrifices to God. Abraham was literally covered as he
entered into the covenant of circumcision. All of Israel was
literally covered as they followed the Law of Moses.
The precious blood of the Lamb covered men from all
covenants, because the Son of Man became the High Priest of
the “Olam Habba.” Sin was not “pushed ahead” waiting for the
blood to follow, but the High Priest took His blood into the
place that is forever located both before and after the
foundation of the world. This place is the Holiest of Holies—
the eternal God of all ages.
Chapter Two:
Preeminence Through the
Resurrection
In the first chapter of the book of Colossians, we find evidence
that Paul believed Christ ascended into the timeless aeon of
God—the “Olam Habba.” The grammar proves the apostle
believed Jesus dwelt “before all things” at the time he wrote
this letter.
To establish the context of this passage, we will begin at
verse twelve:
“Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made
us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the
saints in light: Who hath delivered us from the
power of darkness, and hath translated us into the
kingdom of his dear Son: In whom we have
redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness
of sins: Who is the image of the invisible God, the
firstborn of every creature.” (Colossians 1:12-15)
Paul carefully defined the subject of his text as God
incarnate in the Son of Man, not the Deity of Christ
before the incarnation. For instance, it is not possible to
interpret: “the image of the invisible God” (verse 15) as
“Christ’s invisible, preexistent Deity.” The Bible teaches that
God is Spirit (John 4:24,) without form or shape. The glorified
Son of David—the human being born at Bethlehem—is “the
image of the invisible God” because He is God incarnate.
The apostle also called Christ: “the firstborn of every
creature.” Many interpret this phrase to be a figure of speech
signifying Christ’s “preeminence.” In other words, the term
“first-born” means that Christ existed “before creation.”
This point of view ignores the fact that Paul interpreted his
own words only a few verses later. In verse 18, we read:
“And he is the head of the body, the church: who is
the beginning, the firstborn from the dead...”
(Colossians 1:18)
The latter expression: “firstborn from the dead” interprets
the phrase: “firstborn of every creature.” The similarity of
these two verses is not coincidental. Jesus was the “firstborn
from the dead” because He was the first of God’s creation
1
to
be raised from the dead. Similarly, He was the “firstborn of
every creature” because He was the first to be risen in a
glorified body.
In the book of Acts, Paul applied the term “begotten” to the
resurrection
2
. Therefore, it is logical that the apostle used the
idiom, “firstborn” for the glorification. Christ was “begotten”
a second time when He was raised from the dead; likewise, He
was “born” a second time when He was glorified.
If the words “in whom we have redemption through his
blood” are part of the original text
3
, this is additional proof
that the subject of this chapter is the glorified Christ, not
the Deity of Christ before the incarnation. The only blood the
Spirit of God ever possessed was the blood that flowed
through the veins of the Son of Man.
The Father is Not the Creator?
The next passage is perplexing, because Paul’s dissertation
is about both God the Father and Christ, yet the apostle
1
The Bride of Christ follows
2
“God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath
raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art
my Son, this day have I begotten thee.” (Acts 13:33)
3
This phrase is not found in some early Greek manuscripts.
wrote that creation occurred “in” “through” and “towards”
only one person—Christ. Carefully examine the grammar of
this passage:
“Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made
us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the
saints in light: Who hath delivered us from the
power of darkness, and hath translated us into the
kingdom of his dear Son: In whom we have
redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness
of sins: Who is the image of the invisible God, the
firstborn of every creature: For by him were all
things created, that are in heaven, and that are in
earth, visible and invisible, whether they be
thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers:
all things were created by him, and for him:
Consider, Paul wrote:
“…by him were all things created…”
He did not write:
“…by them were all things created…”
Why did Paul use only one singular personal pronoun
when both God and Christ are the focus of this passage? Did
Paul believe that the Son created everything alone, while the
Father sat idly by and observed? Or did Paul use a singular
personal pronoun for specific reason?
Arians teach the heresy that Jesus is God’s “agent of
creation.” Such a premise is absurd, since there are passages
that clearly teach that God the Father created all things
4
.
Without question, Paul believed that God the Father
created the universe. Yet, why did he write that creation
occurred only “by” one person—Christ? The Greek language—
and a study of similar passages in the New Testament—
reveals the answer to this question.
