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PSU TEACHER WORK SAMPLE TEMPLATE

Your First and Last Name: Date Su mitted: Distri!t "#ere $ou !om%&eted t#e TWS: Name o' S!#oo& (ui&din) "#ere $ou !om%&eted t#e TWS: Content Area o' $our TWS: TWS Unit To%i!: *rade Le+e& o' t#e C&assroom , Students in W#i!# t#e TWS Unit Was Com%&eted:

Alyssa Stuhlsatz March 15, !1" US# "$

%herokee &lementary School

Mathematics

Place 'alue (otation an) Tools

n)

*ra)e

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

1

-. Conte/tua& -n'ormation and Learnin) En+ironment Fa!tors
A. Narrati+e *enera& Conte/tua& -n'ormation 'or Communit$0 Distri!t0 and S!#oo& +limite) to 1 page,
The elementary school is no- combine) -ith Southeast .unior /igh in Southeast 0ansas an) has a total enrollment o1 25 stu)ents3 The stu)ent population consists o1 slightly more males having "53114 1emales an) 5"3564 males3 /o-ever, in the secon) gra)e classroom there is a higher percentage o1 males -ith only 1ive 1emales an) 1ourteen males3 The elementary school )oes not hol) a very )iverse population3 A large 62354 o1 the stu)ents are %aucasian -hile only the remaining 73 4 are /ispanics, A1rican Americans, an) other ethnicities3 8n comparison to other )istricts 8 have been place) in, 8 1oun) it 9uite surprising that the )istrict contains no stu)ents that are &nglish :anguage :earners3 Similar to other schools in the surroun)ing areas, the elementary school has a high percentage o1 economically )isa)vantage) stu)ents3 753524 o1 stu)ents in the buil)ing 9uali1y 1or 1ree an) re)uce) lunch3 This is only slightly higher than the )istrict average an) 1"4 higher than the state average3 When comparing the elementary school -ith a near school in Pittsburg, 8 1oun) that the comparing school has almost 1!4 more stu)ents -ho are economically )isa)vantage)3 This is interrelate) -ith little parental involvement in stu)ent -ork3 8 have 1oun) having a high percentage o1 )isa)vantage) stu)ents makes it har)er on teachers to sen) home home-ork or stu)ying materials an) e;pect it complete)3 /o-ever, school members an) teachers )o not kno- -ho is eligible 1or 1ree an) re)uce) lunches< 8 think this is great to protect stu)ents 1rom biase) school personnel3 The overall community in the city seems generous an) very -illing to help< many local organizations )onate clothes, supplies, an) other essential items to be han)e) out to nee)y stu)ents3 The school )oes this )iscreetly to protect each in)ivi)ual=s pri)e an) sel1>i)entity3 The a)ministration an) teachers )o all that they can 1or their stu)ents an) hol) them to high stan)ar)s3 The elementary school=s population consists o1 1532 4 o1 stu)ents -ith )isabilities3 This is about average 1or the )istrict but a little high 1or the state +123$"4,3 The classroom 8 am place) in has 1ive out o1 15 stu)ents on 8&P=s3 Though there is not much cultural )iversity in the school to con)uct the Work Sample, the secon) gra)e classroom has great )iversity in ability levels an) behavior3 This -ill impact instructional material an) teaching metho)s greatly in the classroom3 8 have provi)e) a )etaile) )escription o1 class conte;tual in1ormation in table 1313

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

Ta &e 1.1 C&ass Conte/tua& -n'ormation +limite) to 1 page, *ra)e level ?? ???? %ontent area +e3g3, mathematics, ?&lementary Sub@ects +All,??? Topic +e3g3, geometry, All pertaining to n) gra)eATWS complete) in Math on Place 'alue (otation an) Tools Age range o1 stu)ents ?????$>5??????? (umber o1 male stu)ents ????1"???? Total number o1 stu)ents ?????16????? (umber o1 1emale stu)ents ?????5???? Percentage o1 stu)ents receiving re)uce) lunch ??753524????? Percentage o1 stu)ents not receiving re)uce) lunch?????2131$4????? Bi' 'ree,redu!ed &un!# in'ormation not a+ai&a &e 'or !&ass0 %ro+ide s!#oo& %er!enta)es2 Area in -hich stu)ents live +check all that apply, Urban ??!?? Suburban ??!??? Cural ?16??? &thnicity o1 stu)ents +give numbers, ???!? A1rican American or Dlack ??1 ?? /ispanic or :atino ???!?? (ative AmericanEAlaskan (ative ??15??? White ???!?? Asian or Paci1ic 8slan)er ???!?? Fther +speci1y, ?????????? :anguage pro1iciency o1 stu)ents +give ??16?? Gluent &nglish Pro1icient ???!?? &nglish :anguage :earners numbers, 8)enti1ie) special nee)s categories represente) +give numbers, ??? ??? Speci1ic :earning #isability ???!??? /ar) o1 /earing ???!??? #ea1 ???!??? #ea1>Dlin) ???!??? Fther /ealth 8mpaire) ???1??? Multiple #isabilities ???!??? Drain 8n@ury ???!??? &stablishe) Me)ical #isability +!>5 yrs, ???!??? At risk 1or )evelopmental )isabilities ??? ??? SpeechE:anguage 8mpaire) ???!??? 'isually 8mpaire) ???!??? Frthope)ically 8mpaire) ???!??? &motionally #isturbe) ???!??? Autism ???!??? Mental Cetar)ation ???!???*i1te) ???!??? #evelopmentally #elaye) ???!??? Fther +Speci1y,???????????????

Pro+ide a%%ro%riate !#arts,)ra%#s to dis%&a$ demo)ra%#i! data 'or distri!t0 s!#oo&0 and !&assroom in A%%endi/ A.

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

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Ta &e 1.3 Student C#ara!teristi!s 'or W#o&e C&ass +limite) to 1 page, Student C#ara!teristi!s -nte&&e!tua& C#ara!teristi!s 4 8nclu)ing rea)iness, cognitive abilities, learning nee)s, )evelopmental levels, etc3 S%e!i'i! Des!ri%tions Though the )ata sho-s this class )oes not have ethnic )iversity, it contains great )iversity in cognitive, learning, an) )evelopmental )isabilities3 The class becomes o11 task easily an) almost hal1 nee) constant remin)ers to stay on task3 Three chil)ren are being treate) 1or A##3 These stu)ents struggle to pay attention an) sit still in their seats )uring in)epen)ent -ork3 There are a 1e- others -ho constantly try to escape aca)emic -ork by sharpening their pencils, thro-ing a-ay paper, etc3 There are 1ive stu)ents -ith 8&P=s an) three o1 these stu)ents nee) a Para or help 1rom the teacher to complete almost all course-ork3 These stu)ents have )i11ering spelling tests, participate in less rigorous material, an) are pulle) out to the resource room throughout small amounts o1 the )ay3 There is almost al-ays a Para in the classroom -ith these three stu)ents3 T-o stu)ents are on the list to be teste) soon 1or the *i1te) program3 They process ne- material an) 1inish assignments at a much 1aster rate than the ma@ority o1 the class3 To sho- previously )emonstrate) per1ormance, 8 use) the most recent A8MS -eb testing in rea)ing 1or the secon) gra)e classroom3 Si; out o1 16 stu)ents -ere above average, ten -ere on levelEat average, an) three -ere beloaverage3

Previously )emonstrate) aca)emic per1ormanceE abilityH 4 Above stan)ar) ??2 4?? 4 Meets stan)ar) ? 524? 4 Delo- stan)ar) ?154? So!ia& C#ara!teristi!s > 8nclu)ing emotional, attitu)inal, motivational, etc3

Persona& C#ara!teristi!s 4 8nclu)ing physical, social, in)ivi)ual e;periences, talents, language, culture, 1amily an) community values, etc3

