CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence

CHCAC317A. Support older people to maintain their independence
Author: John Bailey Copyright Text copyright © 2008 by John N Bailey. Illustration, layout and design copyright © 2008 by John N Bailey. Under Australia’s Copyright Act 1968 (the Act), except for any fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review, no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission from John N Bailey. All inquiries should be directed in the first instance to the publisher at the address below. Copying for Education Purposes The Act allows a maximum of one chapter or 10% of this book, whichever is the greater, to be copied by an education institution for its educational purposes provided that that educational institution (or the body that administers it) has given a remuneration notice to JNB Publications. Disclaimer All reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the quality and accuracy of this publication. JNB Publications assumes no responsibility for any errors or omissions and no warranties are made with regard to this publication. Neither JNB Publications nor any authorized distributors shall be held responsible for any direct, incidental or consequential damages resulting from the use of this publication.

Published in Australia by: JNB Publications PO Box, 268, Macarthur Square NSW 2560 Australia.

Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009

CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1

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CHCAC317A. Support older people to maintain their independence Contents
CHCAC317A. SUPPORT OLDER PEOPLE TO MAINTAIN THEIR INDEPENDENCE........................................... 2 Author: John Bailey .................................................................................................................................. 2 Copying for Education Purposes ............................................................................................................... 2 Disclaimer ................................................................................................................................................. 2 Description: ............................................................................................................................................... 7 Employability Skills: .................................................................................................................................. 7 Application: ............................................................................................................................................... 7 Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 7 Learning Program ..................................................................................................................................... 8 Additional Learning Support ..................................................................................................................... 8 Facilitation ................................................................................................................................................ 8 Flexible Learning ....................................................................................................................................... 9 Space......................................................................................................................................................... 9 Study Resources ........................................................................................................................................ 9 Time ........................................................................................................................................................ 10 Study Strategies ...................................................................................................................................... 10 Using this learning guide: ....................................................................................................................... 10 THE ICON KEY............................................................................................................................................ 11 THE SUPPLEMENTARY ICONS .................................................................................................................... 12 How to get the Most out of your learning guide .................................................................................... 13 Additional research, reading and note taking. ....................................................................................... 13 EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS – ........................................................................................................................... 14 CERTIFICATE III IN AGED CARE .................................................................................................................. 14 PERFORMANCE CRITERIA .......................................................................................................................... 18 SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE .......................................................................................................................... 20 Required Skills ......................................................................................................................................... 20 Required Knowledge ............................................................................................................................... 21 RANGE STATEMENT .................................................................................................................................. 22 EVIDENCE GUIDE ....................................................................................................................................... 23 1. SUPPORT THE OLDER PERSON WITH THEIR ACTIVITIES OF LIVING. ................................................... 24 1.1 ENCOURAGE OLDER PEOPLE TO UTILISE SUPPORT SERVICES WHERE APPROPRIATE. ............................................ 24 Social Justice ........................................................................................................................................... 26 Aged Care Standards .............................................................................................................................. 27 Aged Care Assessment Teams ................................................................................................................ 28 Home & Community Care Program (HACC) ............................................................................................ 29 Community Aged Care Packages (CACP) ................................................................................................ 31 Extended Aged Care at Home (EACH) .................................................................................................. 31 Extended Aged Care at Home Dementia (EACH D) ................................................................................. 32 National Respite for Carers Program (NRCP) .......................................................................................... 33 Centrelink Assistance .............................................................................................................................. 34

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.................................................. 39 Low level Care .............................................................................................................................. 56 Activity 2: Case Study ...... 75 Roles and Responsibilities ................................................................................................ 52 Respite ................................................................ 51 Carer Support ............................. 66 Routine in an Aged Care Facility .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 37 Types of Care and Services ....................................................................................................... 44 Aged care homes for culturally and linguistically diverse people .............................................................. 35 Community nursing and Health Centres ............................ 67 Customs/Cultural needs ......................................... 53 High level care ...................................................... 69 Cultural communication ............................................................................................................................................................... 47 Activity 1 ..... 42 Short-term Care ................................................ .................................................................................................................................................................................... 52 Formal Care ................................................................................................................................................................... 65 Ensure visits and service delivery accommodate the older person’s established routines and customs where possible........................................................................ 68 The Iceberg Model ................................................................... 75 Working with Carers .......................................... 60 Supervision ....................................3 IDENTIFY THE NEEDS OF THE OLDER PERSON FROM THE SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN AND FROM CONSULTATION WITH A SUPERVISOR.. 42 How does your client access respite care? ............... .............................................. 35 Transition Care Program ...................................................................... 76 Limited Supervision.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 70 Co-workers........................................ 73 1......................................................................................................................... 42 How palliative care is managed in aged care homes? ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 47 What if your client is not happy with their care? ...................................... 45 Independent Living Units ........................ 77 Activity 7 ...................................................................................................................................................................... 47 Where else can they get help? ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................2 CLEARLY EXPLAIN THE SCOPE OF THE SERVICE TO BE PROVIDED TO THE OLDER PERSON AND/OR THEIR ADVOCATE................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 44 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people .................................................................................................................................................. 45 Particular health conditions ............................................................................................................................... 57 1........................................................................... 74 Carer attributes ............................................................................................................................................. 54 Ageing in Place ....................................... ................................................... 58 Stages of Care Planning ........................................................... 50 Personal Cost of Caring ............................................................. 78 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 4 of 158 .......... ..................................................................................... 49 Informal Care ................... 73 Activity 6 ............................................................................................................................................. 67 Activity 5: Case Study ..... 41 End-of-life Care/Palliative Care .......................................................................................................... 65 Activity 4 ........................................................................................................................................................... 43 What fees do they have to pay? .............................................................................5 PERFORM WORK IN A MANNER THAT ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE SERVICES ARE BEING PROVIDED IN THE CLIENT’S OWN HOME............... 46 Home nursing ............. 43 Cultural and Identified Needs .............................................................. 43 Transition Care ......................... 52 Carer Resource Centres ................................................................................................................................................................................... 38 Hostel/accommodation services .................................................................................................................................... 41 Extra Services.................................................................................................................................................. 48 1.......................................Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Program ................. 61 Activity 3 ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Ageing in Place ............................................................................................ 76 Documentation ........................................................................................................................................................................ 43 How much respite care can a client have? ....................................

......................... TO MAXIMISE SAFETY AND COMFORT................................................................................................................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 81 Activity 8 . ............ 127 3.............. 97 2......................................................................... SUPPORT THE OLDER PERSON WHO IS EXPERIENCING LOSS AND GRIEF.................................................. 139 Reporting Grief ...................... 111 Activity 18 ............................................................. 94 2............... 145 Listen with Compassion ........... ................................................................................................................ 85 1...................................................................... 104 Clinical notes/Progress notes/Care Plan .................................. 104 Activity 15 ................................................ 111 Figure 1: Safety ............................................4 RECOGNISE HAZARDS AND ADDRESS IN ACCORDANCE WITH ORGANISATION POLICY AND PROTOCOLS...... 110 2..................... 122 3......................... ............................... 118 Activity 21: Case Study ................................................................................................................ RECOGNISE AND REPORT CHANGES IN AN OLDER PERSON’S ABILITY TO UNDERTAKE ACTIVITIES OF LIVING................................................................................................................. 115 Activity 20 ................................................................................................... ............................................. PROTOCOLS AND PROCEDURES.... 87 Activity 10 ................... 143 4........1.............................1 RECOGNIZE SIGNS THAT OLDER PERSON IS EXPERIENCING GRIEF AND REPORT TO APPROPRIATE PERSON....... 99 Activity 14 ...........................................................................7 PROVIDE SUPPORT/ASSISTANCE IN ACCORDANCE WITH ORGANISATION POLICY.............. IN CONSULTATION WITH THE OLDER PERSON....................................................... 103 Telephone ........................................................1 MONITOR THE OLDER PERSON’S ACTIVITIES AND ENVIRONMENT TO IDENTIFY INCREASED NEED FOR SUPPORT/ASSISTANCE WITH ACTIVITIES OF LIVING....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 107 Activity 16 ..........................................................................................2 PROVIDE SUPPORT TO PROMOTE SECURITY OF THE OLDER PERSON’S ENVIRONMENT........................................................................................................................ 115 Activity 19: Research ............................................................... .........................................................................6 PROVIDE SERVICES IN A MANNER THAT ENABLES THE OLDER PERSON TO DIRECT THE PROCESSES WHERE APPROPRIATE...................... 116 3........................................................... ..........................................................................3 SUPPORT/ASSIST THE OLDER PERSON TO MODIFY OR ADAPT THE ENVIRONMENT OR ACTIVITY TO FACILITATE INDEPENDENCE.......................................... ...............................4 SEEK AIDS AND/OR EQUIPMENT TO SUPPORT/ASSIST THE OLDER PERSON UNDERTAKE ACTIVITIES OF LIVING INDEPENDENTLY............... ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 147 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 5 of 158 .................................................................................................................. 121 Activity 22 .......................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................................................. 118 3......................1 ENCOURAGE AND SUPPORT/ASSIST THE OLDER PERSON TO MAINTAIN THEIR ENVIRONMENT...... ............................ 84 Activity 9: Case Study ............................................ 97 Activity 13 .... 103 Face to face/Verbally ........... 80 Meeting Care Needs ................................................................... 132 3.............. 139 4............................................................... SAFETY AND SECURITY................ 123 Activity 23 ............................. 109 Activity 17 ............................ 81 Home and Community Care (HACC) Services .............2 REPORT TO A SUPERVISOR THE OLDER PERSON’S INABILITY TO UNDERTAKE ACTIVITIES OF LIVING INDEPENDENTLY................................................................ 146 Concentrate your efforts on listening carefully and with compassion..................................... 105 2...................... 137 4........................... ............................................. 134 Table 2: Hazards in the Environment ............................................................................................................................................. SUPPORT THE OLDER PERSON TO MAINTAIN AN ENVIRONMENT THAT MAXIMISES INDEPENDENCE............. ...........................8 DEMONSTRATE APPROPRIATE USE OF EQUIPMENT TO SUPPORT/ASSIST THE OLDER PERSON WITH ACTIVITIES OF LIVING WITHIN WORK ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITY...................................................................................................................................................... 129 Activity 24 ................................................ 88 1.. 102 2............... 89 Activity 11 .................. 93 Activity 12 .....................................................................................................3 ADAPT OR MODIFY THE ENVIRONMENT................................ 142 Activity 27 ...................................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................................. 135 Activity 25 .............2 USE APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES WHEN OLDER PERSON IS EXPRESSING THEIR FEARS AND OTHER EMOTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH LOSS AND GRIEF................................................................................................................................... 136 Activity 26 ....................................................

........... 153 Things to remember ...................................... 152 Support from family and friends is important .... 152 Where to get help ........................................................................ 147 Offer practical assistance .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 148 Provide ongoing support ........................................................................... 152 Bereavement counselling ................................... .... 156 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 6 of 158 ............................... 149 Activity 28: Case Study .................................................. 155 Activity 30 .....3 PROVIDE OLDER PERSON AND/OR THEIR SUPPORT NETWORK WITH INFORMATION REGARDING RELEVANT SUPPORT SERVICES AS REQUIRED.......................................................................... 150 4.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 153 Moving on with life ..........................................................................................................................................................................Comments to avoid when comforting the bereaved ......................................................................... 154 Activity 29 .............................................................................................................................................................................. 148 Watch for warning signs ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

This unit of competency will help you acquire the knowledge and skills to work effectively as an individual and in groups. This unit of competency introduces you to some of the key issues and responsibilities or workers and organizations in this area. a trainee or a future worker you want to enjoy your work and become known as a valuable team member.CHCAC317A. Support older people to maintain their independence Description: This unit describes the knowledge and skills required by the worker to support the older person to maintain their independence with activities of living. Employability Skills: This unit contains Employability Skills. Support the older person to maintain an environment that maximises independence. Introduction As a worker. Support the older person who is experiencing loss and grief. safety and security. Recognise and report changes in an older person’s ability to undertake activities of living. Application: This unit applies to workers in the aged care sector. This Learning Guide covers:     Support the older person with their activities of living. It will give you the basis to contribute to the goals of the organization which employs you. The unit also provides you with opportunities to develop the competencies necessary for employees to operate as team members. or those working with older people. It is essential that you begin your training by becoming familiar with the industry standards to which organizations must conform. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 7 of 158 .

should arrange to see you at least once. videos and other materials which provide extra information for topics in this unit. You will build up a sound knowledge of the industry standards within which organizations must operate. will make regular contact with you and if you have face to face access. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 8 of 158 . After you have enrolled your facilitator will contact you be telephone or letter as soon as possible to let you know:       How and when to make contact What you need to do to complete this unit of study What support will be provided. Additional Learning Support To obtain additional support you may: Search for other resources in the Learning Resource Centres of your learning institution. journals. Union organizations. Facilitation Your training organization will provide you with a flexible learning facilitator.Learning Program As you progress through this unit you will develop skills in locating and understanding an organizations policies and procedures. in the workplace. You should also become more aware of the effect that your own skills in dealing with people has on your success. Many of these services are listed in the telephone directory. mail or facsimile. Contact the relevant facilitator by telephone. Most libraries keep information about government departments and other organizations. Knowledge of your skills and capabilities will help you make informed choices about your further study and career options. Give you a clear visual timetable of events for the semester or term in which you are enrolled. including any deadlines for assessments. Here are some of the things your facilitator can do to make your study easier. Equal Opportunity Commission. You may find books. Check that you know how to access library facilities and services. or otherwise. Many councils have a community development or welfare officer as well as an information and referral service. Your facilitator will play an active role in supporting your learning. Contact information services such as Infolink. Commissioner of Workplace Agreements. services and programs. Contact your local shire or council office. and public relations and information services provided by various government departments. Search in your local library.

Space Try to set up a place at home or at work where:     You can keep your study materials You can be reasonably quiet and free from interruptions. and easy access to the other facilities. Here are some ideas to help you through the hard times. You will also learn about your own ideas.   Conduct small ‘interest groups’ for some of the topics. your facilitator can use these for specific topics or discussion sessions. including a dictionary Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 9 of 158 .   Flexible Learning Studying to become a competent worker and learning about currents issues in this area. perhaps you could use your local library. and You can be reasonably comfortable. particularly when you have an assignment to do and you aren’t sure how to tackle it…. but you will have quiet. resources and time. You will not be able to store your study materials there. seating and a flat surface for writing. with good lighting. You will also have fun – most of the time. is an interesting and exciting thing to do. study can seem overwhelming and impossibly demanding.and…. fellow workers and clients. To study effectively.and your family and friends want you to spend time with them……and a movie you want to watch is on television…. Circulate a newsletter to keep you informed of events. Use ‘action sheets’ and website updates to remind you about tasks you need to complete. Study Resources The most basic resources you will need are:       a chair a desk or table a reading lamp or good light a folder or file to keep your notes and study materials together materials to record information (pen and paper or notebooks. At other times. topics and resources of interest to you. You will establish relationships with other candidates. Sometimes being a candidate can be hard. you need space.. Set up a ‘chat line”. If it is impossible for you to set up a study space. a desk and chair. If you have access to telephone conferencing or video conferencing. or a computer and printer) reference materials. Keep in touch with you by telephone or email during your studies. attitudes and values.

Most people find that studying in short. Some people learn best by listening or repeating things out loud. Build in “deadlines” and set yourself goals for completing study tasks. Be realistic in allocating time for study. Remember that it is the quality of the time you spend studying rather than the quantity that is important. as long as you can read your own notes. Allow time for reading and completing activities. talking also gives you a chance to find out extra information and to get fresh ideas and different points of view. This also helps you to remember important points. Time It is important to plan your study time.Do not forget that other people can be valuable study resources. As well as helping you to clarify and understand new ideas. Work out a time that suits you and plan around it. a guide to help you learn. your local librarian. concentrated blocks of time (an hour or two) at regular intervals (daily. your flexible learning facilitator. and everyone needs regular breaks from study to avoid overload. Make up a study timetable and stick to it. family. friends. Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 10 of 158 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . and try to identify any barriers to learning which might affect you. provide information and knowledge to help you develop your skills provide you with structured learning activities to help you absorb the knowledge and information and practice your skills direct you to other sources of additional knowledge and information about topics for this unit. (Do not underline things in other people’s books). Look at what is required for the unit and look at your other commitments. work supervisor. Your learning guide will describe the skills you need to demonstrate to achieve competency for this unit. once a week) is more effective than trying to cram a lot of learning into a whole day. every second day. Assess your own learning style. Make notes. Talk to other people (fellow workers. Keep your notes with the rest of your study materials and add to them as you go. other candidates. Some learn best by doing. your facilitator) about what you are learning. Underline key words when you are reading the materials in this learning guide. Use pictures and diagrams if this helps. You need time to “digest” the information in one section before you move on to the next. Are you easily distracted? Are you afraid you will fail? Are you taking study too seriously? Not seriously enough? Do you have supportive friends and family? Here are some ideas for effective study strategies. A learning guide is not a text book. Do not worry about spelling or neatness. some by reading and making notes. This often helps you to remember new or unfamiliar information. and workers in this area can also help you. Your fellow workers. Using this learning guide:      A learning guide is just that. Study Strategies Different people have different learning ‘styles’. fellow candidates.

Chart Provides images that represent data symbolically.The Icon Key Key Points Explains the actions taken by a competent person. Activity Provides activities to reinforce understanding of the action. Assessment Strategies with which information will be collected in order to validate EACH intended outcome or objective. Intended Outcomes or Objectives Statements of intended outcomes or objectives are descriptions of the work that will be done. Example Illustrates the concept or competency by providing examples. compact format. They are used to present complex information and numerical data in a simple. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 11 of 158 .

E1. S1.XX Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 12 of 158 . Readings Provides backup and reasoning to the underpinning knowledge and skills Primary Skills Assessments Where the Primary Skills Assessments are applicable there will be an icon in the format PSA .The Supplementary Icons PowerPoint Any PowerPoint associated with a unit will have this icon next to them Forms and Care Plans If there is a form or care plan associated with a unit there will be an icon like this with the relevant number of the form or care plan in the format FFACF-015 Employability Skills Where the employability skills are shown to be embedded in the unit and relates to the table in the front of each unit eg: T1.XX World Wide Web Where the world wide web is used for an activity in the unit you will find this icon. Resource Document Where the Resource documents are applicable there will be an icon in the format RDN .

and the name of the publisher. fellow workers or with your workplace supervisor. Ask yourself questions as you go: For example “Have I seen this happening anywhere?” “Could this apply to me?” “What if…. You will need this for some assessment tasks. Start off with a question you want answered when you are exploring additional resource materials. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 13 of 158 . when it was published. This will give you a better understanding of the material. fellow workers. If you are using the additional references and resources suggested in the learning guide to take your knowledge a step further. They are there for a reason. If you are taking notes about specific ideas or information. where it was published. there are a few simple things to keep in mind to make this kind of research easier. Additional research. Read the section again to see if you can make sense of it. Relate your notes to the material in your learning guide. the title of the book or article. This is called the reference information. Put things into your own words. Make notes. contact your facilitator or discuss the activity with other candidates. Talk to people about your study. Work through the activities. you will need to put the page number as well. think carefully about the way the questions or instructions are phrased. Talking is a great way to reinforce what you are learning. fellow candidates) try to relate the information presented in this learning guide to your own experience and to what you already know. Even if you are tempted to skip some activities. If you do not understand an activity. Read through the information in the learning guide carefully. the edition. Keep your notes short and to the point. This will structure your reading and save you time. Some sections are quite long and cover complex ideas and information. doing them will help to reinforce what you already know. 4. and to build on your existing knowledge.How to get the Most out of your learning guide 1. Make sure you understand the material. 2.?” This will help you to make sense of new material. If you come across anything you do not understand:     talk to your facilitator research the area using the books and materials listed under Resources discuss the issue with other people (your workplace supervisor. If you are still confused. reading and note taking. Always make a note of the author’s name. 3. and it will help you to find the book again if you need to. and even if you already have the knowledge or skills relating to a particular activity. do them anyway.

possibly with clients) 11. Reading and interpreting workplace related documentation. Listening to and understanding work instructions.Employability Skills – Certificate III in Aged Care EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS FACETS ADDRESSED: Industry/enterprise requirements for this qualification include the following facets: 1. such as prescribed programs 4. Negotiating responsively (eg. with other staff. Working as an individual and a team member 2. re own work role and/or conditions. Applying teamwork skills to a limited range of situations 5. Giving feedback C6 C8 C9 C11 C12 T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 Code C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 14 of 158 . Applying knowledge of own role as part of a team Teamwork 4. Speaking clearly/directly to relay information 3. in relation to safe or ethical work practices and own work role) 12. such as forms. Working with diverse individuals and groups 3. Empathising (eg. Writing to address audience needs. Identifying and utilising the strengths of other team members 6. directions and feedback 2. Applying basic numeracy skills to workplace requirements involving measuring and counting 8. Being appropriately assertive (eg. Interpreting the needs of internal/ external clients from clear information and feedback Communication 6. working as part of an allied health team) 9. case notes and reports 5. in relation to others) 1. Sharing information (eg.

Using numeracy skills to solve problems (eg. with an awareness of assumptions made and work context) 7. Identifying opportunities that might not be obvious to others (i. if role has direct client contact) P6 P7 P8 Initiative and enterprise 1.e. time management.e.e.e. within scope of own role) 2. within a team or supervised work context) 5.e. shift handover) 6. within own work role) 6. within a team or supervised work context and within established guidelines) I1 I2 I3 I5 I6 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 15 of 158 .e. within scope of own role) 2. within scope of own role) Code P1 P2 P3 P5 Problem solving 5.e. within scope of own role) 3. Listening to and resolving concerns in relation to workplace issues 8. Developing practical solutions to workplace problems (i. Solving problems individually or in teams (i. Showing independence and initiative in identifying problems (i. Translating ideas into action (i.e. Developing innovative solutions (i.EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS FACETS ADDRESSED: Industry/enterprise requirements for this qualification include the following facets: 1.e. within relevant guidelines and protocols) 3. simple calculations. Adapting to new situations (i. Resolving client concerns relative to workplace responsibilities (i.e. Testing assumptions and taking context into account (i. Being creative in response to workplace challenges (i.

if relevant to own role) Code O1 O2 O3 O4 O5 O6 O7 O8 O9 O10 S1 S2 Self management 1. Collecting. Taking limited initiative and making decisions within workplace role (i. within authorised limits) 5. within scope of own role) 2. in relation to requirements of own work role) 2. Managing time and priorities (i.e. if applicable to own role) 3. Working within clear work goals and deliverables 7.e. Using basic systems for planning and organising (i. within scope of own role) 8.e. Balancing own ideas and values with workplace values and requirements 4. within scope of own role) 6. in relation to tasks required for own role) 10. Determining or applying required resources (i. Taking responsibility at the appropriate level S3 S4 S5 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 16 of 158 . Monitoring and evaluating own performance (i.e.e.e. Being self-motivated (i. Being appropriately resourceful 4.EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS Planning and organising FACETS ADDRESSED: Industry/enterprise requirements for this qualification include the following facets: 1.e.e. Articulating own ideas (i. Allocating people and other resources to tasks and workplace requirements (only for team leader or leading hand roles) 9.e. within a team or supervised work context) 3. analysing and organising information (i.e. within a team or supervised work context) 5. Adapting resource allocations to cope with contingencies (i. Participating in continuous improvement and planning processes (i.

EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS Learning FACETS ADDRESSED: Industry/enterprise requirements for this qualification include the following facets: 1. Applying OHS knowledge when using technology Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 17 of 158 .e. Contributing to the learning of others (eg. if within scope of own role) 2. Participating in developing own learning plans (eg. Learning new skills and techniques 6. within scope of own role) 4. Being open to learning new ideas and techniques) 2. Learning in a range of settings including informal learning 3. Applying a range of learning approaches (i. Using technology and related workplace equipment (i.e.e. Using basic technology skills to organise data 3. Adapting to new technology skill requirements (i. as part of performance management) Code L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L6 L7 L8 L10 E1 E2 E3 E4 Technology 1. Learning in order to accommodate change 5. as provided) 10.e. Taking responsibility for own learning (i. Participating in ongoing learning 4. within scope of own work role) 7. by sharing information) 8.

CHCAC317A.Support Older People To Maintain Their Independence Element

Performance Criteria
Support the older person with their activities of living.

1.

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.

Encourage older people to utilise support services where appropriate. Clearly explain the scope of the service to be provided to the older person and/or their advocate. Identify the needs of the older person from the service delivery plan and from consultation with a supervisor. Ensure visits and service delivery accommodates the older person’s established routines and customs where possible. Perform work in a manner that acknowledges that the services are being provided in the client’s own home. Provide services in a manner that enables the older person to direct the processes where appropriate. Provide support/assistance in accordance with organisation policy, protocols and procedures. Demonstrate appropriate use of equipment to support/assist the older person with activities of living within work role and responsibility.

Recognise and report changes in an older person’s ability to undertake activities of living.

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

Monitor the older person’s activities and environment to identify increased need for support/assistance with activities of living. Report to a supervisor the older person’s inability to undertake activities of living independently. Support/assist the older person to modify or adapt the environment or activity to facilitate independence. Seek aids and/or equipment to support/assist the older person undertake activities of living independently.

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3.

Support the older person to maintain an environment that maximises independence, safety and security.

3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 4.

Encourage and support/assist the older person to maintain their environment. Provide support to promote security of the older person’s environment. Adapt or modify the environment, in consultation with the older person, to maximise safety and comfort. Recognise hazards and address in accordance with organisation policy and protocols.

Support the older person who is experiencing loss and grief.

4.1 4.2 4.3

Recognise signs that older person is experiencing grief and report to appropriate person. Use appropriate communication strategies when older person is expressing their fears and other emotions associated with loss and grief. Provide older person and/or their support network with information regarding relevant support services as required.

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Skills and Knowledge
Required Skills It is critical that the candidate demonstrate the ability to:
    

Apply demonstrated understanding of own work role and responsibilities Follow organisation policies and protocols Liaise and report appropriately to supervisor Adhere to own work role and responsibilities Monitor older people’s ability to undertake instrumental activities of living and providing support/assistance in accordance with service delivery plans

In addition, the candidate must be able to demonstrate relevant task skills; task management skills; contingency management skills and job/role environment skills These include the ability to:
 

Accommodate older people’s established routines and customs and right to direct service delivery processes Apply reading and writing skills required to fulfil work role in a safe manner and as specified by the organisation/service: this requires a level of skill that enables the worker to follow work-related instructions and directions and the ability to seek clarification and comments from supervisors, clients and colleagues industry work roles will require workers to possess a literacy level that will enable them to interpret international safety signs, read client’s service delivery plans, make notations in clients records and complete workplace forms and records Apply oral communication skills required to fulfil work role in a safe manner and as specified by the organisation: this requires a level of skill that enables the worker to follow work-related instructions and directions and the ability to seek clarification and comments from supervisors, clients and colleagues industry work roles will require workers to possess oral communication skills that will enable them to ask questions, clarify understanding, recognise and interpret non-verbal cues, provide information and express encouragement Apply numeracy skills required to fulfil work role in a safe manner and as specified by the organisation:

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protocols and practices of the organisation in relation to Unit Descriptor and work role The importance of community engagement and the ability to undertake instrumental activities of living for older people Principles and practices of confidentiality and privacy Principles and practices associated with providing services in a client’s own living environment Strategies for supporting/assisting an older person to undertake instrumental activities of living independently Services and aids available to support independence with instrumental activities of living Referral mechanisms Safety and security risks associated with ageing Hazards in an older person’s environment Strategies for minimising hazards in older person’s environments Stages of loss and grief and impact of ageing on person’s experiences of loss and grief Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 21 of 158 . contingency management skills and job/role environment skills as outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit These include knowledge of:            Relevant policies. task management skills. industry work roles will require workers to be able to perform basic mathematical functions. colleagues and supervisors   Required Knowledge The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively perform task skills. such as addition and subtraction up to three digit numbers and multiplication and division of single and double digit numbers Apply basic problem solving skills to resolve problems of limited difficulty within organisation protocols Work effectively with clients. social networks.

It allows for different work environments and situations that may affect performance. accessibility of the item. needs of the candidate. laundering and meal preparation Gardening equipment Personal and security alarms Mobility devices Poor or inappropriate lighting Slippery or uneven floor surfaces Physical obstructions (e.incident reports Domestic appliances utilised for cleaning.case notes .telephone .face-to-face Non-verbal (written): . and local industry and regional contexts. Older people may include: Contexts may include:      Individuals living in residential aged care environments Individuals living in the community The older person’s own dwelling Independent living accommodation Residential aged care facilities Home maintenance Garden maintenance Transport and attendance at appointments and social and recreational activities Domestic cleaning Domestic laundry Meal preparation Shopping Attendance to financial matters and personal correspondence Pet care Verbal: . Add any essential operating conditions that may be present with training and assessment depending on the work situation.g.Range Statement The Range Statement relates to the unit of competency as a whole. furniture and equipment) Poor home and domestic appliance maintenance Inadequate heating and cooling devices Inappropriate footwear and clothing Activities include: of living may          Report include: may be and   Aids and/or may include: equipment     Hazards may include:       Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 22 of 158 .progress reports .

workers should be aware of cultural. assessment takes place away from the workplace. equity and human rights issues in relation to their own area of work All workers should develop their ability to work in a culturally diverse environment In recognition of particular issues facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.Evidence Guide The evidence guide provides advice on assessment and must be read in conjunction with the Performance Criteria.appropriate workplace where assessment can take place .equipment and resources normally used in the workplace Observation in the workplace Written assignments/projects Case study and scenario analysis Questioning Role play simulation Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 23 of 158 . the Range Statement and the Assessment Guidelines for this Training Package. protocols and procedures .relevant organisation policy. or access to equipment and resources. Critical aspects for assessment and evidence required to demonstrate this unit of competency:     Access and considerations: equity     Context of and specific resources for assessment:   Method of may include: assessment      The individual being assessed must provide evidence of specified essential knowledge as well as skills This unit will be most appropriately assessed in the workplace or in a simulated workplace and under the normal range of workplace conditions It is recommended that assessment or information for assessment will be conducted or gathered over a period of time and cover the normal range of workplace situations and settings Where. historical and current issues impacting on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people Assessors and trainers must take into account relevant access and equity issues. however holistic assessment practice with other community services units of competency is encouraged Resources required for assessment include access to: . for reasons of safety. Required Skills and Knowledge. space. in particular relating to factors impacting on Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander clients and communities This unit can be assessed independently. the assessment environment should represent workplace conditions as closely as possible All workers in community services should be aware of access.

Remember that the client — not the worker or anyone else — should be at the centre of the service. preferences and perspectives.7 1. protocols and procedures.3 1. Provide support/assistance in accordance with organisation policy. Demonstrate appropriate use of equipment to support/assist the older person with activities of living within work role and responsibility. Perform work in a manner that acknowledges that the services are being provided in the client’s own home.1. Ensure visits and service delivery accommodates the older person’s established routines and customs where possible. stereotyping and the impact of attitudes on how services are delivered will help aged care workers and carers to focus on their clients.2 1. To promote a clientcentred or person-centred approach and minimise ageism and discrimination:   assume that everyone is different check to see whether you use collective or childish names for older clients.6 1. 1. as this is an excellent start to providing an individualised. people to utilise support services where Being aware of ageism (the process of systematic stereotyping and discrimination against older people simply because they are old). 'sweetie' or 'old codger' — if you do.8 Encourage older people to utilise support services where appropriate.1 Encourage older appropriate. you may think you are being very caring but you are also being ageist always use the person's preferred name. Identify the needs of the older person from the service delivery plan and from consultation with a supervisor.4 1.1 1. Clearly explain the scope of the service to be provided to the older person and/or their advocate. Support the older person with their activities of living. non-stereotypical service  Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 24 of 158 . Services must always focus on the individual client and their needs. such as'duckie'.5 1. Provide services in a manner that enables the older person to direct the processes where appropriate. 1.

including learning. use a trained interpreter — do not use a member of the family. as is access to information services such as computer and electronic media to assist in maintaining social networks. efficient and high-quality Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 25 of 158 . personal care. and respect for their right to confidentiality and privacy and these are found in state and federal legislation and acts such as the Privacy Act and the Confidentiality Act. home modification and home maintenance are important in supporting older people to remain independent at home. Healthy ageing requires providing support to older people before they experience physical or mental health crisis. drug and alcohol use. beliefs and values physical activity to maintain fitness mental activity. recreation and social activity good nutrition regular health checks for the early identification of diseases immunisation programs revising lifestyle choices such as diet. These rights include respect for their dignity. Health Ageing approaches:            research to identify causes of disease and the best way to deal with them health promotion recognition of individualised needs. smoking careful medication management Quality Care Services for Older People affordable. including cultural preferences.    always ask the person what they need and how they would like things done use good listening and communication skills to clarify information and develop a working environment that is mutually respectful learn about and uphold client rights.  The elderly have certain absolute rights that should be built into all services that are provided. Home support services such as home help. exercise. The availability of accessible transport and leisure and recreation programs is vital to realise the expectation of a healthy and enjoyable old age. and tell clients what their rights are if the client is from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) community. appropriate. services accessible. and do not try to guess what the person is saying let the older person be the judge of what is in their best interests. the ability to make informed choices either directly or through a guardian.

innovative. Social Justice Social justice is where everyone is of equal worth and everyone has an equal opportunity to succeed. This is demonstrated by the work an aged care worker performs and aims to:  develop a client-centred culture based on responding to their expressed needs and wants provide services that take a non-discriminatory approach to all people using the service including clients. coworkers and the general public Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 26 of 158 . the Australian government established the Commonwealth Carelink Centre to help people locate the right services.     planned. aged care homes and other support services via a freecall number. As part of social justice comes access and equity is a commitment on behalf of your client and their personal carers. family and friends. Fairness in the distribution of resources-services. There are four key areas to consider:1. These centres have been successful in helping consumers understand how to use the system and in referring them to relevant services in their area. housing. wealth 2. dependable and on-going Meet the required government standards set by federal and state legislation Empower older people to participate in the delivery of their care Are affordable and accessible Have a fair society in which. flexible and coordinated services a range of private and publicly funded services a trained workforce providing information to clients so that they can make informed choices supporting the needs of carers (Andrews 2001) In 2001. integrated. The expectations we have on services are:      Are reliable. People have better opportunities to participate and be consulted about decisions that affect their lives. People have fair access to resources and services to meet their basic needs and to improve their quality of life 4. Carelink Centres provide information about community services. People’s rights are promoted 3. Are holistic and individualized to promote a person-centred approach. everyone is of equal worth and everyone has an equal opportunity to succeed (social justice).

religious. social. healthy and well-balanced diet oral and dental health is maintained. Aged Care Standards There are four standards and up to 44 expected outcomes to continue to receive funding from the government.  These rights should be referred to in all relevant documentation including the clients' charter of rights and the Aged Care Act 1997 that includes a quality system of accreditation as it relates to the Aged Care Standards. and your best level of mobility is achieved.             Standard 2: Health and personal care. staff and stakeholders and the changing environment that the home operates within continuous improvement that you have access to a complaints system that the staff who care for you are skilled. Standard 1: Management systems. emotional and intellectual protect the rights of clients. staffing and organizational development. and requires that: medication is managed safely and correctly clinical care meets your needs continence is managed effectively pain management continence management you are offered a varied. representatives. undertake work that caters for individual differences including cultural. physical. behavioural. and that the home has the appropriate goods and equipment. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 27 of 158 . economic. Among other things this standard ensures:  homes have management and information systems that are responsive to the needs of clients. These rights include rights to:  privacy and confidentiality  being treated with dignity and respect  being safe and comfortable in the environment  being able to express their feelings and concerns  freedom of association and forming friendships  choosing to participate  having access to complaint mechanisms. developmental.

and how they can be arranged for your client. security and emergency risks Occupational Health and Safety having an effective infection control program. physiotherapist. occupational therapist. There are no fees charged for this assessment. Home help is often described as 'community care'. a member of your client’s local ACAT will visit them in their home. such as home help or the support provided by an aged care home. and ensuring clients understand their rights and responsibilities. Aged Care Assessment Teams To work out if you're eligible for certain subsidised aged care services you'll need to contact your client’s local Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT or ACAS in Victoria). give your client all the information your client requires. ask your client a series of questions and discuss the assessment with your client. your client or a health professional such as your client’s doctor. This part helps your client. Standard 4 requires a safe and comfortable environment that ensures quality of life.Standard 3 is about lifestyle. Once your client or their representative has made an appointment. You as carer are able to be involved in this discussion. your client’s family and friends understand the various types of home help available – why your client might want or need them. psychologist or other appropriate health care professional. and:      maintaining your independence respecting your privacy. hospital or elsewhere. Referrals to an ACAT can be made by anyone – you as a carer. social worker. cleaning and laundry services to enhance your client’s quality of life. your welfare and that of your visitors and the home’s staff by:     minimising fire. The ACAT member visiting your client may be a doctor. These are teams of health professionals who help decide on the types of care that will best meet your client’s needs. nurse. and providing catering. dignity and confidentiality encouraging your participation in decisions about services the home provides fostering your cultural and spiritual life. Their job is to discuss your client’s situation. The ACAT is made up of health care professionals who have experience with the system and can help you in many ways: Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 28 of 158 . you as the carer. and help your client make the best choices based on their individual needs and the services available.

The primary aim of all home and community care is to maintain or enhance the personal independence and quality of life of frail older people. such as housework. residential or institutional-based care. washing and shopping home maintenance and modification personal care. information and advocacy services social support (including neighbour aid). dressing and eating meals on wheels and day centre-based meals ancillary health services like podiatry and speech therapy community-based respite care (day care) transport assessment and/or referral services counselling. and by arranging short-term care. Without access to home and community care services many frail older people and people disabilities would require placement in a residential facility much sooner. This is an ideal solution if long-term care in an aged care home is inappropriate and your client only needs low-level care. with decisions about whether your client can continue living at home with home help or if your client should consider moving into an aged care home by providing information about aged care homes and home care services in your client’s area by assessing your client’s eligibility to receive aged care services by organising and approving care and support services by referring you to other services that may assist you. and carer support Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 29 of 158 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . the Home and Community Care (HACC) program can assist by supporting your client’s independence at home and in the community. assistance with continence management. privately. and by church or charitable organisations throughout Australia. such as help with bathing. The HACC Program can help your client with services such as:            Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 nursing care. so you as their carer or your client’s can take a break. such as respite care. The services are provided by the community.      Home & Community Care Program (HACC) If your client requires some basic help with everyday tasks. The Home and Community Care (HACC) program aims to provide your client with a basic range of maintenance and support services to help your client stay at home. An assessment by an ACAT is not necessary to access these services. all in your client’s own home home help. people with disabilities and their carers. including home nursing. Home and community care services enable people to remain living at home rather than using hospitals.

Agencies funded through the HACC Program are required to report on aspects of quality. to discuss your client’s needs and adjust them as your client’s requirements change. So if your client has difficulties with everyday tasks. or call the Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre on 1800 052 222 during business hours or. HACC services are designed to reach people with the greatest level of need. To contact your client’s nearest HACC services. These vary according to your client’s income and the number of services your client uses. Extended Aged Care at Home (EACH) and EACH Dementia. To be eligible for the HACC Program your client must:  be living at home. call 1800 059 059. use the ‘Talk to someone about this’ box in the right hand corner of this page. should your client develop more complex care needs your client should enquire about other community services. such as Meals on Wheels service. including standards. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 30 of 158 . The National Guidelines for HACC Service Standards provide agencies with a nationally consistent approach to the quality and delivery of all HACC funded services.   Some services charge a small fee that varies between states and territories – check with your client’s local HACC service about the costs of the particular services your client needs. as decided by HACC service providers. Under these laws your client has the right to be treated respectfully and be informed and consulted about their care.To access HACC your client can contact your local HACC provider directly. be an older and frail person. or be likely to need to go into an aged care home or a hospital for care if your client were not being provided with support from HACC. be a carer of a frail older person or person with a disability. state. The Standards Instrument was developed to provide a consistent method for evaluating and monitoring the quality of service provision. territory and national level. HACC services are designed for people who need support to continue living in the community and who are older and frail or who have a disability. Special arrangements may be made if your client cannot afford to pay. as well as assist in the planning aspects of the service delivery system on a regional. EACH HACC service provider will assess your client to determine the appropriate level of service for your client. The HACC Program operates under a comprehensive quality framework to ensure that acceptable standards of service provision and program administration are maintained. such as getting dressed or showering. Community care service providers are expected to comply with obligations under laws such as the Aged Care Act 1997. for emergency respite support outside standard business hours. this could well be the extra support your client needs. or a person with a disability and have difficulty doing everyday tasks such as dressing or preparing meals. such as Community Aged Care Packages. And remember.

or possibly help participating in social activities Other types of services that may be provided include:          meal preparation laundry assistance with continence management transport personal care social support home help gardening. EACH is also an individually planned package and is coordinated for your client. Your client’s CACP care manager’s role is to plan and manage your client’s care package. a package may give your client help with personal care such as bathing and dressing. An EACH package is highly flexible and includes qualified nursing input. and assistance with continence management Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 31 of 158 . and temporary in-home respite care To be eligible to receive a care package. tailoring it to your client’s individual needs. For example. your client must be assessed by an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT). your client must be assessed by an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT or ACAS in Victoria) as requiring the level of assistance this package delivers.Community Aged Care Packages (CACP) This program provides a planned and managed package of community care for your client if your client has complex low-level care needs but can still live in their own home. The services that may be provided as part of an EACH package include:         care by an allied health professional such as a physiotherapist or podiatrist personal care domestic assistance in-home respite transport social support home help. domestic assistance such as housework and shopping. Extended Aged Care at Home (EACH) Extended Aged Care at Home (EACH) is a program that provides your client with high-level care at home if your client needs more assistance than a Community Aged Care Package can provide. To be eligible to receive a package.

community care standards make sure that your client receives a service that meets their individual needs and that they have access to complaints procedures if they need them. and is able to live at home with the support of an EACH D package. call 1800 059 059 (free call). For example. Services that provide EACH packages are required to take part in Quality Reporting. Under these laws your client has the right to be treated respectfully and be informed and consulted about their care. Community care service providers are expected to comply with obligations under laws such as the Aged Care Act 1997. It checks that services have systems and processes in place to meet the care standards that are put in place by government legislation. Extended Aged Care at Home Dementia (EACH D) If your client or someone your client cares for needs assistance because of behavioural problems associated with dementia. and assistance with continence management To receive an EACH D package. and may impact on functional capacity needs high level care in an aged care home prefers to receive EACH D. The Australian Government sets standards to ensure your client receive quality care. including periods of changes in behaviour.To receive an EACH package an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT or ACAS in Victoria) must assess your client as needing high-level care at home. Hospitals and Community Centres. Information on ACATS is available from Doctors. or Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centres on 1800 052 222 (free call) during business hours or. The services that may be provided as part of an EACH D package include:      linkages to government funded Dementia Behaviour Management Centres care by an allied health professional such as a physiotherapist or podiatrist personal care home help. for emergency respite support outside standard business hours. or the Aged Care Information line on 1800 500 853 (free call). the Extended Aged Care at Home – Dementia (EACH D) program can provide high-level care through an individually tailored package An EACH D package is highly flexible and includes qualified nursing input.    Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 32 of 158 . your client must first be assessed and approved by an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT or ACAS in Victoria) as a person who:  is experiencing behaviours of concern and psychological symptoms associated with dementia that significantly impact upon your client’s ability to live independently in the community.

National Respite for Carers Program (NRCP) Caring for a frail or older person can be physically and emotionally demanding. the National Respite for Carers Program (NRCP) provides day care centres. The National Respite for Carers Program (NRCP) allows carers of older people. The Australian Government sets standards to ensure your client receives quality care. and respite for employed carers and for carers seeking to return to work. home care and personal care services providing respite and support activity programs a break away from home.Community care service providers are expected to comply with obligations under laws such as the Aged Care Act 1997. which give your client and the person they're caring for the chance to take a short break. people needing palliative care and people with disabilities to have a break to look after their own health and well-being. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 33 of 158 . in-home and activity respite programs. including timely. If your client cares for a family member or friend to help them to continue living at home. Your client does not need an ACAT assessment for community based respite services – only if your client is receiving respite in an aged care home. Under these laws your client has the right to be treated respectfully and be informed and consulted about their care. carer education and support that’s both culturally and linguistically sensitive. A range of community-based and residential respite is available and includes:        day care centres that provide respite for a half day or full day in-home respite services. perhaps with a support worker respite for carers of people with dementia and challenging behaviours respite in a residential aged care home or overnight respite in a community setting. including overnight. with the comfort of knowing that their client’s dependants are well looked after. your client may also be interested in respite care opportunities. There is a lot of assistance available for carers today. their preferred level of social independence access information about the care options available and the facts they may need to make informed choices access to details of the care being provided take part in developing a package of care that best meets their needs. To make sure you as a carer get a break. quality information. Recipients of an EACH D package of care (or their representatives) are entitled to:      quality services that meet their required needs where possible.

The amount of care you receive will depend on your needs. which provides an income support payment (similar to a pension) for people whose caring responsibilities prevent them from significantly participating in the workforce. Your client has access to complaints procedures should they require them. be informed and consulted about their care. Your client has the right to be treated respectfully. You can call them on 1800 242 636. a free and independent financial planning service available whether or not your client is receiving a pension or benefit. and the Carer Allowance. the respite service provider.  Centrelink can also help with information about Rent Assistance. your eligibility. or the Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre will assess whether you and your carer are eligible. For respite care in your client’s home or in a day care centre. call 1800 059 059. It also provides the Financial Information Service. Centrelink Assistance Financial assistance is available in many forms to help your client and/or you including:    the Disability Support Pension. you can have up to 63 days of government-funded respite care in any financial year. you will have to be assessed by an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT or ACAS in Victoria). available for people who are unable to work for a prolonged period of time because of a disability the Mobility Allowance. For example. You can contact the Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centres on 1800 052 222 during business hours or. Access to respite care is based on priority and need. Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centres can help you with locating and booking a respite bed. community care standards ensure that your client receives a service that meets your client’s individual needs. which provides an income supplement for people who provide daily care and attention at home for an adult or child with a disability or severe medical condition. and it may be possible to extend the care period by up to 21 days at a time. the Age Pension and concession cards. To receive respite care in an aged care home. and the right to make a complaint.The NRCP can provide you as carer with specialised professional counselling. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 34 of 158 . Usually. paid to eligible disabled workers to meet the extra cost of travel the Carer Payment. These services are operated through Carers Australia and The Network of Carer Associations. if your ACAT considers this necessary. and the availability of respite care services. Community care service providers are expected to comply with obligations under their funding agreements and to deliver quality services that must meet national standards. for emergency respite support outside standard business hours. located throughout Australia. except in emergency situations. your client has a responsibility to treat their service provider with respect. In turn. The Australian Government sets standards to ensure your client receives quality care.

ensuring that the Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre closest to your client will know about the services in your client’s particular location. It provides a package of services including low intensity therapy and personal and/or nursing care as part of an ongoing but slower recovery process. You or your client can call Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centres on 1800 052 222 (free call) or visit the Commonwealth Respite and Carelink website. Transition Care Program The Transition Care Program is aimed at helping your client improve their independence and confidence after a hospital stay. The Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Program is a national network of centres that maintains an extensive database. There are 65 walk-in shopfronts throughout Australia.Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Program The Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Program is a national network of centres that provide up-to-date information on local community. An ACAT assessment and approval is required to access this service. aged care and disability services in your client’s area that will help them continue living at home. The Transition Care Program aims to help your client improve your independence and confidence after a hospital stay. or need to consider the level of care provided by an aged care home. These centres can provide your client with free and confidential information on:             household help personal care home nursing meal services home modifications carer support short-term care day care centres day therapy centres special services for people with dementia services for people with incontinence and a range of allied health services. which may include returning home with community support or accessing the level of care provided by an aged care home. This means that your client and their family or carer has time to consider their long-term care arrangements. giving your client and their family more time to determine whether they can return home with additional support from community care services. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 35 of 158 .

Transition care provides a package of services tailored to their needs. dressing eating and eating aids managing incontinence transport to appointments moving. they must be assessed by an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT. The average period of care is expected to be about seven weeks. In determining their ability to pay fees. your client must be an older person and an in-patient of a hospital. Examples of low intensity therapy services may include:              physiotherapy occupational therapy dietetics podiatry speech therapy counselling. This includes consideration of their ability to benefit from the services transition care offers (eg low intensity therapy such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy) within the allowable time limits (a maximum of 12 weeks. Access to transition care is decided on a needs basis. or ACAS in Victoria) as someone who would be suitable for transition care. This may include a range of low intensity therapy services and nursing support and/or personal care services. Transition care can take place either at home or in a live-in setting. and communication. and social work. with a possibility to extend to 18 weeks if your client is assessed as needing an extra period of therapeutic care. it must be provided in a more homelike.Transition care is provided in their own home or in a ‘live-in’ setting. Transition care can be provided for a period of up to 12 weeks. walking. not on your client’s ability to pay fees. While your client is still in hospital. When it’s offered in a live-in setting. your client’s transition care provider takes into account their other Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 36 of 158 . To be eligible for transition care. Your client must have completed their acute and any necessary sub-acute care (eg rehabilitation). non-hospital environment that has space available for therapy. Example of personal care services may include assistance with: showering. with a possibility to extend to 18 weeks if they are assessed as needing an extra period of therapeutic care).

cultural. civil. and Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 37 of 158 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . including involvement in management. accommodation and any other information that relates to your client personally be involved in deciding on and choosing the care most appropriate to your client’s needs receive care that takes account of their lifestyle.  It’s also good to know that the government has a quality framework in place to monitor:      the quality of transition care your client receives the qualifications of staff the building where transition care takes place the complaints procedure. including the manner in which it’s being provided. including the right to have a Transition Care Recipient Agreement with the service provider. and your client’s rights. While you’re in transition care you have rights. and choose a person to speak on their behalf for any purpose. You also have the right to:           full and effective use of your client’s personal. legal and consumer rights be in a safe.unavoidable expenses such as high pharmaceutical bills or fees that your client still needs to pay to your aged care home. care. Community nursing and Health Centres Community health centres aim to improve your client’s health and wellbeing by:      encouraging them to actively participate in their own health care working on their needs with other primary health care providers offering facilities for their local community groups encouraging active participation in the centre's activities. linguistic and religious preferences be given a written plan of the services they will receive take part in social activities and community life as far as possible have their dignity and privacy respected complain about the care they’re receiving. secure and homelike environment be given enough information to make an informed choice about their care have written information about their rights. fundraising and volunteer work promoting prevention of lifestyle-related diseases and conditions. without fear of losing the care or being disadvantaged in any other way.

Clients in high care must receive additional care and services at no additional cost. or because they have a severe dementia-type illness or other behavioural problems. including health advice. strength and movement podiatry for foot and lower limb problems nursing. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 38 of 158 . accommodation or socialisation. All aged care homes must provide a specified range of care and services at no additional cost to clients. If a home provides the required range of specified care and services but the client would like certain other brands. The types of services that may be available at the local health centre include:        medical services physiotherapy to help maintain their flexibility. you as advocate could assist in getting that information by perhaps asking the manager of the aged care home. education. then the home does not have to cover the cost of those products. This may be because they are physically unable to move around and care for themselves. developing health care programs and activities to improve social and physical environments in the community. or has individual specific needs. counselling and monitoring speech pathology to help them communicate more effectively should they have a speech disorder social workers to help them or you as their carer with problems related to finances. and tailored programs for their specific dietary needs. These requirements vary according to whether the client has ‘low-care’ or ‘high-care’ needs. There are some specified care and services that all clients receive and additional ones that are provided for high-level care clients. Community health centres offer a range of services that can help your client remain at home by supporting them and you as their carer. If your client is unsure of whether they are receiving high-level care or low-level care. The specified care and services that must be provided by the aged care home at no additional cost are listed below. Types of Care and Services High level care High-level care is for people who need 24-hour nursing care.

Personal care and services All clients receive specified care and services including:  assistance with the activities of daily living. Additional requirements for high-level care High care clients must be provided with additional items. face washers.g. crutches. shampoo. denture cleaning preparations. such as:            bathing and grooming using the toilet eating dressing mobility maintaining continence or managing incontinence communicating with other people emotional support treatments and procedures (such as assistance with taking medication) recreational activities rehabilitation support Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 39 of 158 . toothpaste. walkers goods to assist with toilet and incontinence management more basic toiletries – such as tissues.bath towels. care and services such as:    goods to help them move themselves e. conditioner and talcum powder. soap and toilet paper meals and refreshments social activities provision of staff on call to provide emergency help.Hostel/accommodation services All clients receive specified care and services relating to:           maintenance of buildings and grounds accommodation furnishings bedding cleaning services general laundry toiletries .

  assistance in obtaining health practitioner services and access to specific therapy services. care and services such as:  Nursing services and equipment. bathing etc. going to the toilet. laundry and meals) and some allied health services such as physiotherapy. such as bathing. Homes must also meet the requirements under the Accreditation Standards for Residential Aged Care. Low-level care is for people who need some help. Nursing care can be given when required. Low level Care Low-level care places are for people who need some help. and assistance in obtaining health and therapy services. Most low-level aged care homes have nurses on staff. rehabilitation support. cleaning services. such as equipment to assist with:  mobility. dressing. Low care includes:  accommodation-related services — furnishings. maintaining continence or managing incontinence. but do not have very complex ongoing care needs. people in low-level care can walk or move about on their own. and personal care services — assistance with the activities of daily living. Additional requirements for high-level care High care clients must be provided with additional items. maintenance of buildings and grounds. all meals. Mostly. bedding. moving around. basic medical and pharmaceutical supplies and equipment. provision of therapy services and short term oxygen. general laundry. helping with medications. some toiletries. and support for people with memory loss or confusion. and the provision of staff on call to provide emergency assistance. continence aids. Low-level care focuses on personal care services (help with dressing.). accommodation. or at least have easy access to them.  Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 40 of 158 . eating. eating. support services (cleaning.

because all homes have to provide the same level of care to their clients. It is possible in some aged care homes for you to receive care at lowlevel or high-level in the same place of residence. The staff will be qualified and trained to support older people needing varying styles of care. They may also charge an accommodation bond for both low and high-level care when receiving extra services. with some providing for either low-level or high-level care needs. An ageing in place policy is particularly beneficial for couples planning for a move from the family home as it may enable them to remain together even if their care needs significantly change over time. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 41 of 158 . but not both. including nursing. an extra-service agreement must be made between the aged care provider and the client. If paying for extra service. Extra Services Some aged care homes may offer a higher standard of accommodation. if needed. It also means people can maintain the relationships they have developed with staff and clients. that cannot be managed. a home may not be able to appropriately care for you in certain circumstances – such as when behaviours of concern associated with dementia develop. in addition to the normal client agreement. extra service does not mean that clients will be provided with a higher level of care (such as nursing). However. Extra-service homes offer clients a higher standard of accommodation. for instance. It should specify what the home will provide at a higher standard. Not all aged care homes offer ageing in place. food and services for an additional daily fee. As this amount varies from home to home. It is called ‘ageing in place’. If your client chooses to enter an extra-service aged care home.and lowlevel care. Also. a wider choice of meals. it’s best to check costs directly with the aged care home. a client may receive.Ageing in Place Ageing in place refers to aged care homes that offer both high. The ageing in place homes are designed to cater for people with a variety of care needs. or wine with meals. how often the extra service fees can be increased and by how much. how much those aspects will cost. or if you need acute care and need to go to hospital. a bigger room. This means you don’t need to move as a result of changing care needs. services and food (sometimes referred to as 'hotel' services) at a higher fee. and to situations where it is possible to stay in the same home if your care needs increase.

and for whom the primary treatment goal is quality of life. with little or no prospect of a cure. or palliative care. and that the comfort and dignity of the client is maintained at all times. reducing the need to move clients to another location such as a hospital or hospice. How palliative care is managed in aged care homes? Palliative care in aged care homes aims to give the client the best possible quality of life. safe and comfortable. It focuses on ‘living’ well until death. In fact. where the person will ultimately return home. is care provided for people who have a life-limiting illness. This allows the client receiving care and their family to stay in their familiar environment and to feel supported. Palliative care in aged care homes aims to give the client the best possible quality of life. Palliative care uses a holistic approach – managing pain and other symptoms. external palliative care services may be consulted. where the person will ultimately return home.End-of-life Care/Palliative Care End-of-life care or palliative care is care provided for people who have a life threatening illness. with little or no prospect of a cure. Respite care in an aged care home is short-term care on a planned or emergency basis. their family and their carers. In some cases. Short-term Care Respite care in an aged care home is short-term care on a planned or emergency basis. the approach of some aged care homes reduces the need to move clients to another location such as a hospital or hospice. The Guidelines for a Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care Facilities have been developed to provide support and guidance for the delivery of a palliative approach in residential aged care homes across Australia. cultural. where clients have complex symptoms and the aged care team within the home needs more specialist palliative support. emotional. whilst also addressing the physical. and for whom the primary treatment goal is quality of life. End-of-life care. social and spiritual needs of the person. Also. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 42 of 158 . All residential aged care homes in Australia have received a copy of the guidelines and national workshops have been held across Australia to raise the awareness of these guidelines and the benefits of using a palliative approach to care. accreditation standards of aged care homes make them responsible for ensuring that symptoms such as pain are managed.

Transition care is provided in their own home or in a ‘live-in’ setting. they will be asked to pay a basic daily flat fee. for holidays or the inability to provide care for other reasons. Transition Care The Transition Care Program is aimed at helping your client improve their independence and confidence after a hospital stay. or need to consider the level of care provided by an aged care home. It provides a package of services including low intensity therapy and personal and/or nursing care as part of an ongoing but slower recovery process. And they don’t have to pay any additional income-tested charges. A booking fee may also be payable to assist in organising care. which may include returning home with community support or accessing the level of care provided by an aged care home. with the possibility of extensions of 21 days at a time if an ACAT considers this necessary.How does your client access respite care? Respite care can be provided at a low-level care or high-level care in an aged care home once an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT or ACAS in Victoria) has assessed you as needing one of these levels of care. The booking fee is a prepayment of respite care fees and not an extra payment. The availability of services may vary from region to region. People who live alone may also stay in an aged care home for a short break. This means that your client and their family or carer have time to consider their long-term care arrangements. Carers can use respite to help with stress. giving your client and their family more time to determine whether they can return home with additional support from community care services. There are exceptions for emergency situations. Transition care can be provided for a period of up to 12 weeks. with a possibility to extend to 18 weeks if they are assessed as needing an Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 43 of 158 . How much respite care can a client have? Your client may have 63 days of respite care in a financial year. Your regional Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre help your client find respite vacancies in an aged care home. The Transition Care Program aims to help you improve your independence and confidence after a hospital stay. in the event of illness. Respite clients do not pay an accommodation charge or accommodation bond. It works by providing low-intensity therapy and support as part of an ongoing but slower recovery process. Respite care in aged care homes assists frail older people who are living at home and gives carers a break from their usual care arrangements. What fees do they have to pay? If a person receives government-subsidised respite care in an aged care home.

language or religious backgrounds are able to access all aged care homes and the homes must acknowledge and respect their cultural identity. often in remote areas where no aged care services are otherwise available. national or social communities. and to take part in the social life of those communities. Planning for aged care services is based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population aged 50 years or older. to help explain their needs and preferences. compared with 70 years or older for other Australians. no matter where they live. people who live in rural and regional areas. The average period of care is expected to be about seven weeks. economic circumstance or geographic location. ethnicity. if your client needs one. those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and people in rural and remote areas – all have particular needs that must be provided for to preserve and enhance their quality of life. People from different cultural. Aged care homes may arrange for a translator. and people who are socially or financially disadvantaged. Cultural and Identified Needs Some aged care homes offer specialised services for particular groups such as veterans. But some homes provide additional services that are specific to their individual needs as well. people who are culturally and linguistically diverse. people with a disability. Flexible models of care are provided under the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Strategy. whatever their background. No matter what your gender. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. People living in aged care homes have the right to practice their own religion. Veterans. language. There are many care and support services that are designed to meet the needs of older Australians. Some homes have regular visits from clergy or can arrange transport to places of worship. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 44 of 158 . the Aged Care Act 1997 facilitates their access to aged care. Aged care homes will encourage and help clients to maintain existing links with cultural. But some groups of people need additional services. culture. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people Conditions associated with ageing generally affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people earlier than other Australians. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Quality aged care is a basic right for all older Australians.extra period of therapeutic care. some homes have their own chapel or quiet room.

Aged care homes for culturally and linguistically diverse people People from different cultural, language or religious backgrounds are able to access aged care homes. However, some homes provide specific services to meet particular needs. A number of aged care homes run by ethnic community organisations receive public funding to improve the quality of life and care for older people from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Clustering brings together people who share similar cultural, language or religious backgrounds within one aged care home. Other options include multicultural services and services that are specific to a particular nationality or language group. The Partners in Culturally Appropriate Care (PICAC) program supports aged care homes to provide culturally appropriate care. The Community Partners Program (CPP) allows aged care homes and culturally and linguistically diverse communities to work together to establish and maintain links between people living in aged care homes and their social, cultural and language networks. Particular health conditions Some aged care homes offer specialised facilities for particular conditions, such as dementia, mental health, falls, and continence management. If your client requires these services, they will need to discuss them with the managers of homes they are considering. Once an aged care home accepts your client, it must cater for their particular health needs. These might include any one from a range of conditions such as dementia, incontinence, and chronic, terminal or mental illness. Some homes cater specifically for these particular needs.

Dementia While all homes cater for clients with dementia, some provide more targeted dementia services. These homes generally have staff who are specially trained, and areas that have been specifically designed for people with dementia. Not all people with dementia require a specific dementia unit in an aged care home. However, people with special care needs, such as those who may not be safely accommodated in general residential facilities, are best suited for these homes. Alzheimer’s Australia produces a checklist that may help.

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Multipurpose services (MPS) Multi-Purpose Services (MPS) are designed specifically for rural and regional areas, and bring together a range of health and aged care services under one management structure. The Multi-Purpose Services Program is a joint Australian and state/territory government initiative specifically designed for rural and regional areas. The aim of the Program is to provide a coordinated and cost-effective delivery of health services where separate health and aged care services may not be viable. Australian Government funding for flexible aged care is combined with State Government health services funding. The multi-purpose service applies this combined funding flexibly across health and aged care services to offer more service choices specific to the needs of the local community and to be innovative in service delivery. Services provided could include:        aged care, both residential and home care, Home and Community Care (HACC) services including community nursing, domestic assistance and meals on wheels, respite care, acute care, emergency services, mental health services, and a range of allied health services including physiotherapy and podiatry

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Strategy provides a culturally appropriate and flexible approach to the delivery of aged care services for Indigenous Australians, mainly in rural and remote areas. Independent Living Units Independent Living Units are residential communities that offer a range of services for independent older people, and are regulated by state and territory governments. People who need less care than that offered by aged care homes may wish to consider independent living units, or retirement villages. These residential communities offer a range of services for independent older people, and are regulated by state and territory governments.

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Home nursing A nurse may also visit to help:       restore health after an illness, and allow you to maintain the best level of independence.

They may also provide assistance with: personal hygiene medication injections, or changing dressings.

Care may be provided regularly or occasionally when your client needs it. What if your client is not happy with their care? If your client feels that the facility is not responsive to their needs or that they’re not getting the level of care they expect then they can get more support by contacting:   The Aged Care Information Line on 1800 500 853 who will tell them about advocacy services in their state or territory, or The National Dementia Helpline on 1800 100 500.

Where else can they get help?          doctor local community health service local council Carers Australia, phone 1800 242 636 Dementia Helpline, phone 1800 100 500 Carer Respite Centre, phone 1800 059 059 Carers Resource Centres, phone 1800 242 636 Aged Care Assessment Teams, or Aged Care Information Line, phone 1800 500 853.

Maintaining independence and feeling a sense of control is important for all people but especially to the older person. This could be as simple as maintaining the routine, desire to choose who to spend time with, the types of clothing to wear, when and where they need privacy, the choice of activity the person wants to participate in, ability to control their immediate environment such as listening to music, opening a window, or turning a fan or heater on/off. Remember, the older person is still a person regardless of their ability to communicate, frailty and cognitive ability. It is still important to offer choices whether it be simple or complex, be treated with respect, dignity and courtesy, explain what you

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are doing and to help as much as possible with their activities of daily living (ADLs). eating. sleeping. provide to older people? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ List other services. Activity 1 What is Carelink? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Does an older person deserve the same rights’ as everyone else? Why/why not? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What are the Aged Care Standards? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What does ACAT stand for? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ In your own words. what does the Home and Community Care (HACC)Program. dressing. programs or packages that older people can utilise? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 48 of 158 . grooming and elimination (urinary & bowel). Activities of daily living (ADLs) are similar shared needs that everyone has such as. showering.

this is the fundamental key of advocacy. The advocate may attend discussions about the older person’s support and care. One of the key characteristics of an effective aged care worker is the ability to think of ways in which we can support people to do as much for themselves as possible._________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Name and summarise the types of care and services available _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What does ADLs stand for? _________________________________________________________ 1. Many of the issues facing older people in our society are the very issues facing the majority of the population. People’s rights are important. sleep and rest general feelings of isolation and loneliness real or anticipated loss of privacy Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 49 of 158   Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . Independence is central to a well-developed sense of self. The ability to live your life the way you want and to pursue your wishes. As a person gets older. hopes and desires. friends and community cultural isolation changing needs for physical comfort. An advocate is a person who can provide support to the older person in deciding and discussing what they want or how they will live. To make sure that the older person is able to say what they want and receive the service they need. the ability and importance of controlling your own life should remain unchanged. and sometimes older people may need support from the advocate to exercise their rights. is the basis of a happy and fulfilling life. These include:  coming to terms with the ageing process access to family. And where extra support is required this needs to be provided in a manner that allows people to maintain their dignity.2 Clearly explain the scope of the service to be provided to the older person and/or their advocate. Empowerment is the process of supporting people to assert their own rights’.

relatives or friends who provide support to frail older people and people with a disability. however many carers juggle their caring role with paid employment and/or the responsibilities of caring for their children and grandchildren. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 50 of 158 . The current system of providing support to people who need care in their home relies heavily on the role of carers. memory. Most primary carers (78%) cared for a person living in the same household. Carers in fact. deliver more than 70% of all care to family members and friends needing care and support. About one in five carers are primary carers. Informal care is not considered to be volunteering. In many cases. Often there is at least one carer who assumes responsibility for most of the care provided. there were 2. Twenty-four per cent of primary carers were aged 65 years and over. compared to 13% of the total population 37% of primary carers spent on average 40 hours or more per week providing care and 18% spent 20 to 39 hours per week.     loss of home and loss of independence death. personality and social interaction ageism fear of change itself Informal Care Informal care is the care provided by family and friends (often referred to as carers) and it is by far the most common type of home care received. Carers may be parents. They often sacrifice a great deal of their time and quality of life to care for someone else. Many people who provide care do not identify them-selves as carers because they take on their caring role as part of their family responsibilities. The difference between formal care and informal care is that carers work in an unpaid capacity and the work they do is not regulated by government bodies. Just over half (54%) of all carers were women. partners. intellectual function. children. grieving and loss changes that ageing may bring to physical processes. as carers are generally not able to negotiate the terms of their commitment. this person is referred to as the primary carer. Being a primary carer can be as demanding as a full time job.6 million carers who provided some assistance to those who needed help because of disability or age. the role of carers is paramount to the success of the individual's ability to remain living at home. Facts about carers (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2003)       In 2003.

many older people and people with a disability may require institutionalised and long-term residential care at great cost to society. Carers themselves may need help and support from formal home and community care services in addition to the services provided to the person for whom they are caring. physical tiredness and even injury when their caring duties require them to lift or move the other person. insomnia. Some carers experience a loss of privacy. informal counselling. for some of the most vulnerable members of our community. Providing care frequently has a negative impact on the carer's quality of life with many carers reporting anxiety. Please remember that a lot of carers are not recognised as carers and will take care of a loved one regardless of the slight remuneration they may get from the government. depression. meal preparation) auxiliary care (shopping. time constraints. transportation. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 51 of 158 . dressing. weight loss and burnout. The amount and type of care provided by family and friends is diverse and each care situation is different. Personal Cost of Caring Caring for a person at home can affect family and friends in a number of ways. The level of responsibility that carers assume depends on the physical and psycho-social needs of the person requiring care and the dynamics of the relationship between the carer and the care recipient. fatigue. All services aim to support carers in their caring role and many formal services offer carer respite. often on a daily basis. household layout and most of all quality of life and lifestyle choices. Becoming a carer may limit a person's ability to work or socialise outside the home. The level of support that carers offer may include some or all of the following:       personal care (bathing. physical exhaustion. toileting) domestic care (cleaning. social activities) complex and technical care (managing medications. Without carers. This includes finances. Carers also provide an enormous amount of social and emotional support. loss of sleep. emotional exhaustion. psychological and emotional strain. or even perform routine tasks such as going shopping or taking a walk. ill health.As Australia's population ages. catheters and colostomies) specialised care (managing challenging behaviour and monitoring mental health status). the supply of carers cannot keep pace with the increasing need for care. managing finances) social care (emotional support.