4
For instance, see Romans 11:36
“All Things” were Created “In” “Through” and
“Into” Christ
The book of Romans taught that all things are “out of”
[ek,] God. In the book of Colossians however, Paul used a
different Greek word to describe Christ’s role in creation. In
the King James Version, we read:
“For by him were all things created, that are in heaven,
and that are in earth…”
The word translated “by” in the English comes from the
Greek word [en], which means “in” or “inside.” The New
Revised Standard Version uses this definition:
“for in him all things in heaven and on earth were
created, things visible and invisible, whether
thrones or dominions or rulers or powers-- all
things have been created through him and for him.”
(Colossians 1:16, New Revised Standard Version)
Several Bible Versions translate this Greek word
accurately
5
. However, this translation is not logical. How is it
possible that the entire universe was created “in” the one who
is the “image of the invisible God,” and the “firstborn from
the dead” (God incarnate)?
Moreover, Paul wrote that all things were created
“through” and “for” Christ. The word “through” comes
from the Greek word [dia,] which has the same meaning.
The word “for” comes from [eis], which means “to” “into”
“unto” or “towards.” The American Standard Version uses
these definitions:
“For in him were all things created, in the heavens and
upon the earth, things visible and things invisible,
whether thrones or dominions or principalities or
powers; all things have been created through him, and
5
See: The American Standard Version, the Darby Bible, The New
American Bible, The New Jerusalem Bible, The Revised Standard
Version, Young's Literal Translation
unto him.” (Colossians 1:16, The American Standard
Version)
When Paul wrote that all things were created “in” and
“unto” or “towards” Christ, we find the doctrine of the “circle
of creation” in his words. Remember, Anaximander taught that
creation “forms a circle,” and “...the beginning and end of the
circle is the same.” Creation began with God when all things
went forth “out of” [ek] Him; creation ends with God, when
all things return unto [eis] Him.
In Romans—in reference to God, and in Colossians—in
reference to Christ, the philosophy credited to Anaximander
is clearly taught. Yet in Colossians, it is the Son of Man—
“the image of the invisible God”— who dwells at the
beginning and ending of the “circle!” Since the Messiah has
ascended into the eternal God, this should be no surprise.
Consider these facts in light of the translation by Greek
scholar Kenneth S Wuest:
“…giving thanks unto the Father…who delivered
us…into the kingdom of the Son of His love, in whom
we are having our liberation, procured by the payment
of ransom, the putting away of our sins, who is a
derived reproduction and manifestation of absolute
deity, the invisible deity, who [the Son] has priority to
and sovereignty over all creation, because in Him were
created all things in the heavens and upon the earth,
the visible things and the invisible ones, whether they
be thrones or lordships or principalities or authorities.
All things through Him as intermediate agent and with
a view to Him stand created.” (Colossians 1:12-16,
Wuest: An Expanded Translation. By Kenneth S. Wuest)
Wuest translates Paul as describing Christ as the one who
is the “…derived reproduction and manifestation of
absolute deity, the invisible deity…” Everything was
created “with a view”—or “into”—or “towards”—this
glorified man, the image of God.
Compare Paul’s words to the prophet Isaiah:

My hand laid the foundations of earth and my right
hand spread out the heavens. I summon them and
they all present themselves together.” (Isaiah
48:13, New Jerusalem Bible, words underlined in
this book only)
Isaiah predicted that God will “summon” all things unto
Himself, and Paul taught that creation would return “into” or
“towards” Christ:
“…all things were created through him, and into him:”
(Colossians 1:16)
The doctrine of Isaiah and Paul is identical. Paul
understood that God is the eternal beginning and ending of
creation, and that the Son of Man ascended into this eternal
God. Consequently, Paul differentiated between God and the
Son of Man’s role in creation. Creation occurred “out of God,”
(Romans 11:32-36) yet “in” Christ (Colossians 1:16.)
The Distinction Between God and Christ in
Creation
In the book of Ephesians, Paul wrote another Scripture
about the creation of the universe. As in Colossians, we read
that the worlds were created through the Messiah. However,
the apostle made an obvious distinction between God and
Christ in the same verse. We read:
“But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are
all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by
whom are all things, and we by him.” (1 Corinthians 8:6)
In the King James translation, we read that all things were
created “of” God the Father, yet “by Jesus Christ.” In the
Greek, the word “of” is again from [ek], which means, “out
of” or “away from.” Thus God is the source of creation.
