Shannon Waite

Fahrenheit 451
“The temperature at which all books catch fire and burn.”

Shannon Waite

Contents:
 Unit Introduction
Title Grade Levels Timeline Unit Overview Unit Rational Rational References Student Objectives Common Core State Standards

 Unit Components
Resources Needed Teacher Preparation Texts Used

 Detailed Lesson Plans
23 daily lesson plans

 Worksheets, handouts, and rubrics
Survey * Fahrenheit 451 Notes ―The History of Book Burning as a Form of Censorship‖ * ―The Most Frequently Banned or Challenged Books of the 20th Century‖ * ―Carpathia‖ The Literary Element of Theme ―Latest Word on the Trial? I Take It Back‖ * To Censor * Reading Bookmarks Vocabulary Vocabulary Chart Character Chart Comprehension Questions Montag Revealed *

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Character Chart (Character Sketch) Talking to the Text Chart Subject and Predicate handouts Subject and Predicate quiz Reading Checks Final Unit Test * Essay Introduction Sheet Essay Edit Sheet * Essay Rubric Unit Calendar

*Some of these items cannot be included in the electronic version (such as the unit test or certain articles) because they belong to other sources.

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1. Unit Introduction
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Title: The Grade Levels: Timeline: Unit Overview:

Cost of Censorship: Fahrenheit 451

9th to 10th grade Five weeks

This unit covers vocabulary, characterization, and comprehension of the novel Fahrenheit 451 while focusing on the major theme of censorship. Using the censorship theme, this unit encourages students to delve deep into the novel’s substance and apply it to their own lives. Parts of a sentence are also introduced during this unit and, in addition to smaller writing exercises throughout it; the unit ends with a literary analysis essay.
This unit includes multiple small writing activities as well as a larger, literary essay at the end of the unit. The smaller writing activities include: hypothetical journals/letters to Montag, a short story that could be censored, other various journals (on various censorship topics or quotes), and six word memoirs. These writing activities are designed specifically so students can apply what they are reading about in the novel to their own lives and practice writing in doing so. These writings also relate to the unit’s concept, therefore allowing students to creatively engage with the text (Maxwell, Meiser, and McKnight). Ultimately, these writings demonstrate understanding on the students’ parts because it allows them to draw concepts from the novel and transfer it to other situations (in their writing) (Smagorinsky). The major writing project for this unit is the literary essay at the end. This essay gives students practice with the literary analysis form as well as forces them to use textual evidence to support their claims and arguments. This is a positive learning experience as they will need to master both of these concepts for future classes. This essay also allows students to demonstrate understanding (Wiggins and McTighe) (like the smaller writing assignments) because they apply their knowledge of characterization (and character development) in order to argue the ways in which the character changed. Also, this writing assignment supports students’ writing process because it includes stages to help encourage the writing process (Smagorinsky); it allows students to brainstorm and sketch out ideas in an organized fashion, then re-write the ideas in essay format, edit, peer edit, and then complete the final copy. Ultimately, the writing assignments encourage the eliciting and interpreting of individual students’ thinking, allow teachers to sequence lessons towards a specific learning goal, and use writing as a method to check understanding. By allowing students to express a wide range of thoughts through writing, we are allowing students to become more comfortable with the writing process in various forms which helps them in that area, as well as the content that they are writing about. This unit also includes a variety of other assignments to help support students understanding of the literature. In this unit the students

Unit Rational:

Shannon Waite do a lot of writing in the form of charting information, interpreting plot, and responding to the literature. The students are asked to take part in group discussions (with partners and the class) so that they can verbally work through material too. The students are asked to read in a variety of ways during this unit. Sometimes they read in class independently, sometimes they read at home independently, sometimes they read with a partner, and sometimes we listen to the book on CD in class. This is to help address a variety of needs by the students in terms of how they best engage, comprehend, and understand. Unit Rationale References: Maxwell, Rhoda J., and Mary Jordan. Meiser. Teaching English in Middle and Secondary Schools. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill, 1997. Print. Smagorinsky, Peter. Teaching English by Design: How to Create and Carry Out Instructional Units. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2008. Print. Wiggins, Grant P., and Jay McTighe. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1998. Print.

Student Objectives

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Students will be able to understand characterization and use their understanding towards applications which involve theoretical situations. Students will gain greater understanding on censorship and be able to observe censorship in their own lives. Students will learn how to brainstorm creative writing and how to apply that brainstorm to the actual writing process. Students will learn characteristics of themes and be able to use this knowledge to find themes in their own writing. Students will be able to use textual evidence to support reasoning in a whole-class discussion. Students will be able to understand vocabulary in the context that it is used in the novel. Students will be able to apply higher order thinking skills regarding the unit’s theme to their own lives and critically analyze how they can relate to the novel’s lessons. Students will be able to show understanding of the novel by producing a literary essay.

CCS Standards

This unit meets the Common Core State Standards by scaffolding themes, information, and personal experiences in conjunction to the writing experience. Students are expected to complete smaller assignments that will help them produce one large assessment piece at the end of the

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unit to demonstrate their understanding and ability.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1d Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1e Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2b Develop the topic with wellchosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2c Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, wellchosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3a Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as

Shannon Waite dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3d Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 9–10 here.) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, wellreasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3a Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian’s Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type.