&very stu)ent has a big heart an) tries to help each other -ith assignments an) every)ay tasks3 /o-ever, the overall class starte) slightly immature emotionally 1or the n) gra)e3 Many stu)ents complaine) an) ma)e e;cuses -hen they )i) not -ish to -ork on school -ork3 Positive behavior rein1orcement given by the teacher helpe) -ith behavior an) motivation< they also have a classroom store an) earn pennies -hen notice) being goo)Ethey bring home-ork back complete)3 The pennies can be taken a-ay 1or behavior but stu)ents are usually given a -arning be1ore this occurs3 They may buy items an) privileges at the en) o1 each month3 8 notice that most o1 the class tries to please the teacher, but many cannot seem to stay on task3 A 1e- stu)ents sho- high motivation to 1inish their -ork an) go beyon) -hat the teacher asks3 Fne stu)ent brags about -hat he accomplishes an) seems to belittle the other stu)ents i1 they )o not un)erstan)< the teacher )oes a great @ob by pulling him to the si)e an) e;plaining -hy his behavior can hurt others3 Another stu)ent has a behavioral )isability an) has thro-n tantrums that cannot be calme)3 At various times, male school o11icials ha) to be calle) into the classroom to han)le the situation3 Fverall, the stu)ents try to get along, but as -ith many chil)ren, tattling an) 1ighting still occur in the bathroom, hall-ay, etc3 &ach stu)ent is very uni9ue in attitu)e, an) 8 love to -atch as they -ork together an) help each other gro- in the classroom3 Since a large amount o1 the class is economically )isa)vantage), most stu)ents treasure 1oo) an) other every)ay items that they receive at school3 Some come )resse) in the same clothes as the )ay be1ore an) -ithout obvious sho-er, -hile some are )resse) in high class material3 8t has been very e;citing to -atch them gro- throughout the year< -e have improve) greatly on partner -ork an) -orking as a team3 While some stu)ents are very talente) singers, others are very gi1te) technologically, mentally, an) artistically3 Though not all stu)ent=s home lives seem to be very positive, the stu)ents all have great community values an) try their best to help each other out3 Teacher Work Sample "

Pittsburg State University

(. Narrati+e: -m%&i!ations 'or W#o&e C&ass -nstru!tion (ased on -n'ormation 'rom Ta &e 1.3 5&imited to 1 %a)e6 8ntellectual levels vary greatly in this classroom -ith 1ive chil)ren on 8&Ps3 There1ore, it is pertinent that teaching this class involves )aily )iscussions an) coor)inating -ith the Special &)ucation teacher an) Title 8 teacher to meet these stu)ents= nee)s3 Three o1 the stu)ents re9uire Para help in the classroom )uring Cea)ing an) Mathematics3 They also have )i11erent spelling lists an) e;tra visual ai)s at their )esk3 Within the class, there are also several stu)ents -ho 1inish in)epen)ent -ork much 1aster than the rest o1 the class< be1ore instructing the teacher must have e;tra material prepare) 1or these stu)ents3 The )i11ering intellectual levels also re9uire splitting o1 groups )uring MTSS time an) other points throughout the )ay3 The t-o stu)ents -ith 8&Ps in speech are pulle) out at several times an) the teacher must plan so that they )o not miss important classroom material3 The teacher must have a strong behavior plan in place to create a positive learning environment as note) in social characteristics3 The teacher utilizes a penny system to re-ar) stu)ents an) sometimes takes a-ay pennies a1ter -arning3 /o-ever, the stu)ent may earn this penny back -ith goo) behavior later3 As note) above, the class re9uires a tremen)ous amount o1 positive behavior rein1orcement3 The teacher is constantly complimenting stu)ents3 8 believe the teacher=s positive behavior support plan is very e11ective -ith this class3 As note) in personal characteristics, much o1 the class is economically )isa)vantage)3 Along -ith this, many parents )o not coor)inate -ith the teacher as much as she -oul) like3 This re9uires e;tra -ork 1or the teacher 1ocusing on -hole class instruction3 81 no learning takes place at home, -e have to make up 1or it in school3 Since some o1 these stu)ents )o not al-ays receive their basic nee)s at home, the teacher must 1ocus on this be1ore aca)emic material is learne)3 8t is great to see stu)ents helping each other out )aily3 They all have very big hearts an) great values -hen it comes to len)ing a han) to classmates3 We have been -orking throughout the year to improve team-ork an) partnership )uring class3

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

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C. Su 4 *rou%s,Students -n'ormation Des!ri e t#is su )rou%,student usin) in'ormation 'rom Ta &e 1.1 This 1ocus stu)ent is a %aucasian male -ho struggles to stay on task an) 1ollo- )irections3 /e is currently on an 8&P 1or behavior an) an intellectual SU(*ROUP )isability3 or FOCUS STUDENT

W#$ "as t#is su )rou%,student se&e!ted7 8 selecte) this stu)ent so that 8 coul) try to implement netechni9ues to help -ith his behavioral an) intellectual setbacks3

W#at "as &earned a out t#is su )rou%,student7 -nte&&e!tua& The stu)ent per1orms at a much lo-er level intellectually than the rest o1 the class3 /e nee)s one on one instruction 1rom a Para to gui)e him an) complete rea)ing an) math in the classroom3

This 1ocus stu)ent is a %aucasian male -ho struggles -ith attention3 /e is currently )iagnose) -ith A## an) is on me)ication 1or it3 SU(*ROUP or FOCUS STUDENT

So!ia& This stu)ent most o1ten gets along -ith other stu)ents in the classroom3 /o-ever, he )oes not seem to have any very close 1rien)ships -ith other stu)ents3 The stu)ent has ha) melt)o-ns an) thro-n tantrums at times in 1ront o1 the class3 Most stu)ents ignore )isruptions coming 1rom the stu)ent3 Persona& The stu)ent )oes not seem to have a very proper home li1e an) loves coming to school3 /e has a re-ar)s system 1or behavior that he completes each )ay -ith his Para3 The stu)ent gets 1rustrate) easily an) nee)s constant remin)ers to take )eep breaths3 /e has also ha) several acci)ents )uring school that re9uire him to go home an) change clothes3 8 selecte) this -nte&&e!tua& stu)ent because 8 This stu)ent has an average intellectual ability3 /o-ever, he struggles to pay -oul) love to 1in) attention )uring class an) 1inish his -ork3 The stu)ent has been 1oun) to ne- strategies to complete no -ork even i1 the teacher lea)s the class through the ans-ers3 /e is help him stay on task constantly )istracte) by other things3 an) slim )o-n So!ia& )isruptions in the The stu)ent seems to have some close 1rien)ships in the classroom3 /o-ever, class3 some stu)ents seem to get 1rustrate) -hen -orkingEplaying -ith him )ue to his spora)icEun1ocuse) behavior3 /e o1ten )isrupts the class an) likes to make them laugh, most likely 1or attention3 Persona& The stu)ent has the ability to )o very -ell in class3 /o-ever, his attention span an) likeliness to get )istracte) seem to get in the -ay3 /e seems to -ant to complete all o1 his -ork an) please the teacher but is 1oun) )ay)reaming at many times3 /e also loves to act silly an) become o11 task )uring instruction time3 Teacher Work Sample 7

Pittsburg State University

D. Narrati+e -m%&i!ations 'or Su 4*rou%8s,Fo!us Student8s -nstru!tion +limite) to 1 page, 8t is imperative that 8 )i11erentiate -orksheets an) instructional activities so that they 1it the ability level o1 my stu)ent having a learning )isability +stu)ent 8,3 81 assignments are too har), 1rustration levels increase an) his behavior usually -orsens3 We provi)e manipulatives at his )esk )uring &very)ay Mathematics such as a number gri)3 /e also nee)s one on one help 1rom a Para )uring Cea)ing an) Mathematics3 81 any material is provi)e) at the 1ront o1 the classroom, the stu)ent must have it -ritten on his personal -hiteboar) so that he can see it properly3 The stu)ent must have secon) gra)e rea)ing items rea) alou) to him by an a)ult be1ore he can complete the assignments3 /e is also on a behavior system that inclu)es a sticker chart< i1 all stickers are ma)e throughout the )ay he earns small re-ar)s3 Stu)ent 8 must also have calming remin)ers at his )esk such as breathing techni9ues3 Stu)ent 88 nee)s constant remin)ers to stay on task3 #uring -hole class instruction, 8 have come up -ith a Isecret= sign to use -ith him -hen he is getting o11 task3 The stu)ent an) 8 )eci)e) that it -oul) be lightly tapping on his )esk3 8 try to use him as a positive e;ample )uring class i1 8 notice him staying on task3 8 also think it is important to compliment him one on one i1 8 notice positive behavior< he seems to nee) the e;tra attention3 This also cuts back on him )isrupting the class )oing silly things 1or attention3 The teacher, a1ter -arning, takes a penny i1 he )oes not complete -ork in a timely manner3 .ust like other stu)ents, he must stay in 1rom recess until all morning -ork is 1inishe)< Stu)ent 8 is o1ten seen in the classroom )uring recess time, but it has been lessening as the year progresses3

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

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--. -nstru!tiona& Desi)n
A. Narrati+e Des!ri%tion o' Ran)e o' O 9e!ti+es and Rationa&e 'or Se&e!tion 5&imited to 1 %a)e6 This unit a))resses many important items that )eal -ith place value, place value tools, an) place value notation3 Place value notation is an essential li1e skill that -ill carry on to every other gra)e in a stu)ent=s li1e3 %ommon %ore stan)ar)s place great emphasis on place value an) un)erstan)ing it -ith a))ition an) subtraction in the secon) gra)e3 This unit a))resses counting by 1s, 1!s, an) 1!!s, mo)eling an) -riting 2> an) ">)igit numbers using base>1! blocks an) money, an) making e;changes -ith base>1! blocks -hile relating that to e;changes -ith money3 The 1irst )ay o1 the unit also inclu)es real -orl) applications o1 place value through a money e;change game -ith manipulatives3 The secon) )ay continues counting 1or-ar)s -ith 1!s, 1!!s, an) 1,!!!s3 8t also teaches stu)ents ho- to rea), -rite, an) mo)el numbers to the ten>thousan)s using place>value tools that they create themselves an) using base 1! blocks3 The lesson also helps stu)ents i)enti1y the values o1 )igits in numbers3 The last )ay o1 the unit has stu)ents orally counts by 1!!!=s, mo)el an) -rite ">)igit numbers using their create) place value tool, an) i)enti1y )igit values by counting through transitions on a calculator3

