You are on page 1of 11

Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 1 ‐ Preliminaries 

™ Types of Equations (Acronym – PIGS): 
™ Point‐Slope:   
™ Intercept:  1 
™ General:  1  Note: A, B, and C are whole numbers 
™ Slope‐Intercept:   
™ Converting absolute value functions to piecewise: use sign charts 
™ Converting  to absolute value: | |  
™ Even/odd functions and their proofs – Spell out each step:  1 1  
™ Greatest integer (round down) function:   OR   
™ Least integer (round up) function:   
™ Factoring for zeros: 
™ Factor the constant ( ) 
™ Factor the coefficient of the highest power ( ) 
™ Determine all possibilities of   (both positive and negative) 
™ Synthetically divide until the answer is reached (remainder of zero) 
™ Equation of a circle:   and parametric:  cos  & sin  
™ Equation of an ellipse centered at the origin:  1 where “a” and “b” are half widths of the axes 
™ Important trigonometric identities: 
The Unit Circle: 
™ cos  
™ sin  
™ cos cos cos sin sin  
™ cos cos cos sin sin  
ƒ cos 2 cos s in  
™ sin cos 1 and all it’s subsidiaries 
™ Law of Sines:   
™ Law of Cosines:  2 cos  

 
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries Chapter 2 – Limits and Continuity
 There can only be one limit per function at any given x-value
 Tabular approximation of limits: plug numbers approaching some value 𝑥𝑥 = 𝑐𝑐 from both sides into a function
 A function approaching both positive and negative infinity will have lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) = 𝐷𝐷𝐷𝐷𝐷𝐷
 A function approaching only positive or negative infinity will have lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) = 𝐷𝐷𝐷𝐷𝐷𝐷 (→ ∞)
 lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 + 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) is the right-hand limit; lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 − 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) is the left-hand limit
 Important limits:
sin 𝑥𝑥
 lim𝑥𝑥→0 =1
𝑥𝑥
sin 𝑥𝑥
 lim𝑥𝑥→∞ =0
𝑥𝑥
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥+ℎ )−𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥)
 Instantaneous rate of change: = limℎ→0
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 ℎ
Δ𝑦𝑦
 Average rate of change: 𝑚𝑚𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠𝑠 =
Δ𝑥𝑥
 End behavior: lim𝑥𝑥→±∞ 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) = _____
 End behavior model cases:
1. Degree numerator > degree denominator long division to find model (discard the remainder)
𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛𝑛
2. Degree numerator = degree denominator 𝑦𝑦 =
𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐𝑐 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑
3. Degree numerator < degree denominator 𝑦𝑦 = 0
1 1
 Theta substitution: 𝜃𝜃 = → lim𝑥𝑥→∞ 𝑓𝑓 � � = lim𝜃𝜃→0 𝑓𝑓(𝜃𝜃)
𝑥𝑥 𝑥𝑥
 Limit as approaching negative infinity: lim𝑥𝑥→−∞ 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) = lim𝑥𝑥→∞ 𝑓𝑓(−𝑥𝑥)
 Sandwich Theorem: if 𝑔𝑔(𝑥𝑥) ≤ 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) ≤ ℎ(𝑥𝑥) in an interval about some value 𝑥𝑥 = 𝑐𝑐, and if lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 𝑔𝑔(𝑥𝑥) =
lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 ℎ(𝑥𝑥) = 𝐿𝐿, then lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) = 𝐿𝐿
 Types of discontinuities:
sin 𝑥𝑥 𝑥𝑥 2 −5𝑥𝑥+6
1. Point discontinuity (can be removable) lim𝑥𝑥→0 and lim𝑥𝑥→3 respectively
𝑥𝑥 𝑥𝑥−3
2. Jump discontinuity lim𝑥𝑥→0 ⌊𝑥𝑥⌋
1
3. Infinity discontinuity lim𝑥𝑥→0 � �
𝑥𝑥
1
4. Oscillating discontinuity lim𝑥𝑥→0 sin � �
𝑥𝑥
 Continuity – A function is continuous if:
1. 𝑓𝑓(𝑐𝑐) exists
2. lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) exists
3. lim𝑥𝑥→𝑐𝑐 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) = 𝑓𝑓(𝑐𝑐)
 Continuity – A function’s endpoints (in interval [𝑎𝑎, 𝑏𝑏]) are continuous if:
1. lim𝑥𝑥→𝑎𝑎 + 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) = 𝑓𝑓(𝑎𝑎)
2. lim𝑥𝑥→𝑏𝑏 − 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) = 𝑓𝑓(𝑏𝑏)
1
 𝑦𝑦 = is technically a continuous function. However, it has a discontinuity at 𝑥𝑥 = 0
𝑥𝑥
 If two functions are continuous at 𝑥𝑥 = 𝑐𝑐, then they are still continuous if added, subtracted, multiplied, divided
(if the denominator doesn’t equal 0), and inserted, like in 𝑓𝑓�𝑔𝑔(𝑥𝑥)�
 Polynomial are unconditionally continuous
 Proper form of a function with a point discontinuity is a piecewise function covering the point
 Absolute (global) extrema are always relative (local). No absolute if a discontinuity where the extreme would be.
 Min-Max Theorem: if a function 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) is continuous in an interval [𝑎𝑎, 𝑏𝑏], 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) must have an absolute minimum
and an absolute maximum in that interval
 Intermediate Value Theorem: A function 𝑓𝑓(𝑥𝑥) that is continuous in an interval [𝑎𝑎, 𝑏𝑏] takes on every value
between 𝑓𝑓(𝑎𝑎) and 𝑓𝑓(𝑏𝑏)
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 3 – Intro to Derivatives 
™ Ways of signifying a derivative:  , , , , ,  
™ Primary definition of a derivative (as in chapter 2):    lim  
™ Alternate definition of a derivative:  lim  
™ Differentiable functions have derivatives at all points (or at ends of a closed interval, left/right hand derivatives) 
™ Numerical differentiation (TI‐83/84) for point derivatives:    , ,  
™ Symmetric Difference Quotient (SDQ), with a fixed h‐value:   
™ Functions are non‐differentiable at:  
1. Corners  | |   @  0 
2. Discontinuities (except in the case of something like   @  0     @  0 
3. Cusps (slope approaches positive AND negative infinity)     @  0 
4. Vertical asymptotes (slope approaches positive OR negative infinity)  √    @  0 
™ 5 ways to derive: Definition, Alternate Definition, SDQ, Point nDeriv, Graphed nDeriv 
™ Critical points: any point with  0 or   
™ When finding all derivatives of a function, use the notation  , , , , , ,…,     _____  
™ : They are inverses, and the quantities   and   are discrete numbers (in a defined ratio) 
™ Average cost is the average value of the cost function. Marginal cost (estimated cost for one more item) is the 
derivative of the cost function 
™ Chain rule:  ; formally:   
™ Implicit differentiation: when deriving a function with no isolated “ ” portion 
™ Logarithmic differentiation: in an equation, take the natural log of both sides. Derive and isolate  . MUST be 
used in any circumstance with  , that is, any function to the variable “x” power 
™ Slope fields: given  , plugging in  ,  coordinates to graph slopes at common coordinates of a graph 