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2. Unit Components
Resources Needed:             
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Access to enough novels of Fahrenheit 451 for all students to take home Access to computers (for students to type essays) Access to printers (for students to print essays) Access to printers and paper to print out unit worksheets and handouts Access to a copy machine to make copies of worksheets and handouts Enough paper and pencils for each student to use daily Enough construction paper (and markers) for students to use Access to a computer and smart board/projector (for PowerPoint slides) Access to worksheets taken from The Center for Learning Curriculum Unit book Access to worksheets taken from Secondary Solutions Fahrenheit 451 Standards-Based Literature Guide Copy of the novel being read on CD Access to Elmo (to display modeled answers for students) White board and dry erase markers

Teacher Preparation:

Read Fahrenheit 451 and be able to teach it Get access to all worksheets needed for this unit (and print them) Make photocopies of all materials for every student Acquire access to the media center (or a computer lab) for three days to type up final essays Refresh self on parts of a sentence (subjects and predicates) Get access to the book on a CD Familiarize oneself with six word memoirs (Individual lessons detail what needs to be used/done)

Texts Used

Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury (novel) ―Carpathia‖ – Jesse Lee Kercheval (short story) ―The History of Book Burning as a Form of Censorship‖ - Secondary Solutions (Article) ―The Most Frequently Banned or Challenged Books of the 20th Century‖ – Secondary Solutions (Article) ―Latest Word on the Trial? I Take It Back‖ – Peters, NY Times (article)

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Detailed

Unit Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 1 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Essential Understanding/Big Idea

What makes a book worth burning?

Prior Learning
What are: setting, themes, and symbolism

Materials
    Copies for every student of the unit test for Fahrenheit 451 Copies for every student of the ―The History of Book Burning as a Form of Censorship‖ article Whiteboard and dry erase markers Enough paper and pencils for each student

Objectives
Students will be able to understand book burning in a historical context and relate their own experiences to it

Assessment
Fahrenheit 451 Unit Test

Engagement
Class Discussion

Lesson Procedure
      Give students the Fahrenheit 451 Unit Test (30 minutes) The purpose of this test is to identify growth at the end of the unit by giving students the same test. Collect tests (1 minute) Have students fill out survey (4 minutes) The survey helps introduce students to the unit and gets them thinking. Pass out article ―The History of Book Burning as a Form of Censorship‖ (1 minute) Read the article silently (5 minutes) This article introduces the fact that books have been burned, and the idea of censorship. When finished, ask the students to journal, answering these two questions:

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What makes a book worth burning? Why burn books? (5 minutes) This will allow students to apply what they’ve read to their prior knowledge. Return as a class to discuss the answers to these questions (5 minutes)

Closure
Discuss expectations for reading during this book (and remind the students to ask for help if it is needed)

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Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 2 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3a Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3d Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 9–10 here.) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
What could you say (or write) that could be banned?

Prior Learning
Background on some of the novels that are challenged/banned

Materials
     Access to Elmo A copy of the ―The Most Frequently Banned or Challenged Books of the 20th Century‖ article Whiteboard and dry erase markers A copy of the short story ―Carpathia‖ for each student Access to paper and pencils for all students

Objectives
Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of why books are banned through their application of ―banned characteristics‖ to their own creative writing

Assessment

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Short story brainstorming outlines

Engagement
Encouraging creativity and exploring ―banned‖ material

Lesson Procedure
Put a copy of the ―The Most Frequently Banned or Challenged Books of the 20th Century‖ article on the Elmo  Look at the banned books together, as a class; read through the list out loud (4 minutes)  Have students individually brainstorm reasons why they might be banned (2 minutes)  Go around the class and have each student give a reason that they wrote down (5 minutes)  Discuss the actual reasons that they were banned (as listed on the article) (2 minutes)  Introduce assignment: Write our own ―banned‖ short stories – Make sure that the students know that their story could be ―banned‖ for the following criteria: for encouraging lying, cheating, stealing, going against authority, or the use of magic and witchcraft (unfortunately we still have to censor them for this activity… oh, the irony!) (5 minutes)  Pass out copies of the short story, ―Carpathia‖ (1 minute)  Look at/read the story and discuss what qualities make it a short story, as a class. Even though it is short, how is it still a story? What elements makes it a complete story? (15 minutes)  Have students pull out paper and pencils to start brainstorming (1 minute)  Model how to brainstorm a short story (and have them outline/do it): (20 minutes) Character Development Create a name for each character. List where each one lives and their age, and list four words to describe their appearance. Also, list four words to describe their personality. List a few hobbies of the character and their career or career goal. Plot Tell students to list 4-5 plot events for the story. Create unique plot events. Avoid mundane events that are too common in everyday life. If they want to use a surprise twist in the story list that as a plot event. Describe the setting for each plot event and list which characters will be involved in that event. Theme Teach the student to summarize the theme of the story he wants to create in one or two sentences. Writing down the theme of the story before writing keeps the writer focused and helps to shape events to help the story tell the idea of the theme with clarity. Setting List at least 10 details about the setting of the story. For example:The month and year the story takes place, the climate, the name of the town, the name of the street the main character lives on, the atmosphere in the town (occupants are happy? Sad? Why?) and describe the home of the protagonist and other details. Imagery The student should list five examples of imagery he will use in the story. Imagery is very effective at the start of the story. Mood The student will list the overall mood of the story. Is it bleak, joyful, dramatic, suspenseful, scary, energetic? Give details about the mood and list how it will be portrayed in the story.  Have students begin writing their short stories 

Closure

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Ask if anyone would like to share their works in progress (2 minutes) Let students know that they need to complete the story for homework (They will need to rewrite or type a final copy)

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Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 3 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How does the novel reflect themes related to technology, nature, censorship, propaganda, and conformity?

