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Technical Proposal GPP PLUP PVBS CM MCA I.pdf

Technical Proposal GPP PLUP PVBS CM MCA I.pdf

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In general, the Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP) Activity, with funding of US$25million, is designed to: (i) put in place the foundational spatial (land use) planning elements needed to enable and sustain the specific investments in renewal energy and natural resource management funded by the GP Investment Facility; (ii) improve land use certainty for communities within the districts selected for GP investments; and (iii) support compliance with Specifically, the PLUP is expected to: (i) enhance the technical capacity of provincial and district governments in spatial (land use) analysis, planning and enforcement; (ii) identify and, when possible, reduce land use and land tenure disputes as a means to improve the investment climate for renewal energy and natural resource management projects; and (iii) empower women and men of the communities, and potentially marginalized groups by providing spatial (locational) certainty through inclusive participatory geo-location and demarcation of village boundaries and the mapping of critical natural and cultural resource8 areas within these villages. If women and marginalized groups are left out of the consultation, the VBS may not reflect the full scope of marginalized groups and women’s natural resource management and use patterns (e.g., selective species nurturing, collection, harvesting, and post-harvest production) – potentially affecting outcomes in landscapes, livelihoods, and food security. It will be critical to include female-headed households and women more generally in the boundary-setting and community mapping consultations.
In general, the Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP) Activity, with funding of US$25million, is designed to: (i) put in place the foundational spatial (land use) planning elements needed to enable and sustain the specific investments in renewal energy and natural resource management funded by the GP Investment Facility; (ii) improve land use certainty for communities within the districts selected for GP investments; and (iii) support compliance with Specifically, the PLUP is expected to: (i) enhance the technical capacity of provincial and district governments in spatial (land use) analysis, planning and enforcement; (ii) identify and, when possible, reduce land use and land tenure disputes as a means to improve the investment climate for renewal energy and natural resource management projects; and (iii) empower women and men of the communities, and potentially marginalized groups by providing spatial (locational) certainty through inclusive participatory geo-location and demarcation of village boundaries and the mapping of critical natural and cultural resource8 areas within these villages. If women and marginalized groups are left out of the consultation, the VBS may not reflect the full scope of marginalized groups and women’s natural resource management and use patterns (e.g., selective species nurturing, collection, harvesting, and post-harvest production) – potentially affecting outcomes in landscapes, livelihoods, and food security. It will be critical to include female-headed households and women more generally in the boundary-setting and community mapping consultations.

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INDONESIA GREEN PROSPERITY PROJECT (GPP) – PARTICIPATORY LAND USE PLANNING (PLUP).

SENSITIZATION FOR PARTICIPATORY VILLAGE BOUNDARY SETTING AND COMMUNITY MAPPING (VBS/CM)

Technical Proposal

AOGA expert | Tiar PROSPERA CONSULTING ENGINEERS Kebayoran Baru Jakarta Selatan Indonesia

Chapter 1 Technical Approach & Methodology
I.
A.

Technical Approach
Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP)

I. Introduction 2.1. Several organizations have been involved in developing the strategies, methods and tools for PLUP. Major contributions have been made by FAO and GTZ, drawing on their project experiences in a large number of countries. Definitions for PLUP proposed by FAO & UNEP and GTZ are, (Participatory) Land-use planning is a systematic and iterative procedure carried out in order to create an enabling environment for sustainable development of land resources which meets people's needs and demands. It assesses the physical, socio-economic, institutional and legal potentials and constraints with respect to an optimal and sustainable use of land resources, and empowers people to make decisions about how to allocate those resources. Participatory land-use planning (PLUP) is an iterative process based on the dialogue amongst all stakeholders aiming at the negotiation and decision for a sustainable form of land use in rural areas as well as initiating and monitoring its implementation. Land-use planning happens in every society and at all times, even if the term as such is not used. Wherever groups of people use land and its resources, land use is planned and certain restrictions are set up. Very often central government adheres to the concept that decisions on land use should be taken by technical and political people on the national level, while in reality many land use decisions are made daily, mostly at the local level where the actual management of resources is carried out. Other decisions with relevance to land use are also made on the provincial or district level with or without knowledge or consent of the national level or the local population. Very often there is an obvious lack of transparency, communication and public consultation even in crucial decision making on land management issues. It is exactly against this background, that the concept of PLUP has developed over the past two decades. The new PLUP approach focuses on the capacities and needs of local land users, based on the assumption that sustainable resource management can only be achieved if resources are managed by the local populations once they dispose of clear use and tenure rights. This "participatory" approach to land-use planning represents an entirely new perspective to solving land use and resource management issues compared to the topdown and very technically oriented land-use planning approach of the 1960s and 70s.

2.2.

2.3.

2.4.