However— in the same sentence—Paul used a different Greek
word pertaining to Christ. In the KJV, we read:
“…one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things.”
The word translated “by” is from the Greek word dia, [dia,]
which means, “through.” This is the same word Paul used in
Colossians 1:16. Many Bible versions correctly translate this
word, including the English Standard Version:
“yet for us there is one God, the Father, from whom are
all things and for whom we exist, and one Lord, Jesus
Christ, through whom are all things and through whom
we exist.” (1 Corinthians 8:6, English Standard Version)
The distinction Paul made in this passage cannot be
ignored. All things are “out of” God, yet “through” Christ.
Consider, Paul could have written:
“But to us there is but one God, the Father, and one
Lord Jesus Christ, out of [ek] whom are all things...”
But instead:
“…one God, the Father, out of [ek] whom are all
things… and one Lord Jesus Christ, through [dia,]
whom are all things...” (1 Corinthians 8:6)
Since Paul used two different Greek words in the same
sentence, he obviously believed that creation occurred
differently “through Christ.” Paul knew the Greek language;
therefore he used two different words on purpose.
When Paul wrote that creation occurred “through Christ,”
the word “Christ” must be properly defined. In the Greek this
word means: “The Anointed One
6
.” It is a term that refers to
the Son of David or the Son of Man—God incarnate. Christ’s
invisible Deity does not need to be “anointed”—He is the
anointing!
As a Jew living in the first century, Paul would have
interpreted “Messiah” or “the Anointed One” in this manner.
Today, many believe that “Christ” is a Divine name. Certainly,
6
Greek: Christos; Hebrew: ··:: mashiyach
“Christ” is called God in the New Testament
7
. However, this is
an affirmation of the Deity that dwells within the Son of Man,
it is not proof that “Christ” (or “Messiah”) was His name prior
to Bethlehem.
When Paul wrote that the worlds were created through
Christ, he wrote of the Son of David. Of course, this is illogical,
unless the apostle believed Christ ascended into the “Olam
Habba.” If this is the case, it is logical that Paul concluded
that Christ’s ascension into God and heaven brought Him to
the place that never changes, the eternal beginning. In this
place of pre-eminence, God moved through Him with His
Spirit when the universe was born. Through the power of the
resurrection, creation was reordered, with the Son of David
dwelling in the first cause (God).
“Through Christ” In Hebrews
In the book of Hebrews, there is another passage that
teaches the universe came into existence through the image
of the invisible God—the Son of David. In chapter one, we read:
“God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake
in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, Hath in
these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath
appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the
worlds; Who being the brightness of his glory, and the
express image of his person, and upholding all things by
the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our
sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high;
Being made so much better than the angels, as he hath
by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they.”
(Hebrews 1:1-4)
In the phrase, “…by whom also he made the worlds…” the
word “by” is again from [dia,] which means “through.” The
word translated “worlds” is the plural form of [aion] which
means, “ages.” Thus Hebrews teaches that God created time
itself through the Son.
7
For instance, Christ is called “God blessed forever” in Romans 9:5
Again, this is an extraordinary statement, since the writer
of Hebrews plainly identified God incarnate as the subject.
We read that the one whom God created the ages through is
“heir of all things.” It is not possible for God to inherit
anything, since He possesses all things from eternity! Only
after becoming a man was it possible for God to inherit the
entire universe.
We also read that the one through whom creation came
into existence is “the express image” of God’s “person.” In
the Greek, this phrase literally means: “the image of His
substance
8
.” Let us compare Hebrews to Colossians.
In Colossians, we read:
“… the image of the invisible God”
In Hebrews:
“the express image of God’s substance”
Both of these expressions are systemic to the incarnation.
Therefore, it is not proper exegesis of Scripture to interpret the
subject matter of this Scripture as pertaining to God before
he became a man. As in Colossians, the book of Hebrews
taught the cosmos was created through the image of God—
the glorified Son of David.
The writer of Hebrews continues to define “God incarnate”
as the subject of this passage. We read that the one through
whom all things came into being has “purged our sins.” Of
course, the Son of David accomplished this. Additionally, we
read that Christ inherited his name. Since God’s name is
from everlasting (Isaiah 63:12-16), He could only “inherit” His
name after becoming a man.