Prior Learning
Background knowledge on books being banned and why they are banned

Materials
    Access to projector Fahrenheit 451 Power Point slide on background information/themes/elements Copies for each student of character charts, vocab charts, comprehension questions, and the Literary Element of Theme Access to paper and pencils for all students

Objectives
Students will be able to understand the role of themes (and how that applies to the concept of banned books) and apply that knowledge to their own writing. Students will also be able to identify major themes (and other elements) in Fahrenheit 451

Assessment
   Edited short story Reflection on the bottom of the story Exit Slip

Engagement
Sharing creative writing with the class

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Lesson Procedure
         Give students time to look over their stories and make any final edits that they would like (5 minutes) Ask students to share a summary of the plot of their short story (10 minutes) Pass out notes sheet to the students so that they have a direction when following the PowerPoint (1 minute) Present PowerPoint introducing the novel, focusing on: themes and elements (20 minutes) Pass out handout on themes and explain it (5 minutes) Have students find the themes that are discussed in their own short stories that they wrote (write which themes were found at the bottom of the story) (5 minutes) Collect short stories (1 minute) Pass out handouts: character charts, vocab charts, and reading comprehension questions (1 minute) Explain the procedures/how to do the different worksheets (10 minutes)

Closure
 Have students complete an exit slip on what they are excited about regarding reading the novel (1 minute)

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Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 4 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How have you been censored?

Prior Learning
What is censorship

Materials
    Each student’s vocab charts Access to construction paper and markers for students (groups of 2-3) Access to paper and pencils for all students Copies of ―Latest Word on the Trial? I Take It Back‖ article for all students

Objectives
Students will be able to define difficult vocabulary that will be found in the text

Assessment
  Journal entries Vocabulary charts

Engagement
Actively engage in defining vocabulary

Lesson Procedure
 Have students journal about the quote: (5 minutes) “Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.‖ To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee) Pt. 1, ch. 2; Jean Louise (Scout) Finch What have you lost/been censored on?

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Discuss students journal answers (10 minutes) Have students define, on their vocab charts, the vocabulary (leave sentences and drawings blank until they read the word in the novel) (20 minutes) Assign students a vocabulary word – have them write the word, define it, and illustrate it on construction paper for a word wall (15-20 minutes) Homework: Read the “Latest Word on the Trail? I Take It Back” article

Closure
 Have students introduce their words as they get hung (5 minutes)

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Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 5 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How have you been censored?

Prior Learning
What is censorship

Materials
   Copies of ―To Censor‖ worksheet for all students Copies of books for all students to take home with them Copies of ―Latest Word on the Trial? I Take It Back‖ article for all of the students

Objectives
Students will be able to originate definitions of censorship

Assessment
 Censorship worksheets

Engagement
Group discussion

Lesson Procedure
    Assign students to groups of about four and have them complete the ―To Censor‖ activity (15 minutes) As a class, discuss what censorship means (have each group give their own definition) (5 minutes) As a class, discuss what gets censored such as: internet in China, music on the radio, books in school, etc (5 minutes) Think, Pair, Share: Have students turn to a partner and quickly discuss what they thought about the articles that have been reading so far regarding censorship. Come up with a mutual answer and then share with the

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class how they feel about it/how it applies to their lives. (6 minutes) Pass out bookmarks with reading dates on them (1 minute) Start reading pages 3-14 of Fahrenheit 451 while listening to it on CD (If not completed, assign the rest for homework) (20 minutes)

Closure
 Remind students to complete the reading, and to follow along with their comprehension questions, vocab sheets, and character charts.

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Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 6 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards

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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How do characters develop?

Prior Learning
The beginning of the novel must be read

Materials
     All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension check questions All students’ vocabulary charts Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils for reading checks

Objectives
Students will be able to notice characterization in the novel and identify characteristics of the characters

Assessment
 Character charts

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Engagement
Working on character charts together as a class

Lesson Procedure
    Start class with a quick reading check (#1) to make sure that students paid attention/completed the reading from the weekend (10 minutes) Listen to the novel (pages 14-24) in class (20 minutes) Model how to identify characteristics of characters and to fill out the character chart (8 minutes) (Remind students to fill out comprehension check questions as we’re reading)

Closure
 Discuss views on the novel so far (and encourage participation/engagement) (5 minutes)

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Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 7 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
What is the cost of censorship?

Prior Learning
The beginning of the novel must be read

Materials
      All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension check questions All students’ vocabulary charts T4 charts to pass out to students (for all students) Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils for reading checks

Objectives
Students will be able to identify subjects in their own writing and relate the characterization that they are observing in the novel to extended experiences

Assessment
 Journaling to Montag

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Engagement
Actively ―talking‖ to the character Montag and the text that is being read

Lesson Procedure
 Introduce (almost) daily journaling assignment to students: They will be journaling/writing a letter three days a week (Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday) to Montag. These letters/journal entries will respond to things that he is doing, thinking, or going through in the novel. The teacher should have an example prepared that he/she can show the students (15 minutes) Pass out ―subjects‖ grammar hand out (1 minute) Do a mini-lesson on parts of a sentence: subjects. Talk about the subject is who or what the sentence is about (and discuss that you is the subject in a command sentence) (5 minutes) Find subjects in the journaling that was completed at the beginning of the hour (8 minutes) Introduce T4ing to the class: Pass out T4 sheet and explain that they are to record parts of the novel where they have questions, predictions, thoughts, etc. and then write those thoughts (5 minutes) Silent read (pages 24-40) and T4 (Talking to the Text) (15 minutes) If they do not finish the pages in class, the rest is for homework

     

Closure
 Remind students that they need to finish the reading for homework and complete vocab, character charts, questions and T4

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 8 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
When do we start censoring ourselves?