Differences between a "traditional LUP" approach and PLUP Issues/Aspects Working Level Traditional LUP Approach Higher Level: Province, District,Watershed Technical staff from line agencies, Provincial and District administration Identification of optimal land use according to land suitability and enforcement of these practices by the use of incentives or legal directives PLUP Local Level: Village, Commune, MicroWatershed Local population, local administration, Process facilitators with some technical background Identification of sustainable and equitable land use opportunities on the local level by searching for compromises and coming to agreements between local needs, outsider interests and national policies; transparency is crucial. People's perspectives + priorities as well as Government policies + guidelines Is considered a crucial issue; usually the need for clear ownership or use rights and eventually changes in land tenure are specified during the PLUP process Implemented as a process with a sequence of steps according to the villagers' pace and time availability To strengthen local stakeholders' capacities for managing their resources in a sustainable way

Main Actors

Main Focus

Main Criteria

Technical parameters, such as soil depth, soil fertility, slope etc. Is usually not considered

Land Tenure

Implementation

Usually implemented in the form of a study within a fixed time limit To make best use of land resources according to objective criteria

Main Objective

Source: Manual PLUP In Rural Cambodia, 2001 2.5. In addition to the local residents who directly use the land resources in a planning area, other stakeholders in PLUP include the government agencies dealing with the various land resources, the local authorities, any existing coordination committees with regard

to land use, NGO and IO projects, private service providers as well as other actors outside the planning area. 2.6. Goal and justification of PLUP. PLUP is a method of ; 1.6.1. which leads towards achieving more sustainable management of natural resources by local communities, 1.6.2. helps to analyze present use of the resources and to identify needs for changes due to over-exploitation, illegal use or conflict situations, 1.6.3. and to clarify present tenure of land resources and prepare the ground for allocation or re-allocation of land and natural resources use in view of securing user rights, 1.6.4. has an institution/capacity building aspect, as the method will support local communities in strengthening their management capacities as well as clarify the role and responsibility of government institutions and their committees, 1.6.5. and helps to create transparency on resource use issues and intensify communication on all levels. 2.7. PLUP is helpful in all areas where there is a present or a foreseeable land use conflict or where natural resources are degraded by conflicting or ill-adapted resource use practices. Conflicts over tenure of land (land disputes) are another frequent starting point for PLUP. The concept of PLUP which focuses on a participatory process will for reasons of practicability always start from the local or lower administrative level (village, commune). In other cases this could also be a sub-catchment or a small watershed. 2.8. PLUP deals with all areas traditionally used or claimed by communities (e.g. forest areas and shrub lands, fishery areas, agricultural land, settlements and minefields). Therefore the PLUP scope is very wide and is about every type of land and every type of resource. 2.9. If PLUP is delayed or not implemented in the case of the conflict situations mentioned above, this could have serious environmental and social consequences. Usually the cost of these consequences will by far surmount the cost of initiating and implementing a proper land-use planning process. 2.10. Conceptual Framework and Principles. The conceptual framework for PLUP is set by legal, institutional, natural resources aspects and the socio-economic situation of the local population. PLUP requires a strong bottom-up planning perspective. Putting local users in the centre of interest, calls for the use of simple, low-cost planning techniques to encourage and foster active participation and consensus finding among villagers. Involvement of outsiders should be restricted primarily to the moderation and facilitation of the planning process. At least initially these outsiders might also have to play the role of strong advocates and defenders of community interest e.g. in cases of conflicts with powerful outsiders. This does often lead to specific role conflicts for Government staff involved in PLUP activities. Under no circumstances the facilitators of a PLUP process should dictate their solutions to villagers or take on a strong advisory function. 2.11. Basic principle of PLUP;

1.

2. 3. 4. 5.

It is a participatory approach, which should encourage and follow the people's perspectives and priorities; it focuses on strengthening local management capacities. Outsiders mainly perform the role of moderators and facilitators, but can initially also become advocates and general supporters. PLUP can and should ideally prepare the ground for land allocation procedures. PLUP usually deals with all land classes regularly used by villagers within their living area. The PLUP process will eventually lead to organizational arrangements on village and commune level, produce a plan (usually a map) and a set of rules and regulations pertaining to the use of private, communal, open access and state land within the area of the village/commune.

Flowchart Fundamental PLUP Process

PLUP Facilitation Teams and their Tasks

Materials and Equipment used during PLUP

State Land and Concession Areas

Preparatory and On-the-Job Training for PLUP Teams

Selection of the Planning Area

Support Services and Data Resources on the National Level

Stakeholder Analysis and Review of Existing Information

II. Step and Procedures Of PLUP Process of PLUP

Step 0

Step 1 1. Step 2 1. Phase 1. 2.

○ 
2.

Getting Started

Preparation 3. Analysis 4. 5.


3. 2. Phase 3. Phase 4. Phase

Step 3 1 2 Step 4


3

Screening 4 Forming Mgt. Committee

Step 5 1 Step 6

 
2

Plans/Regulations 3 Endorsement/ Approval Link to Services Implementation Monitoring & Evaluation

Step 7

Step 8

  

Source: Manual PLUP In Rural Cambodia, 2001

2.1.

