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ABSTRACT ON JAVA RING TECHNOLOGY

A Portable Wearable Computer: It seems that everything we access today is under lock and key. Even the devices we use are protected by passwords. It can be frustrating trying to keep with all of the passwords and keys needed to access any door or computer program. Dallas Semiconductor is developing a new Java-based, computerized ring that will automatically unlock doors and log on to computers.

You can keep the iButton with you wherever you go by wearing it as a closely guarded accessory - a watch, a key chain, a wallet, a ring - something you have spend your entire life practicing how not to lose.

Introduction
Java Ring
A Java Ring is a finger ring that contains a small microprocessor with built- in capabilities for the user, a sort of smart card that is wearable on a finger. Java Ring contains an inexpensive microprocessor in a stainless-steel iButton running a Java virtual machine and preloaded with applets (little application programs). The rings were built by Dallas Semiconductor. The Java Ring is an extremely secure Java-powered electronic token with a continuously running, unalterable real-time clock and rugged packaging, suitable for many applications. The jewel of the Java Ring is the Java iButton -- a onemillion transistor, single chip trusted microcomputer with a powerful Java Virtual Machine (JVM) housed in a rugged and secure stainless-steel case.

The Java Ring is a stainless-steel ring houses a 1-million-transistor processor, called an iButton. The ring has 134 KB of RAM, 32 KB of ROM, a real-time clock and a Java virtual machine, which is a piece of software that recognizes the Java language and translates it for the user's computer system. Designed to be fully compatible with the Java Card 2.0 standard the processor features a high-speed 1024-bit modular exponentiator fro RSA encryption, large RAM and ROM memory capacity, and an unalterable real time clock. Lithium-backed non-volatile RAM offers high read/write speed and unparallel tamper resistance through near-instantaneous clearing of all memory when tampering is detected, a feature known as rapid zeroization. Data integrity and clock function are maintained for more than 10 years. The small and extremely rugged packaging of the module allows it to attach to the accessory of your choice to match individual lifestyles, such as key fob, wallet, watch, necklace, bracelet, or finger ring.

CONTENTS I-Buttons
An iButton is a microchip similar to those used in a smart card . The iButton was invented and is still manufactured exclusively by Dallas Semiconductor mainly for applications in harsh and demanding environments.

A Java Ring--and any related device that houses an iButton with a Java Virtual Machine--goes beyond a traditional smart card by providing real memory, more power, and a capacity for dynamic programming. On top of these features, the ring provides a rugged environment, wear-tested for 10-year durability. You can drop it on the floor, step on it, forget to take it off while swimming and the data remains safe inside.

Like a smart card, an iButton does not have an internal power source. It requires connection to a reader (known as a Blue Dot Receptor) in order to be supplied with power and to receive input and send output. Unlike some smart cards, there are currently no contactless iButtons: they require physical contact with a reader to function.

Every iButton product is manufactured with a unique 8-byte serial number and carries a guarantee that no two parts will ever have the same number. Among the simplest iButtons are memory devices that can hold files and subdirectories and can be read and written like small floppy disks. In addition to these, there are iButtons with password-protected file areas for security applications, iButtons that count the number of times they have been rewritten for securing financial transactions, iButtons with temperature sensors (for food storage and transport), iButtons with continuously running date/time clocks, and even iButtons containing powerful microprocessors. There are iButtons that have an electronic ID (for physical access to buildings); and store e-cash (for purchases both in stores and via the web).

IButtons have an advantage over conventional smart cards in term of durability and longevity. The stainless steel casing gives iButton a far greater ability to survive in a range of temperatures -- all versions are functional from -40 C to +70 C -- and in a much harsher range of environments (such as exposure to salt water and long term exposure to physical impacts) than the plastic smart card. For e-commerce and personal ID usage, iButtons can be mounted on a range of personal accessories: watch, ring, key chain, or dog tag.

Blue Dot Receptor


Information is transferred between your iButton and a PC with a momentary contact, at up to 142kbps. You simply touch your iButton to a Blue Dot receptor or other iButton probe, which is connected to a PC. The Blue Dot receptor is cabled to a 1-Wire adapter that is attached to the PCs serial or parallel port.

The Blue Dot receptor provides a convenient pipeline into the PC for iButton-toPC communication. The receptor's cable connects to either a serial or parallel port, according to which adapter you choose. The receptor itself easily affixes to any accessible spot on the front of the PC. The user can elect a quick information transfer with a momentary touch of the iButton to the Blue Dot. Alternately, the iButton can be snapped into the Blue Dot and remain there, allowing handsfree operation.

Each receptor contains two Blue Dots to accommodate instances where multiple iButtons are required to complete a transaction. For example, a company's policy may require both an employee and a supervisor to authenticate access to sensitive information stored on a network server.

