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Navy Program Guide: 2014

Navy Program Guide: 2014

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Published by Steeljaw Scribe
Status updates on all USN programs
"The United States is a maritime nation with vital interests far from its shores. Operating forward around the globe, the U.S. Navy is
always on watch, contributing key capabilities to win our Nation’s wars, deter conflict, respond to crises, provide humanitarian assistance and disaster response, enhance maritime security, and
strengthen partnerships. The Navy Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 Program supports the highest priorities of the President’s Defense Strategic Guidance (DSG). We organize, man, train, and equip the Navy by
viewing our decisions through three tenets: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready. The Navy will continue to rebalance
to the Asia-Pacific region, sustain support to our partners in the Middle East and other regions, focus our presence at key strategic
maritime crossroads, and satisfy the highest-priority demands of the geographic combatant commanders.

The standard that guides our FY 2015 President’s Budget submission is the DSG and its objectives for the Joint Force; this guidance is benchmarked to the year 2020. The DSG incorporated the first set of Budget Control Act (BCA)-mandated budget reductions and directed the military to address “the projected security environment” and to “recalibrate its capabilities and make selective additional
investments to succeed in the missions” of the Armed Forces.

The Navy prioritized investments to maintain a credible and modern sea-based strategic deterrent, maximize forward presence using ready deployed forces, preserve the means to defeat or deny adversaries, sustain adequate readiness, continue investing
in asymmetric capabilities, and sustain a relevant industrial base.

The Navy’s FY 2015 Program provides the resources to achieve the President’s strategic guidance, albeit at higher levels of risk for some missions - most notably if the military is confronted with a technologically advanced adversary or is forced to respond to more than one major contingency. In the near term, we face readiness challenges because of sequester-induced shortfalls, limited FY 2015 funding, and the expected demand for U.S. military forces globally. Throughout the long term, we face the risk of uncertainty inherent to the dynamic nature of the security environment. Should funding be adjusted to the BCA reduced discretionary caps, the Navy will not be able to execute the President’s defense
strategy in the near or long term.

The Navy made tough choices to achieve a comprehensive and balanced FY 2015 Program, based on the following strategic
priorities:
• Provide credible, modern and safe strategic deterrent
• Provide global forward presence
• Preserve means to defeat or deny adversaries"
Status updates on all USN programs
"The United States is a maritime nation with vital interests far from its shores. Operating forward around the globe, the U.S. Navy is
always on watch, contributing key capabilities to win our Nation’s wars, deter conflict, respond to crises, provide humanitarian assistance and disaster response, enhance maritime security, and
strengthen partnerships. The Navy Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 Program supports the highest priorities of the President’s Defense Strategic Guidance (DSG). We organize, man, train, and equip the Navy by
viewing our decisions through three tenets: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready. The Navy will continue to rebalance
to the Asia-Pacific region, sustain support to our partners in the Middle East and other regions, focus our presence at key strategic
maritime crossroads, and satisfy the highest-priority demands of the geographic combatant commanders.

The standard that guides our FY 2015 President’s Budget submission is the DSG and its objectives for the Joint Force; this guidance is benchmarked to the year 2020. The DSG incorporated the first set of Budget Control Act (BCA)-mandated budget reductions and directed the military to address “the projected security environment” and to “recalibrate its capabilities and make selective additional
investments to succeed in the missions” of the Armed Forces.

The Navy prioritized investments to maintain a credible and modern sea-based strategic deterrent, maximize forward presence using ready deployed forces, preserve the means to defeat or deny adversaries, sustain adequate readiness, continue investing
in asymmetric capabilities, and sustain a relevant industrial base.

The Navy’s FY 2015 Program provides the resources to achieve the President’s strategic guidance, albeit at higher levels of risk for some missions - most notably if the military is confronted with a technologically advanced adversary or is forced to respond to more than one major contingency. In the near term, we face readiness challenges because of sequester-induced shortfalls, limited FY 2015 funding, and the expected demand for U.S. military forces globally. Throughout the long term, we face the risk of uncertainty inherent to the dynamic nature of the security environment. Should funding be adjusted to the BCA reduced discretionary caps, the Navy will not be able to execute the President’s defense
strategy in the near or long term.

The Navy made tough choices to achieve a comprehensive and balanced FY 2015 Program, based on the following strategic
priorities:
• Provide credible, modern and safe strategic deterrent
• Provide global forward presence
• Preserve means to defeat or deny adversaries"

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Published by: Steeljaw Scribe on Apr 18, 2014
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04/26/2014

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Description

The Navy’s two Mercy-class hospital ships—the USNS Mercy
(T-AH 19) and USNS Comfort (T-AH 20)—are national strategic
assets and are employed to support combatant commander (CO-
COM) requirements. Hospital ships provide highly capable medi-
cal facilities and are configured and equipped to meet their pri-
mary mission as large-scale trauma centers for combat operations.
Each ship has 12 operating rooms and up to 1,000 beds (100 acute
care, 400 intermediate, and 500 minor). Additionally, the hospi-
tal ships serve as cornerstones for peacetime shaping and stability
operations, acting as powerful enablers of stability, security, and
reconstruction efforts around the globe. The Nation’s hospital
ships provide a highly visible, engaged, and reassuring presence
when deployed for Theater Security Cooperation (TSC) missions
or to respond to humanitarian-assistance or disaster-relief needs.
As part of the Naval Fleet Auxiliary Force managed by the Military
Sealift Command, these ships are maintained in either a reduced
operating status (ROS) or full operating status depending on mis-
sion tasking and COCOM requests. Generally, one hospital ship
is scheduled for a 120-150 day TSC deployment per year. Periodic
maintenance is performed to ensure both ships are able to meet
full operational capability within a matter of days when activated
from ROS. Civilian mariner crews man these ships, with medical
staff augmentation when activated.

Status

The USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort have expected service lives
to 2020 and 2021, respectively.

Developers

General Dynamics

San Diego, California, USA

National Steel and Shipbuilding Company

168

SECTION 6: SUPPLY AND LOGISTICS

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