Preparation of field work

. Distribution of Tasks among the PLUP Facilitation

2.2.

2.3.

2.4.

2.5.

Team Members. After the familiarization of the PLUP team with its new tasks by training courses, study tours, the review of existing data and information as well as the establishment of contacts with relevant service providers on the national level, the team members should be well prepared to start the field activities in the selected planning area. When conducting the field activities, which will be described in detail in the following chapters, it is of great importance that all team members are given equal opportunity to practice their theoretical knowledge. Therefore the colleagues must take turns in performing the various tasks required of them. In meetings with villagers their main tasks consist of: (i) facilitating or moderating the process; (ii) observing the reactions of community members and the PLUP team and providing feedback to all team members; (iii) documenting the results or at least supervising the documentation by the villagers themselves. Therefore, as a standard rule the PLUP team members should shift their specific role and task from one visit in the working area to the next and take turns in moderation, observation and documentation. Needless to say, that the team members should also take turns in working with villagers e.g. during the mapping exercises, the drafting of regulations or management plans etc.. Ideally, in the PLUP team each member should be in a position to perform every working step. The specific technical knowledge of each individual will be of secondary importance during most parts of the PLUP process. Technical expertise will be mainly required during the assessment the present agricultural, fishery or forestry resources use by the local population, specific resource inventories and while advising villagers in the drafting of regulations or detailed management plans e.g. for community forest areas or specific fishponds. Irrespective of the "generalist" approach described above, a PLUP team should elect a coordinator or group leader to be responsible for work plans, report writing and representing the team in meetings on the district or provincial level.

Figure Illustration of Introductory Meeting

2.6.

Inform Local Population and Neighbouring Villages in the Working Area. When the PLUP implementation team is ready to start the actual field work, they need to inform the villagers that their area has been selected for PLUP work or that the PLUP team is now ready to respond to a request from that particular area. 2.7. During the very first visit to the village or the planning area, the team will introduce itself to the local leaders, briefly explain about PLUP and request a first village meeting. It is very important to select the right period and the right time to start a PLUP process. Peak working seasons for farmers (e.g. field preparation or harvesting times) should be avoided. Times of particular village preoccupations with other issues can also be detrimental (e.g. serious conflicts, insecurity, feast and wedding seasons). The village authorities should in any case be consulted on the right timing for the PLUP work and possibly the team needs to react with flexibility to a particular request by villagers, such as evening meetings. 2.8. In addition, the PLUP team will have to decide whether the presence of representatives of the local authorities (e.g. District an Provincial) in the first village meeting is considered beneficial. This needs to be evaluated from case to case. The presence of higher-ranking officials in this meeting will increase its importance and justification, but could also intimidate villagers, prevent them from participating voluntarily or speaking out freely during the village meeting. 2.9. Introductory Meeting in the Working Area. Once the date of the village meeting has been agreed, the village leaders should invite at least one adult member of each household, representatives of all village organizations, representatives from neighbouring villages and the commune leaders for an initial meeting on PLUP. In this meeting the PLUP team members will introduce themselves, give a brief outline of the future PLUP activities, but thoroughly describe the main objectives of the whole exercise. At least one team member will moderate, others will observe and a third group or person will take first notes. 2.10. After the introduction, a good way to start is to ask villagers for the history of the village and then for a description of the currently prevailing land and resources use in their area, the agricultural land use, fishing, hunting or NTFP collection activities and finally the use of forestry resources. Once the current situation has been sufficiently clarified, the next question would deal with changes in the use of these resources over the past 10-15 years. Usually at this stage by the latest, villagers will come up with several use conflicts which have developed over the past years and a description of the general degradation of their environment. 2.11. Once the land and resource related problems have been mentioned, the team could start explaining the details of the PLUP process and describe the main objectives. In essence, this should contain the promise of the team to try and assist villagers in identifying ways and means to overcome their problems by: (i) acquiring a general understanding of their situation with regard to social aspects, natural resources use and institutional aspects (situation analysis, Step 2); (ii) jointly assessing and mapping the different land use areas + their boundaries; (iii) helping them to identify options and best solutions for future use (Step 3); (iv) assisting them to form a committee in order to supervise the work process and to improve the management of the village resources (Step 4); (v) helping them to draft future land-use plans, regulations + management plans (Step 5);

(vi) applying together with them for official endorsement of the plans and regulations and possibly supporting them to request formal land allocation for specific areas within their community (Step 6); (vii) supporting them in the implementation and enforcement of their plans and regulations (Step 7 and 8). 2.12. As mentioned before, the presence of higher authorities in the first meeting is optional, but at least representatives from the commune level and especially from neighbouring villages need to be present. In case the working area has been selected on a higher level and villagers have formulated no request it could be possible that the local population rejects PLUP for whatever reasons. In such a case the PLUP team should not insist, but select another, possibly a neighbouring area. Voluntary participation and contribution by the villagers to the work process is essential.