(. State O 9e!ti+es Here: Gocus shoul) be on stu)ent per1ormance J not activities3 What -ill stu)ents kno- or be able to )oK 5&imited to 1 %a)e6 O 9. No. 1 3 : Unit O 9e!ti+es The stu)ent -ill count by 1!s, 1!!s, an) 1!!!s %omprehension The stu)ent -ill rea), -rite, an) mo)el numbers up to the thousan)s The stu)ent -ill create 2> an) "> )igit numbers using base>1! blocks Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample Application Synthesis 5 Le+e&5s6 5e.). (&oom8s Ta/onom$6

; < =

The stu)ent -ill count the value o1 base 1! blocks using 1lats, longs, an) cubes The stu)ent -ill -rite the value o1 )igits in numbers The stu)ent -ill recognize the value o1 numbers in place value notation

Analysis 0no-le)ge 0no-le)ge

C. -denti'$ State Standards > (en!#mar?s Addressed $ Unit O 9e!ti+es J /o- )o ob@ectives a))ress these stan)ar)sK +&imited to 1 %a)e6 Domain0 C&uster0 Standard • Num er and O%erations in (ase Ten • Un)erstan) place value3 • Use place value un)erstan)ing an) properties o1 operations to a)) an) subtract3 • • Standards: Math3 3(DT3A31 Un)erstan) that the three )igits o1 a three>)igit number represent amounts o1 hun)re)s, tens, an) ones< e3g3, $!7 e9uals $ hun)re)s, ! tens, an) 7 ones3 Un)erstan) the 1ollo-ing as special casesH o Math3 3(DT3A31a 1!! can be thought o1 as a bun)le o1 ten tens A calle) a Lhun)re)3M o Math3 3(DT3A31b The numbers 1!!, !!, 2!!, "!!, 5!!, 7!!, $!!, 5!!, 6!! re1er to one, t-o, three, 1our, 1ive, si;, seven, eight, or nine hun)re)s +an) ! tens an) ! ones,3 Math3 3(DT3A32 Cea) an) -rite numbers to 1!!! using base>ten numerals, number names, an) e;pan)e) 1orm3 Math3 3(DT3D35 Mentally a)) 1! or 1!! to a given number 1!!J6!!, an) mentally subtract 1! or 1!! 1rom a given number 1!!J6!!3 O 9e!ti+es • T#e student "i&& ora&&$ !ount $ 1@s0 1@@s0 and 1@@@s • T#e student "i&& use a %&a!e +a&ue too& to read0 "rite0 and mode& num ers • T#e student "i&& !reate :4 and ;4 di)it num ers usin) ase41@ &o!?s • T#e student "i&& !ount t#e +a&ue o' ase 1@ &o!?s usin) '&ats0 &on)s0 and !u es • T#e student "i&& "rite t#e +a&ue o' di)its in num ers • T#e student "i&& re!o)niAe t#e +a&ue o' num ers in %&a!e +a&ue notation

• • •

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

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Pre4Assessment: T R -

Lesson

Date

The stu)ents -ill complete a -ritten assessment that inclu)es -riting the value o1 base 1! blocks, the value o1 )igits in numbers, recognizing the value o1 numbers in place value notation, an) completing a table using patterns o1 1! more, 1!! more, an) 1!!! more3 Formati+e Lesson -nstru!tiona& A!ti+ities, Des!ri e S%e!i'i! Ada%tations, Assessment O 9e!ti+e5s6 Strate)ies Di''erentiation 5'orma&,in'orma&6 • 8 )isplay base 1! blocks an) the stu)ents participate in an open )iscussion about the relationships among base 1! blocks3 8 intro)uce the big cube +1!!!s, an) -e )iscuss -hat it means3 8 ask three volunteers to 1orm a line hol)ing 1lats, longs, an) cubes3 8 have stu)ents -rite on their slates the value3 We repeat the activity an) make sure to inclu)e ! as a placehol)er3 8 -rite Ie;pan)e) 8n1ormal notation= on the boar) an) intro)uce the term3 8 have the class practice -riting their )igits in e;pan)e) notation on the slates3 We participate in an open )iscussion about homoney relates to base 1! blocks3 8 sho- the relationship -ith pictures on the Mimio Doar)3 The stu)ents play the IMoney &;change *ame= that 8 ha) prepare)3 With this, they practice the skill o1 making e;changes bet-een coins an) bills3 Stu)ents create the Teacher Work Sample smallest an) largest )igits they coul) on their slates -ith " )igits 8 ha)

The three stu)ents -ith learning )isabilities are given e;tra time to )isplay the numbers on their slates an) hol) up base 1! blocks3 They also have a para to help them3 When calling on the stu)ents -ho are slightly slo-er in math, 8 incorporate e;tra visuals into my 9uestions an) provi)e supplemental hints3 8 have the stu)ents play the IMoney &;change *ame= as they 1inish their -ork3 This provi)es an enrichment opportunity to those -ho 1inish early3 8 then pair higher stu)ents -ith lo-er stu)ents so that they may help each other in partner -ork3

• The stu)ent -ill rea), -rite, an) mo)el numbers up to the thousan)s • The stu)ent -ill count the value o1 base 1! blocks using 1lats, longs, an) cubes

1

E 5

TC8

• • The stu)ent -ill create 2> an) "> )igit numbers using base>1! blocks •

Pittsburg State University

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Ta &e 3.1 > -nstru!tiona& Desi)n > Unit P&an
T- Lesson integrates technology; R- Lesson uses reading strategies; I- Lesson demonstrates integration of content across and within content fields

Ta &e 3.3: Narrati+e Des!ri%tion o' Pre4assessment0 Formati+e Assessments0 and Summati+e Assessment +limite) to pages, W#i!# o 9e!ti+es -denti'$ #o" t#e assessment "i&& e Des!ri e t#e assessment to e E/%&ain rationa&e 'or !#oosin) --. D0 H0 and K does t#is s!ored and,or t#e !riteria to e used t#is assessment assessment used 'or e+a&uation. address7 The assessment -ill be gra)e) on the A -ritten assessment that same )ay -ith 11 available points3 inclu)es -riting the value o1 The scoring o1 each stu)ent -ill not base 1! blocks, the value o1 8 chose this assessment because it be recor)e) in the gra)ebook3 8ts )igits in numbers, recognizing is short an) simple enough that Pre>Assessment creation -as to help me un)erstan) the value o1 numbers in place my stu)ents -ill not become 1>7 +#iagnostic, ho- much my stu)ents kno- about value notation, an) completing 1rustrate)3 8t also a))resses all o1 place value an) place value notation3 a table using patterns o1 1! the ob@ectives in this unit3 8 -ill use the evaluation to more, 1!! more, an) 1!!! )i11erentiate instruction base) on more3 stu)ent kno-le)ge3 8 chose these assessments because 1, , 2, " &ach stu)ent=s slateEmanipulative -as A1ter )isplaying base 1! blocks stu)ents love the interactive, checke) )uring the activities3 They at the 1ront, stu)ents -ere aske) han)s on e;perience an) it let me -ere tol) to try again i1 the ans-er -hat number this represente) kno- ho- -ell each stu)ent -as -as incorrect3 A1ter this, 8 gave them an) tol) to -rite it on their grasping the concept o1 place hints3 81 more than one stu)ent ha) slates3 They -ere then given value3 8t allo-e) me to e;plain )i11iculty, 8 aske) the class to help me multiple numbers to )isplay items in a ne- -ay an) provi)e a solve the problem 1or everyone to see3 Gormative Assessment -ith their o-n base>1! ne- light on material -hen 8 We then trie) again until the concept - Informal manipulatives3 realize) the concept -as not -as mastere)3 mastere)3 The stu)ents -ere given "> an) 5>)igit numbers to -rite on their slates an) then sho- on their personal place value books3 Gormative Assessment 8 chose this 1orm o1 assessment 5, 7 The in)epen)ent @ournal page -ill be - Formal Stu)ents complete) a math because it -as a -orksheet in gra)e) on the same )ay -ith 5 @ournal page -ith 11 problems &very)ay Mathematics that possible points3 The 1irst 1ive points Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 11

covering place value3

seeme) to 1it the lessons 8 ha) taught over the past three )ays very -ell3 8 thought it )isplaye) ho- much they kne- an) coul) tell me i1 -e nee)e) to still -ork on areas in place value3 8 chose this assessment because it is short an) simple enough that my stu)ents -ill not become 1rustrate)3 8t also a))resses all o1 the ob@ectives in this unit3 1>7