Prior Learning
The beginning of the novel must be read, what does censorship mean

Materials
     All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension check questions All students’ vocabulary charts Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils

Objectives
Students will be able to apply thoughts fueled by the novel to their own lives, therefore better understanding the novel’s message

Assessment
  Journaling to Montag Thank, pair, share

Shannon Waite

Engagement
Students will dialogue about their thoughts regarding the novel’s main theme with a partner

Lesson Procedure
     Have students journal to Montag. Again, this will respond to things that he is doing, thinking, or going through in the novel (5 minutes) Have students identify the subjects in their journal sentences (5 minutes) Read pages 41-50 in the novel out loud, as a class, (in popcorn style) (25 minutes) Pose to the class the question: When do we start censoring ourselves and why? (1 minute) Think, Pair, Share: Have students write down an answer then turn to their partner and share – together they should come up with the best answer and then we will go around, as a class, and share answers (15 minutes)

Closure
 Remind students that they need to complete vocab, character charts, and questions

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 9 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
When does censorship (or breaking the rules) start to affect other people?

Prior Learning
The beginning of the novel must be read, censorship must be understood

Materials
     All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension check questions All students’ vocabulary charts Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils

Objectives
Students will be able to think critically about the themes, topics, and subjects that have been read so far in the novel

Assessment
  Journaling to Montag Chalk talk

Shannon Waite

Engagement
Students will engage in reading with a partner, as well as share ideas silently through the ―Chalk Talk‖

Lesson Procedure
     Have students journal to Montag. Again, this will respond to things that he is doing, thinking, or going through in the novel (5 minutes) Have students identify the subjects in their journal sentences (5 minutes) Read pages 50-61 of the novel together with a partner – this should be done where one reads one page out loud and then they switch. (35 minutes) Once the reading is completed, students will silently go up to the board and write a statement, a reflection, a comment, or a question. When a student is done writing, they will give their marker to another student who has not yet reflected on the board. (2 minutes) If time is left over, students will silently work on their worksheets

Closure
  Pages 61-68 will need to be completed for homework Before the class is finished, we will observe and discuss the various thoughts written on the board; it should be a collection of related thoughts that are relevant to the essential question (5-10 minutes)

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 10 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
When does censorship become a part of your (or a character’s) identity?

Prior Learning
The beginning of the novel must be read, censorship must be understood

Materials
     Copies of ―Montag Revealed‖ sheet for all students Copies of Part I/Reading Check Quiz for all students Copies of Character Sketch worksheet for all students Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils

Objectives
Students will be able to use textual evidence to provide support for characterization in the novel

Assessment
   Part I quiz Montag Revealed worksheet Character sketch worksheet

Shannon Waite

Engagement
Students will partner up to understand characteristics of characterization in the novel

Lesson Procedure
       Give students the Part I quiz (combined with a reading check question) (10 minutes) Pass out Montag Revealed worksheet (1 minute) Model the first two questions with the class (complete them together) (10 minutes) Students can then partner up to complete the rest of the questions (20 minutes) Once this worksheet is done, students will be assigned a character (3 minutes) Pass out individual character chart worksheet (1 minute) Depending on time, students may start the character chart/sketch worksheet for the character that they were assigned; otherwise, the worksheet is homework

Closure
  Review the significant topics of Part I (5 minutes) Remind students that the character sketch is homework

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 11 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How does censorship play a role in your life?

Prior Learning
The beginning of the novel must be read, censorship must be understood

Materials
     All students’ copies of vocab charts All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension questions Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils

Objectives
Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of the characters, language, and plot in the novel

Assessment
   Character chart worksheet Vocab worksheet Comprehension Questions worksheet

Engagement
Students will actively work on completing assignments

Lesson Procedure
   Today will be a day for students to catch up on anything that they are behind on: (45 minutes) Vocabulary charts Character charts

Shannon Waite

 

Comprehension Questions Reading

Closure
  Discuss weeklong activity: for homework, students will need to find some form of an example of censorship in their own lives (3 minutes) If students did not chose to read during class, then their homework is to read pages 71 - 83

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 12 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How does censorship play a role in your life?

Prior Learning
Part I of the novel must be read, censorship must be understood, subjects need to be understood

Materials
       All students’ copies of vocab charts All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension questions Copies of books for all students to take home with them Reading check questions Book on CD/way to listen to it Paper and pencils

Objectives
Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of the text through their reading check as well as learn how to use predicates

Assessment

Shannon Waite

 

Reading check Journal to Montag

Engagement
Students will be engaged by journaling to Montag

Lesson Procedure
      Have students journal to Montag. Again, this will respond to things that he is doing, thinking, or going through in the novel (5 minutes) Pass out ―predicates‖ grammar hand out (1 minute) Do a mini-grammar lesson: review verbs and explain predicates: the part of the sentence that makes a statement about the subject – starts with a verb (10 minutes) Have students identify the predicates in their journal sentences (5 minutes) Give a reading check (#2) (5 minutes) Listen to pages 83-96 in the novel (25 minutes)

Closure
  If the reading is not completed in class, then students must complete it for homework Remind students to watch for the role that censorship plays in their lives

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 13 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How does censorship play a role in your life?

Prior Learning
Part I of the novel must be read, censorship must be understood, subjects need to be understood

Materials
     All students’ copies of vocab charts All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension questions Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils

Objectives
Students will be able to demonstrate deeper thinking in connection to the text as they T4 it

Assessment
 Journal to Montag

Engagement

Shannon Waite

Students will be engaged by journaling to Montag and with the text through T4ing

Lesson Procedure
    Have students journal to Montag. Again, this will respond to things that he is doing, thinking, or going through in the novel (5 minutes) Have students identify the predicates in their journal sentences (5 minutes) Pass out another T4 worksheet (1 minutes) Have students read pages 96-110 silently for the hour, T4ing while they do it (35 minutes)

Closure
  If the reading is not completed in class, then students must complete it for homework Remind students to watch for the role that censorship plays in their lives

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 14 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How does censorship play a role in your life?