Figure Illustration of Participatory Appraisal

2.13. Situation Analysis

. In order to support villagers to identify ways of improving

the management of their local environment, the PLUP teams need to gain a good understanding of the present situation in the respective community. To this end, the team will start their fieldwork by conducting an in-depth situation analysis; covering socio-economic, institutional and natural resources related aspects. The current use of land within the working area and the prevailing use conflicts will be identified and analysed together with the local population. As the team will undertake certain parts of the situation analysis with smaller groups of villagers, it is absolutely crucial to provide regular feedback to the entire community. This will permit all households of the community to stay informed and to contribute accordingly to the overall PLUP process. Wherever possible, the gained information should be cross-checked and analysed in the presence of a larger group of villagers. 2.14. First Phase - Participatory Appraisal and Information Collection. Information and data requirements in PLUP have to be carefully defined to avoid "data graveyards". Very often many institutions and foreign organizations indulge in data collection (not only those involved in research work) without critically assessing their real or minimum information requirements.

2.15. Robert Chambers, the "father" of PRA has created the expression of "optimal ignorance" to describe what external facilitators should strive for during the situation analysis phase. They will never be able to collect and understand the totality of issues and facts in a given working area, so they will basically remain "ignorant". Yet, they should try to single out the most important facts and information, concentrate on those aspects and aim for reaching the best possible level of understanding ("optimal ignorance").

Figure Illustration of Participatory Appraisal 2.16. Another important issue is the question of "ownership" to the data and information collected during this first phase. The concept of a participatory approach requires the outsiders to support the local population in the analysis of their own situation, their own needs and priorities. 2.17. This is the first step towards the broader aim of formulating their need for change themselves. Therefore, the data and information should basically remain the "property" of the villagers and stay in the village. This would on the other hand prevent the PLUP team from playing their role of active supporters, advocates and sometimes lobbyists. A reasonable compromise is to work according to the principle that all original documents and PRA tools should remain in or be returned to the village after being copied manually by the PLUP team. PLUP team members can then make use of all the data and information in order to advance the PLUP working process. In case anybody wants to use the data and information for research or publication purposes, a special permission should be obtained from the villagers. 2.18. Analyzing Socio-economic Aspects in the Working Area. The PLUP team will have to gain a basic understanding of the socio-economic situation of the village or the working area. One of the main objectives is to get an optimal understanding of the current and possibly future demand situation on land and natural resources: 2.19. Essential elements: The overall population and the number of families of a community, the ethnic composition and some indications on the population growth (natural and by immigration). Some information on any long term or seasonal migration of villagers to areas outside their usual boundaries is also required.

2.20. Furthermore, information on the main occupations of villagers and their sources of income needs to be collected. In this context it can be useful to jointly compile a long list of all subsistence and income generating activities as practiced by villagers and to ask for each activity how many families are involved in it. 2.21. Finally some indications on poverty levels in the respective area or village are an important aspect. The PLUP team should try to identify how many families in the planning area are considered poor, average or better off by their fellow villagers. Also the incidence of landlessness or insufficient land availability should be assessed. 2.22. Optional information: Sometimes it is useful to gain some deeper understanding on the history and origin of the community. In case the PLUP team is not very familiar with the local society and their practices or traditions, additional information on e.g. main household activities by gender, annual and daily time use by men and women, detailed household analysis of better-off, medium and poor families and livestock numbers per family can be collected. Other details could be the number of women-headed households, age structures, birth and death rates. It could also be attempted to identify and analyse social or tribal conflicts within the village. 2.23. Methods, tools: Information on the population, their main occupations and income generating activities can be gathered in direct or semi-structured interviews in a village meeting. The incidence of poverty is best assessed by the use of wealth ranking exercises.

Figure Illustration of Villager Activities

Figure Illustration of Villager Activities 2.24. Analyzing Institutional Aspects in the Working Area. The local leadership and existence of community-based organizations needs to be analysed to understand the degree of self-reliance and cohesion within the community: 2.25. Essential elements: All existing local institutions and community-based organizations, including formal and informal leadership within the village need to be identified. Determine their roles and functions and their relationship to the entire community. How did these organizations or committees get created? Identify the key individuals in the community who influence village life and find out how they came into this position. Do these local institutions and organizations address issues relating to land and natural resources use? Which other project or donor-funded activities have in the past been implemented in the community? 2.26. Optional information: The internal functioning of the existing committees and villagebased organizations can be further analysed. Their outputs and activities as well as those implemented with or by other projects/donors can possibly be visited and assessed. The representation of women in all the groups can be identified. 2.27. Methods, tools: Direct or semi-structured interviews. The relative importance of all the identified institutions and community-based organizations can be further assessed by the use of Venn diagramming. 2.28. Analyzing Current Land and Natural Resource Use Patterns. Villagers should be encouraged by the PLUP team to openly present and discuss their current land and NR use. The objective is for the PLUP team to understand what the main prevailing issues are at the time being. For example: Is there basically sufficient availability of land and NR in the area? And, what could be a solution if this is not the case. Do villagers make use of many resources outside the community or planning area? Are there important conflicts with outsiders or neighbouring villagers? Are there vast open access areas around the community without any control or management principles? Are there any traditional use restrictions or protection mechanisms in specific areas? Etc. 2.29. Essential elements: The main land use areas need to be identified. Also it needs to be determined how local people actually manage and use the land and natural resources in

2.30.

2.31.

2.32.

2.33.

2.34.

their community. Then the status of land ownership in the community is assessed e.g. by checking for receipts, applications for possession, land certificates and land titles (formal/informal). Assess customary access rights e.g. to forests or fishing areas (who uses the resources?, for what purpose?, with what exploitation levels and frequency?, where are important boundaries?). In many areas of Cambodia, the villagers seasonally or permanently make use of fishing or forest resources far away from their home community. Such resource use outside the village or commune boundaries also needs to be considered. Vice versa, there are usually many other users exploiting NR within the planning area and these should also be identified (who comes from outside and when?, what do they use?, in what quantities and in which seasons?, what traditional or formal rights do they have?). Are there customary or traditional management rules for specific areas? If yes, are these existing rules and regulations known to everybody?, respected?, available in written form? Does the local population use a traditional land classification system? If yes, what are the main elements and how does it work? Finally, it would be important to know if allocation of land resources by the Government to outsiders has had serious effects on the local population and their customary practices? Methods, tools: Villagers should be asked to draw a simple "community resources sketch map" (also called: village base map) on a large sheet of paper with coloured markers. The hand-drawn map should distinguish the settlement area, the main roads and paths, main landmarks, roughly the outer village boundary and all agricultural areas including swidden fields, upland farms and orchards, all forest areas, possibly distinguishing their current condition (e.g. very dense, good, slightly degraded, degraded, very poor, shrub land), all grasslands and all fishing areas (e.g. lakes, ponds, rivers, small streams, canals). Remember that it is not important to have a true to scale map at the end of this first mapping exercise. The village base map is a tool to roughly assess the overall situation of present land use. It should not be forgotten that one PLUP team member has to moderate the drawing of the village base map and that another team member documents any other comments by people not directly involved in drawing the map. All PLUP team members should continue asking questions by pointing on the map to fill any empty spaces and to get the complete picture. Finally, a simple legend should be added to the map. Analyzing Current Land and Natural Resource Use Conflicts and Past Changes in Resource Use. Most probably any conflicts over NR use within the community or with outsiders will have already emerged during any of the previous steps. Nevertheless the PLUP team will have to take this up once again, as PLUP can also contribute to conflict management. The team therefore needs to determine what and who are the causes of the conflicts and what previous efforts have been made to resolve them. The PLUP team also has to get a clear understanding of the changes in NR use that have taken place in recent years. Essential aspects: What are the main conflicts over resources use with outsiders? How does the community deal with conflict situations on land use? Are there cases of land grabbing or land sales to any businessmen or powerful persons? Is the resources use by outsiders dominated by subsistence needs or for income generation purposes? Who are

2.35.

2.36.

2.37.

2.38.

2.39.

2.40.

these outsiders? How has the overall situation on land and NR use evolved over the past 10-15 years? Optional information: Possibly, the PLUP team could proceed immediately to an investigation of the views of others involved in any serious land use conflicts within the planning area. By looking at "the other side of the coin" they will be able to gain a better understanding of the overall situation and the causes of the conflict. This crosschecking of use and tenure conflicts is relatively easy in case of other villages being involved. In case of business people, concession companies, demobilised soldiers etc. this is more difficult and should be postponed to a later stage in the PLUP process. Methods, tools: In a second hand-drawn map (often referred to as "conflict map"), villagers should copy the main land use areas from the "village base map" and then mark in which area there is currently use of resources by outsiders, e.g. the name of the village or area they come from and the main products they use as well as the season and the number of outsiders making use of the NR. Zones where this leads to conflicts should be particularly highlighted with bright colours or flash signs. The PLUP team should always remember that their role is to ask questions and not to give the answers. In the case of the first resource maps drawn in the village, it is absolutely crucial that these are drawn by villagers and not by technical staff. At a later stage, these maps can be copied by the team. One important aspect of the entire situation analysis is to create trust and understanding between the PLUP team and the local population. This confidence and trust cannot develop if team members take a dominating attitude and order people what to do or what not. At the end of each exercise, the final question by the moderators should be: Have we overlooked or forgotten any issues relating to land and natural resource use that we should address? Do you want to add something?. Second Phase - Preliminary Analysis of Information and Feedback to the Entire Community. Under normal circumstances the participatory appraisal and information collection phase will take approximately 2 days of fieldwork. After this stage, the PLUP team will need time to review, analyse and copy the information collected. This means some office work. The team will compile and compare all their notes and the PRA tools to obtain a general picture of the community. This will also give them a chance to check and discuss whether they consider their information as complete and detailed enough. In some cases, standard "village profiles" are compiled in order to standardize the information, to make it easier to check the information for completeness and to make the data more comparable between the various working areas. Once the team feels it has sufficiently analyzed the information received, it should prepare for another village meeting to present how they have understood the villagers, cross-check the information and provide the chance to the local population to correct them. These feedback sessions with the whole community are extremely important during the entire process in order to avoid misunderstandings, keep all villagers informed and maintain an atmosphere of mutual understanding.