Hereafter, the arrow “ ” will be used to informally signify derivation, with the arrowhead pointing to the derivative. 

Important derivatives to know: 

™ sin cos sin cos sin  


™ tan sec     ™ cot csc    
™ sec sec tan   ™ csc csc cot  
™ sin   ™ cos  
√ √
™ sec   ™ csc  
| |√ | |√

™ tan   ™ cot  
™ log   ™ ln  
™ ln   ™
 

™          
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 4 – Applications of Derivatives 
™ First Derivative Theorem for Local Extrema: if a function   has a minimum or maximum at   and  ’  
exists,  ’ 0. Take note, the opposite is not necessarily true (case of inflection points). 
™ Informal corollary:   If  ’  changes signs from positive to negative, an unconditional maximum occurs. 
  If  ’  changes signs from negative to positive, an unconditional minimum occurs. 
™ Second Derivative Theorem for Local Extrema: If a function   has first derivative  ’ 0, and if… 
™ The second derivative,  ’’  is positive, an unconditional minimum occurs 
™ The second derivative,  ’’  is negative, an unconditional maximum occurs 
™ Mean Value Theorem for Derivatives: if a function   is both continuous and differentiable in a closed interval 
, , there is at least one point   in the interval where  ’  
™ Rolle’s Theorem: If a function   is continuous and differentiable on a closed interval  , , and 
0, there is at least one point   where  ’ 0 
ƒ Rolle’s Theorem Extension: If the aforementioned function   has  , there is 
at least one point   where  ’ 0 
™ When describing functions: find first and second derivatives. Indicate when the function is increasing or 
decreasing, has a minimum or maximum, is concave up or down, and has an inflection point 
™ Definition of an antiderivative:  . “ ” is the arbitrary constant, or the constant of integration 
™ Linearization:  ’ . This is just a first order Taylor series, as you’ll learn later in chapter 9 
™ Differentials separate parts of the derivative ratio (e.g.  4 ,   4 ) 
™ Error is defined as:  | |; %  100, where   is any approximation of   
™ Maximization (MUST be shown for full AP credit): 
1. Develop a plan of the situation. Often this necessitates a drawing. 
2. Mathematically model the situation 
3. Identify domain of model 
4. Identify critical points and endpoints 
5. Solve model, taking into account both critical points and endpoints 
™ Related Rates (MUST be shown for full AP credit): 
1. Develop a plan of the situation. This almost always requires drawing(s) 
2. Mathematically model the situation 
3. Differentiate model, relative to an arbitrary variable,  , for time. 
4. Solve model, as dictated by the problem 
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 5 – Intro to Integrals 
™ Rectangular Approximation Method (RAM). Casual: LRAM, RRAM, MRAM. Formal: (Type) Riemann Sum.   
™ Left Riemann sum to infinity: lim 0 1 1  
™ Right Riemann sum to infinity: lim 1 2  
™ Informal notation:        ,  means take LRAM with “n” rectangles on the closed interval  ,  
™ lim       , , , ,  
™ Trapezoidal Approximation Method:  2 2 2  
™ Maximum Trapezoidal Error: | | , where “M” is the maximum value of  ’’  on the interval  ,  
being integrated 
 