The Australian Government provides financial support to carers through the Carer Allowance or Carer Payment. Carer Allowance is a fortnightly supplementary payment for people who care for an adult with a disability or a severe medical condition or someone who is frail. While formal carer support may come in the form of financial assistance. Unlike the Carer Allowance. Carer Payment provides income support (similar to a pension) to carers who. are unable to support themselves through participation in the workforce. it is just as important that attention is given to the needs of the carer. Respite The National Respite for Carers Program (NRCP) is one of several Australian Government initiatives designed to support and assist carers through the provision of information and support for carers and respite services. because of their extensive caring role. such as those provided by the Home and Community Care Program (HACC) and by residential care facilities. access to information and respite services. This includes information on:        Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 services in the local area financial entitlements support services respite options advice on legal issues carer support groups and networks home help. It is not income tested. aged and living at home. Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 52 of 158 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . services also need to be ever mindful of meeting the needs of carers and working in partnership with them. the Carer Payment is income tested. The National Respite for Carers Program funds:      respite services Commonwealth Carer Respite Centres Commonwealth Carer Resource Centres the National Carer Counselling Program Respite care is provided by community care services.Carer Support Carers play such a critical role in enabling frail older people and people with a disability to remain living at home. Carer Resource Centres Each State and territory has a Commonwealth Carer Resource Centre.

charitable organisations and private service providers. people with disabilities and their carers. Recently. state or territory government bodies. Work around the home such as cleaning. ironing and home maintenance. Support people to be more dependent at home hence. residential or institutional-based care. services to assist older people to remain in their home for as long as possible to include: Community care services including Home and Community Care (HACC). community providers. washing. Home and Community Care (HACC) funds community agencies to provide services to help older people with:  Provide a comprehensive. Without access to home and community care services many frail older people and people disabilities would require placement in a residential facility much sooner.The National Carer Counselling Program (NCCP) provides short term counselling through professionally qualified counsellors and is delivered through the Commonwealth Carer Resources Centre. timely service to respond to the needs of the older person. coordinated and integrated range of basic maintenance and support services for frail older people. or a combination of all of these providers. Provide flexible. enhancing their quality of life. The focus on issues such as:       stress management coping skills grief and loss issues practical problem solving techniques emotional support health and wellbeing. cooking. Home and community care services enable people to remain living at home rather than using hospitals. Therapy Centres and Carers programs to assist an older person to stay independent and living at home and to maintain a life with dignity in the community. and Residential Aged Care (RAC). The primary aim of all home and community care is to maintain or enhance the personal independence and quality of life of frail older people. Formal Care Formal care is the term used to describe any home and community care services provided by organisations or paid individuals. Formal home and community care services may be provided by a range of local. Community Aged Care Packages (CACP). people with a disability and their carers. particularly when they develop chronic problems that prevent them from functioning at normal capacity or independently in the community.    Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 53 of 158 .

Some clients receive only a single service. but many frail older people and people with complex care needs access multiple services which are often provided by a number of different agencies.Hostels generally provide accommodation and personal care. podiatry and physiotherapy. showering or bathing. Nursing homes . These requirements vary according to whether the client has ‘low-care’ or ‘high-care’ needs. Some clients need assistance with tasks such as household cleaning and transport. This may be because they are physically unable to move around and care for themselves. such as help with dressing and showering. This can be low and high nursing care. case planning and review domestic assistance home nursing and personal care transport services home maintenance and modification meal services allied health care social support centre-based day care. specialist mental health care and allied health or palliative care services. There is some specified care and services that all clients receive and additional ones that are provided for high-level care clients. Food services such as home nursing. the most commonly used services include:          assessment. Although the specific services provided will differ from client to client. Residential Aged Care (RAC):. or because they have a severe dementia-type illness or other behavioural problems.offer two options for frail older people who cannot live at home and who have been assessed as needing such care. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 54 of 158 .Nursing homes tend to care for people with a greater degree of frailty. The range of assistance provided will vary depending on the needs of the client. technical nursing care. These are:  Hostels . often in need of continuous nursing care. Other people have more complex and personal care needs such as assistance with mobilising. All aged care homes must provide a specified range of care and services at no additional cost to clients.  High level care High-level care is for people who need 24-hour nursing care.  Personal care such as bathing and dressing. Clients in high care must receive additional care and services at no additional cost. together with occasional nursing care. continence management. and social support such as banking and transport.

crutches.If you are unsure of whether you are receiving high-level care or lowlevel care. face washers. Additional requirements for high-level care High care clients must be provided with additional items. care and services such as:    goods to help them move themselves e. The specified care and services that must be provided by the aged care home at no additional cost are listed below. toothpaste. walkers goods to assist with toilet and incontinence management more basic toiletries – such as tissues. Hostel/accommodation services All clients receive specified care and services relating to:           maintenance of buildings and grounds accommodation furnishings bedding cleaning services general laundry toiletries . or has individual specific needs.bath towels. denture cleaning preparations. such as:  bathing and grooming  using the toilet  eating  dressing  mobility    maintaining continence or managing incontinence communicating with other people emotional support Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 55 of 158 . conditioner and talcum powder. ask the manager of the aged care home. then the home does not have to cover the cost of those products. soap and toilet paper meals and refreshments social activities provision of staff on call to provide emergency help. If a home provides the required range of specified care and services but the client would like certain other brands. shampoo.g. Personal care and services All clients receive specified care and services including:  assistance with the activities of daily living.

but do not have very complex ongoing care needs. Most low-level aged care homes have nurses on staff. rehabilitation support. all meals. eating.). maintenance of buildings and grounds. people in low-level care can walk or move about on their own. and the provision of staff on call to provide emergency assistance.and low-level care. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 56 of 158 . general laundry. such as equipment to assist with:mobility. Low level Care Low-level care places are for people who need some help. care and services such as: Nursing services and equipment. provision of therapy services and short term oxygen.     treatments and procedures (such as assistance with taking medication) recreational activities rehabilitation support assistance in obtaining health practitioner services and access to specific therapy services. going to the toilet. bathing etc. maintaining continence or managing incontinence. and  personal care services — assistance with the activities of daily living. Mostly. bedding. eating. Low care includes:  accommodation-related services — furnishings. dressing. accommodation. support services (cleaning. Low-level care focuses on personal care services (help with dressing. Low-level care is for people who need some help. laundry and meals) and some allied health services such as physiotherapy. and to situations where it is possible to stay in the same home if your care needs increase. continence aids. and assistance in obtaining health and therapy services. moving around. helping with medications. such as bathing. Ageing in Place As stated before Ageing in place refers to aged care homes that offer both high. Nursing care can be given when required. Additional requirements for high-level care High care clients must be provided with additional items. some toiletries. basic medical and pharmaceutical supplies and equipment. cleaning services. or at least have easy access to them. and support for people with memory loss or confusion.

However. Paul is able to feed the cats if the cans of cat food have been opened. and he needs to sit down to do these things and can only use one hand properly. Paul lives in a small unit on his own. His unit is cleaned for him twice a week. These are the things Paul does:  Paul gets onto the community bus each week to go to the local shopping centre. Paul has two cats that are very independent. Paul cannot do his laundry or hang it out and he is unable to look after the building maintenance. Paul cannot take a shower or get dressed without help. Paul doesn't remember to check the calendar regularly to read his notes. as the stroke has left him very weak on one side. Paul uses a walking frame with wheels to get around. Paul reads all his mail and sorts out the bills.There are also short-term care options called respite care which can include:    Care in a day centre Support in a person’s own home for a number of hours a week A short stay in a residential care facility. Paul can no longer cook meals but he can make a sandwich. There is no garden. as Paul sometimes forgets the way back to the entrance and where to catch the bus home.       What help with the ADLs would Paul need to maintain his independence? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ What services are available to Paul to help him stay at home? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 57 of 158 . The stroke left him unable to move his right arm. Activity 2: Case Study Paul is a 68-year-old man who had a stroke 10 years ago. He has some memory loss. he writes the dates they are due on the calendar. He has a friend that goes with him to the shops. His right leg is weak. To remind himself to pay the bills.

The care planning process is designed to ensure that the care provided meets the identified needs of the older person in the most effective way. When assessing an older persons’ needs. The role of the aged care worker in documenting what they do throughout the care planning process is very important.How does Paul get access to the help he needs? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Should Paul be put into an aged care facility? Why/why not? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 1. as well as ensuring appropriate care for clients. A care plan gives all staff. a care plan or a service delivery plan is developed. if the older person has a fall and fractures a leg and usually the person only needs a walking stick to mobilise and now requires a wheelchair as cannot manage crutches then the care plan would be changed immediately to meet the new needs of the person and when the leg is healed then the care plan may need to be modified again. The most important document you will work with is the care plan or service delivery plan. This ensures the client or your team members and you remain safe.3 Identify the needs of the older person from the service delivery plan and from consultation with a supervisor. The care plan is reevaluated regularly to check that all care is implemented and to reassess the needs of the client. including yourself. Care plans are legal documents. The purpose of the care plan is to establish goals with the person/client and to determine ways of delivering services that suit their individual needs and preferences. including continuous Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 58 of 158 . to provide the best quality care. Every client or client in your care will have a number of documents and records about their care requirements. The care plan is an essential tool for providing evidence that the facility is meeting its contractual obligations to the government via the accreditation process. You must consult the care plan before completing any task with a client. For instance. It is a crucial document for ensuring delivered care is responsive to the needs of the client. This ensures everybody works together in a consistent way. detailed information about the person in your care and their specific care needs. There are many names given to this process.

it is part of your role to report changes to your supervisor and seek guidance on how to update the care plans in your workplace. you will be involved in the care planning process. Planning — planning actions/strategies/solutions and identifying goals to be achieved. risk management. including yourself. A care plan is a 'dynamic' document. or suggesting actions/strategies/solutions to support your client. Assessment — identifying the problems through comprehensive assessment. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 59 of 158 . This means it is reviewed and updated regularly. will be responsible for maintaining the care plans for people in your care. and revising the plan in line with any revised care needs(Review the plan and revise as necessary) If you work in aged care. and your level of involvement will depend on your role in the team.improvement. All staff. (Care plan developed by the team and the client) 3. (Collect information) 2. Evaluation — reflecting/evaluating on how effectively the goals were achieved. Implementation — putting the practice. The care planning process involves four steps:1. You may be collecting information for the assessment phase. case management and individual service plans. Different workplaces will have different ways of presenting information in a care plan.(Carry out the plan of care) action/strategy/solution into 4. to meet changing needs. or reporting or recording details of care you provided and the older person's responses to that care. You need to know how to access and read the care plans in your workplace. You may be involved in documentation of the plan. and the care plan is updated in response to this evaluation to ensure the most appropriate care is always provided. The care planning process is an example of a continuous improvement process — care is evaluated on an ongoing basis. Therefore. They will help you plan your daily work with each client or client.

and comprehensive assessments are carried out to ensure that their abilities and care needs are identified. and then document your observations. and each health professional will undertake an assessment according to their area of professional expertise. all staff will know exactly what care is required for each client/client and what issues exist for each client/client. which contribute to Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 60 of 158 . Aged care workers will be involved in case conference discussions and client interviews. personal hygiene. Assessment provides the opportunity to report and record your observations. toileting. Assessment 2. Assessment Assessment is the process of gathering information to identify care needs. Information can be collected by talking to or interviewing the client. This contributes to a comprehensive assessment of their personal care needs. mobility. social and emotional aspects of their life. Assessment of older people tends to focus on function and include assessment through observation physical. cognitive/mental. Planning 3. In residential care. assess their level of independence or ability. A range of forms and tools are used for assessment. 1. You will need to observe your client. eating and drinking. As an aged care worker. Planning During the planning stage.Summary of Care Planning Process:1. By following this process. the information collected during the assessment stage is reviewed. your role in assessment will include documenting the client's abilities — for example communication. Evaluation Stages of Care Planning The care planning process directs client care. Each new client will be interviewed. and a plan of care is developed to meet the needs of the older person. this process is closely linked to the funding mechanisms. Implementation 4. their family or friends. past carers or health workers. social and emotional needs. provides a framework for teamwork and ensures adequate documentation. 2.

and evaluation of these actions. and assists the team to regularly review the plan to assess whether those needs/goals are being met. It will be documented in a way that provides clear directions on how to care for the older person. It allows workers to communicate effectively. they should encompass all of the factors contributing to holistic care. meet individual needs and in turn. doing something wrong because you are unsure of what to do then making mistakes and then having to either fix them or someone else fixes them. interventions or actions. When care plans are written.the development of the care plan. You will follow this plan of care and document what you did for the client and how they responded. The care plan should reflect the client's goals and the type of care and support they require. why the plan did not work and what should be done to achieve the desired outcome. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 61 of 158 . the interdisciplinary team will implement the strategies (also called actions or interventions/solutions) outlined in the care plan to ensure the older person's needs are met. empowerment to the older person. The care planning process involves assessment. 3. Evaluation Evaluation involves reflecting on the process and reviewing the care plan. Once the care plan has been agreed upon and documented. do they still need the level of assistance provided. Always discuss any questions. The person who has to fix the mistakes will be agitated or angry for fixing something up that shouldn’t have to be done in the first place as it takes away time for their duties that need to be carried out. and provides ongoing documentation to ensure care is consistent and holistic. planning. if the care plan identifies that assistance with toileting is required. evaluation would include reviewing whether the older person has received assistance as required. Implementation This is the action stage. inform future decisions about care delivery. queries or concerns with your supervisor prior to the event if possible rather than. Evaluation asks the question 'is the plan achieving the needs/goals that were identified?' For example. Aged care workers look at how the older person has responded to the care given and make changes to the care plan as required. It may also highlight to your supervisor that the care plan or service delivery plan needs more details written on it so it is very clear about what needs to be done to meet this particular clients needs. your supervisor is there to help you provide the best possible support to older people. are they comfortable and dry at all times and if not. 4. leads to coordinated and client-focused care. Supervision Remember.

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Another example of Resident Care Plan: (Front of Sheet) FITZROY FALLS AGED CARE FACILITY RESIDENT CARE PLAN Resident Name:____________________________________________ Care Need Relating To:_____________________________________ Date What is the Problems/Diagnosis? Signature Date What Goal/s do we want to Achieve? Signature Date Which Interventions will achieve these Goals Signature .

Resident Care Plan: (Back of Sheet) It is important to watch older people as you visit them EACH time to CARE PLAN EVALUATION FORM ascertain if their needs have changed or if they require extra help. Resident Name:____________________________________________ Care Need Relating To:_____________________________________ FITZROY FALLS AGED CARE FACILITY Date Evaluation Signature Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 64 of 158 .RECORD EVALUATIONS OF INTERVENTIONS & GOALS ACHIEVED ON ATTACHED EVALUATION SHEET.

Bill enjoys the radio and television put on very loud. He uses a wheelchair to move from one place to another.Activity 3 Use the Respite/Summary Resident Care Plan form to fill out the following scenario. when Bill has migraines or pain in the ankle he can be verbally and physically aggressive if pain not subsided quickly. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Why does the care plan need to be up-to-date? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 65 of 158 . He has high support needs. He cannot stand without support. At times Bill is incontinent of urine and faeces if not taken to the toilet as per routine. He lives in a nursing home in the dementia unit. dry and change him. shave and dentures cleaned twice a day. Activity 4 What are the four stages of care planning process? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ In your own words. but is often hard to understand. It has been six months since his family has visited him. He needs help to stand and transfer into a chair. He told his daughter not to visit again. Bill has a hearing aid but doesn’t wear it as he thinks he can hear okay. He has problems with migraine headaches. enjoys a daily morning shower. He speaks. On the last visit. At times. Bill Perkins is 90 years old. summarise the four stages of the care planning process. His wheelchair is old and one foot plate is broken. Next week is Bill's 91st birthday. He enjoys participating in ANZAC festivities. He also gets pain from an old ankle injury. Bill fought in World War II. He likes to be up early. He uses a shower chair and needs someone to wash. he became angry.

it is your responsibility to help older people maintain their independence as much as possible. They might observe a religious custom at a certain time of the day. Some older people feel very strongly about sticking to them. Our routines are important to us because they give us a sense of control over our lives. It is important that services that support older people fit in around the older person's routine where possible. We all feel more independent and in control of our own lives when we are able to decide what we want to do and how we want to do it. We know what is happening next. As an aged care worker. They may have the same food for breakfast every day. It may involve a certain time. They might get upset if a routine is changed. what would or could you do to assist in the communication process? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Ensure visits and service delivery accommodate the older person’s established routines and customs where possible. An older person's sense of control over their lives lessens when they require more support to do their day-to-day activities. Routine is the usual way a person arranges tasks and activities. when a person gets older they like to keep to the routines they have always followed. They might meet a friend for coffee on a certain day of the week. They might get up at a certain time in the morning. what to expect. Most people have a daily routine. It is important that services are flexible so they can be changed to fit around the person's routine when necessary. place and method used to complete EACH task. It could be a simple as allowing the person to wash their own face to holding the water nozzle in the shower right through to just washing their backs and toes Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 66 of 158 . Generally.What happens if you do not comply with or follow care plans of individual clients? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ If you have a client that has a hearing impairment. Our customs are important as they help us to maintain our connection with religion or culture. Our regular social appointments are important to keep us connected to our friends and family. week or year. Aged care workers should be aware of the routines of older people who they work with so that they can work in a way that meets their needs.

the staff may try to make sure that this still happens. that the routine is also used in conjunction with the individual care plans. if an older person always has a glass of sherry at night before their dinner. Activity 5: Case Study Melinda is an aged care worker in an aged care facility. If the older person goes out to lunch with relatives and friends once a fortnight. It says he likes a cup of tea in bed before he gets up. Aged care facilities make sure that older people maintain control over their lives through individualised care planning. When an older person first moves into the aged care facility. just do all the older persons’ ADLs (everything) for them they could lose the level of independence they have regardless if the amount of independence the older person has is a little or a lot.in the shower. This ensures the person feels in control of their ADLs and a sense of empowerment with what you are offering to them. Remembering. then Melinda pulls his jumper over his head. if new staff or casuals are on they can more effectively utilise their time and the clients/clients maintain the routines they are used to. It is important to make sure the older person is as independent as possible for their situation/condition. this is the be assessed individually simply. the aged care worker. For example. She puts his trousers over his feet for him. as it has what ADLs need to be met based on the older persons’ needs and preferences. She asks him to put his shoes and socks on while she tidies up Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 67 of 158 . Melinda arrives at Mr Smyth's room at 0730hrs. If the older person enjoys having a shower before they go to bed rather than in the morning this will be adhered to. by ask the person what they can door what they need help with. The daily routine in an aged care facility is planned to meet the individual needs of the older people living there as much as possible. She wakes him and helps him out of bed. the staff find out what their routine was like at home. She goes to Mr Smyth's room to help him get dressed and ready for the day. Older people in aged care facilities must sometimes follow the routines set by the facility for meals. Mr Smyth’s care plan says that he likes to get up at 0800hrs. and pulls them up when he stands up. personal care and some social and recreational activities. The staff at the facility will then try to match the daily routine at the facility as closely as possible to the older persons’ routine followed at their home. He needs help only with doing buttons up and putting his socks on. She helps him to put his arms in his shirt before doing up the buttons. the staff will try to ensure that the older person is still able to do this. They ask about their customs. Routine in an Aged Care Facility Aged care facilities plan their daily routines around staffing and making sure that there is time for staff to meet the needs of all of those living in the facility. Sometimes it is not possible for the older person to maintain the routine they may have had in their own home when they move into an aged care facility. This is because if you. It says that he is able to dress himself. The routine for each shift are also put into the policies and procedures of the organisation so that.

movies). What would you have done at 0730hrs? What would you have done to maintain Mr Smyth’s routine? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Customs/Cultural needs Aged care services in Australia are provided in a diverse multi-cultural setting. social activity. work and law. As a aged care worker. Melinda makes sure he is comfortable in his armchair and serves him a cup of tea. government. religion. family life. Working holistically in this context requires awareness of cultural differences and an understanding of your own attitudes towards cultural differences. Once he is dressed. We usually identify that a person is from a different culture by their obvious behavioural differences. What tasks did Melinda do that were not part of Mr Smyth’s care plan/routine? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ 2.the bed. Culture is developed and passed on to others through formal and informal stories (fairytales. you may be working with clients who do not share the same cultural background or speak the same language. education. and then ties his shoelaces for him. Culture may be thought of as a collection of behaviours and beliefs that distinguishes one group of people from another. how do you think this may have made Mr Smyth feel? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ 3. Culture touches every area of a person's life. On any given work day. folk stories. literature. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 68 of 158 . but we are less aware of the underlying cultural differences around belief systems. poetry. 1. media.

as well as what is bad. be it their food. Deep below the "water line" are a culture's core values. music. and acceptable. different cultural groups share the similar core values (such as "honesty". These are primarily learned ideas of what is good. these internal Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 69 of 158 . and unacceptable. undesirable. people often think of culture as the observable characteristics of a group. or "family"). arts. or "respect". The reality is that these are broad components of culture -.The Iceberg Model The portion of an iceberg which is visible above water is only a small piece of a much larger whole. right. Ultimately.the complex ideas and deeply-held preferences known as attitudes and values. In many cases. dances. Similarly. wrong. or even greeting rituals. desirable. but these are often interpreted differently in different situations and incorporated in unique ways into specific attitudes we apply in daily situations.

including discrimination based on cultural background. reflecting on our own core values. or Australian-born Chinese. Workers demonstrate cultural competence when they provide services to meet the unique needs of each person. and acknowledges that there is a shared humanity between all cultural groups. nationality. studying institutions. but we also seek out a cultural identity with specific groups and develop personalised ways of 'belonging' in the world. the way we act. The structure of the family may be very different from what you are familiar with. where you enable the other person to feel respected and confident to express their cultural needs. One word written on a document. like an iceberg. Multiple combinations are possible — for example. speaks. age and interests. It is common to belong to many different cultural groups — groups based on race. Cultural competence recognises and accepts differences between people. the laws we enact. religion. These institutions of influence are powerful forces which guide us and teach us. gender. Human beings share many basic needs regardless of cultural differences. To give the best care possible we need to gather detailed information about our client or client. They are passed on from generation to generation by numerous institutions which surround us. and the ways we communicate with each other. It is also important to note that the core values of a culture do not change quickly or easily. Be aware that the Australian governments and territories have also passed laws to protect against discrimination. there are things that we can see and describe easily. Cultural competence means being able to interact effectively in many different cultural situations. and when they are able to identify and reflect on their own attitudes about cultural differences. Australian Lebanese Christian. thinks and what they believe. and in many cases. It may be a specific requirement that family are involved with all decisions about treatment and care. such as Vietnamese. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 70 of 158 . The following may give you some ideas on things we need to know about our client or client:   Family may be extremely important. We need to know about their language skills and their culture. So. such as the words we use. but there are also many deeply rooted ideas that can only be understood by analysing values. it is extremely important to keep in mind that all cultures share a common humanity.forces become visible to the casual observer in the form of observable behaviours. does not give very true and accurate information about how that person lives. Cultural communication Many people are born and live in a variety of countries during the course of their life.