Figure Illustration Village Meeting

2.41. Third Phase - Transect Walks, Mapping and Modeling. Assess and Map Present Land Use and/or Prepare Models. Once the PLUP team has conducted the crosschecking and feedback session in the working area it is time to explore the land-use planning area in more detail. One suitable technique to start the field exploration steps is to carry out transect walks. During the transect walks the PLUP team will split up in several sub-groups. A number of villagers will guide each sub-group in their walk across the village area. This can take the form of the groups walking in straight lines, e.g. from one end of the village boundary to the other in East-West and North-South directions or the team members can request villagers to show them areas or spots they consider as particularly important. Once again, the transect walks and all observations made during these walks need to be properly documented. Topographic maps or even better, aerial photos can help tremendously in the orientation during these walks. 2.42. After the PLUP team has also physically experienced the character of the planning area, the PLUP team in cooperation with the villagers has to take a decision on: (i) which part of the area needs to be mapped for present land use?; (ii) what degree of detail should the mapping exercise achieve?; (iii) should a traditional or a "modern" land use classification system be used for the mapping exercise?

Figure Illustration Map of Transect walks 2.43. Essential information and requirements: 1. The present land use map of the planning area should have a scale between 1:5.000and 1:20.000. Ideally, it should be prepared on a transparent laid over enlarged aerial photos or satellite imagery. Enlarged topographic maps are usually insufficient as a mapping base (see Annex 9). 2. In some projects with easy access to GIS facilities the present land use mapping is done by using the hand-drawn village resource map (see 4.2.1.3) and digitising that sketch map with the help of GPS measurements. Thereby, the map originally drawn by villagers is gradually transformed to a true to scale village map reflecting present land use. 3. On the present land use map at least a relatively accurate village boundary or boundary of the planning area should be marked. Staff from the Provincial Cadastre Office should assist in the demarcation of any administrative boundaries. 4. Furthermore, the present land use map should reflect all units of common property resources or open access areas with some indication on their function (e.g. production forest used for communal firewood supply, spiritual forest), current condition (e.g. severely degraded) and describe the prevailing access rights (e.g. used by villagers from x,y,z). This means that at least a complete inventory of all forest areas and all fishing areas should be aimed for during the mapping exercise. The details on each mapping unit should be compiled in a small table or data sheet. The use of codes (see example of classification system in Annex 3) for each mapping unit saves time and will improve the utility of the map.

5.

2.44.

2.45.

2.46.

2.47.

2.48.

The present land use map should under Cambodian conditions always contain information on any minefields within the planning area, possibly with additional remarks on past and planned de-mining activities, mine density etc. 6. As a rule of thumb, any areas showing rapid transformation in the type of land use and particularly in the tenure system should also be mapped in detail, unless this would mean more than 10-15 days of fieldwork for the team. Such areas could be recent upland farm areas established in former secondary forests or shrub lands, new plantations claimed by outsiders or expansions of the rice fields. 7. On the other hand, old rice production areas (e.g. rain fed rice fields, floating rice areas) should normally not be mapped as individual fields or family properties, but as rice fields in general. Also, swidden fields and the corresponding fallow areas should not be mapped by family, but marked on the map as e.g. shifting cultivation area within a secondary production forest. The surveying and detailed mapping of the rice fields, all upland farms and swidden fields will be carried out by MLMUPC staff once a land registration and distribution program with the attribution of land certificates is conducted in the specific area after the PLUP mapping work. The exact procedure of the present land use mapping will largely depend on the quality and the accuracy of the mapping base. For example, in case the PLUP team has enlarged aerial photos of recent date or high quality satellite images at their disposal, the necessity of conducting the demarcation work in the field will be greatly reduced. If the team only has copies of relatively old aerial photos, this would mean more ground truthing work in order to demarcate the new boundaries between land use units on the transparent. If the team works with the hand-drawn village resources sketch map, enlarged topographic maps and GPS equipment, the marking of boundaries on the map and the surveying work will most probably take even longer. If the project or organization supporting PLUP has access to GIS services of their own or by service providers, the final version of the present land use map should be digitised so that coloured printed maps can be produced. For digitisation the draft present land use map should contain between 6 and 20 GPS measurements at landmarks (e.g. old buildings, stream bends or mountain peaks) or clearly visible crossroads. This is also the case if the mapping base was an un-rectified aerial photo or even a satellite image. Modelling has the advantage of being a very participatory approach in case of temporary or semi-permanent terrain models being built by villagers. On the other hand, modelling is time consuming and does in most cases not fully replace the need for mapping exercises, as official endorsement procedures for land use plans usually require maps on paper. Once again: a certain standardization of land and resource types is required for efficient mapping purposes. Official recognition, comparability and usability of a map will greatly increase by the use of a standardized classification system for land use units and the use of GIS for clean prints. During mapping exercises it is extremely useful to cross-check village to village boundaries marked on the map in the presence of the neighbouring communities, although this is not always easy to organize. In some cases the boundary conflicts