In Hebrews chapter two, we find additional terminology
that must be applied to the incarnation. And again we read
that all things were created through the Son of Man, God
incarnate:
8
See: American Standard Version, Bible in Basic English, Darby Bible.
“Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet.
For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left
nothing that is not put under him. But now we see not
yet all things put under him. But we see Jesus, who
was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering
of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the
grace of God should taste death for every man. For it
became him, for (dia=through) whom are all things, and
by (dia=through) whom are all things
9
, in bringing
many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their
salvation perfect through sufferings. For both he that
sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for
which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren.”
(Hebrews 2:8-11)
Of course, God placed all things under the feet of Christ
after the resurrection:
“And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All
power is given unto me in heaven and in earth.”
(Matthew 28:18)
As an eternal Spirit, all things are under the rule of God
from eternity to eternity. Only incarnate in a man could God
receive all power. We also read that Christ was “made a
little lower than the angels” and that He is not ashamed to
call us His “brethren.” Again, these terms describe the Son
of Man. And, three times the writer of Hebrews stipulated
that creation occurred through Him.
“Through Christ” in Ephesians
In the book of Ephesians, Paul again taught that all things
were created through Christ. We read:
“Whereof I was made a minister, according to the gift of
the grace of God given unto me by the effectual working
of his power. Unto me, who am less than the least of all
saints, is this grace given, that I should preach among
9
The reiteration of this phrase might suggest the new heaven and new
earth [Revelation 21:1,] (a cyclical universe.)
9
The reiteration of this phrase might suggest the new heaven and new
earth [Revelation 21:1,] (a cyclical universe.)
9
The reiteration of this phrase might suggest the new heaven and new
earth [Revelation 21:1,] (a cyclical universe.)
9
The reiteration of this phrase might suggest the new heaven and new
earth [Revelation 21:1,] (a cyclical universe.)
9
The reiteration of this phrase might suggest the new heaven and new
earth [Revelation 21:1,] (a cyclical universe.)
9
The reiteration of this phrase might suggest the new heaven and new
earth [Revelation 21:1,] (a cyclical universe.)
the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ; And to
make all men see what is the fellowship of the mystery,
which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in
God, who created all things by (dia=through) Jesus
Christ: (Ephesians 3:7-9)
Some texts drop the phrase “through Jesus Christ.” If this
is not an interpolation in Ephesians, there are five places in
the New Testament that teach creation occurred through
Christ (1 Corinthians 8:6, Colossians 1:16, Hebrews 1:2,
Hebrews 2:10 and Ephesians 1:9.) Together with these
passages, we read that all things were created in Christ
(Colossians 1:16.)
In contrast to these passages, Paul wrote that creation
occurred out of God the Father two times (1 Corinthians 8:6,
Romans 11:36.) Throughout the New Testament this
distinction is made. This cannot be a coincidence. God is
communicating a profound truth, if we are willing to pay
attention.
Paul Believed Christ Dwelt “Before All Things” At
the Time He wrote This Letter
As we continue reading Colossians, Paul wrote words that
attest to the fact that he believed Christ ascended into the
timeless abode of God. We read:
“And he is before all things, and by him all things
consist. (Colossians 1:17)
Examine the tense of this passage. Paul wrote:
“…he is (present tense) before all things…”
Paul did not write:
“…he was (past tense) before all things…”
I had read this passage numerous times throughout the
years, and never noticed the significance of the grammar. Yet
it is unmistakable. The word translated “is
10
” in the Greek is
“present indicative.” When a word is “present indicative,” it
means that the one speaking or writing: “asserts something
which is occurring while the speaker is making the
statement.
11

The “present indicative” of the Greek proves that Paul
believed that Jesus dwelt before “all things” at the time he
wrote this letter (in the first century A.D.) Of course, this
would be illogical, except for the fact that Paul believed Christ
ascended into the timeless domain of the eternal God.
Unless we ignore the grammar of this passage, it is not
possible to interpret these words any other way. Was Paul so
uneducated he did not know the difference between the past
and present tense? The present tense of this one verse speaks
volumes about Paul’s theology.