       A discussion with your client/client can find out a lot of information that will be useful for all care workers and most of all for benefit of that person. Pronounce your words clearly not loudly. It is very important that we recognise this is happening and follow clear steps to support the person. Yet another may be brave. It takes a lifetime to get to truly know a person. Many of our co-workers also have a diverse cultural background. Some cultures have rules about what gender may treat and care for them. 1. They may use folk medicine methods with or without Western treatments. Other cultures may look more at the whole person for healing. it is common for language use to go back to their first learnt language. Some cultures use terms like "hot". The care recipient may suffer extra stresses related to a change in their role and financial dependency because of their cultural beliefs. "cold". There may be issues related to the client or client being male or female. To promote a better workplace. Speak slowly and clearly The care recipient or client needs time to understand your words. we need to know information about them to ensure their care needs are met. Independence and self-control are important to them. diet and physical self are a key to their health. The care recipient may use other types of healing. Another group of people we need to consider in our workplace are our working partners and colleagues. "wind". Some client/clients may be proud. We need to be careful not to be judgemental about a client/client's outward personality. spirituality. Clarify by writing down words. The following are some tips to help you communicate effectively across cultures. Some cultures feel shame to express their feelings about a trauma or loss. As people age. Don't use slang words or jargon (like medical terms and initials). Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 71 of 158 . Their thoughts. "nerves" to describe symptoms. Take care not to talk down to the person. take time to find out about your co-workers without being too nosy! The more we know about people the easier it is to understand them and work with them. feelings. As many of our care recipients are born in another country or speak more than one language. Different cultures have different values. We all have an accent check to see if your client or client understands yours. Another culture may value co-operation. environment. family. The care recipient may have lived through incredible suffering for example if they have been a refugee or prisoner of war.

it may be their custom to say "yes" to be polite. the pitch. 3. Differences in word meanings Some words have different meanings in different cultures. The way someone is dressed. Take care not to approach the client or client when you know you really haven't got the time to talk it through thoroughly. In some cultures it is respectful to maintain eye contact yet in another it is respectful NOT to have eye contact.2. 7. Rather. Take time to listen Extra time taken to listen can enable you to clarify what is needed. People express feelings in many different ways Emotions and feelings are open to a lot of misunderstanding when translating from one language to another. This will save a lot of time for all staff later and prevent the care recipient becoming frustrated or withdrawn. Rules of communication All cultures have unspoken rules of communication. Care workers need to remain non-judgemental. It is better to have the person let you know that they "understand" what you have said rather than accept a simple "yes" for an answer. are all factors to be considered when we speak with people of another culture. their stance. Explain your role to the care recipient It is important to explain your role in words that is understood by your client or client. One person may cry and sob to express their grief and another may not show any signs of emotion at all. Remain respectful of people's different ways. Listen and observe Words are only one part of communication.what is the right thing to talk about and in what setting. "Yes" does not always mean the person understands. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 72 of 158 . Lack of understanding and awareness can lead to misinterpretation and lack of respect. These rules include things like . the speed we speak and the emphasis we place on words. What may be proper behaviour for one group of people may be disrespectful for another. Be aware of your body language and learn about the body language of your care recipient's culture. 6. What tone of voice we use. 5. the use of silence. make sure you have the time to discuss any issue with patience and respect. The majority of our communication involves many other cues. the tone of voice. 4. Everyone has their right to express their feelings their own way. body gestures.

Beliefs and attitudes must be respected Care recipients have developed certain beliefs about illness and ageing over their lifetime. If the aged care worker is still having difficulties with the older person culture and the workers own beliefs and attitudes you may need to speak to the supervisor or manager to get guidance and possibly need further training in this area. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Why are routines important to the older person and the aged care workers? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Why is the cultural and religious background of an older person important to meeting their needs? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 73 of 158 . 9. the structure of their sentences can become confused. take time to find out about your co-workers without being too nosy! The more we know about people the easier it is to understand them and work with them. We need to ask for more information about what they believe rather than discount them. Do not assume that a care recipient's level of English will always be correct As a care recipient translates from one language to another. To promote a better workplace. Activity 6 Write down five things that are part of your routine. Many of our co-workers also have a diverse cultural background. It is more respectful to ask them to tell you more about what they believe and how they would be cared for in their former country. Co-workers Another group of people we need to consider in our workplace are our working partners and colleagues. This can occur if a person is distressed or excited.8. This could be every day or week. Let the client or client know you are interested to know more about them.

dress. shave and perform other personal hygiene tasks providing assistance with meals monitoring health issues such as taking blood pressure readings and performing blood glucose level testing assisting with medications basic wound care implementing appropriate strategies for managing complex problems related to dementia. pain management and challenging behaviours providing respite care services palliative care services   Home care workers may be employed to visit and work within both private homes and/or community establishments (such as group homes for Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 74 of 158 . Home care workers also provide significant support for. Home care workers may perform a large range of tasks which can include. cleaning. cooking and shopping assisting with arranging social activities and accompanying people on community outings providing companionship. continence. but is not limited to:          domestic duties such as vacuuming. washing.How do aged care workers communicate with an older person that has reverted back to their primary language which is not english? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 1. to maintain their independence in their home.5 Perform work in a manner that acknowledges that the services are being provided in the client’s own home. and work in partnership with carers. friendship and emotional support basic personal care such as assisting the person to bathe. Home care workers provide an important service in assisting people with a disability and frail older people.

They may be required to work evenings. These include:         excellent verbal and written communication skills the ability to communicate effectively with frail older people.people with a disability) or day centres. Working in partnership with carers and providing appropriate support. but also be able to work independently and without direct supervision the ability to maintain confidentiality and privacy the ability to be flexible and respond to the changing needs of the client ability to provide safe. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 75 of 158 . Home care workers need to be mindful of meeting the needs of carers. Carers play such a critical role in enabling frail older people and people with a disability to remain living at home. Home care workers can also exercise more control of their work routine and work flexible hours that may better suit their needs and the needs of the older person. competent and ethical care a commitment to best practice and continuous improvement principles Working with Carers The needs of carers are as important as the needs of the client. Carer attributes In addition to particular skills that are important when working in home and community care there are also desirable personal attributes important for the home care worker. weekends and public holidays and in rare circumstances they may be required to sleep-over in the person's residence or to live-in on a permanent basis. In the community the worker must have effective time management skills and be able to prioritise their work EACH day. people with a disability. carers and families the ability to provide professional and non-judgemental assistance to clients from diverse backgrounds the ability to work as part of a team. It is also important to be able to work closely with family members and carers as well as liaise with staff from other agencies. information and respite for carers is central to providing quality home and community care services. Working in people's homes and in the community setting requires a slightly different skill set than when working in residential aged care. Working in partnership with the carer may include:    building a relationship of trust with the carer based on mutual respect and consideration identifying the carer's preferred way of doing things and working within these standards wherever possible consulting the carer and client before making any changes in their environment or usual care routine.

complexity or technical skill of the service and the activity to be performed must be considered. service sheet or task sheet and the individualised care plans. personal attributes of the worker. Make sure you get consent to enter the persons’ home and to do the tasks that are req uired. carer and the home care worker. Even though the older person understands that you are from an organisation to do you job. complex wound care is to be performed by the district or community nurse. staff training and qualifications of the worker. level of ability. While many personal care activities are provided by home care workers. The appropriate person to provide such a service must be decided on an individual basis. Some agencies will also provide a list of duties that cannot be performed by the home care worker. you may be new and as yet have not build a positive. such as a service record. Support is available from a supervisor who is on call to assist home care workers if necessary. During the assessment of the client. Limited Supervision Home care workers usually work alone in the client's home. These may come in many forms. This may involve making decisions about the order in which they complete their Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 76 of 158 . unless two workers are required for specific duties. the agency will need to take into account the nature of the work. trusting relationship with that client. Roles and Responsibilities Every employer will have a state of roles and responsibilities to guide their employees and are found in the policies and procedures of the organisations.Home and community care agencies go to great lengths to ensure that workers and clients are appropriately matched. knowledge and skills required to perform the job. some clients with personal care needs may require the services of a registered or enrolled nurse or an allied health professional. the home care worker must not give insulin injections or undertake any tasks related to the care and maintenance of renal dialysis equipment. working in the client's home means that it is not always possible to provide home care workers with direct supervision. Assigning the most appropriate worker is an important part of creating a positive and therapeutic relationship between the client. The home care worker must be able to work independently. client needs and preferences. Most home and community care agencies will provide workers with a clear list of tasks or service descriptors. It is essential that all home care workers have a clear understanding of their role and role boundaries and do not engage in duties or tasks that exceed their role and/or their training and qualifications allow. When selecting the most suitable home care worker for the client. Assigning an appropriate and suitable home care worker to the client is a critical aspect of the care planning process. the client's characteristics. For example. For example.

Documentation Documentation strategies used in the community must therefore ensure effective transfer of information between workers. many community organisations also use a diary. their family or others incidents and deaths immediately according to the policies of the organisation. maintain confidentiality and ensure the communication book is stored in a safe and secure place. As with all forms of documentation. both elder abuse and child abuse any difficulties or conflicts related to providing the client with services instances where services have been refused or where they no longer meet the needs of the client all instances of threatening. and the older person's response to interventions. It may also involve being able to respond to an unexpected event or emergency situation. client and others all situations of abuse or possible abuse. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 77 of 158 . time of entry. Continuity of care depends on effective communication and accurate recording of care needs. you must record the date. however. Include relevant information only. or information about future activities/client appointments. special instructions. It is also essential to report any instances where the client's or worker's rights and responsibilities have been ignored or are not being upheld.scheduled work to best meet the needs of the client. EACH client will have a care record. It is critical that the home care worker uses whatever communication means are most appropriate to receive direction from others and to report events such as:         absences from work or changes to routines any observed changes in a client's emotional and/or physical health all situations of risk to the worker. policies and procedures for the use of communication diaries and the type of information that is recorded in them. daybook or communication book to record information such as significant incidents. aggressive or violent behaviour from the client. your signature and designation. Health team members rely on documentation to provide individualised care which is responsive to the needs of the older person. Reporting to your supervisor Workers may be required to use their judgement about what to report to their supervisor and when to report it. Your employer will have guidelines. the support that is provided.

When writing in documentation such as progress notes. Care Worker) on any written information No entry concerning a resident's care or treatment given should be made on behalf of another care worker Activity 7 Mrs Stallone's care plan states that the community care worker should help her with all or part of the following tasks:      Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 Preparing lunch Opening and reading mail Folding clean laundry Getting out of bed in the morning (Mrs Stallone likes to get up at 0730hrs) Preparing breakfast Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 78 of 158 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . It is important to keep the following points in mind:              Always use black ink. why it is being written and what effect it is intended to have Write events in the order that they happened and as soon as practical after they happened Be certain the resident's/client's name is written on EACH page of your notes Sign your name then print name and status (i. clear and legible Only use abbreviations approved by your organisation Use correct spelling. concise and factual and present the information in a logical order Use quotation marks when recording a resident's statement Consider who is going to read the document.e. date and sign Your writing should be neat. Draw a line through an error.Progress notes for a client or client are the most appropriate place to note that the plan of care has been evaluated. accurate. The progress notes provide evidence that regular evaluation is taking place. you will need to ensure that they are of the highest quality to meet legal and organisational standards. These documents are permanent records and may be required for legal purposes Avoid 'white out'. They reflect client/client care in a legal document which can be used to protect the organisation if there is a claim made against them by the client or their family. Progress notes help in maintaining a record of the continuity of care and quality of care to the standards that are required by the organisation and by legislation. punctuation and grammar Don't leave spaces between entries Be objective.

_________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 79 of 158 .   Cleaning teeth Getting dressed Walking the dog How would prioritise the tasks that need to be completed for Mrs Stallone? _________________________________________________________ List the tasks in order of priority for Mrs Stallone _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Is there any flexiblitiy between the older persons’ care plan and the community workers’ tasks that need to be completed? How? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ List the important points to remember when documenting in any clients’ progress/clinical notes.

you lose it. a holistic approach. Remember. Assessment of the older person's needs should begin with their perspective of their needs. Assessment of the older person tends to focus on function and include assessment of the physical. when the person wants a shower. choosing the clothes they wear. whether the older person is at risk of falling. For instance. social and cultural approach. The assessment will include an evaluation of risk factors for instance. It is vital that the older person retains and continues to practise skills required for daily living.6 Provide services in a manner that enables the older person to direct the processes where appropriate. or when they want to go to sleep. In some care situations it may appear to be more practical and usually quicker to take over doing something for the person. and not as a specific illness or disease.1. and the list keeps going on and on. How do you know what services are appropriate to the older person? Firstly. concerns. Assessments may be undertaken to gather comprehensive information about the older person's health condition. which sock goes on which foot first. social and emotional aspects of their life. assessment is the process of gathering information to identify care needs. fears and what support they feel they need to maximise their independence. if you don't use it. what activities the person wants to do. This is so that positive contributions for health outcomes can be met for EACH older person. mental/emotional. but it is critical that all care is tailored to maximise the abilities of the older person and to help them to regain or retain their optimal level of independence. Encourage the older person to ask questions and take an active part in the assessment. abilities and social Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 80 of 158 . the key areas that underpin quality care services and promote successful ageing outcomes:      an understanding of the key issues affecting older people social justice approaches culturally inclusive approaches positive ageing client-centredness or person-centred approach to individualised care The client/person-centred approach to care encourages and values older people to maintain their independence and control over important and routine aspects of their daily lives. The aged care worker needs to look at an older person as a whole. views. rather than encouraging and supporting their efforts. It is normal for most older people to fear losing a sense of control and selfworth especially if they do not have any choices or do not participate in meeting their own needs. this entails looking at the person in a physical. their abilities. and this will also consider the needs of carers if appropriate. cognitive/mental. have lunch. As the saying goes.

stereotyping and judgement. thereby preventing their inappropriate admission to long term residential care and enhancing their quality of life. The person has a right to privacy and should be able to share information about their problems. it is essential that all assistance with personal care reflects the highly specific needs and preferences of the individual. needs and circumstances without others being able to hear. Again. The aims of the HACC program: To provide a comprehensive and integrated range of basic support services for frail. or they may be targeted to collect specific information. The aim of any intervention will be to maximise the independence. To provide a greater range of services and more flexible service provision to ensure that services respond to the needs of users (Health& community services Victoria: aims of the HACC program)   Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 81 of 158 . Home and Community Care (HACC) Services As a service provider working in a HACC program it is imperative that you understand the aims of the HACC program. the older person should be actively involved in the development of the care plan and help to make decisions about the care they need. a care plan can be developed. Therefore. The care plan identifies appropriate support services. It is important for the aged care worker to approach the assessment with sensitivity. abilities and needs. for example to monitor their blood pressure. and that care services are provided in a manner that is free from discrimination. and their carers. Meeting Care Needs When the assessment of the older person is complete and necessary information has been collected. Family members. People who require assistance with personal care have many differing personal characteristics. in particular to meet their personal care needs. Remember that some of the questions you may need to ask during the assessment could cause embarrassment. To help these people be more independent at home and in the community.situation. This may not be sufficient as the older person may require the assistance of another person to manage their ADLs. abilities and quality of life of the older person. while considering resources available and the needs of carers. You need to inform the older person what issues will be covered and what information you are seeking. as well as adaptations or assistive devices that would help the older person to regain their independence and maximise their abilities. carers and those close to the older person should also have the opportunity to be part of making decisions about how best to meet the needs of the older person. aged and other people with a disability.

repairing broken windows and occasional garden maintenance. Community nursing This program provides nursing to improve and maintain the consumer’s health and well-being. bill-paying and other appropriate services. It can include cleaning spouts. The supply of meals into the home for the consumer is one important support to enable them to continue to reside in their own home Meals can be provided so the consumer can reheat them at a time appropriate for them. There are some localities where home care is being integrated to assist this service. The social support program includes friendly visits. Some meals can also be arranged at senior citizen centres and community centres. Food services There is a variety of ways that this service can be delivered. This service helps the usual care to take a break. The program also coordinates care with other areas of the home care organisations such as doctors. isolation and loss of social interaction. hospitals and other agencies. In many areas this service delivery is being tendered out to private industry. or they can be delivered hot as 'meals on wheels'. shopping and helping people get appointments. special dietary needs and to religious and cultural factors. Home maintenance This service provides essential repairs and maintenance tasks to the person's home. EACH locality has adapted this service to suit local needs. telelinks. Minor modifications to a home can also be carried for ‘at-risk' situations. laundering.cleaning. telephonemonitoring and participation in senior citizens' clubs/groups where appropriate/ Home help/Home care This program assists individuals and families with everyday and personal tasks. Because of illness or disability.Social support This program is aimed at re-establishing people's community links. the HACC consumer may experience loneliness. transport. cooking. Home care services also provide assistance in personal tasks such as dressing and showering. Also a range of flexible options can be explored such as excursions or vouchers in restaurants and hotels. Nurses visit consumer's home on a regular or onoff basis. These include:. Specific home help This service helps families who are caring for HACC consumer and who meet the criteria for specific home help. Specific home help can also assist with everyday household task and can be available at night and weekends. Consideration in the provision of food services must be given to food preferences. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 82 of 158 .

Senior citizens centres There are centre that provide a regular meeting-place for senior citizens and provide opportunities for older people to meet socially. Adult Day Activity Support Services (ADASS) Planned activity groups are designed to provide out-of-home group activities that will enhance their physical. Co. or Via State administration or state funds directly. mobility and the ability to lead as normal a life as possible. Allied health This program assists the consumers to maintain independence. The services include physiotherapy. These services are provided either at home. transport and meals are provided. Various localities organise these programs to suit local needs. podiatry. Community Care Options These programs aim to improve service delivery in the HACC system and be responsible for :      the coordination of services the case management of consumers promoting service flexibility providing effective care offering consumers greater choice of services purchase or brokerage of services to meet special needs.Care. For example:   assistance with dressing assistance with bathing Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 83 of 158 . psychological and social well-being for older people. people with disabilities and their carers. Co-care. There are several different funding sources for the care services and this affects the manner of the service delivery.' Some services are subsidised and some are not. intellectual. Personal care Personal care is the service provided by a HACC worker to assist the consumer in tasks or personal care. uses case management and assesses consumers for 'on-going complex care needs. Linkages. or at community centres such as Adult Day Centres. Money to deliver these services can come from Federal funds directly. speech therapy and dietary advice. Community Health Centres or Senior Citizen Centres. Interchange This program provides respite care for carers through the short term placement of children with disabilities (zero to eighteen years old) with host carers. For most consumers. for instance.

The care planning process entails:- 1. carer. cleaning teeth.  assistance with personal hygiene( e. transfer to/from wheelchairs). family and health professional about the persons’ needs. PLANNING Care plan developed by the team & the client 3.g. the services needed then an individualised care plan devised with the older person being to put some input into it. ASSESSMENT Collect Information 2.g. in your own words describe in more detail what happens in EACH step _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 84 of 158 . Once it is decided by the older person. washing hair) assistance with access to transport (e. EACH program has a common objective. IMPLEMENTATION Carry out the plan of care to meet the needs of the older person 4. EVALUATION Review the plan & revise as needed or 6 monthly Activity 8 For EACH step of the care planning process. which is to provide services to the HACC target group.

She has two sons: Kane. You have been assigned Norma’s case. Many bills had not been paid and all the money in her bank account had been gradually withdrawn over the previous six months. does not go out much and has stopped catching up with friends. Kane recently came from overseas to stay with his mother for a week. but also about her financial situation. who is a courier. who lives overseas with his wife. Norma now has no savings and it has become apparent to Kane that Daniel has been taking financial advantage of his mother without her knowledge. Her doctor contacted Daniel. what steps and/or actions would you follow and complete so that you can put an individualised care plan together for Norma and what services are available for Norma so she can stay at home. who agreed to visit more regularly and help out with shopping and managing things in the house. and Daniel. Kane was concerned not only about his mother's health. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 85 of 158 . Over the last year. Norma has become quite confused.Activity 9: Case Study Norma is a widow and lives alone in her own home. calling in occasionally when his work takes him into that area or when he needs money from his mother to help cover the costs of running his truck. Daniel does not see a lot of his mother. She often forgets appointments.

_________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 86 of 158 .

Having procedures in place ensures that everyone knows exactly what to do and how to do it. an organisation's Procedure for Handwashing or Disposal of Sharps or ways to support older people to complete their daily living activities. and they provide clear direction for all workers. providing transport and handling money. Policies and procedures manuals exist within organisations to ensure there is consistency in the delivery of care. Before you start looking for information. They mean you do not have to guess about what is expected.1. the Aged Care Act 1997 and the Aged Care Standards and Principles. The policy will ensure that the organisation is complying with the occupational health and safety legislation and regulations of that state or territory. policies have been written to make your job easier. explains in detail how to carry out these procedures. The policy and procedures manual will reflect all the relevant legislation. and in which sub-section. think about where it might be — in which general section. for example working safely. Policies reflect the individual organisation's values and should be consistent with relevant Australian and state legislations. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 87 of 158 . with further information under sub-section headings. Policies are formal statements that guide the decisions of staff. They combine the values of the organisation within the broader professional and legislative framework to which the organisation belongs. An example of a policy is a rule that no aged care worker is to lift heavy items until they have successfully completed a manual handling certificate. This is an important document because it tells you what should be implemented in a particular situation and how it should be carried out. for example the Occupational Health and Safety Act. For example. These manuals include a contents page to help you find information quickly.7 Provide support/assistance in accordance with organisation policy. They guide you in how to do your work and help you make decisions about the right thing to do. common law responsibilities and standards of care that you must follow. protocols and procedures. They are there to give you protection in difficult situations. Usually the information will be organised under general section headings. Procedures reflect the policies of the organisation. You should familiarise yourself with your organisation's policies and procedures. lifting and handling heavy items. There are policies for every aspect of workplace activities. This may be simple lists of instructions that are used every day. as a reference book to consult when you are unfamiliar with a particular procedure or the accepted practice within your organisation. Remember. Procedures are stepby-step instructions on how to perform certain tasks. They may tell you how to act in a situation. An organisation's occupational health and safety policy specifies the course of action to be followed in relation to workplace health and safety issues.

As a worker please be aware that policies and procedures are regularly being reviewed and updated so. roll it into a joint and then light it for them would you do it? Why/why not? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Why do organisations have a no lift policy? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Where in the policies and procedure manual would I find the handwashing procedures? Why is it in this part of the manual? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ You are a new employee in the organisation. to buy cannabis.Also you should know where and how to access the policy and procedures manual at your workplace. Activity 10 If an older person asks you. If you find yourself faced with a situation that does not seem to be covered by any particular policy. Ask your supervisor to explain any terms you do not understand. As soon as a worker deviates from these policies and procedures you may be in trouble with the organisation and law enforcers. This is due to policy and procedures manuals sometimes use very complex language because they relate to legal frameworks. Where are policy and procedure manuals located? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 88 of 158 . or to clarify any procedures that seem unclear. during staff induction you need to locate where all the policy and procedures manuals are kept. an aged care worker. The most important thing to remember about policies and procedures is that if you work within these guidelines you are protecting yourself as policies and procedures come from legislation which is law. check with your supervisor. you need to be updated with theses in the way of memos on staff notice boards or signing new policies that you have read or they may be on the computer in the organisations intranet of policies and procedures.