Summative Assessment

A -ritten assessment that inclu)es -riting the value o1 base 1! blocks, the value o1 )igits in numbers, recognizing the value o1 numbers in place value notation, an) completing a table using patterns o1 1! more, 1!! more, an) 1!!! more3

)eal -ith matching -ritten numbers to integers3 The ne;t 5 points are allotte) to-ar)s stu)ents -riting the values o1 )igits in numbers3 The last points )eal -ith stu)ents completing number patterns an) recognizing place value notation3 The assessment -ill be gra)e) on the same )ay -ith 11 available points3 &valuation o1 the assessment -ill tell me i1 each stu)ent has mastere) the concept o1 place value an) place value notation3

Narrati+e 'or -nstru!tiona& Desi)n --. E. The lessons are se9uence) in this manner because it allo-s stu)ents to buil) on prior kno-le)ge3 &ach lesson a))s more in1ormation to the stu)ent=s schema an) gives them more in1ormation about place value notation -ithout over-helming them3 Gor instance, the 1irst lesson a))resses counting by 1s, 1!, an) 1!!s -hile the secon) lesson a))resses this again -hile a))ing on counting by 1!!!s3 The thir) lesson helps stu)ents reach mastery in this area by revie-ing counting by 1!!!s3 The lessons buil) upon each other in this -ay -ith place value notation also moving 1rom base 1! blocks, to place value tools, to -ritten applications3 There are many learning strategies incorporate) in this unit3 Some o1 these inclu)e opening 9uestions 1or each lesson that helps stu)ents make connections bet-een prior kno-le)ge an) necontent3 The unit also inclu)es many visuals that helps stu)ents learn -hat place value actually means3 Some o1 these inclu)e base 1! blocks an) -ritten visuals o1 place value notation3 8n a))ition, the unit o11ers the use o1 many manipulatives consisting o1 base 1! blocks, personal stu)ent place value books, etc3 :astly, the unit lets chil)ren make real>-orl) connections -ith the material through money games an) other activities3 All o1 the lessons inclu)e learning through Teacher Work Sample 1

Why are the lessons se9uence) in this mannerK

--. F. What learning strategies -ere incorporate) into this unitK

Pittsburg State University

/o- )o the instructional strategiesEactivities a))ress the learning ob@ectives 1or this unitK --. *.

gui)e) practice, in)epen)ent practice, an) cooperative learning strategies3 The instructional strategies ma)e it possible 1or all stu)ents to learn in their o-n -ay about place value an) place value notation3 Fral 9uestioning an) )iscussions, visuals, real>-orl) activities, an) manipulatives all enable stu)ents to un)erstan), apply, an) think about place value, ho- to -rite it, an) ho- it is use) in real li1e e;periences3 Stu)ents are re9uire) to think critically throughout almost the entirety o1 this unit3 &very)ay Mathematics is closely aligne) -ith %ommon %ore stan)ar)s an) re9uires stu)ents to think critically an) problem solve on a )aily basis3 Throughout the unit, stu)ents are aske) i1 they kno-hat place value means an) -hy it is important to real li1e e;periences3 The stu)ents are allo-e) to practice problem solving strategies -hen they play the money e;change game< they must use their kno-le)ge o1 place value to return the correct amount o1 money3 They must also use critical thinking skills to manipulate their place value tools an) count on by 1!s, 1!!s, an) 1!!!s3 Stu)ents must use multiple rea)ing strategies to complete mathematics problems throughout the unit3 Gor instance, -hen )ealing -ith -or) problems )ealing -ith place value, stu)ents must ans-er -ho the problem is talking about, -hat it is asking, -here or in -hat conte;t is it being use), an) ho- to solve the problem3 The stu)ents must think an) search to solve many problems< the ans-er is in the -or) problem but they must search to 1in) it3 There is also a tremen)ous amount o1 ne- mathematical vocabulary that stu)ents must learn, rehearse, an) remember to complete the lessons3 8 usually connect the terms to their personal li1e to help )evelop their schema an) later recall the in1ormation easily3 Technology -ill be integrate) throughout the unit through use o1 the classroom Mimio Doar) an) Fnline &very)ay Mathematics materials3 The materials inclu)e an ePresentation 1or each lesson3 8 -ill ran)omly call on stu)ents to come up an) manipulate the Mimio Doar) )uring the lesson3 The ePresentation allo-s them to L)rag upM base 1! blocks, -rite their ans-ers to place value notation 9uestions, an) manipulate visuals o1 money to un)erstan) place value3 The teacher -ill also use images to e;plainE )emonstrate stu)ent games, -orksheets, an) other activities3 The stu)ents must rea) instructions to play interactive place value games, complete mathematical problems, an) per1orm other math activities3 They must also use their social skills to interact -ith partnersEgroups to complete these activities3 8n a))ition, stu)ents must use critical thinking an) problem solving skills to participate in each lesson3 8 provi)e) manipulatives such as place value tools an) base 1! blocks 1or stu)ents -ho nee)e) the e;tra visuals -hen completing in)epen)ent -ork3 8 also paire) higher stu)ents -ith lo-er stu)ents in partner activities an) games to accommo)ate the nee)s o1 each chil)< the class helpe) each Teacher Work Sample 12

/o- -ill critical thinking an) problem solving strategies be implemente)K *ive speci1ic e;amples o1 use3

--. -.

&;plain the rea)ing strategies that -ill be use) throughout the unit3 *ive speci1ic e;amples3 +Cemember that using te;t is not a rea)ing strategy,

/o- -ill technology be integrate) -ithin the unitK &;plain both teacher use an) stu)ent use3

/o- )oes the unit )emonstrate integration o1 content across an) -ithin content 1iel)sK --. B. What speci1ic a)aptations or )i11erentiate) activities -ere use) to accommo)ate in)ivi)ual learning nee)s 1or the -hole classK Pittsburg State University

What speci1ic a)aptations or )i11erentiate) activities -ere use) to accommo)ate in)ivi)ual learning nee)s 1or the i)enti1ie) sub>groups E stu)entsK

other in the learning process3 &ach )ay, 8 use the last 2! minutes o1 instruction time to -alk aroun) the classroom an) help the stu)ents that nee) an e;tra e;planation or visual to un)erstan) the lesson3 #uring this time, stu)ents -ho mastere) the concept play place value enrichment activities -ith partners3 A)aptations -ere ma)e 1or three o1 the stu)ents on 8&Ps that inclu)e) )i11erent home-ork sheets that a))resse) smaller numbers but still )ealt -ith place value3 There is also one para in the classroom to rea) )irections to these three stu)ents an) provi)e them -ith a))itional help3 Some o1 the stu)ents -ere also given an enlarge) number chart 1or their )esk to help them complete their problems3

Pro+ide a !o%$ o' t"o !om%&ete detai&ed &esson %&ans in A%%endi/ (.

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

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---. Tea!#in) and Learnin)
A. Narrati+e: Dai&$ Tea!#in) Re'&e!tions +limite) to " pages, Da$ 1: My 1irst lesson involve) a lot o1 manipulatives that re9uire) 9uite a bit o1 preparation3 8 staye) a1ter school the )ay be1ore to prepare the envelopes o1 money 1or the LMoney &;change *ameM that the stu)ents playe) near the en) o1 the lesson3 8 also spen) part o1 my lunch break han)ing out base 1! blocks to stu)ents= )esks, etc3 All o1 this -ork seeme) to pay o113 8 starte) the lesson by sho-ing the base 1! blocks an) intro)ucing the big cube3 This grabbe) stu)ents= attention +they ha) never seen the big cube be1ore,3 8 ha) them guess ho- many 1lats it -as -orth an) then -e counte) as a class3 The e;citement in the room tol) me that stu)ents -ere rea)y 1or me to continue3 Girst, 8 ha) stu)ents recognize the relationship bet-een each base 1! block +a 1!>1! relationship,3 8 ha) -arne) stu)ents at the beginning that they -ere not to play -ith their base 1! blocks until tol) to )o so3 Gor the most part, they listene)3 Some behaviors 8 ignore) -hile others 8 9uietly aske) to give me a penny3 8 brought stu)ents to the 1ront o1 the classroom an) ha) them hol) up 1lats, longs, an) cubes3 The rest o1 the stu)ents sho-e) me the numeral it represente) on their -hite>boar)3 A1ter a 1e- practice roun)s, 8 intro)uce) the -or) Ie;pan)e) notation= an) ha) the class repeat it -ith me3 8 then sho-e) them -hat e;pan)e) notation looks like3 A1ter this, 8 -rote numerals at the 1ront -hile stu)ents )isplaye) their base 1! blocks at the )esk3 The ma@ority o1 the population caught on very 9uickly as 8 circle) the room3 A1ter coming to the )ecision that everyone un)erstoo), 8 assigne) their in)ivi)ual -orksheets an) e;plaine) the math game at the 1ront o1 the classroom3 As my above average stu)ents 1inishe) their -ork, they -ere allo-e) to pair up an) start on the game3 The class -as very e;cite) to play the game an) each -ante) to play until 1inish3 Fverall, the lesson 1lo-e) smoothly an) 8 -as very happy -ith the outcome3