Prior Learning
Part I of the novel must be read, subjects need to be understood

Materials
     All students’ copies of vocab charts All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension questions Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils

Objectives
Students will be able to interact with the class when reading and pause to discuss important topics

Assessment
 Journal to Montag

Engagement

Shannon Waite

Students will be engaged by journaling to Montag

Lesson Procedure
   Have students journal to Montag. Again, this will respond to things that he is doing, thinking, or going through in the novel (5 minutes) Have students identify the predicates in their journal sentences (5 minutes) Read pages 113-125 as a class in popcorn style. The teacher should model good comprehension strategies and stop to discuss important points in the novel as it is being read (40 minutes)

Closure
  If the reading is not completed in class, then students must complete it for homework Remind students to watch for the role that censorship plays in their lives

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 15 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
What is the cost of censorship and is it always worth it?

Prior Learning
Part I and II of the novel must be read, subjects need to be understood

Materials
    Copies of grammar quiz for every student Copies of books for all students to take home with them Reading check question Paper and pencils

Objectives
Students will be able to connect their understanding of the novel to observations of similar themes/topics in their own lives

Assessment
 Writing sample of real-life connections to the novel

Shannon Waite

Engagement
Students will be engaged by journaling to Montag

Lesson Procedure
   Give students the grammar quiz (quizzing them on subjects and predicates) combined with the reading check (20 minutes) When students are completed with the quiz, have them share the examples of the censorship that they observed in their own lives (10 minutes) They will then need paper and pencils – they are going to write off of the prompt: Is the censorship that you observed worth it? What is the cost of the censorship that you dealt with/observed? How is this censorship similar to the novel? The teacher should have an example written up to help model to the students how they should answer these questions/write this answer (15 minutes)

Closure
 Once the class has completed the writing, they will do a quick think, pair, share before they leave (10 minutes)

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 16 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
What do you give to people? What can you give to people?

Prior Learning
Part I and II of the novel must be read

Materials
   Copies of books for all students to take home with them Paper and pencils Half sheets of paper

Objectives
Students will be able to take their understanding of the novel and apply it to the meaning of a quote that is given to them

Assessment
 Observing students’ responses to the significant quotes

Shannon Waite

Engagement
Students will apply the essential question to a symbolic representation by trading significant quotes and having to interpret them

Lesson Procedure
      Ask students to keep the essential questions in mind (―What do you give to people? What can you give to people?‖) as they read the novel/listen to the CD (1 minute) Have students listen to pages 137-149 on the CD (30 minutes) When they are finished reading, have them write down a quote that they felt was significant from the reading (on a half sheet of paper) (5 minutes) Collect the half sheets and then re-pass them out to random students. Each student should have a new half sheet in his or her hand. (2 minutes) Ask them to take a minute to think about the new quote that they have and why the writer must have thought that the quote was significant Have the students write down why the new quote is significant (10 minutes)

Closure
  If there is time, ask some students to share the quotes that they were given and why that quote is significant to the novel (5 minutes) Relate the quote activity to the essential question: Students ―gave‖ someone else a significant part of the novel, someone else took that evidence/knowledge and interpreted it and used it

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 17 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards

 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
Do you ever censor yourself? When and why?

Prior Learning
Part I and II of the novel must be read

Materials
    Copies of books for all students to take home with them All students’ copies of vocab charts All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension questions

Objectives
Students will be able to comprehend the novel accurately by being guided with their handouts/worksheets

Assessment
 The students’ vocabulary charts, comprehension questions, and character charts

Engagement
Students will actively work on comprehension by using the handouts that help them follow along and understand the text

Lesson Procedure
    Have students journal to Montag. Again, this will respond to things that he is doing, thinking, or going through in the novel (this will be the last journal so they can acknowledge that in it) (5 minutes) Have students identify the subjects and predicates in their journal sentences (5 minutes) Today is a catch up day for character charts, vocab charts, and comprehension questions so students will have time to read and/or finish these in class Pages 149-160 need to either be read in class or for homework

Shannon Waite

Closure
 Remind students what needs to be completed by the next day (all of their questions/worksheets and reading up to 160)

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 18 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards

  

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Essential Understanding/Big Idea
Whose stories should be censored and why?

Prior Learning
All of the novel must be read, censorship must be understood

Materials
       Copies of books for all students to take home with them The novel on CD to listen to All students’ copies of vocab charts All students’ copies of character charts All students’ copies of comprehension questions Strips of construction paper and markers Access to a computer, projector, and sound

Objectives
Students will be able to reflect and understand the importance of the novel’s theme within the confines of their own lives

Assessment
 The students’ six word memoirs

Shannon Waite

Class discussion

Engagement
Students will think critically about their lives and how to summarize them (or one event) in six words and connect their stories to censorship

Lesson Procedure
          Complete the novel by listening to page 160-165 on CD (15 minutes) When the novel has been completed, pose these questions to the student in a class discussion: (10 minutes) Does Montag have a story? Should his story be censored? Why or why not? Who gets to decide that? What is your story? Now, students will be introduced to six word memoirs. Explain to them what that is and what the project is. Show them the video on this main page: (5 minutes) http://www.sixwordmemoirs.com/index.php?test=1 Give students time to write their own six word memoir about their own lives. Have them write it on a strip of construction paper so they can hang it on the wall (15 minutes) Again, as a class discussion, ask students: Should your story be censored? (7 minutes) Do you censor yourself? Introduce the literary essay: what are three factors that influenced Montag to change? (3 minutes)

Closure
  Encourage students to think about how censorship changes people Remind students to complete all handouts and study for the unit test the following day

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 19 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Essential Understanding/Big Idea
What can you learn from Fahrenheit 451?