For example. when using hoists/lifters. make sure you tell your supervisor. There may be policies about how and when the equipment is to be used. You may need to be trained to use it by the manufacturer or a qualified per son. Make sure you read these. It may be a special type of equipment that is used only by workers helping older people. An aged care worker may heed to use different types of equipment to help older people do their daily living activities. There may be a procedure to read about the equipment. Manual Wheelchair Electric Wheelchair Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 89 of 158 . Sometimes the equipment may be different. Where possible it is appropriate to have training in the use of all items or equipment which you may be using during the care of your client. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ 1. Make sure you are confident in the safe use of equipment before you use it to help an older person. or only by older people who can no longer use the normal household equipment for a common task. and how to use it safely. new shower bed. Mostly this equipment will be the same as what you use every day at home to do your own tasks. Someone who knows how to use it will be able to show you how. or how to use it. use of wheelchairs and so on. If you don't know what the piece of equipment is.Give 5 examples of policy and procedure documents an organisation would have in their manual.8 Demonstrate appropriate use of equipment to support/assist the older person with activities of living within work role and responsibility.

Lifter/Hoist 1 Lifter/Hoist 2 Stand Up Lifter 1 Stand Up Lifter 2 Shower Trolley Walking Aids 1 Walking Aids 2 Walking Aids 3 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 90 of 158 .

ensure that you ask your supervisor for instruction and training of it. and if the equipment requires the assistance of 2 persons to operate it. If the instruction manual is no longer available access the Internet and obtain operating instructions for the equipment. This is also important as you may need to train or educate the older person how to use the aid/equipment so that they do not get an injury. When utilising any equipment ensure that you follow organisational policy and protocol. It might also be possible to obtain the original training manual. It is important that staff know and understand how to use aids safely. Remember. There are many aids available to assist older people meet their needs. Under no circumstances should you be using equipment for which you have no knowledge or training in the use of same. ensure that you bring this to the attention of your supervisor so as to ensure that there are appropriate and sufficient staff available to assist you in providing the care. when using any aid/equipment never put yourself or colleagues and the client at risk of injury.If there is a particular item of equipment which you are not familiar with. Other aids available include:- Shower Chair 1 Shower Chair 2 Shower Chair 3 Adjustable Toilet Chair Modified Utensils 1 Modified Utensils 2 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 91 of 158 .

Commode Chair 1 Continence Pads 1 Continence Pads 2 Continence Pads 3 Button Hook Aid 1 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 92 of 158 .

Mrs Jackson is your client and has had her mobility status revised as now needs 2 staff to help her as she has needs to use a hoist/lifter to transfer her at all times.Activity 11 You are an aged care worker. what instructions/ explanations do you give Mrs Jackson as she is anxious and it is her first time using the equipment? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 93 of 158 . If neither staff have used a hoist/lifter before. what do they need to do to be able to use the lifter? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Should the staff use Mrs Jackson to practice on? Why/Why not? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ If both staff know how to use the lifter/hoist safely.

Activity 12 How would you as a carer encourage older people to utilise support services where appropriate? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ In what way as a carer can you clearly explain the scope of the service to be provided to the older person and/or their advocate? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ As a carer how do you identify the needs of the older person from the service delivery plan and from consultation with a supervisor? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 94 of 158 .

In what ways as a carer do you need to ensure visits and service delivery accommodates the older person’s established routines and customs where possible? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How. as a carer could you assist in providing services in a manner that enables the older person to direct the processes where appropriate? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 95 of 158 . as a carer would you perform work in a manner that acknowledges that the services are being provided in the client’s own home? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How.

protocols and procedures.As a carer you need to provide support/assistance in accordance with organisation policy. How would you go about doing this? Give examples. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How is your role carer involved in Demonstrating the appropriate use of equipment to support/assist the older person with activities of living within work role and responsibility? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 96 of 158 .

They may visit the older person every day or every week in their home. Seek aids and/or equipment to support/assist the older person undertake activities of living independently. These choices may impact on a change to their care or service need. The changes are most commonly monitored through a regular process of evaluation of care and service plans.4 2. As a care worker it is important to remember that client/client's are able to make individual choices and their choices must be respected.2 2. Recognise and report changes in an older person’s ability to undertake activities of living. It is a requirement to provide information to your supervisor regarding changes to your client/client as this information may impact on a change to their care plan or service and impact on their overall wellbeing. this information is then used to develop the client/client care and service needs. Report to a supervisor the older person’s inability to undertake activities of living independently. Support/assist the older person to modify or adapt the environment or activity to facilitate independence. Care needs are reviewed on a regular basis through the process of regular care plan evaluations and through case conference between the care provider and client/client/representative.2. 2. Clients/client's may request a change in their care and service delivery themselves or alternatively you may identify that a change is required through your own observation. Information is gathered through the initial assessment process. Changes in care and service needs can occur at any time though for many varied reasons. An aged care worker who provides support with an older person's ADLs may be in regular contact with them.3 2. Care and service needs are recorded on relevant documents including care and service plans. 2.1 Monitor the older person’s activities and environment to identify increased need for support/assistance with activities of living. Resident/client care and service needs can be subject to change. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 97 of 158 . It is important as a care worker to report these changes either in written or verbal form to assist in the process of providing accurate care and service to client/client's. or several times EACH day in their room in an aged care facility.1 Monitor the older person’s activities and environment to identify increased need for support/assistance with activities of living.

He sees that some of the meat Mr Rolland’s buys on their shopping trips hasn't been cooked. doing his cooking and caring for his little dog. asking questions and listening to clients and family or significant others. Possible changes in condition of the client that must be immediately reported to a supervisor or health professional may include. Fido. Over the past few weeks. Warren knows that this is the only regular help that Mr Rolland receives and that he has always seemed very capable of keeping his house and garden tidy and clean. Who and where would Warren report his observations to? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ It is important to notice these changes in an older person's environment. He visits Mr Rolland twice a week to help him with his shopping and laundry. Example Warren is a community aged care worker. fast or absent bathing. Warren notices that the same dirty dishes are in the sink two visits in a row.As someone who is regularly assisting an older person with their ADLs. breathing (including slowed. It is important to know when the older person may need more help with their ADLs. redness or swelling Headache Skin tone Feelings of dizziness Slurring of speech Nausea and vomiting Blurred vision Confusion Changes in behaviour Anything that appears abnormal about the client/client            Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 98 of 158 . listening). colour change and absence of pulse) Rash Inflammation. He notices that Fido hasn't been washed or brushed for a while. it is important to notice changes in the older person's condition this is achieved through observation (watching. Changes such as those in Mr Rolland's home may show that his condition has worsened and he is less able to do all his ADLs. colour changes) or circulation (including unexpected drowsiness. but are not limited to:  Changes to airway (eg choking).

Hughes communication / progress notes book. Had afternoon tea with Mrs. They may be aware that your client has experienced difficulty with bathing and dressing or needing to be reminded to bathe. Hughes put groceries away. 1200hrs Belinda Smith ACW Belinda Smith ACW 1400hrs Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 99 of 158 . Mrs. attended to make bed but it had already been done. then it is important that aged care workers document these changes in the client’s clinical/progress notes and verbally report the changes to your supervisor.O. Hughes had baked some homemade biscuits for us to have. Hughes today for three hours activity including shopping. transferring from bed to chair and back. The first note was written three months ago and the next one was written after her latest visit. Hughes attended to some gardening whilst I did living room. Case notes / progress Date and time 14/1/08 1100hrs Name . and walking (not bedridden). Basic Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) are the self-care tasks of bathing. Mrs.Watch for signs of physical or memory impairment that strongly inhibit or prevent one from performing tasks of daily living without assistance. being able to use the toilet. Activity 13 The following is a case study and a sample of the daily progress notes. has supported and attended to Mrs. Hughes D. Belinda. She writes daily notes in Mrs. Vacuumed and dusted living room and dining room. Assisted her in carrying in the shopping bags from the car. Listen to family members who may be in regular contact with their family member.B 31/08/1929 Attended to Mrs. eating. dressing and undressing. an community care worker. Should you notice a change in your client’s abilities to attend to the activities of daily living regardless of how subtle or small it may be. inability to prepare nutritious meals and taking medications incorrectly.. Hughes for the past eight months. maintaining bladder and bowel control. Mrs. Mrs. Hughes when jobs finished.

Made bed.B 31/08/1929 21/4/08 1100hrs 1130hrs 1200hrs 1330hrs 1430hrs 1. Carried delivered shopping to kitchen and put heavy items away such as the canned goods and cleaning products. Hughes today for three hours. She says her knees and hands are very sore these days. Picked up newspapers and items from the floors prior to vacuuming the house. Mrs. Cleaned bathroom and kitchen. Mrs. She said she wasn’t hungry. for Mrs. Vacuuming taking longer to do because carpet is becoming frayed.Care Notes / Progress Date and time Name. Hughes to bed before leaving. Hughes but minimal amount eaten. Hughes stayed dozing in lounge recliner whilst I worked. Hughes care between the two sets of progress notes.O. Put Mrs. Make a list of the changes which are in Mrs. ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 100 of 158 . Prepared lunch. Belinda Smith ACW D. Hughes Attended to Mrs.

Look at the progress notes entries. Who would Belinda report these changes to? ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ 5. Hughes ability to perform everyday tasks. What changes might help and improve the care which you provide to Mrs.? ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ 3.2. ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ 4. Hughes. Give reasons for the changes in Mrs. what suggestions do you offer to improve the way the documentation is completed. As Belinda’s supervisor. ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 101 of 158 .

Activity 14 List other changes. emotional. such as physical. social and cultural changes that may occur to an older person ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 102 of 158 .

It will also show a paper trail and provide appropriately and timely admission to a residential complex when the independent living situation deteriorates beyond suitability. so that they can get the support they need. it is important that this is reported to a supervisor. This constitutes a risk assessment profile and will lead to a change in the care plan for your client. Ask your supervisor for help on reporting if you need to. These procedures are there to make sure that there is clear and accurate information about the support needs of older people. How you report the change depends on the situation and the procedures for your workplace. You must make sure you know how your workplace expects you to report changes to an older person's abilities and their support needs. You might also phone your supervisor if you think they are not likely to read your written notes in a reasonable time. They start to do a little more to help the person. This means:     they are the only person who knows what support the older person is getting other aged care workers who support the older person may not be aware of their additional needs the care plan is not up to date the older person may not be getting extra services that they may be eligible for. When everyone has access to current information.2 Report to a supervisor the older person’s inability to undertake activities of living independently.2. Sometimes. Any change which you notice in your client’s ability to undertake activities of independent daily living need to be reported to your supervisor as a matter of priority. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 103 of 158 . It is important that you follow the procedures for reporting that are set by your workplace. This helps older people maintain their independence. It might also necessitate an increase in care hours or increase in items or instruments necessary for your client to maintain living independently. When aged care workers identify changes in an older person's ability to do their ADLs. Changes to the older person's ability to complete their ADLs are usually reported in the following ways. aged care workers change the support they provide to the older person without telling anyone that the older person needs extra help. They make sure that this information is communicated in a way that gives all workers supporting the older person access to current information about their support needs. Doing this means that they are the only ones who know that the older person's condition is getting worse. older people can be reassessed as soon as their support needs change. Telephone Generally you should call your supervisor if the change is sudden or puts the older person or others around them in danger.

Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 104 of 158 . they only described the tasks that they did for her. Do not forget to hand over the changes to the supervisor but also to your colleagues in the next shift. The following example shows how the notes can be written so they help everyone who looks after Mrs Zimmerman. However. as necessary. If the change to the person's support needs does not require an urgent response. The consequences could be injury or harm to the client. the aged care worker wrote about the extra help that they now had to give.Face to face/Verbally If an urgent response is needed. you should contact your supervisor immediately to explain the changes. if there are no changes reported or documented then your duty of care is not upheld. Remember. Clinical notes/Progress notes/Care Plan You should write information about changes to the older person's support needs into the clinical notes or communication book for the older person. For example In the example about Mrs Zimmerman. you might wait until you see your supervisor to report the change to them. yourself and other colleagues. what you (aged care worker) have done and arrange to see them as soon as possible. They did not mention that they had to do extra tasks because Mrs Zimmerman's condition was worsening. condition and level of independence. This makes sure that all the workers providing support to the older person have access to this information. Also the supervisor can change the care plan so that it reflects the new needs of the client. Which may have been prevented if the aged care worker had reported any changes in an older persons’ needs.

She doesn't pick up things from the floor. She finds it more difficult to clean. Carried shopping delivery to kitchen and put away the heavy items such as juice. She now needs assistance with her shopping bags and putting heavy items away.Care Notes Date/Time NAME: Mrs Zimmerman Attended Mrs Zimmerman today for two hours. They are a tripping hazard. cans and cleaning products. rewrite the content so that it shows Mrs Zimmerman’s condition is getting worse. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 105 of 158 . DOB: 25/7/31 3/12/07 1530hrs Bella Jacob (AIN) Activity 15 In your own words. Safety note: The joins in the carpet in the lounge room have started to come apart. Picked up newspapers in lounge room and dirty clothes in bedroom before vacuuming. I made us a cup of tea when jobs were finished and took it to Mrs Z. Dusted surfaces. Mopped bathroom and kitchen and wiped down surfaces. I also noticed that she does not go outdoors to work in the garden or do any baking herself. Note: Mrs Zimmerman says her hands and legs are very sore these days. Mrs Z stayed in the lounge reading a magazine while I worked .

This constitutes a risk assessment profile and will lead to a change in the care plan for your client. It will also show a paper trail and provide appropriately and timely admission to a residential complex when the independent living situation deteriorates beyond suitability Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 106 of 158 .How would you tell your supervisor that Mrs Zimmerman’s condition is worsening? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How would you report the following in an older persons’ condition or abilities? (in any setting) Put a tick in the box that describes the option you would choose. Change in Older Person Unable to work out how to put a shirt on Forgetting if the person has had lunch Placing electric kettle on a stove Person has become incontinent of urine Person has gone for a walk and cannot find their way back home Person is having trouble weight bearing with their walking frame Phone Face to face Care Notes Care Plan Any change which you notice in your client’s ability to undertake activities of independent daily living need to be reported to your supervisor as a matter of priority. You can put a tick in more than one box. It might also necessitate an increase in care hours or increase in items or instruments necessary for your client to maintain living independently.

This may affect a person’s ability to complete tasks. The older person also wants the opportunity to set goals and be successful. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 107 of 158 . Your assistance in identifying and overcoming difficulties may often be necessary to maintain an older person’s independence and confidence. However. You may not be able to change that attitude.3 Support/assist the older person to modify or adapt the environment or activity to facilitate independence. The ageing process.    Break activities down into small steps or tasks. This includes being aware of their rights an adult to refuse assistance or choose not to continue with activity. Talk to your supervisor as other family members or medical personnel may also need to be consulted if the difficulties are caused by age-related illness. Older people do not change a great deal in their ideas. but remember you will need to treat you client with respect. like and dislikes. Problem solving skills and ability to stay with task until completed often parts of a person’s personality. Equipment and aids that may assist include:        Wheelchairs and other transport devices Mobility aids Lifting and transferring equipment Beds Continence aids Toileting aids Personal audio-visual aids You will need to consider the risk and rewards involved in completing tasks successfully. however. Look at problems that might arise. Offer assistance where you feel it may be necessary. can limit opportunities through age related illness. The right to participate in situations that may involve some personal risk must also be respected. These will give the older person a new skill and help them overcome environmental or physical problems. Assistance should be kept to a minimum. you may need to be creative in you approach. Training or practice will make a big difference to a older person’s ability to complete tasks independently. You will need to think of the steps involve in the activity that may require assistance without removing the sense of enjoyment and participation. Some of the factors you will need to consider when planning assistance are:  Decline in skills and abilities does not always happen with old age. Computer driven technology and electronic aids may be available.2.

smell and taste. in the privacy of his own room. Mrs Fong has enjoyed china painting for many years. The carers in the residential care facility have noticed he often forgets item of clothing or dresses inappropriately. If the older person likes to play bingo but the numbers are too small. Mr Rogers continues to dress himself at his own pace in the morning without assistance. you will see how Mr Rogers is given assistance to maintain personal independence. You may consider overcoming some of their difficulties by asking if they are interested in     Raised garden beds so they do not have to bend Indoor pots or flower arranging Gardening programs on radio and television Gardening books and magazines Unresolved feelings or situations from stressful past events in an older person’s life can give them a feeling of helplessness or reduced motivation to participate. Often. it is necessary to adapt the way in which the person performs the ADL. Involvement in as many normal activities as possible allows an older person to exercise control over their lives. The activities should involve a number of the senses: sight. to help to maintain their independence. anticipating the difficulties an older person may face will help you in planning when and where you could assist. The Care Plan is altered and the night staff now hang out clothing for the next day on the wardrobe door. For example. For example. This could be modified by having larger print. Knowledge of the person’s character and personality will also give you clues about their ability and desire to complete tasks. bigger numbers or even have a volunteer to help if there are other problems so the person can still participate in an activity they enjoy. Activities may need to be adjusted to allow for success in stages. a keen gardener may not be able to bend or lift as they have in the past. If playing indoor carpet bowls and they cannot bend down then instead of standing up they could sit down and still play. You will need to have a good understanding of older person’s likes and dislikes.This can sometimes be difficult. touch. hearing. But now the arthritis in her fingers makes this activity painful and frustrating. Other examples include:  If your client has trouble bending down to pick up things from the floor then you could recommend they invest in a pick-up-device which can be purchased from a number of places including hardware stores and independent living specialist’s stores. Difficulties in one area can be compensated for by ability in another. Mr Rogers is becoming increasingly confused. Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 108 of 158   Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . In the following example. Sometimes.

then you could make arrangements with the club for their courtesy bus to collect them and return them at the conclusion of the activity. get books that have CD’s so that it is read to them. If you client really likes to continue to attend to the local RSL to play lawn bowls but can no longer drive their own car and it is too far to walk or too difficult for them to take public transport. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 109 of 158 . Sometimes it is more a matter of common sense which can make observation of the change or modification which is needed.    Activity 16 Gladys enjoys participating in the morning exercise in her aged care facility. and possibly community transport bus or even applying for subsidised taxi vouchers for your clients use. You have noticed that she does not participate in any activities. If an older person cannot read novels possibly get bigger font books. If your client has trouble bending down to pick up things from the floor then you could recommend they invest in a pick-up-devise which can be purchased from a number of places including hardware stores and independent living specialist’s stores. In her care plan you notice she enjoys bingo. How can you encourage Mrs Tran to participate in the activities she enjoys? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ It is well known that nearly/if not all situations within the environment and / or activities can benefit from some form of modification. This morning she is complaining of not being to stand for long periods. If they love to do the weekly shopping but can no longer manage to bring all the bags home. and your client’s environment is not an exception to this rule. then home delivery service would be the way to go. How could you modify this activity for Gladys so that she can still participate and not feel worthless? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Mrs Tran is a new resident in the aged care facility. knitting and socialising in general. When eating meals using plate guards so the food doesn’t fall off the plate and appropriate utensils especially if fingers and hands have changed anatomically. use magnifying glass. rather than a professional university degree education.

then home delivery service would be the way to go.If you client really likes to continue to attend to the local RSL to play lawn bowls but can no longer drive their own car and it is too far to walk or too difficult for them to take public transport. or VIP lawn mowing services. Activity 17 Research your local papers and/or the internet and make a list of at least 10 local organisations which you could refer your client over to for assisted services. If they love to do the weekly shopping but can no longer manage to bring all the bags home. and possibly community transport bus or even applying for subsidised taxi vouchers for your clients use. then you could make arrangements with the club for their courtesy bus to collect them and return them at the conclusion of the activity. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 110 of 158 . Home handyman repairs and gardening could be attended to by firms such as Hire-A-Hubby.

This may affect a person’s ability to complete tasks. can limit opportunities through age related illness. Talk to your supervisor. see below: Figure 1: Safety Recognise the continual need for people of all ages to take risks & learn Self-care. where possible.2. other family members or medical personnel may also need to be consulted if the difficulties are caused by age-related illness. encourages physical & emotional health Environmental designs may need improvement Safety in daily routines is always a major concern Maintaining ADLs provides valuable exercise As an aged care worker. Maintaining independence and pride in accomplishments must be balanced with safety and other factors. There are many many aids and pieces of equipment to support an older persons’ ADLs regardless if they live in their own home or in a aged Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 111 of 158 . however. you will need to consider the risk and rewards involved in completing tasks successfully. The ageing process. Older people do not change a great deal in their ideas. The following figure lists some major areas to consider when planning assistance for older person.4 Seek aids and/or equipment to support/assist the older person undertake activities of living independently. Aged care workers are often called upon to play an important part in helping and older person overcome difficulties with activities of daily living. like and dislikes.

and why. The type of equipment they need depends on what tasks they are having difficulty with. walking frame. Here are some examples of aids that are available:            Tap turner long-handled dustpan and broom non-slip bench mats for mixing bowls jar grips to help open jars foam handle covers for knives. scissors and other utensils to assist with gripping large-print measuring jugs. Braille Printer for Visually Impaired Works with aid of a microphone and a voice recognition recorder on one end and a printer on the other that puts out 25mm x 50mm labels that can be stuck on any item. There are many different types of equipment that have been designed to assist older people and people with disabilities to perform everyday tasks that would otherwise be difficult or impossible for them. labels for washing machine and oven knobs wash basket trolley to take washing to the line and prevent the need to bend call bells personal alarms mobility equipment-walking motorized scooter stick. wheelchair. Remember that training is important for the colder person and their support so that aids and equipment are used safely and correctly to reduce the risk of injuries and harm. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 112 of 158 .care facility.

Big Button Phone Talking Microwave Glasses Button Hook Pick Up Reacher Sock & Stocking Aid Toe Washer Long Handle Comb Long Handled Brush Hearing Aid Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 113 of 158 .

or may need another person to do the task for them. Without the equipment. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 114 of 158 . the person may not be able to continue to live in their own home.Inner Ear Hearing Aid Stocking Aid Long Handled Shoehorn Any of the pieces of equipment described above may assist an older person to continue to do a daily living task independently. Equipment can be a great solution in helping an older person to maintain their independence.

what suggestions could you offer her .au list 5 other products that can be used by older people to maintain their independence. What piece of equipment could be used for this? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Mrs Samuels has difficulty using normal eating utensils because of her arthritic fingers. What suggestions could you offer so Mr Blake can stay at home? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Activity 19: Research From the following website Independent Living Centre on www.ilcaustralia.Activity 18 An older person you work with can no longer bend down to pick things off the floor. to maintain independence? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Mr Blake lives at home by himself in a two-storey house and is finding it more and more difficult to climb the stairs. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 115 of 158 .org.

Give examples and reasons for this ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 116 of 158 .Activity 20 How as a carer would you monitor the older person’s activities and environment to identify increased need for support/assistance with activities of living? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ In what way as carer is it your responsibility to report to a supervisor the older person’s inability to undertake activities of living independently? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ As a carer you need to support/assist the older person to modify or adapt the environment or activity to facilitate independence.

In what way as a carer are you able to assist in seeking aids and/or equipment to support/assist the older person undertaking activities of living independently? Give examples. ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 117 of 158 .