between neighbouring villages can only be solved by decisions on a higher administrative level (commune or district), which will seriously delay the PLUP work. Nevertheless, a clear demarcation of the planning area and its administrative boundaries is essential in order to clarify the management responsibilities of the local population. 2.49. While during the initial stages of the situation analysis, villagers should always take the leading role in analysing their current situation, the PLUP team members need to take a more active role in the mapping procedures on present land use. Villagers should be encouraged as much as possible to contribute to the mapping work, but generally speaking and due to the technical demands, they will mostly play the role of informants during the field work and GPS measurements. In case the team has enlarged colour aerial photos at their disposal, this will increase the opportunities for villagers' participation, as they will usually be capable of reading and interpreting these photos. 2.50. Fourth Phase - Feedback to Entire Community (Village Workshop). Once the mapping exercise on present land use has been concluded, a second general village feedback session should be organized. Some projects in Cambodia (e.g. FAO-PMNR in Siem Reap) refer to this type of meeting as village workshop in which also representatives of local authorities (commune, district, DAFF, armed forces etc.) can be invited. 2.51. The objective of such a meeting or workshop is to reflect once more on the present land use, check the map for completeness of information and to start discussions on options for land use changes, future land use and possibly land distribution. 2.52. Preliminary Identification and Screening of Options

. Identification of Land

Use Areas Requiring Changes. After the detailed analysis of the present situation in a specific planning area, it is important for the PLUP team to assist villagers in the development of a common vision of the future land use and to prioritize their needs for change. On the basis of the collected village data and information, the village base map, the conflict map and the more detailed present land use map as well as any other source of information, the PLUP team can now proceed to moderate the discussion on required changes in the planning area. 2.53. These changes can be of several types: 1. Change of land use in one land unit without changing the tenure rights (e.g. transforming a swidden agriculture plot into a permanent upland farm or fruit tree plantation). 2. Change or at least clear definition of tenure rights to specific land units (e.g. allocation of specific forest areas as "community forests" and requesting official endorsement for this or allocation of former common property resources to individual families with insufficient or no land resources for productive measures). 3. Re-allocation of land already claimed by certain people, but presently without formal title (e.g. distribution of illegally appropriated land areas to landless people in the village).

4.

2.54.

2.55.

2.56.

2.57.

2.58.

Re-definition of village boundaries, protected areas or concession areas, as well as proposals for joint management models in large forest areas, in case the area available for use by villagers is highly insufficient. 5. Resettlement of the entire village as the last option, which would only be considered under specific circumstances. It must always be kept in mind, that any changes proposed by the villagers together with the PLUP team have to be considered as provisional and will need endorsement from the higher administrative levels. At this stage, the PLUP team will sometimes have to fulfil the difficult task of having to play two roles at the same time. On one hand they should be the advocates or lobbyists for the village interests. Yet, as staff members of Government institutions they also have to be loyal to their superiors and represent the state's interests. Once the PLUP team comes to the stage of discussing the need for changes in current land and natural resources management practices as well as the related tenure issues, it is important to have a notion of any additional land requirements or improved access rights for poor families within the planning area. This means, that from the original data and information collected during the situation analysis, the PLUP team should be in a position to say how many families in the village currently have access to sufficient land and natural resources and how many do not. Basically, they will have to review all present land claims in the planning area. In some countries standard rules are defined e.g. on the minimum land requirements for agricultural production (e.g. in sq.m per capita or ha/family), for forest use (e.g. in cub.m per capita or ha/family) etc.. Most of these standards are highly controversial and very difficult to adhere to in practice. Equally, the standards become quickly obsolete and irrelevant in view of rapid population growth on one hand and dwindling resources on the other. Nevertheless, the PLUP team needs to jointly evaluate with the villagers during the PLUP process the relationship between peoples' needs and the overall availability of resources. It is an obligation for the PLUP team to identify practical solutions for the landless or destitute people in the village in cooperation with village authorities. In case a solution can be found, this should be noted for later inclusion in the future land use map and the village regulations. Nevertheless, when the land claims of the local population are reviewed some kind of regulating body or a set of rules is required to avoid unjustified and exaggerated resource appropriation by the villagers. This aspect would have to be clarified further in the implementation guidelines on land distribution following the new land law. PLUP can also play an important role in stabilizing shifting cultivation practices by e.g.: 1. encouraging the local population to limit swidden agriculture to designated and clearly demarcated production areas, which will usually be in fairly degraded secondary forests. 2. allocating these specific areas of secondary forest to the entire community for management according to a set of rules and regulations (see chapter 4.5) or clearly allocating (with a land certificate) specific fields and fallow areas to families for use under a rotational swidden system.