At the conclusion of verse 16, Paul repeats the assertion
that creation will return back in or into Christ. We read:
“And He is before all things, and by him all things
consist.”
In this verse, the word “by” again comes from [ev], which
means “in.” Remember, this word was used when Paul wrote,
“in Him were all things created.” The word translated “consist”
means: “to place together, to set in the same place, to bring or
band together
12
.” Therefore, this verse could be translated:
“And he is before all things, and in him all things will be
placed together.”
According to the doctrine of “the circle of creation,”
creation returns to the same location where it once began.
Paul’s words definitely teach this concept. Not only does the
Son dwell “before all things,” but also “all things” will be
“placed together” in Him at the end of time.
10
esti
11
From: The Complete Word Study of the New Testament by Spiros
Zodhaties.
12
sunistao
Compare this to verse 16, where we read that all things
were created “in Him.” Paul wrote:
“For in him were all things created …all things were created
through him, and into him.” (Verse 16)
“And he is before all things, and in him all things will be
placed together.” (Verse 17)
According to Paul, both the beginning and ending of the
“circle of creation” occurs “in” Christ. Jesus dwells “before all
things” [the beginning of time] and also in the location where
“all things will be banded together” [the end of time.]
The connection is unmistakable. Yet, what does it mean
that creation occurred “in” Christ, and will be “placed
together” “in” Him? The answer is found in the Greek
language.
In the Greek, the word translated “in
13
” with the
impersonal dative means “in” or “inside,” but with the
personal dative it means “at” “near” or “among.” In this
instance, it designates location. This word is used in
Ephesians 1:4, where Paul wrote that we are “chosen in Him
before the foundation of the world.” Obviously, this means
that we will dwell where Christ dwells, not literally inside of
his glorified body.
In Colossians, the word translated “in” is with the personal
dative. Thus Paul’s words mean that Christ dwells at, near, or
among the location of the “first cause”—the same place where
all matter will come together.
Preeminence and the Origin of Creation
As we continue reading, Paul connects the resurrection to
Christ’s “pre-eminence”:
“And He is the head of the body, the church: who is the
beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all
things He might have the preeminence.” (Colossians
1:18)
13
en
Several ideas are connected in this passage. First of all, we
read that Christ:
“…is the beginning…”
In the previous verse, we read:
“And He is before all things...”
The word “is” again in the Greek is “present indicative,”
signifying that Paul believed that Christ was “the beginning”
at the time the book of Colossians was written. The word
translated “beginning” is [arche], one of the words the
Greeks used to describe the “first cause” of creation.
Take note, Paul wrote that He who is the “first born from
the dead” is “the beginning.” This is the Son of David—not
the preexistent Deity of Christ—for God cannot be “born from
the dead.”
In the words that follow, we discover that Christ was able
to “become the first” through the resurrection:
“And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the
beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things
he might have the preeminence.” (Colossians 1:18)
The phrase, “might have” comes from a word that means,
“to become” or “to come into existence
14
.” The word translated:
“that” means, “in order that” or “so that
15
.” “Preeminence”
comes from a word that means, “to be first” “first in rank” or
“to hold first place
16
.” Therefore, Paul literally wrote:
“And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the
beginning, the firstborn from the dead, so that in all
things he might become first in rank (or order)”
Paul wrote that the one who is “the firstborn from the
dead”—the Son of Man—became “first in rank” over all
creation. Since God is a timeless Spirit, He does not “become”
14
ginomai
15
hina
16
proteuo
preeminent or preexistent. He possesses the preeminence
from eternity to eternity!
“Preeminence” in The Book of Parables
Paul may have passed down the same Jewish tradition as
“The Book of Parables” when He wrote that Christ achieved
the preeminence. This book taught that the Son of Man has
“preeminence” in the presence of God forever:
“And I asked the angel who went with me and showed
me all the hidden things, concerning that Son of Man,
who he was, and whence he was, (and) why he went
with the Head of Days? And he answered and said unto
me: This is the Son of Man who hath righteousness,
With whom dwelleth righteousness, And who revealeth
all the treasures of that which is hidden, Because the
Lord of Spirits hath chosen him, And whose lot hath the
pre-eminence before the Lord of Spirits in uprightness
for ever. And this Son of Man whom thou hast seen
shall raise up the kings and the mighty from their seats,
[And the strong from their thrones] and shall loosen the
reins of the strong, and break the teeth of the sinners.
