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Navy Program Guide: 2014

Navy Program Guide: 2014

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Published by Steeljaw Scribe
Status updates on all USN programs
"The United States is a maritime nation with vital interests far from its shores. Operating forward around the globe, the U.S. Navy is
always on watch, contributing key capabilities to win our Nation’s wars, deter conflict, respond to crises, provide humanitarian assistance and disaster response, enhance maritime security, and
strengthen partnerships. The Navy Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 Program supports the highest priorities of the President’s Defense Strategic Guidance (DSG). We organize, man, train, and equip the Navy by
viewing our decisions through three tenets: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready. The Navy will continue to rebalance
to the Asia-Pacific region, sustain support to our partners in the Middle East and other regions, focus our presence at key strategic
maritime crossroads, and satisfy the highest-priority demands of the geographic combatant commanders.

The standard that guides our FY 2015 President’s Budget submission is the DSG and its objectives for the Joint Force; this guidance is benchmarked to the year 2020. The DSG incorporated the first set of Budget Control Act (BCA)-mandated budget reductions and directed the military to address “the projected security environment” and to “recalibrate its capabilities and make selective additional
investments to succeed in the missions” of the Armed Forces.

The Navy prioritized investments to maintain a credible and modern sea-based strategic deterrent, maximize forward presence using ready deployed forces, preserve the means to defeat or deny adversaries, sustain adequate readiness, continue investing
in asymmetric capabilities, and sustain a relevant industrial base.

The Navy’s FY 2015 Program provides the resources to achieve the President’s strategic guidance, albeit at higher levels of risk for some missions - most notably if the military is confronted with a technologically advanced adversary or is forced to respond to more than one major contingency. In the near term, we face readiness challenges because of sequester-induced shortfalls, limited FY 2015 funding, and the expected demand for U.S. military forces globally. Throughout the long term, we face the risk of uncertainty inherent to the dynamic nature of the security environment. Should funding be adjusted to the BCA reduced discretionary caps, the Navy will not be able to execute the President’s defense
strategy in the near or long term.

The Navy made tough choices to achieve a comprehensive and balanced FY 2015 Program, based on the following strategic
priorities:
• Provide credible, modern and safe strategic deterrent
• Provide global forward presence
• Preserve means to defeat or deny adversaries"
Status updates on all USN programs
"The United States is a maritime nation with vital interests far from its shores. Operating forward around the globe, the U.S. Navy is
always on watch, contributing key capabilities to win our Nation’s wars, deter conflict, respond to crises, provide humanitarian assistance and disaster response, enhance maritime security, and
strengthen partnerships. The Navy Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 Program supports the highest priorities of the President’s Defense Strategic Guidance (DSG). We organize, man, train, and equip the Navy by
viewing our decisions through three tenets: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready. The Navy will continue to rebalance
to the Asia-Pacific region, sustain support to our partners in the Middle East and other regions, focus our presence at key strategic
maritime crossroads, and satisfy the highest-priority demands of the geographic combatant commanders.

The standard that guides our FY 2015 President’s Budget submission is the DSG and its objectives for the Joint Force; this guidance is benchmarked to the year 2020. The DSG incorporated the first set of Budget Control Act (BCA)-mandated budget reductions and directed the military to address “the projected security environment” and to “recalibrate its capabilities and make selective additional
investments to succeed in the missions” of the Armed Forces.

The Navy prioritized investments to maintain a credible and modern sea-based strategic deterrent, maximize forward presence using ready deployed forces, preserve the means to defeat or deny adversaries, sustain adequate readiness, continue investing
in asymmetric capabilities, and sustain a relevant industrial base.

The Navy’s FY 2015 Program provides the resources to achieve the President’s strategic guidance, albeit at higher levels of risk for some missions - most notably if the military is confronted with a technologically advanced adversary or is forced to respond to more than one major contingency. In the near term, we face readiness challenges because of sequester-induced shortfalls, limited FY 2015 funding, and the expected demand for U.S. military forces globally. Throughout the long term, we face the risk of uncertainty inherent to the dynamic nature of the security environment. Should funding be adjusted to the BCA reduced discretionary caps, the Navy will not be able to execute the President’s defense
strategy in the near or long term.

The Navy made tough choices to achieve a comprehensive and balanced FY 2015 Program, based on the following strategic
priorities:
• Provide credible, modern and safe strategic deterrent
• Provide global forward presence
• Preserve means to defeat or deny adversaries"

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Steeljaw Scribe on Apr 18, 2014
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04/26/2014

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Description

The Mk XIIA Mode 5 Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) is a se-
cure, real-time, cooperative “blue-force” combat identification
system designed to inform commanders’ “Shoot/No-Shoot” de-
cisions. Advanced technology, coding, and cryptographic tech-
niques are incorporated into the IFF Mode 5 to provide reliable,
secure, and improved equipment performance compared to Mode
4. The Mode 5 waveform is defined in NATO Standardization
Agreement (STANAG) 4193 and is compatible with all U.S. and
international civil IFF requirements. This Navy Acquisition Cate-
gory II program is based on the improved Mk XII Cooperative IFF
Operational Requirements Document, dated April 27, 2001. Tran-
sponders will be installed on more than 3,000 ships and Navy/Ma-
rine Corps aircraft. Mode 5 interrogator equipment will be fielded
on select ships and aircraft, including MH-60R Seahawk helicop-
ters, E-2D Hawkeye, F/A-18C/D/E/F Hornet/Super Hornet, and
E/A-18G Growler aircraft.

Status

Navy Initial Operational Capability (IOC) and Full Rate Produc-
tion were approved in 2012. Integrated and Operational testing
on the E-2D, MV-22 Osprey, P-3C Orion, Arleigh Burke (DDG 51)
destroyers, and Ticonderoga (CG 47) cruisers occurred during
Bold Quest 13-01/Joint Operational Test Approach–2 in June
2013. The program is on track for joint IOC and Full Operational
Capability in 2014 and 2020, respectively, with the Joint Require-
ments Oversight Council approved exception of the F/A-18E/F
and EA-18G. Operational testing of the combined interrogator/
transponder on the F/A-18E/F and EA-18G is planned for 2014.

Developers

BAE Systems

Greenlawn, New York, USA

DRS

Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, USA
General Dynamics Decision Systems Scottsdale, Arizona, USA

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