1 3. in consultation with the older person. and often the first approach to an organisation is made from a family member or friend or following hospitalization due to physical or emotional difficulties.3 3. English is a second language. Recognise hazards and address in accordance with organisation policy and protocols. You may need to spend a considerable amount of time in completing a health assessment of your aged client. This is often due to a number of reasons. 3. Health assessment data allow health care providers to implement primary and where needed secondary and tertiary regimens.1 Encourage and support/assist the older person to maintain their environment.4 Encourage and support/assist the older person to maintain their environment. Primary care addresses disease prevention and health promotion and maintenance. if they have vision and intellectual ability. to maximise safety and comfort. Sometimes the initial health assessment can be completed by the client before a visit. Support the older person to maintain an environment that maximises independence.2 3. The elderly are often reluctant to seek help due to previous adverse experiences with the health system or because they put their problems down to being just age related and don’t realise that assistance is available. Appropriate care requires professionals with specialized knowledge and skill to assist the client in remaining in their home. safety and security. Aged persons often do not seek assistance from care organisations. Adapt or modify the environment. impaired communication skills as a result of a previous illness – dysphasic. The initial interview with your client requires a skill in establishing your clients trust and confidence and in avoiding offending your client or their family. not the least being because of a lack of schooling of your client. Provide support to promote security of the older person’s environment. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 118 of 158 . 3. The individual can usually receive the care at home.3.

you work in community care and decide when visiting a client who is visually impaired that you move all their furniture because you don’t like the way it is arranged without permission. garden and other areas they use are safe. room. This will help the older person maintain their independence. preferences and aids that they utilize. secure and comfortable. The older person is likely to be injured because of this. secure and comfortable. Help them to plan how they can manage their home. tools and support in place to do the tasks they need to do to maintain their independence. This helps the older person maintain their independence for as long as possible. For example.Upon doing a house visit. you may also need to refer to the individualised care plan to see the persons’ likes and dislikes. This helps the older person identify strategies for making sure that their environment is maintained in such a way that tasks are made as easy as possible. equipment and other features of their environment so that tasks can be done safely and with as little effort as possible. They will be able to go about their daily living tasks independently and happily if they feel confident that their environment is free from anything that could cause them to have an accident or put them in danger. This will help them think about the daily tasks they do. You should move them. Encourage older people to think through the tasks that they do. 'There are electrical cords here that you could trip on. you would have a check list which could first be filled in by your client in relation to their home environment and then by yourself or your organisation. It is important that aged care workers encourage older people to be aware of their environment so they can see the things that are making some tasks difficult for them. you could say. ‘It is important that you make sure that there is nothing for you to trip over. With your assessment. room. All those responsible for supporting older people should make sure that their home (in the community or aged care facility). A key part of helping older people maintain their independence is to help them keep their environment safe. Look around to see if there is anything on the floor’. This is better than saying. you are able to assess the home environment and become aware of any modifications or improvements which might assist your client in being able to remain in their home and stay in their environment. It is more helpful to encourage the older person to look around their environment and spot things they can do to improve it. Older people must have the best possible space. It is important that older people are encouraged to make sure that their environment is kept in a way that makes their lives as easy as possible. rather than tell the person the things they should do. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 119 of 158 . With a home assessment you may be able to assist your client in maintaining their home environment. As an aged care worker. For instance.' It is also important that you get permission off the older person to move things.

wider doorways. For example. better lighting and lowered bench tops. As a worker if you are supporting or assisting them in their environment ask the person questions to see if anything can be done to reduce risks and hazards. If the bin is far away from the person then place a plastic bag or bin closer to them so the rubbish is there rather than in the floor which is a hazard itself. Assistive devices include any aids that help older people to perform ADLs more independently and more easily. Often. Any modification. was telling the community worker the worker suggested to get a night light for the bathroom so the light is always on or to get a urinal or commode put beside the bed at night so Horace doesn’t have to go the bathroom. Horace a client who lives in his home. safety and independence. Modifications can include ramps. and commodes that can increase an individual's independence in toileting. an assessment of the older person will be undertaken to ensure that the most appropriate intervention is recommended. a simple modification to make the environment safer and allow the person to mobilise more easily may be sufficient. There are many assistive devices available that can increase the older person's independence in all ADLs — for example. hand-held showers. The type of modification necessary will depend on the needs of the individual and the part of the home that is being modified. grab rails. adaptation or aid that is recommended and utilised should increase the older person’s sense of security. modification or assistive device. plate guards and cup holders that make eating and drinking easier. aids that enhance safety with walking (such as a walking frame). When Horace. Before recommending any adaptation. adaptations to their home environment will make it possible for the older person to regain their independence — for example.Also encourage the older person to put rubbish in bins rather than throwing it on the floor. slipped in the bathroom after going to the toilet because he didn’t want to turn the light on to save money at money. The assessment will look at the older person's:       ability to perform ADLs and lADLs vision and hearing transportation recreation home and work environment current equipment use. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 120 of 158 .

reading. Geraldine enjoys and can still do the gardening.Activity 21: Case Study Geraldine has had arthritis in her hands for 15 years. cooking and swimming. and to stay in her own home for as long as possible. but still manages to do. simple household chores and hanging and removing washing from a clothes line. Over the years she has developed innovative ways of doing things and with support. She is determined to remain independent. manages to live a full and independent life. Geraldine has lived alone. Her husband died eight years ago and since then. What aids/equipment independence? could Geraldine use to maintain her _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How would you make sure Geraldine understands and knows how to use the aids in a safe manner? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Why is it important to maintain Geraldine’s independence in her home? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 121 of 158 . The activities Geraldine has difficulty with. are dressing and grooming.

Write down some things you could say to Mrs Lyon that would help her look after her environment so that tasks are as easy as possible to reduce the risk of injury. A jar grip has fallen into the laundry basket. The telephone ring is very quiet.Activity 22 An aged care worker notices the following things when they visit Mrs Lyon's home:    The brick path to the washing line has a couple of bricks sticking up. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 122 of 158 .

wash. harassed. It means feeling that you are protected from harm. clean. It may mean:     being sure that floors.2 Provide support to promote security of the older person’s environment. A significant contribution and aspect to the fear of crime amongst the elderly is the socioeconomic deterioration of the neighbourhood and the loss of ‘true’ neighbours. feeling and being secure in their own home can mean feeling safe from intruders. An older person may feel less independent if they don't feel secure. For most people.3. steps and pathways are clear and even so they don't feel that they may accidentally trip and fall not being abused. Whether you work in the community. Part of the role of an aged care worker is to help older people feel secure in their own environment. pushed or bullied from anyone having windows and doors locked making sure that they are able to shop. It would be pertinent as part of your assessment of your client‘s condition to do an assessment of their environmental surrounding. but there fears may-well be intensified as they feel more vulnerable due to their frailness or disability. the same fears about violence and crime as is held by the rest of the population. hurt or in danger. Feeling secure means being free from anxiety and worry.   Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 123 of 158 . Feeling secure is very important for older people. They may feel that they cannot or do not want to do things for themselves in case they get hurt or something else bad happens. care for pets. visit friends and pay bills so that they remain in control of their own lives knowing that the older person can get help at anytime especially if in a facility knowing that someone is coming to visit at a particular time and will know if the older person is unwell. Everyone needs to feel secure in their own homes and in their daily lives. in older people's homes or in aged care facilities it is important to help older people feel secure. fire and other serious events that would cause them harm or distress. The older individuals in our society will share the same sentiment. especially if the person is living alone. For an older person it may also mean more than this.

For example Julia is the aged care worker who visits Sheila in her home. She does not visit at a regular time, but only as requested by her employer, when Sheila needs support. When Julia is leaving, Sheila always asks her when she will see her next. Julia says she doesn't know which day, but she is sure it will be soon. Sheila always seems upset when she leaves. Julia talks to her supervisor about this. Her supervisor suggests she talk to Sheila about the things Sheila does during the week and who else she sees. The next time Julia visits Sheila, she talks to her and discovers that she is the only person who visits Sheila at home on a regular basis. She discovers that Sheila is very worried that if she is sick or has a fall in her house, it could be days before someone finds her. Julia talks to her supervisor again, and they arrange for Julia to visit Sheila at a set time and day to provide support. They also arrange for Sheila to get a personal alarm, so she can get help quickly if she needs it. The next time Julia visits Sheila she seems much calmer and says she feels very safe with her personal alarm around her neck all the time. When Julia is leaving, Sheila doesn't ask when she will be back, but says, 'See you next Thursday.' Sheila feels more secure due to her personal alarm and that someone will come if she presses it. Also that Julia will be checking on her on a particular day.

Make a list of the external environment of the home, is there       Adequate tamper proof external lighting, possibly on a motion sensor switch? Does the house have lockable screen doors in good – excellent condition? Do the windows have key locks installed? Is there an alarm system installed? Does the client have an independent personal alarm? Are there instruments or items outside the home which could possibly be used as a weapon in the event of a break and enter?

You may also:  Take time out to talk to the neighbours, and maybe exchange phone numbers with the neighbour in case of emergency situations. If your client gets on well with a close neighbour it might be beneficial and cost effective to install between them a cordless doorbell alarm system, purchased cheaply from most hardware shops. Your client
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holds the buzzer portion, and the neighbor houses the ring component. (Average cost is ($10-45). A cost effective alternative to a duress alarm which can cost upwards of $300 - $400 a year to maintain.    Introduce them to community–centered neighbourhood crime prevention networks, public education. Suggest they carry only a small amount of money and personal items in a wallet or purse. Encourage your client to keep house keys and larger amounts of money and credit cards in an inside clothing pocket or in a body band. People who snatch purses and wallets are usually not interested in injuring anyone, so it is best to hand over their bag or wallet when being accosted. If there are no keys or identification in the bag then the risk of having their house invaded is almost nil. Encourage your client to believe in safety in numbers. If going for a walk always try to walk with a friend or neighbour. Encourage the wearing of a small sports whistle. Suggest when the client is going for a walk carry a cane or umbrella as it can act as a deceptive weapon of defense. Encourage your client to be alert to stories and news items of fraud, and bogus schemes. Encourage your client not to be overly trusting and not to let anyone that they do not know into their home uninvited. If someone attends and wants to gain entrance by showing identification, encourage them to always phone the agency involved before allowing the person to enter, to verify the authenticity of the identification. Encourage your client to engage in a self-defense course. Encourage an increase in police surveillance of the area or areas that you or your client attends. If you notice that your client is purchasing a lot of unnecessary items over the internet or from phone or door to door salesman, advise them that’s its inappropriate. A lot of unscrupulous sales people will try and sell anything to the elderly as they are a very vulnerable part of our society and often the elderly don’t know how to say NO. Contact the companies concerned and return the items for a full refund.

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For an older person living in an aged care facility, feeling secure may also mean feeling that they have their own private space, maintaining dignity and have privacy. Most areas, such as lounge rooms, dining rooms and sometimes bathrooms and toilets, are shared with other people. Often the only space the older person has that is their own is their bedroom. It is important that the older person can feel secure when they are in their own space, knowing that their belongings are safe, knowing they have aged care workers to call upon and that no one will go into their room without permission.

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For example Timothy lives in an aged care facility. He has his own bedroom but shares a bathroom with Basil in the next room. Basil has dementia and spends most of the day and part of the night walking up and down the hallways. He often comes into Timothy's room. Timothy locks the door when he is in the bathroom. This puts an 'engaged' sign up outside the door. However, Basil will often still rattle the door handle or call out through the door, 'Anyone there?' Timothy likes to spend the afternoon sitting in a chair in his room, reading the paper and writing letters. The cleaner comes a couple of days a week to mop the floor and empty the bin. She doesn't knock on the door, or ask if it is OK to come in. The young man who brings the afternoon tea also just walks in and puts the afternoon tea on his tray. Even though Timothy lives in an aged care facility, his home, what should staff be doing for Timothy? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How would you feel if you were Timothy and this is happening to you? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________

For example Elaine is a resident in an aged care facility, when particular aged care workers are looking after her at night, she feels safer as the workers always check the windows are locked and that her bed rails are up. Other workers put her bed rails up but Elaine does not see the workers look at the windows to see if they are locked so she doesn’t feel as safe. For example, leaving a small night light on at night may make older people feel more safe and secure than if there is no light on. Sometimes feeling secure may depend on the older person's condition. An older person who has a physical condition, such as arthritis or a weak hip, wants to know that they can get around safely and get the support they need to do physical tasks such as cleaning, laundry, gardening and cooking. An older person with a condition that affects them mentally, such as dementia, wants to know where they are, when
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Carol enjoys going for a walk but lately has forgotten how to come home and the police have brought her home. Security of these people can mean providing areas in aged care homes where they are able to walk around and go out to a garden that is locked to make sure they cannot leave the facility without someone knowing. ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Ken lives by himself in the same family home he was born in. security can also mean making sure that they do not go out on their own. Ken was found wandering the streets and taken back home. Ken took the care for a drive. Ken has mild dementia but tries to remain independent. Other times they may not feel secure. he is also worried he will burn himself. At these times the aged care worker can explain the security measures to them so they will know that they are safe. It can be very difficult to provide appropriate support for this. People with memory problems can get lost if they go out on their own. The older person might be worried that they could go for a walk and get lost. ___________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 127 of 158 . It is important that security measures in these facilities are followed so that these people are safe. and what to expect will happen next. Sometimes the older person may not be aware that the security measures are making them safer. Activity 23 What could be done by the aged care worker or community care worker in the following situations to assist the older person to feel and be more secure? Mr Parker has Parkinson’s disease. He enjoys coffee but has stopped having it as his hands shake. parked the car. For people with memory problems. They may wander into bushland. His family was notified and it took 3 weeks to locate the car. locked it and went for a walk.their appointments are. ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Carol has dementia and has lived in the same house for 30 years. They can forget to cross roads safely.

___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 128 of 158 .___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Dorothy lives in an aged care facility. Dorothy cannot recognise who they are. she has dementia and when her family comes to visit which is quiet regularly.

By their activity behaviours. There are ways and means of assisting your client to make modifications along a simplistic scale without rebuilding the whole environment. due to the balance of the house being too cold. modification or assistive device. people are reluctant or are complacent to change their environment or to repair it even though they realize it is in disrepair. an assessment of the older person will be undertaken to ensure that the most appropriate intervention is recommended. It is impossible to completely separate the environment from the person observing it. concerns. Assessment of the older person's needs should begin with their perspective of their needs. modify. modify or maintain their everyday environment by moving into and out of a place and by remaining in a place for shorter or longer periods. The assessment will look at the older person's:       ability to perform ADLs vision and hearing transportation recreation home and work environment current equipment use. views. In home care. (Altman 1975) The individual’s environment will be installed with qualities that are consistent in some respects to the individuals purpose and intention. or maintain their everyday environment by the extent to which they differently occupy (temporarily) and utilise its varied contents. individuals select. individuals select. motivational and behavioural states. Your client may well stay in only 2 or 3 rooms of their house. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 129 of 158 .3. an admission assessment will be conducted when the person moves into the facility.3 Adapt or modify the environment. (Bowers 1973) Individuals by their overt behaviour create. An assessment will be carried out on initial contact with the older person. in consultation with the older person. and they are unable to or have no idea on how to heat it. In other words. their abilities. They may have an increasing difficulty in managing to walk up and down stairs. Encourage the older person to ask questions and take an active part in the assessment. to maximise safety and comfort. and as such they no longer access the back yard and sunshine because it is too difficult and painful to walk up and down the 2-3 steps. By their residential behaviours. In residential aged care facilities. fears and what support they feel they need to maximise their independence. and then regularly to monitor their wellbeing and to detect any changes. select and maintain environments with properties congenial to their own cognitive. Before recommending any adaptation.

Being comfortable means being free from pain and anxiety and feeling that all our needs are satisfied. For example. a simple modification to make the environment safer and allow the person to mobilise more easily may be sufficient. Any modification. There are many assistive devices available that can increase the older person's independence in all ADLs — for example. behavioural and leisure needs. injury. adaptations to their home environment will make it possible for the older person to regain their independence — for example. safety and independence. hand-held showers. so that the things they use frequently are easily accessible. Being safe means being free from harm. The type of modification necessary will depend on the needs of the individual and the part of the home that is being modified. grab rails. For example. and that walkways are clear. danger or risk. Often. an older person may be encouraged to think about where they keep things in their room. wider doorways. Modifications can include ramps. It is still important that the older person is aware of their environment and how to keep it safe and well arranged. plate guards and cup holders that make eating and drinking easier. emotional.physical assessment may not be the primary focus. and commodes that can increase an individual's independence in toileting. better lighting and lowered bench tops. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 130 of 158 . This helps them to be independent and in control. assessment of an older person attending a day care centre may focus more on their social. ramps (to make wheelchairs or walking frames easier access than steps). It is similar to feeling secure. aids that enhance safety with walking (such as a walking frame). adaptation or aid that is recommended should increase the older person's sense of security. Ramp to a house Wheelchair Elevator Assistive devices include any aids that help older people to perform ADLs more independently and more easily. as the assessment may be directed towards the type of support offered by that service and the assistance that the older person needs.

Make sure the temperature is at a comfortable level not too hot or cold. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 131 of 158 . etc) __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ Helping older people to have a safe and comfortable environment can be different depending on where the older person lives. drivers. The older person can then plan to avoid or manage these things. uneven footpaths. are not controllable by the older person. frayed carpet Check electrical appliances and cords for faults or breaks Make sure that the older person can pay their bills. The home belongs to the older person and they may not want. The older person should be encouraged to maintain an awareness of any dangers in these places. What are 5 activities that we do everyday that we cannot control? (For instance. Support an older person to shop regularly so they always have fresh. to have big changes made to make their environment safe and comfortable. or they may not be able to afford. which the older person can operate Make sure there are no tripping hazards around their home such as uneven footpaths. Environments that are outside the older person's home. healthy food and drink available.Making the environment safe and comfortable There are many ways that an older person's environment can be adapted to make sure that it is safe and comfortable for the that person. Make sure furniture is comfortable and that the older person can get in and out of it independently. for example uneven patches on footpaths. such as footpaths and shops. gas. Provide support for the older person to visit doctors and other appointments when necessary. so that they always have electricity. rugs. The older person should also be encouraged to carefully plan how they will do the tasks that involve the environment they cannot control. Some examples might be:         Make sure that the older person has locks on doors and windows. you may find that it is difficult to adapt the environment in the person's own home. telephone etc. As an aged care or a community worker.

The older person may not be able to afford to buy an expensive new chair. sensitivity to their needs in the way you speak to an older person. making sure that they understand why it needs to be modified or changed. It may be difficult to talk to an older person about making changes in their environment as they don't like change. the best solution would be to buy a new electric chair that gets the person to a standing position. however this is costly to the older person. Emphasise that by making changes in the older persons’ environment will help them to maintain or increase their independence and control. Make sure that they understand that they have choices and with the choices there may be consequences that need to be considered.For instance. The older person may not want to do this. or to attach blocks to the legs to make the chair taller. They may like their armchair. if an older person is having difficulty getting in and out of a lounge chair. It may make them feel that they are becoming less independent and therefore have less motivation. A suggestion may be to have cushions on the chair to make the seat higher. It is important to approach the older person with respect. What can be done so Winifred can continue to have bathes? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 132 of 158 . the organisation running the facility has control over the environment and how it can be adapted to make older people safer or more comfortable. or teach the older person to get out of the chair by wriggling closer to the front edge then pushing up to stand up. In an aged care facility. courtesy. Allow the older person time to make decisions as if they feel rushed or overwhelmed they lose that sense of control. as long as the older person has made the decision themselves and not the worker coercing them into a decision. Last time she was in the bath she found it difficult to get out of the bath. An occupational therapist can help with this too. You should never change something in the person's home or room without first talking to them about it. It may suit their house. and getting their consent to do it. less self worth and confidence. Activity 24 Winifred lived at home and enjoys having a bath 2-3 times a week. It may make them feel disempowered over their own home and/or their life. The aged care worker can help the older person to think of another way to adapt the environment. Discussing with an older person about safety It is very important to discuss with the older person about the ways in which their environment could be adapted to make it safer and more comfortable.

Today.Max lives in an aged care facility. Do you accommodate Max’s wishes? W hy/Why not? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 133 of 158 . He needs to 2 aged care workers do to his ADLs. instead of having a bath he wants a shower. He has very limited movement to the left side of his body.

secure and comfortable environment is to recognise things that are likely to be dangerous or cause injury or harm. The purpose of following the policies and procedures of the organisation means that you. an older person has magazines and newspapers piled up in the hallway this is a hazard in the home. For instance. Confidentiality Act and Privacy act to name a few. For instance.4 Recognise hazards and address in accordance with organisation policy and protocols. Remembering that legislation is law so when organisations are writing policies and procedures they comply with the law and so will you when you follow them. In recognizing the hazards it is important to document them in line with your organisations policy. In-house hazards could be:   clients failing eye sight and unable to see whether the gas stove is lit or not old carpet which is fraying at the seams One of the most important parts of helping older people have a safe. they can include those in-house and external. as the facility has a no smoking policy on-site. report them verbally to the supervisor and written by completing the paperwork as per the organisations policies and procedures. As an aged care worker or community worker it is your responsibility to recognise hazards. are complying with the appropriate federal and state legislation such as Occupational Health and Safety Act. remove the hazards. These things are called hazards.3. will be instrumental in addressing the issue with regards to recognizing the hazards of your client’s residence. as a worker. Hazards can be in any form. if an older person in a facility smokes inside and you as a worker do nothing to stop him. Could you as a worker be in trouble? What happens if the cigarette starts a fire? Below are some examples of different hazards in the environment. Having a good understanding of your organisations policy and procedures and protocols. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 134 of 158 . Hazards in an older person's environment means anything that might cause harm or injury and affect the older person's independence.

As these are legal documents that outline the requirements for that particular legislation and is law that is. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 135 of 158 . why they form the basis for all organizational policies and procedures. eliminating or controlling those hazards and monitoring and reviewing risk assessments and control measures. assessing the risk of those hazards. tape cord Environmental Lighting Electrical Wet floor No light on stairs Cords across the floor Faulty machine Slipping Fall up or down Tripping Equipment Back injury. The reason for this is that there is an Occupational health and Safety Act at a federal and at a state level. The steps of risk management is     Step 1-Identify hazards (find a problem) Step 2-Assess risk (check it out) Step 3-Eliminate or control risks (fix it) Step 4-Monitor and review When identifying risks from as simple as boxes obstructing the fire exit to equipment not working properly and water on the floor there is a policy and procedure in place to do with occupational health and safety. This legislation is past through parliament and therefore are law.Table 2: Hazards in the Environment HAZARD WHAT HAZARD WHAT DANGER CONTROL MEASURES Mop floor Install light Hide. risk management is the overall process of identifying hazards. electrocution Back Shoulder Out of order Storage Heavy boxes high Store at low and central height Clear way Entry/exit Blocking exits No exit in emergency Exhaustion Human Lack of sleep Adequate sleep/rest Basically.

The process to do this will vary from organisation to organisation but generally it involves reporting to your supervisor. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 136 of 158 . if it entails equipment put “out of service” tags and remove equipment and handover verbally to colleagues and/or put in communication book what has been done. and do the risk management steps. By complying with the policies and procedures in place you have also complied with your duty of care responsibilities. (Identify hazards. the risk management process is essential to have steps in place for all workers to follow as it will provide a safe working environment. Activity 25 Where would you locate the policy and procedures manuals in any organisation? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ As an aged care worker. if you do not understand the policy and procedures who do ask for help? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ List 5 possible hazards in your home _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Pick one hazard in your home from the list above. Identify hazards.Hence. complete maintenance forms. complete a hazard report form. eliminate or control risks and monitor and review).