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

15

Da$ 3: The math message to)ay intro)uce) " )igits an) ha) chil)ren -rite the biggest an) smallest number they coul) on their slates3 The stu)ents )i) very -ell -ith this an) seeme) to un)erstan) ho- place value relate) -ith )igits -hen -e )iscusse) ho- they arrive) at their ans-er3 8 then sho-e) them a sample o1 the place value book -e -ere about to create an) -e counte) as a class up to the ten> thousan)s place3 We )iscusse) the 1!>1 relationship o1 each place value3 8 use) money as an e;ample an) the stu)ents seeme) to relate -ell3 De1ore 8 han)e) out materials 1or place value books, 8 )isplaye) )i11ering ">)igit numbers on the Mimio Doar) place value tool an) ha) the class rea) them together alou)3 A1ter creating the books that 8 ha) copie) o11 previously, stu)ents love) 1lipping through the )igits to create ne- numbers3 They seeme) to en@oy pairing up to practice rea)ing alou) )i11erent numbers on their place value books3 8 ma)e sure to emphasize that they are kept neatly in their )esks 1or later use3 Though 8 -ish 8 coul) have ha) more time to practice numbers -ith our place value tools, stu)ents seeme) to un)erstan) the lesson an) make great use o1 the short time -e ha)3 Da$ :: To)ay 8 starte) by asking stu)ents to -rite every )igit they coul) think o1 on their -hiteboar)3 Some -ere con1use) by this an) only liste) o)) )igits an) ran)om numbers3 8 emphasize) that it -as a single )igit counting number they shoul) list3 Almost all stu)ents -ere able to list 1 through 6 but 1orgot about !3 We spoke about -hy ! is an important )igit to )isplay in numbers3 8 then ha) the class count up by 1s, 1!s, 1!!s an) 1!!!s to )isplay the relationship bet-een each number3 8 then intro)uce) the 1!,!!!s place on their place value tools3 8 aske) stu)ents ho- many times 8 ha) clicke) on the 1s be1ore it became 1! +8 ha) a place value tool )isplaye) on the Mimio Doar),3 Some sai) 6 an) 8 e;plaine) that -e ha) to click it 1! times be1ore it actually change) to 1!3 We then e;ten)e) this concept to the 1!,!!!s place3 Stu)ents 1inally recognize) -hat 8 meant by a 1! to 1 relationship3 A1ter this, stu)ents -ere e;cite) to use their place value books that they create) the )ay be1ore3 8 passe) out paperclips so that they coul) easily )isplay numbers on them3 Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 17

Almost every stu)ent hel) up the correct number -hen 8 rea) them alou) to the class3 A1ter practicing -ith our place value tools, 8 tol) stu)ents 8 -as going to see ho- much they learne) by gra)ing a -orksheet that -as all about place value3 8 e;plaine) each section o1 the -orksheet an) emphasize) ho- important it -as to try our best an) remember -hat -e ha) talke) about in class over the past couple o1 )ays3 As 8 -alke) aroun), 8 -as gla) to see that every stu)ent un)erstoo) -hat the 9uestions -ere asking an) 1elt that the lesson ha) gone smoothly -ith enough time 1or practice this time3

(. C&assroom Mana)ement P&an 5rules, proce)ures, preventative strategies, supportive strategies, +limite) to 1 page, C&assroom Ru&es 13 :isten care1ully 3 Gollo- )irections 23 Work 9uietly3 #o not )isturb others -ho are -orking3 "3 Cespect others3 De kin) -ith your -or)s an) actions3 53 Cespect school an) personal property3 73 Work an) play sa1ely3 Rein'or!ement P&an The stu)ents have a classroom store an) may earnElose pennies throughout the year base) on stu)ent behavior an) completion o1 home-ork3 The stu)ents love to earn more pennies so they can buy re-ar)s at the en) o1 each nine -eeks3 The classroom system seems to support positive stu)ent behavior an) help stu)ents stay on task3 The plan is generalize) in this -ayH 13 Fne o11ense o1 rulesA-arning )epen)ing on severity 3 Secon) o11enseAa penny is taken a-ay 1rom stu)ent >Stu)ent receives pennies every morning i1 materials an) home-ork are complete)Eturne) in >Stu)ents may buy incentives 1rom the classroom LStoreM at the en) o1 each 6 -eeks -ith earne) pennies :3 (e;t stepAsent to speak -ith principal ;3 81 this )oes not -orkAcall home or set up con1erence -ith parents

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

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C. Student -ntera!tion and En)a)ement+Strategies 1or promoting stu)ent to stu)ent interaction an) stu)ent motivation, +limite) to 1 page, Stu)ent interaction an) engagement are promote) through a variety o1 activities )uring the unit3 #uring the instructional time o1 the lesson, 8 call on stu)ents -ho are paying attention an) on task to come up an) manipulate the Mimio Doar)3 The stu)ents love to utilize the technology an) -ork har) to gain the privilege by staying on task3 This motivates stu)ents to try their har)est an) listen )uring gui)e) practice3 81 stu)ents 1inish on time -ith in)ivi)ual -ork, they are allo-e) to play 1un, interactive math enrichment games 1or t-enty minutes3 This motivates stu)ents to 1inish their -ork in a timely manner3 Stu)ents are encourage) to interact -ith other stu)ents through interactive learning games such as the Money &;change *ame an) partner activities incorporate) in each lesson3

D. Student Communi!ation +)etaile) )escription o1 appropriate strategies to encourage stu)ent to stu)ent communication, +limite) to 1 page, Many strategies -ere utilize) in this unit to encourage stu)ent to stu)ent communication3 #uring perio)s o1 each lesson, 8 encourage open )iscussion bet-een classmates about ho- they achieve) numerical ans-ers an) -hat their thinking process inclu)es3 #uring the lessons, &very)ay Mathematics o1ten inclu)es partner activities an) group activities3 8n each, stu)ents must communicate to complete the problems or game3 8 o1ten emphasize the importance o1 -orking -ith others an) helping a partner out )uring math3 Whether it be group, partner, or -hole class -ork 8 encourage stu)ents to e;press their opinion in a polite -ay an) communicate -ith other stu)ents about ho- they came to their ans-er3 &very)ay Mathematics incorporates -hole>class )iscussion, -hole>class activities, partner activities, an) small group activities in each lesson3

Narrati+e: Ana&$sis o' Assessment E. Pre4Assessment Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 15

Almost hal1 o1 the class receive) an 5!4 or better3 /o-ever, the other hal1 range) 1rom scores o1 11 to 5 out o1 113 This -as not a surprise to me )ue to the high )iversity o1 learning abilities in the

out o1

classroom3 8 -as hoping most o1 the class -oul) be able to 1igure out most o1 the ans-ers on the pre>test3 We have use) base>1! blocks be1ore, )iscusse) place value, an) a))e) an) subtracte) numbers in the 1!s Fverall analysis o1 results3 an) 1!!s3 /o-ever, the big cube +1or the thousan)s place, -as a ne- item3 We ha) also never talke) about the ten>thousan)s or seen a number -ritten in e;pan)e) notation3 Some stu)ents -ere able to solve the problems base) on prior lessons an) making in1erences, -hile other stu)ents simply guesse) an) )i) not kno- ho- to solve the problems3 While some stu)ents seem to have at least a small amount o1 kno-le)ge about each ob@ective, others #iscuss the results in re1erence to the learning ob@ectives3 seeme) to have no kno-le)ge o1 any one o1 the ob@ectives3 These results let me kno- that 8 must teach, practice, an) repeat all o1 the ob@ectives -ith some stu)ents -hile a 1e- have the basic skills )o-n an) nee) more enrichment activities3 The results sho- that 8 nee) to )i11erentiate instruction 1or almost every stu)ent in the classroom3 8t is #escribe ho- pre>assessment )ata -as use) to procee) -ith instruction 1or all stu)ents3 important that 8 -alk aroun) the class )uring the entirety o1 the math lesson to make sure that each stu)ent un)erstan)s3 With the many )i11ering levels, 8 am grate1ul to have paras an) my cooperating teacher to help stu)ents -ho are struggling i1 8 am -ith another stu)ent3