™ Nomenclature of Integration:   
    , where the variable of 
integration is usually “ ” or “ ” 
™ Some definitions: 
™   2    
™   0 
™ 0 
™  
™  
™  
™ , only when   
™  
™ Min‐Max Rule: If a function   has an absolute maximum and minimum value in the interval  , , then 
min max  
™ Mean Value Theorem for Definite Integrals: If a function   is continuous on  , , then at some point     
 such that  ,   
™ Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part 1: If the antiderivative of   is differentiable in the closed 
interval  , ,   
™ Remember the Chain Rule: If the above conditions are met and the function   is also continuous in 
, ,   
™ Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Part 2: If a function   is continuous in  ,  and   is the antiderivative 
of  ,   
™ Euler’s Method for Approximating function values: 
,   ’ ,
,   ∆ ’ ∆ ∆ , ∆
∆ , ∆  
 
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 6 – Types of Integration and Applications 
Methods of Integration: 
™ u‐subsitution:  sin   cos . Define  sin cos . Plug in:    sin    
™ Parts:  .   sometimes, notably in the case of  ln  and  tan  
™ Tabular (same thing as parts, but organized): 
Derivatives  Integrals 
2   +    2 2 2  
2  –    
0   
™ Partial Fractions (only when the degree of the numerator is smaller than that of the denominator): 
™ Standard Case:  . Solve for A and B. Plug them 
into the partial fraction step (located above the underlined word) and integrate each fraction separately. 
2x 3 A B
™ Perfect Square Case:  2 dx 2 dx 
x‐3 x‐3 x‐3

™ Incompletely Factorable Denominator:     
™ Long Division (only when the degree of the numerator is greater than that of the denominator). Divide and 
separate answer into individual integrals 
™ Trig Substitution (completing the square might be necessary): 
  4 sec   1 4  tan    
2 tan 1 2 sec  

 
™ Separation:      to         to    ln| |     to         to      
 
Applications of Integration: 
™ Law of Exponential Change:   and   (“k” is positive when increasing, negative when decreasing) 
™ Continuous Compounding:   (“r” is the rate, “P0” is the initial amount) 
™ Yearly Compounding:  1  (“r” is the rate, “P0” is the initial amount, “n” is the 
number of compoundings per year) 
™ Half‐life:   
™ Logistic Growth:   and   
™ Newton’s Law of Heating/Cooling):   and   (“k” is positive when warming 
and negative when cooling, “T” is the temperature of the object at time “t”, “T0” is the initial temperature of the 
object, and “Ts” is the temperature of the surrounding atmosphere) 
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 7 – Solids and Lengths 
Solids with defined cross sections: 
1. Draw the base graph with a line resembling the cross section (given in the problem): 

√  

 
2. Draw the cross section, label the dimensions, relative to the base function: 
 
  √    
 
  √  
3. Write a formula for the area of the cross section. Determine the volume of the cross section: 
√       &        
4. Integrate (total sum) the cross sectional  formula over the base’s domain needed: 
1
8   
2

 
Disk Method of Revolutions: 
1. Draw the original graph with a line (perpendicular to the axis of rotation) resembling the radius of the circular 
cross section 
2. Model the line’s distance ( ), relative to the original graph function. The line will be the radius of the graph. 
Note: if the cross sections are horizontal circles, the entire integral/function will be relative to the variable “y” 
3.       or        
 
Washer Method of Revolutions: 
1. Draw the original graph with a line (perpendicular to the axis of rotation, between the two functions) resembling 
the difference between inner and outer radii of the 2‐D “doughnut” cross section 
2. Model the outer distance ( ) and the inner distance ( ), relative to the original graph functions 
3.       or        
 
Shell Method of Revolutions: 
1. Draw the original graph with a line (parallel to the axis of rotation) resembling the thin‐thickness cylinder that 
will be swept out 
2. Draw the cylinder and label the radius (r)/height (h)/thickness (dx or dy), relative to the original graph function 
3. Redraw the cylinder into a rectangle (with one side as “2 ” and the other as “ ”), with functions/variables 
relative to “x” or “y” plugged in 
4. Write a function representing the area of the rectangle and another representing the cross‐sectional volume 
5. Integrate the cross‐sectional volume formula over the domain as needed 
 
Lengths of Curves for Continuous Functions: 

™ 1 1  
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 8 – Sequences, L’Hôpital, Rates of Growth, Improper Integrals 
Sequences and their Convergence: 
™ Sequences are plotted as a series of unconnected points (e.g.  ), x‐values usually as all integers  0  
™ Sequences can be either finite or infinite (infinite sequences have ellipsis at the end) 
™ Convergence of sequences: If lim  exists, the sequence converges at the solution. If not, it diverges 
™ If a sequence oscillates between positive and negative values and doesn’t approach a value, it diverges 
™ Arithmetic Sequence:  , , 2 , 3 , , 1 ,   
™ Geometric Sequence:  , , , , , ,   
™ Sandwich Theorem: if sequences   for all values of “n” in the domain and if lim
lim , then lim . Use this to prove convergence (define the upper and lower bounds) 
™ Absolute Value Theorem: if lim | | 0, then lim 0 
 
L’Hôpital’s Rule: 
™ 0 0 , ∞⁄∞: lim lim . (general rule) 

™ 0 ∞ : lim sin lim . Then do the general rule. 


™ ∞ ∞: Find a common denominator, then do the general rule. 
™ 1 , 0 , ∞ : lim ln , do the general rule, and find lim lim lim  
 
Relative Rates of Growth, given two functions   and  , if: 
™ lim   ∞ :   grows faster than   

™ lim   , (0 ∞ :   and   grow at the same rate 

™ lim 1, then the exact same end behavior model 

™ lim 0:   grows slower than   


 
™ When dealing with any ∞ , disregard “k” 
™ lim lim , so find lim , whichever is faster there is faster in the original problem 

™ lim lim  
 
Improper Integrals: 
™ lim  
™ lim lim  (for some function undefined at  0) 
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 9 – Infinite Series and their Convergence 
™ An infinite series (also called an infinite sum) is a sum of an infinite sequence of numbers. Denoted by “ ” 
™ A series is said to converge if its sum equals some value. If a series diverges, it’s sum is infinity. 
™ Geometric Series: ∑ . (e.g. ∑ 5  and ∑ ) 
™ Telescoping Series: ∑  ∑ . If the series is written term‐by‐term, the “middle values” will cancel 
™ Three ways to find the sum of a series: 
1. Estimation (write the values and subtotal 10‐50 times) 
2. Geometric Series Equation: ∑      (or using the defined functions in Taylor Series) 
3. Partial Sums: In a telescoping series, take the first term and the limit (“n” approaches infinity) of the last 
term. Sum them for the answer. 
™ Taylor Series:   models a function 
! !
, centered at   
™ MacLaurin Series (specific Taylor series centered at  0): 
1. ∑ 1   | | 1 
2. ∑ 1 1 1   | | 1 

3. ∑ 1   All real values of x 
! ! !

4. sin ∑ 1 1   All real values of x 
! ! ! !

5. cos ∑ 1 1 1   All real values of x 
! ! ! !

6. tan ∑ 1 1   | | 1 

7. ln 1 ∑ 1 1   1 1 
™ A series is said to converge if its sum equals some value. If a series diverges, it’s sum is infinity. 
™ nth Term Test for Convergence: if lim 0, the series might converge. If not, diverges. 
™ Geometric Series Convergence: a geometric series converges if and only if | | 1 
™ Ratio Test: lim . If  1, converges. If  1, diverges. If  1, inconclusive (use another test) 
™ If all “x” cross out in ratio test, the series either converges everywhere or diverges everywhere 
™ If the limit simplifies to something like “lim 1 | |”, the radius of convergence is 0 at  0 
™ nth Root Test: lim lim . If  1, converges. If  1, diverges. If  1, inconclusive. 
™ Direct Comparison Test: Given sequences  , ,  have no negative values (compare term‐by‐term): 
™ ∑  converges if ∑  converges and   for all  , where   is a positive start point. 
, , , etc. all converge. When comparing series like   and  , add 1 onto  . It’ll still converge. 
!
™ ∑  diverges if ∑  diverges and   for all  , where   is a positive start point.   diverges. 
™ P‐Series: ∑  converges if  1 and diverges if  1 
™ Harmonic Series: ∑  diverges, as do ∑  or ∑ , etc. 
™ Alternating Series Theorem (Leibniz’s Theorem): A series ∑ 1  converges if all   are positive, 
 for all “n” values, lim 0 
™ Integral Test: if a sequence  , where   is continuous, positive, and decreasing for  , then 
∑  and   either both converge or both diverge 