[And he shall put down the kings from their thrones and
kingdoms] Because they do not extol and praise Him,
nor humbly acknowledge whence the kingdom was
bestowed upon them.” (1 Enoch 46:2-5, From: The
Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament. Robert Henry
Charles)
This text passes down a Jewish tradition that taught that
the Son of Man (the Messiah) was chosen by God, and that he
has “the preeminence before the Lord of Spirits in
uprightness forever.” Compare these words to the words of
the apostle Paul. In both cases, the “preeminence” is given to
the Son of Man by God.
The Beginning of the Creation of God
Paul taught that Christ achieved “the preeminence”
through the resurrection and glorification. These are Paul’s
words, and they are completely logical. For only in a glorified
body was it possible for Christ to ascend “above all heavens ”
into God’s holy, timeless abode—the eternal “beginning.”
This passage in Colossians interprets the words of Christ
in the book of Revelation:
“And unto the angel of the church of the Laodiceans
write; These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true
witness, the beginning of the creation of God.”
(Revelation 3:14)
When Jesus declared Himself to be the “beginning of the
creation of God
18
,” He was not claiming to be the first
creature God created (as taught by the Jehovah’s
Witnesses)— but instead— He was declaring the pre-
eminence that He obtained through the resurrection.
Colossians interprets Revelation. The Messiah became “the
first” because His ascension brought Him into the timeless
“Olam Habba” of Judaism—the first cause.
According to Albert Einstein, nothing exists in creation
that can travel faster than light. It is reasonable to assume
that in order to escape the boundaries of this universe, Jesus
had to accomplish this feat. We know that He was
transformed into “a new creature.” In this glorified body, He
can travel faster than the “twinkling of an eye” (1 Corinthians
15:52.) Christ’s glorified body enabled Him to ascend outside
of this universe; therefore Paul wrote that He became “the
first” through the resurrection of the dead
19
.
“All Things” Will Return to the Messiah
We had previously read in Colossians that creation will
return to the Messiah:
“…all things were created through him and into him.”
(verse 16)
“…in him all things are placed together.” (verse 17)
Paul expounds on this same subject in verses 19-20. We
read:
“For it pleased the Father that in him should all fullness
dwell; And, having made peace through the blood of his
cross, by him to reconcile all things unto himself; by
him, I say, whether they be things in earth, or things in
heaven.” (Colossians 1:19-20)
Everything in the universe will be reconciled to Christ. If
“reconciled” means “freed from sin,” this is a peculiar
statement. Why would the entire universe need
reconciliation, if the sun, stars and planets did not commit
any sins? I have heard ministers on the radio preach that the
entropy of the universe was somehow caused by the sin of
Adam. In my opinion, this is absurd.
In this passage, the word “reconcile” comes from a word
that means, “to bring back to a former state of harmony
20
.”
According to the theory of the “Big Crunch,” the universe will
collapse back to its former state—exactly as this Greek word
signifies.
If Paul believed in Isaiah’s “circle of creation,” these words
in Colossians reflect this doctrine. The apostle also wrote
similar words in the book of Ephesians:
“Having made known unto us the mystery of his will,
according to his good pleasure which he hath purposed
in himself: That in the dispensation of the fulness of
times he might gather together in one all things in
Christ, both which are in heaven, and which are on
earth; even in him (Ephesians 1:9-10)
We read that all matter in the universe will be “gathered
together in one” in the Messiah. In the Greek, the phrase,
17
Ephesians 4:10
17
Ephesians 4:10
17
Ephesians 4:10
17
Ephesians 4:10
17
Ephesians 4:10
17
Ephesians 4:10
17
Ephesians 4:10
18
arche (The word used by the Greeks for the “first cause.”)
19
It is logical to assume that in order to leave this universe, one must
ascend past “singularity.”
20
apokatallasso
“gather together in one” comes from a word that means, “to
unify” or “condense
21
.” Similarly, the prophet Isaiah wrote
that God will call all things back to Himself, and they will be
made into “one
22
.”
It is obvious that the theology of the “circle of creation” was
behind the words of Paul. The glorified Son of David ascended
into the timeless God, who is the beginning and ending of the
“circle.” He dwells in the location where creation returns to
become “singularity.”