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

16

8 -ill intro)uce the concepts to the class an) ask i1 anyone has an i)ea o1 the meaning3 8 have 1oun) that the -hole class learns -ell in an open )iscussion< my higher stu)ents put 1orth their opinions on the sub@ect What is the plan to )i11erentiate 1or all learnersK -hile my lo-er stu)ents can learn 1rom their i)eas3 8 -ill provi)e more challenging problems to practice -ith 1or my higher stu)ents an) 1e-er, lo-er problems 1or those -ho score) belo- 1i1ty percent3 8 also -ill have my paras help most -ith the stu)ents -ho receive) much lo-er scores on the pre>test3 8 -ill provi)e enrichment activities 1or those -ho grasp the concept right a-ay3 F. Formati+e Assessment All stu)ents complete) the 1ormal assessment a1ter my secon) lesson3 Fver hal1 o1 my stu)ents achieve) a Fverall analysis o1 results3 per1ect score + 5 out o1 5,3 All o1 my stu)ents achieve) an 5!4 or better3 The analysis o1 results sho-s me that all stu)ents mastere) all o1 the ob@ectives that -ere in place 1or them3 #iscuss the results in re1erence to the learning ob@ectives3 Are stu)ents learning -hat -as inten)e) they learnK Fther stu)ents -ho )i) not achieve 1!!4 ma)e ran)om mistakes3 The 1irst 1ive points )eal -ith matching -ritten numbers to integers3 The ne;t 5 points are allotte) to-ar)s stu)ents -riting the values o1 )igits in numbers3 The last points )eal -ith stu)ents completing number patterns an) recognizing place value notation3 The scoring o1 the assessments sho-e) me that ob@ectives 5 an) 7 -ere met3 This assessment sho-e) me that the entire class mastere) the concepts -ith an 5!4 or better3 8 analyze) the #iscuss any a)aptations base) on the results o1 1ormative assessments3 assessments o1 my stu)ents -ho )i) not reach 1!!4 an) coul) not see any pattern or recurring theme in the incorrect ans-ers3 8 ma)e sure to revie- the material at the start o1 the ne;t lesson an) check 1or un)erstan)ing on each stu)ent=s -hiteboar) to ensure they un)erstoo) the concepts3

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

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The results o1 the 1ormative assessments sho-e) me that the )i11erentiation 8 ha) in place alrea)y -as bene1icial to stu)ents3 A para is assigne) to my three stu)ents -ith learning )isabilities3 She rea)s the 8)enti1y )i11erentiation nee)e) to help all stu)ents meet the goals an) ob@ectives o1 this unit3 problems to them an) makes sure they have a)e9uate manipulatives an) e;tra visuals to complete the problems3 8 also provi)e my higher stu)ents -ith enrichment activities an) games to complete i1 they 1inish the assignment early3 *. Summati+e Assessment The )ata reveale) that every stu)ent ha) improve) in their scores 1rom the pre>test to the post>test What )i) the )isaggregate) )ata o1 the assessment revealK assessment3 The class average improve) 1rom an average o1 5 out o1 11 to 635 out o1 113 Though this improvement is not )rastic, each stu)ent improve) their scores3 The average score o1 635 out o1 11 seeme) acceptable 1or mastery o1 learning ob@ectives3 Stu)ents seeme) #iscuss the results in re1erence to the learning ob@ectives3 to mainly make mistakes )ue to rushing an) not checking over their ans-ers3 The learning ob@ectives 1>7 -ere met by each stu)ent base) on the scoring o1 each section3 Stu)ents learne) -hat they -ere inten)e) to learn base) on the scoring o1 the assessment3 Stu)ents -ho misse) problems seeme) to comprehen) but make trivial mistakes3 Gor instance, one stu)ent misse) 2 #i) all stu)ents learn -hat -as inten)e) they learnK &;plain3 points un)er completing the table o1 1! more, 1!! more, an) 1!!! more3 /o-ever, the rest o1 the table she 1ille) out correctly3 The stu)ent seeme) to have misrea) the starting number an) 1aile) to complete the pattern correctly 1or only one o1 the numbers3 Pro+ide a !o%$ o' %re4assessment do!ument and t#e !orres%ondin) s!orin) ?e$,ru ri! in A%%endi/ C. Pro+ide a !o%$ o' one 'orma& 'ormati+e assessment do!ument and t#e !orres%ondin) s!orin) ?e$,ru ri! in A%%endi/ C.

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

1

Pro+ide a !o%$ o' one in'orma& 'ormati+e assessment do!ument and t#e !orres%ondin) s!orin) ?e$,ru ri! in A%%endi/ C. Pro+ide a !o%$ o' t#e summati+e assessment do!ument and t#e !orres%ondin) s!orin) ?e$,ru ri! in A%%endi/ C. H. Cisua& Re%resentation o' Disa))re)ated Data C#art,Ta &e,*ra%#s o' disa))re)ated data 'or t#e Pre4assessment s#ou&d e in!&uded in A%%endi/ C. #ue to the varie) nature o1 )ata collecte) by the teacher can)i)ates, each !andidate is as?ed to !reate a !#art,ta &e,)ra%# that inclu)es )ata 1or the Whole %lass, Subgroup, an) Gocus Stu)ents3 Title the tableEchartEgraph an) use labels to accurately portray the )ata3

C#art,Ta &e,*ra%# o' disa))re)ated data 'or t#e Summati+e Assessment s#ou&d e in!&uded in A%%endi/ C. #ue to the varie) nature o1 )ata collecte) by the teacher can)i)ates, each !andidate is as?ed to !reate a !#art,ta &e,)ra%# that inclu)es )ata 1or the Whole %lass, Subgroup, an) Gocus Stu)ents3 Title the tableEchartEgraph an) use labels to accurately portray the )ata3

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

-C. Se&'4E+a&uation and Re'&e!tion
A. Narrati+e des!ri%tion o' Su!!ess'u& A!ti+ities and 'uture im%&i!ations (ased on t#e ana&$sis o' a&& t#e assessment resu&ts0 identi'$ TWO &earnin) o 9e!ti+es 'rom t#e unit students "ere most su!!ess'u&. Fb@ective 1H T#e student "i&& !ount t#e +a&ue o' ase 1@ &o!?s usin) '&ats0 &on)s0 and !u es *i+e more t#an one reason 'or ea!# o' t#e su!!esses identi'ied. Grom the pre>assessment to the post>assessment, stu)ent scores improve) )rastically -hen they -ere aske) to -rite the number that the base 1! blocks represente)3 De1ore the unit, most stu)ents )i) not kno- ho- to count by 1!!!s or that the base 1! block +the big cube, represente) 1!!!3 Throughout the 2 )ays, -e practice) counting base 1! blocks in -hole class activities, small groups, an) in)ivi)ual practice3 We practice) in various -ays through using manipulatives, oral rehearsal, an) -ritten -ork3 8 believe the entire class=s learning styles -ere a))resse) an) the ob@ective -as e11ectively learne)3 Stu)ents ha) never been aske) to -rite the -or) 1orm o1 )igit values be1ore the lesson3 There1ore, this concept ha) to be intro)uce), learne), an) rehearse) over the three )ays3 The post>assessment sho-e) me that most stu)ents un)erstoo) the concept in the en)3 8 also checke) 1or un)erstan)ing )uring -hiteboar) practice at the beginning o1 each lesson an) the 1ormal 1ormative assessment3 Dy the en) o1 the unit, almost every stu)ent coul) -rite the value o1 )igits in numbers up to the 1!,!!!=s position3

Fb@ective H T#e student "i&& "rite t#e +a&ue o' di)its in num ers

Dis!uss at &east TWO t#in)s to do di''erent&$ in t#e 'uture to e/tend t#ese su!!esses to !ontinue students8 a!ademi! )ro"t#. 8n the 1uture, 8 -oul) like to provi)e more time 1or stu)ents to manipulate their o-n base 1! blocks in or)er to 1in) the value3 8 -oul) also like to incorporate more partner activities so that stu)ents may check each other 1or un)erstan)ing an) have more han)s>on practice -ith the value o1 blocks3 &;ten)ing the lesson to involve another )ay o1 the -eek -oul) allo- time 1or more repetition an) aca)emic gro-th in the area o1 1in)ing the value o1 base 1! blocks3