Activity 26 How as a carer would you encourage and support/assist the older person to maintain their environment? Give Examples ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ How would you as a carer provide support to promote security of the older person’s environment? Give examples ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 137 of 158 .

go about maximising safety and comfort? Give examples ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ As a carer there are many hazards in your day to day activities. ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 138 of 158 . How do you recognise hazards and address in accordance with organisation policy and protocols? Give examples and how to go about rectifying them. in consultation with the older person.If an environment needs to be adapted or modified how would you as a carer.

loss and grief. Use appropriate communication strategies when older person is expressing their fears and other emotions associated with loss and grief. Change is a natural part of life and a significant part of the experience of ageing. Reactions to loss and grief are very individual. 4. emotional. even simple ones inability to concentrate intense anger at the departed loved one loss of appetite mood swings from anger to guilt need to take care of others. physically. Provide older person and/or their support network with information regarding relevant support services as required. and this loss can be physical.1 Recognise signs that older person is experiencing grief and report to appropriate person. The changes that come with ageing are often associated with loss. Not everyone will experience loss and grief the same way.3 4. to protect them need to tell and retell stories about their loved one and the death experience sensing or feeling the loved one's presence Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 139 of 158 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . The process of grief can be experienced emotionally.2 4. 4. Grief is a natural response to loss and is experienced in many different ways. it is the central part of the healing and recovery process after a loss. There is no right or wrong way to grieve. and each of us will experience unique responses to change.1 Recognize signs that older person is experiencing grief and report to appropriate person. psychologically and behaviourally. Support the older person who is experiencing loss and grief. psychological and social. some common feelings of grief include:              Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 assumption of the lost loved one's mannerisms or speech patterns denial or disbelief that the loss occurred feeling of emptiness in the stomach or abdomen feelings of restlessness heaviness in the chest inability to complete tasks.4.

grief usually refers to the loss of a loved one through death. Although people often suffer emotional pain in response to loss of anything that is very important to them (for example. a home). Grief is defined as the normal. while bereavement is the state of having experienced that loss. a friendship.            sleep disruptions such as insomnia or extreme wakefulness tightness in the throat unexpected and unpredictable bouts of crying wandering aimlessly through the house or neighbourhood social withdrawal anxiety fear sadness guilt inadequacy loneliness lethargy Recognizing the signs of a loss is the start of recognizing the signs of grief Loss may include the loss of:              Independence Control Status Possessions Relationships Health and Significant others – loved ones both human and animals. Reaction to the loss can take the form of: Shock Physical Distress Panic Guilt Hostility / destructive behaviours Lack of interest and apathy Emotional Release The signs of depression and grief can be similar. internal feeling one experiences in reaction to a loss. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 140 of 158 . a job. one's sense of safety. Many people who have experienced both talk about the ‘sadness’ of grief compared with the ‘numbness’ or almost non-feeling state of major depression.

Recognition that time is short promotes anger at having to die without being given a chance to do all one wants to do. or God. nurses. While the person still feels reasonably well.Recognition inevitability of death. Acceptance . Kubler-Ross stressed the importance of hope at all stages. Bargaining . a location. research shows that about 40% of bereaved people will suffer from some form of anxiety disorder in the first year after the death of a loved one. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 141 of 158 . the person denies its seriousness to escape from the prospect of death. Kubler-Ross regards depression as necessary preparation for the last stage. a sound / song / smell / flower or even food. resentment. It would help to have an insight into the circumstances of the loss so that you can be prepared for the triggers and can suitably assist your client. Depression . In addition to grief as an initial reaction to loss.On learning of the terminal illness. This can be in the form of a particular date or anniversary. and envy of those who will go on living. Still.The potential negative effects of a grief reaction can be significant. and there can be an up to 70% increase in death of the surviving spouse within the first six months after the death of his or her partner. revisit a stage or experience several stages at the same time. recognising that the underlying cause is the unfairness of death. denial is self-protective. they are in a better position to provide compassionate support. According to Kubler-Ross.  Denial . Elisabeth Kubler-Ross (1969) is credited with awakening society's sensitivity to the psychological needs of dying people.This is seen as achieving peace. friends. For example. and bargaining fail to postpone the course of illness. Denial is resistance and avoidance. Listening sympathetically is the best response to these efforts to sustain hope. doctors. the terminally ill person attempts to forestall it by bargaining for extra time—a deal he or she may try to strike with family members.     Be aware people do not move through the stages outlined by KublerRoss in any fixed order. Anger . They may miss a stage. anger.When denial. they must tolerate rather than lash out at the client's behaviour. when family members and health professionals understand these responses. people hold some hope that their fate can be altered. of not crushing or denying people’s hope. She devised a theory of five typical responses—initially proposed as stages—to the prospect of death and the ordeal of dying. She felt that even at the stage of acceptance. acceptance. accepting the present and not fighting or protesting the future. the process can be aggravated by events that remind the bereaved individual of their loved one or the circumstances surrounding their loss. Family members and health professionals are often targets of the client's rage.

getting startled very easily. places. This is so staff are informed and to make sure that if the feelings of grief intensify then further steps may need to be taken such as. Loss of weight. Bereaved individuals who may have felt that the death of their loved one was either unexpected or violent may well be at greater risk for suffering from major depression. It will also be verbally handed over to colleagues at handover. PTSD refers to a condition that involves the sufferer enduring an experience that significantly threatened their sense of safety or well being (for example. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 142 of 158 . being quite irritable. Major depression may also lead to the sufferer experiencing unjustified guilt. losing interest in activities he or she used to enjoy. Major depression is described as a psychiatric disorder which can be characterized by depression and/or irritability that lasts at least two weeks in a row and is often accompanied by a number of other symptoms. And they start avoiding things that remind the person of the traumatic event (for example. Generally. They then re-experience the event through nightmares when they are asleep or flashbacks (feeling as if the trauma is happening again at times when the sufferer is awake). counsellors. involving pastoral care. Loss or lack of concentration. or thoughts of wanting to kill them or someone else. or difficulty trusting others). Loss of appetite. having trouble sleeping. family members and other professional as needed. or things that the sufferer may associate with the death of their loved one). such as:      Problems with sleep. the supervisor is notified verbally and the worker will document in the progress or clinical notes what signs of grief the older person is displaying. the suicide or homicide of a loved one). people. They also develop a hypersensitivity to events that are normal and they are very jittery and often tearful (for example. Decrease in energy level It is very important that should you notice your client experiencing any of the above signs and symptoms that you document it accurately and appropriately and notify your supervisor.Reporting Grief The aged care worker or community worker need to be aware that there are policies and procedures in place on what to do if a person is experiencing grief and loss. post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or complicated grief.

_______________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Psychological ._____________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 143 of 158 . Give 5 examples of each: Emotional . psychologically. physically and behaviourally.________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Behavioural .Activity 27 Is there a right or wrong way to grieve? Why/why not? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Grief is experienced emotionally.____________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Physical .

Kubler-Ross created the “Stages of Dying”. what are they and outline the main characteristics of each stage Stage Main Characteristics Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 144 of 158 .

If the loss is a death.2 Use appropriate communication strategies when older person is expressing their fears and other emotions associated with loss and grief. Grief counseling helps mourners with normal grief reactions work through the tasks of grieving. Talk to them.. do not be afraid to mention the loved one’s name and to ask about the death (e. recognize that anniversaries associated with the loss are common triggers. Personal assistance you can provide to your client includes:  Grief is a very private and individual process. mental health diagnoses. Providing support and time to focus on grieving at important times such as birthdays and anniversaries. Helping the bereaved to live without the person / pet who died and to make decisions alone. and sadness). When supporting someone grieving a death. Recognize that loss can involve much more than death: divorce. A grieving person needs the opportunity to talk about the loss. Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 145 of 158                Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 . Offer the person support. but also give them the time to think and grieve.4. anger.g. Grief counseling can be provided by professionally trained people or in self-help groups where bereaved people help other bereaved people. anxiety. All of these services may be available in individual or group settings. Check in with how they are feeling about the loss. Everyone grieves in their own way and at their own time – but you do not have to do it alone Grief can be physically exhausting: one hour of grieving can be comparable to several hours of hard physical labor. Helping the bereaved to separate emotionally from the person / pet who died and to begin new relationships. Helping the bereaved to identify and express feelings related to the loss (for example. helplessness. Describing normal grieving and the differences in grieving among individuals. Do not assume that someone is over their grief because they do not show outward signs. Give the bereaved person permission to grieve. guilt. when it occurred). The goals of grief counseling include: Helping the bereaved to accept the loss by helping him or her to talk about the loss. how the death occurred. etc all involve loss. Ask how they coped or how they are coping now.

and guilt. But knowing how to listen is much more important. fits of anger. There are many ways to help a grieving friend or family member. Your support and caring presence will help them cope with the pain and begin to heal. The bereaved struggle with many intense and frightening emotions. laughing. it’s not too terrible to talk about. The bereaved should feel free to express their feelings. Try simply asking. It can be tough to know what to say or do when someone you care about is grieving. including depression. Listen with Compassion Almost everyone worries about what to say to people who are grieving. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 146 of 158 . You might not know exactly what to say or what to do. While you should never try to force someone to open up. without fear of judgment. just offer eye contact. wellmeaning people avoid talking about the death or mentioning the deceased person. to get angry. saying the wrong thing. The death of a loved one is one of life’s most difficult experiences. starting with letting the person know you care. Talk candidly about the person who died and don’t steer away from the subject if the deceased’s name comes up. However. Don’t let discomfort prevent you from reaching out to someone who is grieving. Don’t press if the grieving person doesn’t feel like talking. Helping the bereaved to understand his or her methods of coping. the bereaved need to feel that their loss is acknowledged. or making the person feel even worse. a squeeze of the hand. they feel isolated and alone in their grief. Let the grieving person know that it’s okay to cry in front of you. anger. Identifying coping problems the bereaved may have and making recommendations for professional grief therapy. Often. When it seems appropriate. Now. more than ever. awkward. but that’s okay. it’s important to let the bereaved know they have permission to talk about the loss. expressions of guilt or regret. Or maybe you feel there’s little you can do to make things better. At times. You can offer comfort and support with your silent presence. If you can’t think of something to say. Having someone to lean on can help them through the grieving process. or criticism.   Providing continuous support. Don’t try to reason with them over how they should or shouldn’t feel. your support is needed. You may be afraid of intruding. This may include crying. Be willing to sit in silence. or to break down. ask sensitive questions – without being nosy – that invite the grieving person to openly express his or her feelings. The most important thing you can do for a grieving person is to simply be there. “Do you feel like talking?” Accept and acknowledge all feelings. It’s common to feel helpless. or a reassuring hug. and their loved one won’t be forgotten. argument. or unsure. screaming. While you can’t take away the pain of the loss. or engaging in activities that reduce their stress such as walking or gardening. you can provide muchneeded comfort and support. You don’t need to have answers or give advice.

but right now they are not important." "Look at what you have to be thankful for. Concentrate your efforts on listening carefully and with compassion. In addition. . With each retelling. Be patient. the pain lessens." ‘She’s lucky she lived to such a ripe old age. claim to “know” what the person is feeling. Keep your beliefs to yourself unless asked. Statements that begin with "You should" or "You will. Don’t forget the power of human touch. Criticising the way they express their grief is hurtful and will make them less likely to share their feelings with you. don’t press." They know they have things to be thankful for. it's time to get on with your life. "It's part of God's plan. ask your friend to tell you how he or she feels. Grief has a mind of its own and works at its own pace. Repeating the story is a way of processing and accepting the death. Instead you could begin your comments with: "Have you thought about. "He's in a better place now. You could." These statements are too directive. Don’t judge or dispute their responses. so let them grieve their own way.’ Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 147 of 158           Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 .’ ‘He’s happy in heaven. sometimes in minute detail. If you’ve gone through a similar loss.’ ‘Try to remember the good times. moving on is easier said than done.Let the bereaved talk about how their loved one died." One can never know how another may feel. . Holding the person’s hand or giving them a hug offers emotional support. "This is behind you now. Remember that you are comforting them just by being there. or compare your grief to theirs. People who are grieving may need to tell the story over and over again. . . don’t give unsolicited advice. instead. Comments to avoid when comforting the bereaved   "I know how you feel. However.’ ‘It was God’s will. "What plan? Nobody told me about any plan. Sitting together in silence is helpful too." Sometimes the bereaved are resistant to getting on with because they feel this means "forgetting" their loved one.’ ‘You can always try for another baby." or "You might." The bereaved may or may not believe this. If they don’t feel like talking. Tell the bereaved that what they’re feeling is okay. share your own experience if you think it would help.’ ‘Be thankful they’re not in pain anymore. Everyone’s experience of grief is unique." This phrase can make people angry and they often respond with. Offer comfort and reassurance without minimising the loss.

Appreciate that your friend may continue to grieve in subtle ways for the rest of their days. The pain may lessen in intensity over time. dropping by. and the initial shock of the loss has worn off. The bereaved person may look fine on the outside. Never suggest that it’s time they ‘got over it’ and moved on with life. But in general. Your bereaved friend or family member may need your support for months or even years.     Provide ongoing support Grieving continues long after the funeral is over and the cards and flowers have stopped. Certain times and days of the year will be particularly hard for your grieving friend or family member. The pain of bereavement may never fully heal. Don’t change the subject if the deceased naturally comes up in conversation. Remember there will be days in the year that will be particularly hard for your friend to bear. Coming to terms with the death of a loved one can take months and years.’ ‘Time heals all wounds. Suggestions include: Don’t shy away from your friend after the funeral. you still have a lot to be grateful for.’ ‘You’ve got to pull yourself together and be strong. The length of the grieving process varies from person to person. Your friend needs to know that their loved one hasn’t been forgotten. birthdays. or sending letters or cards. Stay in touch with the grieving person.” This puts pressure on the person to keep up appearances and to hide his or her true feelings. Don’t make assumptions based on outward appearances. family milestones. Use the name of the deceased in conversation.’ ‘Count your blessings. Avoid saying things like “You are so strong” or “You look so well. Christmas and the deceased’s birthday. Be sensitive to the fact that life may never feel the same. Continue your support over the long haul. Offer extra support on special days. Your support is more valuable than ever once the funeral is over. the other mourners are gone.’ Offer practical assistance  Grief is a process and not an event. Holidays. periodically checking in. such as anniversaries. rather than days and weeks.    ‘You’ll feel better soon. But the sadness may never completely go away. while inside he or she is suffering. The bereaved person may learn to accept the loss. Be sensitive to these times and offer your support. Keep in contact. grief lasts much longer than most people expect. and anniversaries often Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 148 of 158 . You don’t “get over” the death of a loved one.

reawaken grief. Encourage the grieving person to seek professional help if you observe any of the following warning signs after the initial grieving period – especially if it’s been over two months since the death. such as clinical depression. Be sensitive on these occasions. confused. Let the bereaved person know that you’re there for whatever he or she needs. Watch for warning signs It’s common for a grieving person to feel depressed. anger.                           Difficulty functioning in daily life Extreme focus on the death Excessive bitterness. or like they’re going crazy. But if the bereaved person’s symptoms don’t gradually start to fade – or they get worse with time – this may be a sign that normal grief has evolved into a more serious problem. disconnected from others. or guilt Neglecting personal hygiene Alcohol or drug abuse Inability to enjoy life Hallucinations Withdrawing from others Constant feelings of hopelessness Talking about dying or suicide Anger Anxiety Change in worldview Confusion Sadness and depression Sleeping difficulties Drop in self-esteem Difficulties in concentration Feeling unable to cope Guilt and remorse Helplessness Hopelessness Loneliness Questioning of values and beliefs Relief Shock and disbelief. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 149 of 158 .

It can be tricky to bring up your concerns to the bereaved person. You don’t want to perceive as invasive. Instead of telling the person what to do, try stating your own feelings: “I am troubled by the fact that you aren’t sleeping – perhaps you should look into getting help.” Grief therapy is used with people who have more serious grief reactions. The goal of grief therapy is to identify and solve problems the mourner may have in separating from the person who died. When separation difficulties occur, they may appear as physical or behavior problems, delayed or extreme mourning, conflicted or extended grief, or unexpected mourning (this is seldom present with cancer deaths). Reporting your clients circumstances can be verbal / telephone / face – to- face and in writing. Communication with the grieving needs to be in a variety of forms:  Non – judgmental - Non-judgmental is about being open-minded enough to understand that other people have different points of view, and that in their world-view, they may be correct Observing and listening - (facial expressions, gestures, raised eyebrows, eye contact, vocal utterances, and posture). (questions and answers, arguments and counterarguments, agreements and disagreements, challenged and compliances) Respect for individual differences Courtesy - excellence of manners or social conduct; polite behavior; a courteous, respectful, or considerate act or expression Empathy - is the capability to share your feelings and understand another's emotion and feelings. It is often characterized as the ability to "put oneself into another's shoes," or in some way experience what the other person is feeling Sympathy - is a social affinity in which one person stands with another person, closely understanding his or her feelings. It also can mean being affected by feelings or emotions. Thus the essence of sympathy is that one has a strong concern for the other person. Sympathy exists when the feelings or emotions of one person are deeply understood and appreciated by another person.

  

Activity 28: Case Study Sara has just returned to work having had some days off. Before long she notices the difference in the mood of the aged care facility. Jonas has contracted pneumonia and is likely to die over the next couple of days. Although Jonas has had emphysema for many years, this deterioration has happened very suddenly. All the staff members are extremely fond of Jonas, who has been a resident of the facility for eight years. He has a generous and friendly nature and a wonderful sense of humour. At times he has challenged the policies of the facility, but always with goodwill and in a constructive manner.

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Sara experiences a variety of strong emotions in response to Jonas's dying. She feels sadness at the prospect of losing him, and it also brings up memories of her own father's death. How should the staff act towards Jonas? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What can be done to help Sara with her previous memories of grief and loss? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Are the feelings of staff towards Jonas normal? Why/why not? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How can workers care for themselves in this type of situation? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________

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4.3 Provide older person and/or their support network with information regarding relevant support services as required.
Most of the support that people receive after a loss comes from friends and family. Doctors and nurses may and can also be a source of support. For people who experience difficulty in coping with their loss, grief counseling or grief therapy may be necessary. It is important for there to be a good support network available to help your clients through the stages of grief should the experience occur. The support network can include personnel such as:           Advocates Family members Carers Friends Clergy or local church members Veterans / war widows associations Lions clubs and Community welfare organisations Health professionals (registered nurse, doctor, social worker, diversional therapists, and psychologists. National associations for loss and grief Palliative care associations

Support from family and friends is important People who have support from family and friends are less likely to suffer poor health as a consequence of bereavement and loss. However, some people may also benefit from support in the form of counselling. Bereavement counselling Grief support services provide counselling, support and education to bereaved individuals and families. The opportunity to talk things over with a trained counsellor can help you make sense of your feelings. Counsellors can offer you encouragement, support and advice through the grieving process. They will not tell you what to do or how you should be feeling, but they may put forward ideas and strategies to help you cope. Volunteer counsellors have often been through a similar experience. They can share their experiences and give practical advice and suggestions gained from their own bereavement journey.

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Victims of Crime Helpline Tel. For example. There are also grief support groups for families of people involved in industrial or workplace accidents. 1800 551 800 – 24 hours a day. seven days a week. if you have experienced the death of a child or baby. Sometime specialist services are established in response to a particular traumatic event or disaster such as a bushfire or flood. Specialist services      There are a range of specialist grief support services available. These organisations may include: Hospitals and community health centres Palliative care agencies Volunteer groups Church and religious organisations.Support can help you cope with grief Grief support services aim to:    Help and guide people through the grieving process Help with complicated grief issues to prevent physical and mental health problems occurring. Support from family and friends is important. assistance is available from SIDS and Kids or SANDS (Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Support). Where to get help        Your doctor Your local community health centre A trained counsellor Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement – Bereavement Counselling and Support Service 1800 642 066 Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement – Kids Grieve Kids Help Line Tel. agencies and groups are often involved in grief support services. victims of homicide and people experiencing trauma as a result of road accidents. Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 153 of 158 . 1800 819 817 Things to remember   Everyone experiences the pain associated with grief at some time in their life. Support is available in most communities Community organisations.

That care can either be provided at home. social worker. The reality is that many bereaved people continue to have a relationship with their loved ones for the rest of their lives through remembering them. The experience of grief depends on individual factors such as personality and age. Keeping your relationship with the deceased ‘alive’ is a healthy. physically and spiritually. National associations for loss and grief Palliative care associations Being able to care for a dying loved one tends to promote the healing process for those who are left behind. Such programs or facilities also provide special care for their families. On Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 154 of 158 . the relationship with the deceased and spiritual beliefs. doctor. You may like to talk about your loved one in general conversation or commemorate special events like the deceased’s birthday. Contact grief support volunteer groups. normal response. The support network can include personnel such as:           Advocates Family members Carers Friends Clergy or local church members Veterans / war widows associations Lions clubs and Community welfare organisations Health professionals (registered nurse. community or religious organisations. Death ends a life. not a relationship. Moving on with life There is an expectation that accepting the death of a loved one means letting go of them and their memory. hospitals and palliative care agencies to access services Losing a loved one can be a shattering event that affects you emotionally. and psychologists). or in hospice care. A hospice is a program or facility that provides special care for people whose health has declined to the point that they are near the end of their life. in the hospital. Misconceptions about the grieving process can cause difficulties for the bereaved person. diversional therapists.    It is important for there to be a good support network available to help your clients through the stages of grief should the experience occur. There is no one correct way to grieve.

who do you notify? Do you need to document anything? Why/why not? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Who notifies the next of kin that an older person has died? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ If you have never prepared a dead person before. Activity 29 As a care worker. you find an older person who has died. _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ When working. when preparing a dead body to be viewed by the family. List some strategies that could be utilised by workers.the other hand. you may prefer to keep your memories to yourself and grieve more privately – and that’s healthy and normal too. you will care for residents/clients’/older people who will die. how do you find out what to do? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 155 of 158 .

Activity 30 How would you as a carer recognise signs that older person is experiencing grief and report to appropriate person? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What appropriate communication strategies could you use as a carer when an older person is expressing their fears and other emotions associated with loss and grief? Give details _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ How do you as a carer provide older person and/or their support network with information regarding relevant support services as required? _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 156 of 158 .

_________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 157 of 158 .

2560 Fax: 02-4627-0530 Document Name: Document No: © John Bailey 2009 CHCAC317A Support older people to maintain their independence Version No: V1 Created Date: Last Modified Date: Page Sequence: 10 Dec 2008 23-Oct-13 Page 158 of 158 . with occasional phone contact with a designated trainer/teacher? Was your learning externally supported by a study group of other learners studying the same unit? How many workshops were given to support your learning? (Please circle a number 0.2.1.Resource Evaluation Form Please come back to this page when you have finished working on this resource and complete this form.O.3) Did your learning involve class support material at your college? Did you find this resource easy to use? Any Comments? Yes Yes 0 1 2 No No No No 3 Yes Yes Was the content useful/clear/relevant? Any Comments? Yes No Please comment on any ways this resource could be improved for future learners What other resources did you find that helped you with your studies? Thank you for your time to give us your valuable feedback. Your feedback can assist us to continually improve this resource. NSW. Course Unit: CHCAC317A .Support older people to maintain their independence RTO Date at finish of unit Please Circle Was your learning totally external. Box 268 Macarthur Square. Please give this to your trainer/facilitator/teacher who can send to us at the below address – or if you prefer you can do it yourself JNB Publications P.

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