Jesus Became the Eternal Mediator of the Holy
Spirit
The Bible teaches that God made all things through
Christ. Yet it also teaches that God made all things through
His Spirit23. Therefore, the Spirit of God moved through the
glorified Son of David when the world was created. This
corresponds to the doctrine that the Messiah is the mediator
of God, who dispenses the Holy Spirit.
It is logical—yet paradoxical—that God “breathed
23
” upon
His creation with His Spirit through His image, the Messiah.
There are traditions in Judaism that teach this doctrine.
Consider this Midrash from the Genesis Rabbatti:
“R. Shim'on ben Laqish expounded: "and the spirit of
God hovered over the face of the water" (Genesis 1:2)—
this is the spirit of Messiah the King, as it is written,
"And the Spirit of the Lord will rest upon him (Isaiah
11:2.)"... ” (Genesis Rabbatti 2:4)
The “Spirit of God” is called “the Spirit of the Messiah” in
the Midrash of Genesis. Now, let us compare this tradition to
the New Testament. In Ephesians, we read that Christ
ascended to fill “all things”:
21
anakephalaiomai
22
Isaiah 48:13 “together” is from ··· yachad
23
“Spirit” is from ··· ruwach “wind” or “breath.” i.e. God
“breathes” His Spirit upon His creation.
“He that descended is the same also that ascended up
far above all heavens, that he might fill all things.”
(Ephesians 4:10)
The ascension took Christ past the beginning of creation,
outside of this universe—beyond singularity. It is in this
place—the “Holiest of Holies”— that He became the eternal
mediator of God and the center of human history. Anytime
God moves upon creation with His Spirit, He does so through
the glorified Son of David—including the creation of time and
space. Thus Paul wrote in Ephesians that the Anointed One—
the Messiah— filled all things, not merely “all people” after
He ascended “far above all heavens.”
It appears that God gave His people a revelation of the
ascension of Christ many years prior to His coming. These
traditions survived throughout the years, later written in
various texts. Thus we read in the Babylonian Talmud:
“The world was created but only for the Messiah.”
(Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 98b)
The Son of David ascended into the foundation of the
universe—which is God. Unquestionably, how God could exist
outside of this universe in a timeless state of being is beyond
human comprehension. It is also incomprehensible how the
ascension of Christ brought Him to the location where God
performed the miracle of creating the cosmos through Him.
Throughout many cultures, we find legends of the “first
man,” through which the cosmos came into being. In my
opinion, these “legends” originated in Judaism and spread
throughout various cultures around the region. One heretical
group—the Gnostics—believed in this doctrine
24
, as
demonstrated in a text called “The Apocraphon of John”:
“…the image of the invisible one who is the Father of the
all (and) through whom everything came into being, the
first Man. For he revealed his likeness in a human
form.” (The Apocraphon of John
25
)
24
Just because a group is heretical does not mean that they did not
retain some genuine apostolic truths.
25
From: The Nag Hammadi Library in English, James M. Robinson, Editor
According to this text, the Messiah—the Logos—was “the
first man” through which “everything came into being.”
The words of the apostle Paul echo this doctrine, for God
“breathed” through the Son of David—the image of God—
when He created the universe.
The exact words of Colossians bring us to no other
conclusion. The image of the invisible God dwelt “before all
things” at the same time Paul wrote his letter. Moreover, the
apostle believed that this man had achieved “the pre-
eminence” through the resurrection of the dead.
The exact wording of Colossians appears to describe the
impossible, until the true nature of the glorification and
ascension is considered. The Gnostics retained some
knowledge of this doctrine despite their heresy.
We also find it taught in this text called, “On the Anointing”:
“…From now he abides forever in the perpetuity of the
Aeons, forever until the untraceable Aeons of the Aeons.
Amen.” (On the Anointing, Translated by John D.
Turner. Underlined words my own)
The Son of David dwells “forever until the untraceable
Aeons of the Aeons.” The existence of this belief in
Gnosticism does not prove Gnosticism is the original
Christian faith, but rather it is evidence that this aberrant
sect continued to embrace a Pauline doctrine abandoned by
the Church.
Scholars are aware that ancient Jews and Christians
believed that the “timeless aeon of God” existed
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