Another change 8 -oul) make to e;ten) success -oul) be allo-ing more -hiteboar) practice an) -hole class time 1or -riting the value o1 )igits in Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 2

numbers3 Though most o1 the class un)erstoo), 8 coul) tell that they -oul) have bene1itte) 1rom more practice together be1ore going straight into in)epen)ent -ork on values3 8 believe it -oul) have bene1itte) stu)ents to have them -rite the -or) 1orm o1 each value to the 1!,!!!s position on their slate be1ore practicing -ith actual numbers3 (. Narrati+e des!ri%tion o' Least Su!!ess'u& A!ti+ities and 'uture im%&i!ations (ased on t#e ana&$sis o' a&& t#e assessment *i+e more t#an one reason 'or ea!# o' t#e &east su!!ess'u& o 9e!ti+es identi'ied. resu&ts0 identi'$ TWO &earnin) o 9e!ti+es 'rom t#e unit students "ere &east su!!ess'u&. Fb@ective 1H The stu)ent -ill count by 1!s, This ob@ective -as a challenge 1or my stu)ents3 Though they -ere able to orally count by 1!s, 1!!s, an) 1!!!s 1!!s, an) 1!!!s easily -hen starting at !, it -as very har) 1or them to a)) 1!! an) 1!!! to numbers that )i) not en) in !3 Though most o1 the stu)ents correctly ans-ere) most o1 the 9uestions over this ob@ective on the 1ormal 1ormative assessment an) post>assessment, 8 coul) still see that some -ere struggling3 This especially occurre) -hen it aske) them to a)) 1,!!! an) 1!,!!! to a number3 Fb@ective H The stu)ent -ill recognize the Though most stu)ents recognize) numbers in place value notation, some continue) to struggle value o1 numbers in place value notation -ith the concept3 Gor instance, one stu)ent continue) to see the place value notation as ran)om numbers that must be a))e) together by using the partial sums metho)3 A 1e- others struggle) -hen a ! hel) the place value o1 one o1 the )igits in the actual number3 Dis!uss at &east TWO t#in)s to do di''erent&$ in t#e 'uture to im%ro+e students8 %er'orman!e. The 1irst change 8 -oul) make in the 1uture -oul) be 1or Fbective 13 As a class, 8 -oul) incorporate more -hole>class instruction an) practice -ith counting by 1!s, 1!!s, an) 1!!!s3 (e;t time, 8 -ill 1irst ask stu)ents to sho- me a ran)om number on their place value tools3 Then, 8 -ill ask them to a)) 1!s, 1!!s, an) then 1!!!s to that number3 8 -ill continue this until 8 am sure that every stu)ent un)erstan)s3 When practicing on their -hiteboar)s, 8 -ill -rite a number on the boar) an) ask them to sho- me the same number but a)) 1!, 1!!, or 1!!! to it3 This -ill let me kno- -ho un)erstan)s the concept o1 counting up an) -ho nee)s e;tra practice3

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The secon) change 8 -oul) make is to allo- more time 1or practice -ith place value notation3 Though the stu)ents seeme) to un)erstan) -hen -e -ere -riting numbers in place value notation as a -hole class, ne;t time 8 -ill a)) more in)epen)ent activities that )eal -ith the concept3 This -ay, 8 can -alk aroun) the classroom an) -ork -ith stu)ents -ho nee) the e;tra help3 TA(LE ;.1 Communi!ation Lo) Person Conta!ted Met#od o' Conta!t Resu&t or -m%a!t on -nstru!tion All chil)ren returne) their home-ork )ealing -ith place value the ne;t )ay3 This sho-e) me that parents receive) the home-ork chart an) ma)e sure their chil) complete) the activities3 Stu)ents like) to hear that they -ill soon become big 2r) gra)ers an) like to think o1 themselves as higher level stu)ents3 When 8 sho-e) the many manipulatives -e -oul) be using they -ere e;cite) to get starte)3 Fo&&o" U% 5i' ne!essar$6 All materials -ere sent home at the en) o1 the -eek on Gri)ay to let parents kno- ho- their chil) per1orme) in math 1or the -eek3 8 1ollo-e) up -ith stu)ents each )ay by gra)ing -orksheets, circling the room, an) vie-ing slates )uring the lesson3 This let me kno-hat ob@ectives -ere mastere) an) -hich ones nee)e) retaught3

Date

Reason 'or Conta!t

E "E !1"

All Parents o1 Stu)ents

8 inclu)e) the math home-ork an) activities on Mon)ay=s Weekly 1ol)ers to let the parents knohome-ork 1ol)er -hat their stu)ents -oul) be chart -orking on throughout the -eek an) -hat home-ork -as e;pecte) o1 them3 8 in1orme) stu)ents that -e -oul) be -orking on place value 1or most o1 the -eek3 8 tol) them it -as a very important concept that they must kno- to complete 2r) gra)e math3 8 sho-e) them several manipulatives -e -oul) be using to learn more about place value3

E 5E !1"

Stu)ents

Gace to Gace

Add rows as needed

C. Narrati+e Re'&e!tion on -m%a!t o' Communi!ations +limite) to 1 page, Since the unit -as a part o1 &very)ay Mathematics an) stu)ents -ere use) to most o1 the material that -as assigne), 8 believe my 1orms o1 Pittsburg State University Teacher Work Sample 5

communication -ere su11icient3 8 use) communication -ith the stu)ents to get them e;cite) about -hat they -ere )oing an) sho- them that math can relate to their every)ay lives3 8 kne- they love) using manipulatives an) playing enrichment games, so 8 )eci)e) to tell them about these prior to the lessons to spark interest3 Parent contact -as su11icient because it let them kno- -hat their stu)ents -oul) be learning 1or the -eek in math an) ho- much home-ork -as e;pecte) every night3

D. Narrati+e Re'&e!tion on Future Pro'essiona& De+e&o%ment +limite) to 1page, -denti'$ at &east TWO as%e!ts o' instru!tion t#at !ou&d e im%ro+ed. E/%&ain reasonin). Aspect 1H 8 believe &very)ay Mathematics is a great resource an) applies mathematics concepts to real -orl) e;periences -hile using han)s>on activities an) manipulatives3 /o-ever, it covers all concepts in a very short amount o1 time -ith little room 1or practice an) revie-ing3 8 believe this mathematics program coul) be improve) -ith e;tra e11ort on the teacher=s part3 Aspect H Another aspect o1 instruction that coul) be improve) is in the area o1 technology3 Although 8 use the Mimio>boar) )aily -ith math lessons, 8 kno- there are a))itional help1ul 1eatures 8 coul) utilize that 8 )o not kno- about3 We also have a classroom iPa) that has not been use) to the e;tent it shoul)3 8 believe technology coul) improve an) enhance every)ay instruction in math an) be bene1icial to-ar)s stu)ent learning3 W#at s%e!i'i! %ro'essiona& de+e&o%ment o%%ortunities,a!ti+ities "i&& #e&% to a!Duire t#at ?no"&ed)e or s?i&&7 8 -oul) nee) to come up -ith many enrichment activities an) provi)e e;traElonger amounts o1 time 1or in)ivi)ual concepts3 Gor instance, -ith this speci1ic unit, 8 believe that many stu)ents nee)e) e;tra practice -ith simple a))ition 1acts be1ore they move) onto counting up by the 1!s, 1!!s, an) 1!!!s3 8 -oul) research activities that the stu)ents coul) utilize to improve on basic math 1act practice an) other math concepts3 Then, 8 -oul) incorporate these into a small amount o1 math time )aily -ith stu)ents3 8 -oul) like to learn more about iPa)s in the classroom through speaking -ith other schools that utilize them, atten)ing a con1erence, or researching metho)s on my o-n3 8 coul) also speak -ith other co-orkers to learn about ho- they use their Mimo Doar) in the classroom an) come up -ith ne- i)eas 1or instruction3

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REFERENCES

(renda Wau)#ECoo%eratin) Tea!#er S#ari Kimre$EC&assroom Para Ho&&$ Ho sonEC&assroom Para Boe MartinES!#oo& Prin!i%a&

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APPEND-F A
Tit&e 1 E&ementar$ S!#oo& USD 3;G %urrent Accre)itation StatusH Accre)ite) TOTAL ENROLLMENT: (ui&din) Distri!t 25 762

State "5!1"6

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Tit&e 1 Sho- Duil)ings Distri! t TOTAL ENROLLMENT: Distri!t 762

State "5!1"6

NThere -as no online )ata 1or the assessments3 Pittsburg State University

n)

gra)e classroom )ue to the 1act that they )o not complete state Teacher Work Sample 6

APPEND-F (

Lesson Des!ri%tion TitleH Place 'alue *ra)e :evelH Secon) *ra)e AuthorH Alyssa Stuhlsatz Domain0 C&uster0 Standard O O • (umber an) Fperations in Dase Ten Un)erstan) place value3 Stan)ar) o Math3 3(DT3A31 Un)erstan) that the three )igits o1 a three>)igit number represent amounts o1 hun)re)s, tens, an) ones< e3g3, $!7 e9uals $ hun)re)s, ! tens, an) 7 ones3 Un)erstan) the 1ollo-ing as special casesH  Math3 3(DT3A31a 1!! can be thought o1 as a bun)le o1 ten tens A calle) a Lhun)re)3M  Math3 3(DT3A31b The numbers 1!!, !!, 2!!, "!!, 5!!, 7!!, $!!, 5!!, 6!! re1er to one, t-o, three, 1our, 1ive, si;, seven, eight, or nine hun)re)s +an) ! tens an) ! ones,3