Prior Learning
All of the novel must be read, censorship must be understood

Materials
 Copies of the unit test for all students

Objectives
Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding and comprehension of the novel

Assessment
 Unit test

Engagement
Students will actively engage in showing their master of the text

Lesson Procedure
   Students will turn in all of their hand outs (comprehension questions, vocabulary, character charts, and journals/letters to Montag) (3 minutes) Students will turn in all copies of their books (10 minutes) Students will spend the hour taking the Fahrenheit 451 unit test

Closure
 N/A -

Lesson Plan

Shannon Waite

Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Lesson No.: 20

Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Time: 55 minutes

Common Core Standards
  

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

 

  

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1d Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1e Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2b Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How has the author shown us Montag’s changes through his writing?

Prior Learning
All of the novel must be read, Montag as a character must be understood

Materials

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Copies of the brainstorming sheets for all students

Objectives
Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding and comprehension of the novel by using textual evidence to support claims made in a literary essay

Assessment
 Brainstorming sheet

Engagement
Students will be involved in demonstrating their understanding of the text, using specific textual examples, through the writing of a literary essay

Lesson Procedure
   Teacher will pass out brainstorming sheets to students (1 minute) Teacher will explain the brainstorming sheets and how the layout of them works (10 minutes) Students will then spend the hour using their brainstorming sheets (and a set of class room books) to start the rough draft for their literary essays which should discuss how Montag changed over the course of the novel (with examples). The teacher should walk around the class and help students with any questions they may have.

Closure
 Remind students that the brainstorming sheet needs to be completed by the next class because they will begin putting the paragraphs together and typing their essays in the media center

Shannon Waite

Lesson Plan
Lesson Topic: Fahrenheit 451 Grade Level/Course: 9th – 10th Lesson No.: 21-23 Time: Over the course of three days Common Core Standards
  

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2c Spell correctly.

 

  

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1a Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1d Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1e Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2b Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1b Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 9–10 here.) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2c Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3a Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian’s Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type.

 

Shannon Waite

Essential Understanding/Big Idea
How has the author shown us Montag’s changes through his writing?

Prior Learning
All of the novel must be read, Montag as a character must be understood

Materials
    All of the students’ brainstorming sheets (completed) Copies of edit sheets for all students Stapler and staples Access to the media center (with computers and printers)

Objectives
Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding and comprehension of the novel by using textual evidence to support claims made in a literary essay

Assessment
 Final literary essay

Engagement
Students will be involved in demonstrating their understanding of the text, using specific textual examples, through the writing of a literary essay

Lesson Procedure
     Teacher will answer any questions that exist regarding the paper Teacher will then take the student to the media center (or other location which has access to computers and printers) and will allow students to format their brainstorming sheet into an essay form Students will then be given the chance to edit their own papers (with an edit sheet that they will be given) after they type it up Students will also then be given the chance to take that edit sheet and peer edit each others’ papers When all of this has been done, students will then print out and turn in their completed essay, stapled to their brainstorming sheet and edit sheet

Closure
 N/A -

Shannon Waite

Worksheets, handouts, and rubrics

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Fahrenheit 451 Notes
1. What type of novel is Fahrenheit 451?

2. What themes does this novel have?

3. Who is the author?

4. In a few sentences, what is the novel about?

5. Who is the main character?

6. What themes does this novel have?

7. What real life events is the novel inspired by?

Shannon Waite

Parts of a Sentence: Subject and Predicate
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Everything from an atom to a zucchini has parts. And a sentence is no exception. Any complete sentence has two main parts, called the subject and the predicate.

What is the subject?
The subject of a sentence is simply what or whom the sentence is about. It usually comes before the predicate. For example, consider this sentence:  Samantha collects reptiles. This sentence is about a person with an unusual hobby—Samantha. Samantha is therefore the subject of the sentence. Here's another example:  My girlfriend's boa constrictor seems restless this morning. What is this sentence about? It's about my girlfriend's boa constrictor. The boa constrictor is therefore the subject of the sentence. Some sentences that give commands might look as if they don't contain a subject:  Come in, please. In the example above, there is no visible subject. But don't be fooled: the subject in such a sentence is the pronoun you. Normally, the subject in a command is left out, or invisible. When we do express the subject you in a command, it's most often a sign of strong irritation:  You get that fish hook out of my aquarium right now!

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What is the predicate?
The predicate is the part of the sentence that makes a statement about the subject. The main part of the predicate is the verb. The predicate usually comes after the subject. Once you find the subject, you can easily find the predicate. Just ask yourself what the sentence is telling you about the subject. The predicate might tell you what the subject did (or does, or will do). Let's take another look at our first example:  Samantha collects reptiles. In this sentence, as you know, the subject is Samantha. The predicate collects reptiles tells you what Samantha does. The verb here is the action verb collects. The predicate might also give a description of the subject, as in our second example:  My girlfriend's boa constrictor seems restless this morning. Here, seems restless this morning gives a description of the subject boa constrictor. The verb is the linking verb seems, which merely links the description to the subject, without expressing any action. The predicates we have seen have all been two or more words long. But sometimes, the predicate is simply a verb by itself:  Jean-Marc sneezed. In the above example, Jean-Marc is the subject, and the verb sneezed is the predicate.