 
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries    Chapter 9 – Infinite Series and their Convergence 
™ Limit Comparison Test: if sequences   and   are positive for all  , where   is a positive start point, and 
if lim , where 0 ∞, then ∑  and ∑  either both converge or both diverge 
™ Determining convergence at endpoints: 
1. Find the interval of convergence using the ratio test (e.g. ∑ 1  converges in  1 1) 
2. Plug in endpoints: 
a. ∑ 1  diverges (harmonic series) 

b. ∑ 1  converges (alternating harmonic series) 
™ Absolute convergence: If a series and it’s family (regardless whether it’s alternating) converges (geometric) 
™ Conditional convergence: If a series doesn’t converge, but it’s alternating counterpart does (harmonic) 
™ Definition of Remainder: if a series is approximated ∑ ,  | | 
™ Remainder Estimation Theorem (aka Lagrange Remainder):   
!
™  is the maximum value of the  1  derivative of   in the given interval of convergence 
™ Alternating Series Estimation Theorem: If an alternating series converges, the sum of the series approximated to 
the first   terms has a maximum error of the  n 1  term. 
™ Term‐by‐term integration: series ∑ ∑ .  . “C” must come first. 


 
Shivam Verma’s Calculus Summaries Chapter 10 – Parametric, Vectors, and Polar
Parametric:
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑
 = ÷ = ×
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 ′�
𝑑𝑑 2 𝑦𝑦 𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑′� 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑

𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 2
=
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑
(𝑦𝑦 ′ ) = 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 , where 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 is the derivative of 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 , relative to “t”
�𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑

𝑡𝑡 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 2 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 2
 Arc Length: 𝐿𝐿 = ∫𝑡𝑡 2 �� � + � � 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑. Remember, √𝑥𝑥 2 = |𝑥𝑥|
1 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑

Vectors:
 Vectors don’t say where something originates, only where it goes. They are represented as 𝑣𝑣⃑ = 〈𝑎𝑎, 𝑏𝑏〉
 Head minus tail rule: If originating coordinates and ending coordinated are (𝑥𝑥1 , 𝑦𝑦1 ) and (𝑥𝑥2 , 𝑦𝑦2 ) respectively, the
vector created between them is 〈𝑥𝑥2 − 𝑥𝑥1 , 𝑦𝑦2 − 𝑦𝑦1 〉 = 〈𝑎𝑎, 𝑏𝑏〉
 |𝑣𝑣⃑ | = √𝑎𝑎2 + 𝑏𝑏 2
𝑏𝑏 Converting to polar
 𝜃𝜃 = tan−1 � �
𝑎𝑎
 Vectors can be added, multiplied with a constant, or subtracted (take the negative and add)

A Vector and its Components:

(𝑥𝑥2 , 𝑦𝑦2 )

(𝑥𝑥1 , 𝑦𝑦1 ) 𝜃𝜃

Polar:
 Coordinate system: (𝑟𝑟, 𝜃𝜃)
 𝑥𝑥 = 𝑟𝑟 cos 𝜃𝜃 and 𝑦𝑦 = 𝑟𝑟 sin 𝜃𝜃
 𝑟𝑟 2 = 𝑥𝑥 2 + 𝑦𝑦 2 Converting to rectangular
𝑦𝑦
 tan 𝜃𝜃 =
𝑥𝑥
1 𝛽𝛽 1 𝛽𝛽
 Polar Areas: 𝐴𝐴 = ∫𝛼𝛼 𝑟𝑟 2 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 = ∫𝛼𝛼 𝑓𝑓(𝜃𝜃)2 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑
2 2
𝑑𝑑
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 (𝑓𝑓(𝜃𝜃) sin 𝜃𝜃 )
 = ÷ = 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑
𝑑𝑑
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑 (𝑓𝑓(𝜃𝜃) cos 𝜃𝜃)
𝑑𝑑𝑑𝑑