O 9e!ti+es As a result o1 these activities, stu)ents -ill be able toH 13 The stu)ent -ill rea), -rite, an) mo)el numbers up to the thousan)s 3 The stu)ent -ill count the value o1 base 1! blocks using 1lats, longs, an) cubes 23 The stu)ent -ill create 2> an) "> )igit numbers using base>1! blocks Assessment,E+a&uation A1ter )isplaying base 1! blocks at the 1ront, stu)ents -ere aske) -hat number this represente) an) tol) to -rite it on their slates3 They -ere then given multiple numbers to )isplay -ith their o-n base>1! manipulatives3 Materia&s and Too&s Dase 1! blocks 1or each stu)ent + 1lats, 6 longs, an) 6 cubes, 1 Slate 1or each stu)ent 1 )ry>erase marker 1or each stu)ent MimioDoar) 1 copy o1 IMoney &;change *ame= )irections an) envelope o1 sorte) money 1or every t-o stu)ents Moti+ation or Anti!i%ator$ Set

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8 in1orm stu)ents that to)ay -e are going to use base 1! blocks again but learn about a ne- piece3 8 hol) up the big cube an) ask the stu)ents 9uestionsH 13 Who can guess ho- many 1lats are in this big cubeK 3 /o- many longsK 23 /o- many small cubesK Tea!#in) Pro!edures and Learnin) A!ti+ities O 8 )isplay base 1! blocks an) the stu)ents participate in an open )iscussion about the relationships among base 1! blocks3 8 intro)uce the big cube +1!!!s, an) -e )iscuss -hat it means3 O 8 ask three volunteers to 1orm a line hol)ing 1lats, longs, an) cubes3 8 have stu)ents -rite on their slates the value3 We repeat the activity an) make sure to inclu)e ! as a placehol)er3 O 8 -rite Ie;pan)e) notation= on the boar) an) intro)uce the term3 8 have the class practice -riting their )igits in e;pan)e) notation on the slates3 O We participate in an open )iscussion about ho- money relates to base 1! blocks3 8 sho- the relationship -ith pictures on the Mimio Doar)3 O The stu)ents play the IMoney &;change *ame= that 8 ha) prepare)3 With this, they practice the skill o1 making e;changes bet-een coins an) bills3 Ada%tations and A!!ommodations The three stu)ents -ith learning )isabilities are given e;tra time to )isplay the numbers on their slates an) hol) up base 1! blocks3 &;tra visuals an) gui)ance are accommo)ate) 1or stu)ents accor)ingly )uring the lesson3 C&osure Stu)ents are aske) to clean up their game pieces an) come to an en)3 We gather back together an) participate in an open )iscussion about -hy place value is important an) ho- it can be use) in real li1e3

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Lesson Des!ri%tion TitleH Place>'alue (otation 1or Ten>Thousan)s *ra)e :evelH Secon) *ra)e AuthorH Alyssa Stuhlsatz Domain0 C&uster0 Standard O O • (umber an) Fperations in Dase Ten Use place value un)erstan)ing an) properties o1 operations to a)) an) subtract3 Stan)ar) o Math3 3(DT3A32 Cea) an) -rite numbers to 1!!! using base>ten numerals, number names, an) e;pan)e) 1orm3 o Math3 3(DT3D35 Mentally a)) 1! or 1!! to a given number 1!!J6!!, an) mentally subtract 1! or 1!! 1rom a given number 1!!J6!!

O 9e!ti+es As a result o1 these activities, stu)ents -ill be able toH 13 The stu)ent -ill recognize the value o1 numbers in place value notation3 Assessment,E+a&uation Stu)ents complete a math @ournal page -ith 11 problems covering place value3 Materia&s and Too&s Stu)ent @ournal page 55 1 place value tool 1or each stu)ent MimioDoar) Moti+ation or Anti!i%ator$ Set 8 ask stu)ents to take out their personal place value tools an) ask the 1ollo-ing 9uestions3 13 81 -e count up 1rom ! to 6 in the one=s place o1 our place value tool, -hat happens a1ter -e count to 6K 3 What is the largest place value on your toolK 23 Who kno-s -hat an even larger place value -oul) beK Tea!#in) Pro!edures and Learnin) A!ti+ities • • Stu)ents count to 6,!!! by 1,!!!=s an) -e openly )iscuss -hat happens -hen -e nee) to a)) 1,!!! more3 Their place value un)erstan)ing is e;ten)e) to ten>thousan)s3 This is repeate) -ith 1!,!!!s to 1amiliarize them -ith 1!!,!!!3 As 8 say 5 )igit numbers, stu)ents )isplay them on their place>value tools3 8 then )isplay "> an) 5>)igit numbers on my place value tool an) have the stu)ents rea) them alou)3 Teacher Work Sample 2

Pittsburg State University

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8 -rite 1,!!1 on the boar)3 8n an open )iscussion, stu)ents ans-er ho- they -oul) )isplay this number -ith money, base 1! blocks, an) -hy it is necessary to -rite the zeroes3 8n)epen)ently, stu)ents solve "> an) 5>)igit place>value problems in their @ournal3

Ada%tations and A!!ommodations 8 still )i11erentiate instruction 1or stu)ents -ho -ork at a slo-er rate an) provi)e e;tra activities 1or those -ho 1inish early3 As above, 8 revie- ans-ers on place value tools to check 1or un)erstan)ing so that 8 can make correspon)ing a)aptations 1or the stu)ents -ho nee) it3 C&osure 8 encourage open )iscussion -ith the classroom an) ask them -hat their 1avorite partEmanipulativesEgames about place value -ere3 8 tell them that they )i) an e;cellent @ob in using their manipulatives an) -orking -ith each other to solve problems3 8 e;plain this -ill help them )o an even better @ob -hen they become 2r) gra)ers an) use place value in even more 1un -ays3

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NGollo-ing pages are materials 1or the Money &;change *ame an) Place 'alue Tool 0it

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APPEND-F C
1

Class Pre-Test and Post-Test Table
Pre-test Post-test

11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Focus Student 1 score Focus Student 2 score Whole Class Average

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Assessment Cubrics Pre>AssessmentESummative Assessment Cubric The assessment -ill be gra)e) -ith a total o1 11 points3 1, Writing the number o1 each group o1 base 1! blocks> 1 point , Gill in the blanks 1or the represente) number -ith ones, tens, hun)re)s, thousan)s, or ten>thousan)sA points 2, Write the number that is represente) in e;pan)e) notationA points ", %omplete the table giving 1!, 1!!, an) 1!!! moreA7 points

Gormal Assessment Cubric The assessment -ill be gra)e) -ith a total o1 5 points3 1, Matching names o1 numbersA5 points , Gill in the blanks 1or the represente) number -ith ones, tens, hun)re)s, thousan)s, or ten>thousan)sA5 points 2, %ontinue the patternA15 points

8n1ormal Assessment Cubric &ach stu)ent=s slateEmanipulative -as checke) )uring the activities3 They -ere tol) to try again i1 the ans-er -as incorrect3 A1ter this, 8 gave them hints3 81 more than one stu)ent ha) )i11iculty, 8 aske) the class to help me solve the problem 1or everyone to see3 We then trie) again until the concept -as mastere)3

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Pre>AssessmentESummative Assessment Name_____________________________ 1) Write t e n!mber o" ea# $ro!% o" base 10 blo#&s Number shown

__________________________

2) 'ill in t e blan&s( Write ones) tens) !ndreds) t o!sands) or ten-t o!sands The 3 n 32!"#$ stands %or 3________________ The & n '!3&# stands %or &_______________

3) Write t e n!mber $&& ( 3& ( " _____________________ 1!&&& ( ' _____________________

4) Com%lete t e Table

Number '" 3&$

1& more

)1&& more

1&&& more

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Gormal Assessment

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8n1ormal Gormative Assessment A1ter )isplaying base 1! blocks at the 1ront, stu)ents -ere aske) -hat number this represente) an) tol) to -rite it on their slates3 &;amples o1 these inclu)e)H 1, Fne big cube, three 1lats, one long, an) si; small cubesP 1,217 , T-o big cubes, seven 1lats, 1ive longs, an) t-o small cubesP ,$5 2, Fne big cube, no 1lats, no longs, an) one small cubeP 1,!!1

They -ere then given multiple numbers to )isplay -ith their o-n base>1! manipulatives3 &;amples o1 these inclu)e)H 1, 1,7"2 , 1,!2! 2, "!7

The stu)ents -ere given "> an) 5>)igit numbers to -rite on their slates an) then sho- on their personal place value books3 1, 1!,"57 , 2!, !5 2, ", 57

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