Does the subject always come before the predicate?
No, the subject isn't always first. There are three situations in which the subject appears after the verb instead of before it. 1. In most questions:  Are you ready? (The subject you appears after the verb are.)  Did I forget to feed my iguana again? (The subject I is placed after the first half of the verb did forget.) 2. In many sentences beginning with here or there:  Here comes the jury. (The subject jury appears after the verb comes.)  There were fifteen cats and an eviction notice on Janet's front porch. (The subject fifteen cats and an eviction notice is placed after the verb were.) 3. In some sentences beginning with one or more prepositional phrases:  Across the clearing and through the stream ran the frightened deer. (The subject deer comes after the verb ran.) Being able to recognize subjects and predicates is a useful skill, because they are the building blocks of complete sentences.

Taken from noslangues-ourlanguages.gc.ca

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Fahrenheit 451 Comprehension Questions Please answer on a separate sheet of paper by the time you complete the section.

Part 1: The Hearth and the Salamander [Pages 3-33]

1. How are the books that are being burnt described? (3) 2. What is Montag’s job? Does he like his job? (3) 3. How does the author describe the girl that Montag meets near his home? What is her name? How old is she? What does she like to do? (5-7) 4. What symbols does Montag wear on his uniform? Look up the symbols in a dictionary. What do they represent? (6) 5. What does Montag smell of? Why does he smell like this? (6) 6. How old is Montag? How long has he been a fireman? (8) 7. What questions does Clarisse ask Montag that upsets him? (10) 8. Explain the significance of the following quote: What does it tell us about the society in which Montag lives? ―I sometimes think drivers don‟t know what grass is, or flowers, because they never see them slowly, “ she said. 9. Describe the billboards. (9) 10. Describe Montag’s bedroom. Is he happy? (11) 11. What are the Seashells? (12)

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12. What kind of marriage do Montag and Mildred have? Explain. 13. What did Montag kick? (12) Why is this significant? What happened to Mildred? (14) Does she remember what happened? 14. Who comes to help Mildred? Why is Montag upset? 15. Describe the parlour. (20) Who really likes it? 16. What does Clarisse do with the dandelion? Why does this upset Montag? What does this tell us about him? (21) 17. Why does Clarisse go to a psychiatrist? (22-23) 18. What is the Mechanical Hound? What do the firemen do with it when they are bored? (24) 19. Why doesn’t Clarisse go to school? (29) What is the Fun Park? Who goes there and what do they do there? (30) 20. What does Clarisse think about people her own age? 21. What happens to Clarisse? 22. What do the firemen look like? (33)

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Part 1: The Hearth and the Salamander [Pages 34-68]

1. What line from a book does Montag let slip in conversation with Captain Beatty? How is this significant to Montag’s character development? (34) 2. What are the fireman’s rules of conduct? (35) 3. What is being personified on page 41? How is Montag’s hand being personified? 4. What is the normal procedure when an alarm is called in on someone? How is this alarm different? (36) 5. How is the book that is lit on fire described? (37) How is it similar to how the author describes the book at the beginning of the novel? 6. Does the woman whose home the firemen have come to burn leave with the firemen? What happens to her? (38-39) 7. When do the alarms come? (39) Why do they come at this time of day? 8. The woman is ranting. What does she say? Copy what she says into your notebook. What is ―heresy‖? How could the woman’s actions be considered heresy. 9. What does Montag do with the book that he stole? (41) 10. What is the joke Montag refers to Mildred? (42) How is this joke representative of Montag and Mildred’s relationship? 11. What question does Montag ask Mildred that neither of them can answer? Would Montag cry had Mildred died from her sleeping pill overdose? How does this revelation make him feel? What is Montag’s most significant memory of Mildred? (42-44) 12. Mildred never really listens to Montag. There are always too many distractions. What are these distractions?

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13. What has happened to Clarisse and her family? Who tells Montag about what has happened? Why did it take so long? 14. Who or what does Montag feel is outside that night? (48) 15. What does Mildred look like? Use the text to support your answer. Do you think she is attractive? (48) 16. What is the relationship Mildred has with her parlour walls? What does she consider them to be? (49) 17. Montag wants Mildred to call Captain Beatty and tell him that he is sick and will not be coming into the fire station that night. Why is Montag sick? (50) 18. Explain the significance of the following: “There must be something in books, things we can‟t imagine to make a woman stay in a burning house. There must be something there. You don‟t stay for nothing.” (51) 19. Why do you think that Montag became a fireman? (51) 20. What is the realization that Montag comes to about books? (51-52) 21. Who pays Montag to visit a home? Why does he come? Summarize Beatty’s explanation why books have been banned in society. (53-61) 22. What are people in this time and this society led to believe about themselves? (61) 23. Captain Beatty says the following about firemen: “We stand against the small tide of those who want to make everyone unhappy with conflicting theory and thought. We have our fingers in the dike.” What role does Captain Beatty see firemen have in this time? 24. What is the rule about a fireman who takes home a book? 25. What is and has been hidden behind the grille of the air conditioning system? What is Mildred’s first response?

Shannon Waite

Part 2: The Sieve and the Sand [Pages 71-86]

1. Who is Montag still thinking about? (72) 2. What is Mildred’s impression of books? How do books compare to the parlour walls? (73) 3. Montag relates the reader his chance encounter with the old man in the park. In point form, discuss what happened. Why do you think that Montag never turned in the old man? (74) 4. What is the question Montag calls Faber to ask him? How does Faber react? (75-76) 5. What does Montag question Mildred about? (77) 6. Montag feels numb. When does he figure that the numbness started? (78) 7. How does the following quote relate to how Montag feels about books: “Once a child had sat upon a yellow dune in the sea in the middle of the blue and hot summer day trying to fill a sieve with sand, because some cruel cousin had said, „Fill this sieve with sand and you‟ll get a dime.‟ And the faster he poured the faster it sifted through with a hot whispering. His hands were tired, the sand was boiling, the sieve was empty. 8. What is a sieve? 9. How is the train’s radio personified? (79) 10. Describe Faber. 11. Why do you think that Montag describes his wife as ―dying‖? (81) 12. Why has Montag come to see Faber?

