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Claflin University School of Education

EDUC 450: Professional Clinical Practice Reflective Lesson Plan Model Name: Tykeah Oliver, Jalisa Pressley, Jewell Inabinette II Date: March 18th 2014 PART I: PLANNING

Sequencing Lesson Plan for The Very


Title of Lesson

Hungry Caterpillar
Teacher Vision.com

Source Subject Area (s) Grade Level

Reading 1st Grade

(Curriculum Standards)

Description and Background Information Sequencing refers to the ability to understand and talk about a story as an ordered series of events. This lesson is designed to introduce this skill to primary students using the book The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. In this lesson, students discuss events at the beginning, middle, and end of the story, and then sequence the events. This lesson is the first in a set of sequencing lessons designed for primary grades. For students to be able to successfully sequence events in a text, they should have some understanding of time sequence within a larger context of the beginning, middle, and end of a story. They should be able to determine the order of events in a story and thereby understand the author's

purpose.

Lesson Objectives

How will I vary these objectives for students who do not understand the material? How will I vary these objectives for students who have already mastered the concept? How will I vary these objectives for students who are presently learning English?

Varying Objectives for Individuals Needs

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of this lesson is to recall information and put pictures in order.
What materials and supplies are needed to help your students achieve the stated objectives? What will the teacher need? What will the students need? What other resources are needed? Will you use resource speakers?

Materials and Resources

Anticipatory Set

Tell students that they will learn about the beginning, middle, and end of a story. Have them identify the beginning, middle, and end of common things, such as:
o o o o o o o

A school day How a caterpillar becomes a butterfly Sounds in words such as: cat A field trip Songs during a favorite cartoon episode, such as Sponge Bob Squarepants A baseball game A week

Part II: IMPLEMENTATION

Pre-assessment
What will I do to show students what is expected?

Teacher Modeling or Demonstration


What will we do together as they learn how to succeed at the new task?

Guided Practice

Checking for Understanding . Independent Practice For independent practice, have students identified events in the beginning, middle, and end of the story, writing a sentence and drawing a picture for each section. An extension activity is to create a collaborative book, The Very Hungry Animal. Students can choose another animal to write about, and decide what the animal eats each day of the week, and explain what might happen when the animal is full. The class can be separated into three groups to form "Beginning," "Middle," and "End" groups. Be specific about where the groups will start and stop their portions of the story. For instance, the "Beginning" group could start the story with the raccoon being born or appearing at the edge of the forest. The "Middle" group could write about what the raccoon ate on each day of one week. The "End" group could write about the raccoon

What questions will you ask to determine if students understand so far? What techniques or strategies will be used to determine if students understand so far? What will students do by themselves to show that they have internalized the knowledge?

falling asleep and then waking up larger than it was a week before.
How will I conclude the lesson and relate it to future experiences? How will you wrap up the lesson to reinforce concepts taught during the lesson?

Closure Assessment (attach to lesson plan)

One way to assess student understanding of the sequence of a story is to choose a different, familiar book and ask students to identify the beginning, middle, and end of that story. You can strengthen students' understanding of these ideas by focusing on the beginning, middle, and end of a familiar event, such as the school day, and ask students to describe it using these terms
What can students do at home or in the classroom to apply the knowledge or skills? How could you use your colleagues or community agencies to improve student performance?

Extension Activities

How will you use technology to assist students with learning the concepts? What technology will you use to enhance the delivery and comprehension of your content?

Technology
How will you connect this lesson with other content areas across the curriculum? The Arts:

Connection Across the Curriculum

Health:

Physical Education:

PART III: REFLECTION (Complete JOURNAL RESPONSE after individual lesson presentation)
Describe the strengths of your instructional techniques, strategies and classroom management. Describe the strengths of student engagement.

Strengths
Describe the weaknesses of your instructional techniques, strategies and classroom management. Describe the weaknesses of student engagement.

Weaknesses Suggestions for Improvement


What would you change when teaching this lesson again?

Revised 6-2013
THE CLAFLIN IMPERATIVE PREPARING STDUENTS FOR LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE IN A MULTICULTURAL, GLOBAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY