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Cubism

Sam Warren 3/27/14 Math 7th Grade 2nd Period Geometry Project

Cubism is a painting style that was created by Pablo Picasso in 1907 that is still being used today. The style was known to be in the style of Paul Czannes work because he was using geometric shapes in his artwork before Cubism and his ideas of geometricity, simultaneity, and passage. There were two periods of Cubism, the Gallery Cubists and the Salon Cubists. The artists that were known to use the Cubist style in the Gallery Cubist period were Picasso and George Braque. They were called the Gallery Cubists because they were exhibited under contract at galleries. The Salon Cubists included Spanish painter Juan Gris and Frenchmen Marcel Duchamp and Fernand Lger. They were called the Salon Cubists because their art was often displayed in exhibits supported by public funds called salons. Cubist paintings can still be found today around the world in museums and galleries. Cubism is related to geometry because it demonstrates the idea of geometricity. Geometricity is simplifying figures and objects into geometrical components and planes that could or could not add up to the whole figure known in the real world. By that, if you see a quarter of a cup peaking out from a shadow, you wouldnt know if the cup were a quarter of a cup, any fraction of a cup, or a whole cup. Since its a painting, you cannot just simply walk in to the shadow or shine a flashlight on it and you have your answer. You just have to assume that it is a however the amount of the cup that you want it to be. Cubism is related to geometry because it demonstrated the idea of simplifying figures and objects into geometrical components and planes that could or could not add up to the whole figure known in the real world. Cubism is also related to geometry because it demonstrates the idea of simultaneity. Simultaneity is the idea of being able to see different points of view on one plane. By that, it means that you are able to see not just 2 dimensions, but as many as the artist wants. If you took a rectangle, and turned it on its side, you could see another rectangle. Simultaneity is like making a 3 dimensional figure in art, which was revolutionary at the time it was displayed. Cubism is related to geometry by being able to see different points of view on one plane. Cubism is related to geometry because it demonstrates the idea of passage. Passage is the idea of overlapping and interpenetration of planes. By that, passage is overlapping and making an object or plane look like it is on top of something in 2 dimensions. But really, the object or plane to the side of the object it looks to be on top of. This is shown by making the painting in 3 dimensions so it looks like can look like it is to the side of the object. Cubism is related to geometry because of making overlapping and interpenetration of planes. Cubism is an art style that is geometric. It is geometric because it demonstrates simplifying figures and objects into geometrical components and planes that could or could not add up to the whole figure known in the real world. It is geometric because it uses the idea of being able to see different points of view on one plane. It is geometric because it uses overlapping and the interpenetration of planes. Cubism is a great, fun, colorful, beautiful art form that is still used today around the world.

Bibliography
Gersh-Nesic, Beth. "Cubism - Art History 101 Basics." About.com Art History. About.com, 2014. Antiff, Mark and Patricia Leighten. The Cubism Reader. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008. Cottington, David. Cubism and its Histories. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2004 Henderson, Linda Dalrymple. The Fourth Dimension and Non-Euclidean Geometry in Modern Art. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983. Rubin, William. Picasso and Braque: Pioneers of Cubism. New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1989.