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13. What are the three (3) things that Faber says are missing? (83-85) 14. What would Faber like to see happen to the firemen? (85-86)

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Part 2: The Sieve and the Sand [Pages 87-110]

1. According to Faber, are the firemen needed? What purpose does Faber see the firemen as serving? (87) 2. What does Montag do with the Bible? Why does he do this? (88) What does Montag ultimately do with the Bible? (91) 3. How long has the story being told been going on? (89) 4. How did Faber earn his money since he has been an unemployed English professor for 40 years? 5. What is the green bullet? What is its purpose? Who made it? (90-91) 6. What is the constant threat in the sky? (91-92) 7. Who comes over to the Montag house? Why do they come? (93) 8. What does Montag do that is very unusual for this society? What does he insist that the women do with him? (95-96) 9. Is Mrs. Phelps a good mother? What activity does she compare watching her children with? Why? (96) 10. The women and this society put so much value on physical appearance. How do they demonstrate how valuable an attractive person is? (96-97) 11. What does Montag show to the women to shock them? (98) What reason does he tell Faber for showing them? 12. How did Mildred cover for Montag? (99) 13. Where does Montag now hide the books? (102)

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14. When Montag is at the fire station, what do his hands feel like? Why? (105) 15. Who is driving the fire truck? Did this person usually drive? Why do you think that he is driving tonight? (106) 16. Where is the alarm that the firemen go to? (110)

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Part 3: Burning Bright [Pages 113-165]

1. Captain Beatty has stopped in front of Montag’s house. Montag is surprised. Beatty does not think that this shoud come as a surprise to Montag. Why? (113) 2. Who does Beatty think fooled and ruined Montag? (113-114) 3. Where is Mildred in all of the commotion? Who is she worried about? (114) 4. There are books in the Montag house. Where were the books and how did they get back into the house? (115-116) 5. What does Beatty want Montag to do? Why? (116) What does Faber want Montag to do? Why can’t Montag do what Faber tells him to do? (116) 6. When Montag finishes destroying the house, what is supposed to happen to him? (117) 7. Who turned in the alarm? (117) 8. What takes place between Montag and Beatty? What does Beatty discover? (118) 9. Describe in detail what happens to Captain Beatty. (119) 10. Explain the incident with the Mechanical Hound. What happens to the hound? (120) 11. How does Montag’s leg feel? Find the figurative language that the author uses to describe it. (121) 12. What does Montag look for in the backyard? What does he find and what does he do? What are Montag’s feelings about what he has done? (122-123) 13. What realization does Montag come to about Captain Beatty? Why does he believe this to be so? (122)

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14. What does Montag feel he has done to Faber? Why? Is Faber okay? (123) 15. What does Montag hear on the Seashells? What doe he do? (124-125) 16. Why does Montag go to the gas station? What significant event does he learn about there? (125) 17. What or who does Montag think is after him? What happens? Who was it? (128) 18. In whose house does Montag hide some books? Where does he hide them? What does he do next? (130) 19. Montag questions all that has happened in the last week and all that is now lost? What is lost? (131) 20. Where does Faber suggest Montag should go? Who else will he find there? (132) 21. Faber gives Montag a small postcard-sized TV. What is being broadcast tonight? Is this event similar to anything you might have watched on TV? (133) 22. It is very late or early morning. How would the people know to come and watch the hunt on the parlour walls? (134-135) 23. What instructions does Montag give to Faber for after he leaves? Does it work? (135) 24. How does the audience become involved in the drama? (138) 25. Describe the conflicts that are going on inside Montag regarding Clarisse, Mildred, Beatty, and Faber. 26. Explain the following symbols or ideas: a. the river (139) b. burning (141-) c. senses (139-145) d. fire (145) e. book burning (147-155)

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27. Who is Granger and what is his importance? 28. How does the book end? Explain why Bradbury ends it this way.

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Name: _______________________________

Character Chart
Name: Age (if known):

What is this character's major goal?

Why is this goal so important to this character?

Are there any events in the character's past that affect the significance of this goal?

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T4 Talking to the Text
Text/quote from book (include page numbers) Your thoughts

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Reading Checks

RC 1: 1. In the opening scene, why are the books compared to birds?

RC 2: 2. Why are all the houses fireproof in this society? 3. What is the purpose of Beatty’s visit?

RC 3: 4. In the scene where Mildred and Montag read books together, what are their separate reactions?

RC 4: 5. What is revealed/what do we learn about Beatty’s character?

Shannon Waite

Subject and Predicate Quiz
Birthdays come only once a year 1. The subject of the sentence is ________________ The predicate of the sentence is ________________

The boy ran into the house. 2. The simple subject of the sentence is ________________ The simple predicate of the sentence is ________________

Circle the subject and underline the predicate. 3. Thirteen pink candles decorated Lisa's birthday cake.

4. The __________ tells what the subject does or is. 1. 2. 3. 4. statement subject exclamation predicate

Write a good sentence that has the word fish as the subject and the word swims 5. as the predicate. ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

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Fahrenheit 451 Literary Analysis Essay
Throughout the novel we notice BradBury use characterization to develop Montag, the main character. We went over this characterization individually as well as in class. In this essay, you will be using evidence from the text to demonstrate how you believed that Montag changed.

You will be turning in: A completed outline A handwritten rough draft A typed final copy An Edit sheet

Make sure that you prove your claims with specific examples from the novel. You also need to focus on correct sentence structure, spelling, and capitalization as well.