1-Wire Interface
By simply touching each of the two contacts we can communicate to any of the iButtons by using 1-Wire protocol. The 1-Wire interface has two communication speeds. Standard modes are at 16kbps and overdrive mode at 12kbps. 1-wire protocol is used for communication between PC and the blue dot receptor over the 1-wire Network. 1-Wire Network includes a system with a controlling software, wiring and connectors and iButtons.

Fig. The 1-wire interface

WORKING:
Information is transferred between your iButton and a PC with a momentary contact, at up to 142kbps. You simply touch your iButton to a Blue Dot receptor or other iButton probe, which is connected to a PC. The Blue Dot receptor is cabled to a 1-Wire adapter that is attached to the PCs serial or parallel port The DS1402 Blue Dot receptor provides a convenient pipeline into the PC for iButton-to-PC communication. The receptor's cable connects to either a serial or parallel port, according to which adapter you choose. The

receptor itself easily affixes to any accessible spot on the front of the PC. The user can elect a quick information transfer with a momentary touch of the iButton to the Blue Dot. Alternately, the iButton can be snapped into the Blue Dot and remain there, allowing hands-free operation.

ADVANTAGES OF USING JAVA RING

The Java Ring are very easy and convenient way for users. They are more secure than using passwords since passwords are short or can be guessed. Java Ring provides authentication to users which is crucial for many applications. It is easier for administrator to maintain the security infrastructure.

Asset Management: The Java Ring provides a simple, secure way of identifying a person or asset. It can serve as an electronic serial number that is never duplicated. With an memory up to 32k bytes, Java Ring can also give the asset their own personalized database. Each asset will have the ability to store unique information about itself and have that information permanently affixed to the asset. This makes Java Ring perfect for various asset management and data collection functions such as equipment maintenance records and inventory management.

Access Control: A Java Ring becomes a personalized key to protected assets and information. By touching the correct key to an iButton reader, the desired event, such as, opening a lock is enabled. Java rings are perfect access controllers to access various buildings, computers and other equipments.

E-Cash: Java Ring can be an personalized token and acts like a small change purse for one or multiple applications. It enables to complete transactions, like dispensing a candy bar or metering a prepaid volume of water. By using Java Ring, it eliminate the need to carry small amounts of cash, and it can service multiple, independent applications.

DISADVANTAGE OF USING JAVA RING


Java Ring can be the most secure storage medium for many industries, the cost of implementing the system could be very high. Even though ibutton can be purchased for cheaper price, in order to function it needs a blue dot receptor which is very expensive. Also, it needs a high level tools and method in order to program application efficiently, reliably, securely. A Java Ring-based system doesnt automatically allow user mobility. The problem with the Java Ring that many of the organization don't even know the existence of Java Ring. User mobility is only possible if every machine that the user accesses has a iButon reader attached. IButton has a limited processor power and memory. For better performance and scalability it is imperative to move the processing load to the application server. Also only limited amount of information can be stored which means an individual might need to carry more than one Java Ring.

APPLICATIONS: Tracking Snail Mail :


For example, the U.S. Post Office uses iButtons affixed to the inside door of every blue postal box standing on curbs across the country so it can track carrier, pick-up location, date, and time of mail retrieval.

Sturdy Data Trackers :


Ryder Commercial Leasing & Services tracks millions of fuel transactions each year using a two-iButton system. One iButton

stays on the side of a vehicle, digitally identifying it and its home base, and upon rental, stores the customer name and odometer reading as input keyed in from an attendant's hand-held touch probe. A second iButton attached to the fuel pump records the fuel transaction. At day's end all the information downloads into the shop's main computer.

Coffee Factory

The coffee machine itself, manufactured by Cyberonics, Inc., was entirely driven by Java technology -- from the moving parts, to the scheduling, to the tracking. But the facility went well beyond simple automated manufacturing. It also demonstrated key principles of cyber- cash, and agent-driven negotiation and manufacturing During the personalization of your Java Ring, you were assigned 999 "cyber-beans" with which to purchase cups-a-joe (the default price being 250 beans per cup).

CONCLUSION
Java ring is highly durable because of its rugged and secure stainless packing. It is used in personal computing. The Java iButton, therefore, is simply the latest and most complex descendant of a long line of products that have proven them to be highly successful in the marketplace. With its stainless steel armour, it offers the most durable packaging for a class of products that likely will suffer heavy use and abuse as personal possessions. The iButton form factor permits attachment to a wide variety of personal accessories that includes rings, watchbands, key fobs, wallets, bracelets, and necklaces, so the user can select a variation that suits his or her lifestyle.