3.

2.59.

2.60.

2.61.

2.62.

2.63.

2.64.

2.65.

2.66.

assisting shifting cultivators to gradually transform at least some of their traditional swidden fields to permanent upland farms or fruit tree plantations (e.g. with mixed cropping systems, agro-forestry etc.). In rare cases, the need to re-discuss village boundaries can be identified during the PLUP fieldwork. This could be the case when large parts of the village population have insufficient resources at their disposal within the village area, while large common property resources are located in the neighbourhood, which are already widely used and claimed by the villagers. In such cases, the PLUP team also needs to assure the equitable distribution of land resources between neighbouring communities and this will imperatively require the cooperation with provincial cadastre staff. Evaluation of Options. In most cases the changes required are not clear-cut, simple solutions. In most PLUP exercises there will be a multitude of options for changes in land use, NR use and tenure. The challenge is to identify socially acceptable, environmentally favorable and practically feasible solutions for the main land use related problems. The leading principles for the evaluation of options would be: 1. at least subsistence needs of all villagers should be satisfied, 2. any decision must be socially just and equitable, 3. sustainable use and protection of resources should be promoted, 4. and in some cases additional income generating opportunities could be identified. This requires a thorough analysis of the available options for all major land use units. The role of the PLUP team is to introduce and clarify the various options and to moderate the village discussions on the various choices. The discussion on necessary changes in land and resources use within the community can be aided by the use of PRA tools, such as dream mapping, ranking and matrix scoring exercises. Once the community has decided on which option to choose, these should be written down by a village representative in view of using them again in the preparation of the future land use map and the village regulations. Changes in agricultural land use will mostly concern upland areas (e.g. swidden areas or upland farms) and will require the formulation of certain restrictions and possibly some incentives to promote the wanted transformations. Usually, the present rice field areas require fewer changes. Changes in the use of common property resources could be envisaged for forest areas, grassland areas and water bodies. The management changes could take the form of specific use restrictions (by season, by technique, by selection of permitted users etc.) or lead to total protection of the area. Any envisaged management changes will also require a review of the land and resource tenure system. State land (concession areas or protected zones) is a priori excluded from any changes in tenure. In some cases the local community will request improved access rights and a co-management responsibility in state concession or protected areas. As mentioned earlier, there would be numerous options for joint or collaborative management models in such areas, depending on the level of devolution and the institutional arrangements. Sometimes this could also necessitate the redefinition and adaptation of boundaries.

2.67. For designated community forest areas there are a few tenure options. These could be maintained in one block under communal management according to a set of rules or be subdivided in individual family forest plots under household management. 2.68. One important issue, which is often overlooked, concerns the definition of land and resources needs for future generations. Ideally, the PLUP team should during the evaluation of options also discuss the setting aside of sufficient land areas for use by young families in future. This concerns agricultural land, but possibly also forest land and fishing areas. In those areas where the current exploitation levels are close to or beyond the limit of the natural production potential, this issue will be particularly difficult to solve. 2.69. The re-allocation of individual property for agricultural production (e.g. farmland acquired by outsiders or fields of large landowners in the village) will be one of the most sensitive issues during the PLUP process. In case villagers request this option, conflicts with higher administrative levels are very likely. The village authorities and the PLUP team will have to decide whether such cases should be brought up to the "Land Conflict Resolution Committee". 2.70. Technical Suitability Assessments. In those areas where the need for a change in land or resources use has been identified, more detailed land capability assessments or resource assessment (e.g. agricultural potential, water availability etc.) could be envisaged. In practice, such assessments are extremely time consuming, costly and require good technical expertise. Therefore, the implementation of suitability assessments is only optional during the PLUP process. In view of establishing simple management plans by communities a participatory resource inventory and some specific measurements should be conducted (see chapter 4.5.3). Yet, these inventories are very different from comprehensive land capability and resource assessments. 2.71. Usually, villagers know best about their direct environment and can judge quite well on the suitability of land areas to fulfil their own needs. It is this local expertise that is mainly used for PLUP and it will be complemented by the technical knowledge of the PLUP team members. This is different in the case of PLUP in resettlement or de-mined areas, where generally a more thorough assessment of the potentials of land use units is required. 2.72. Decision on best Options for Future Land Use. Once, the community has exhausted the discussion and evaluation of the different options, decisions need to be taken and documented. These decisions will later be incorporated in the future land use map, the village regulations and eventually the management plans. 2.73. Creation of a Management Committee

. At one stage of the PLUP process it

will be necessary to create a committee for the management of land and natural resources in the planning area. This could be a village committee, elected by the villagers of one community or it could be a committee with representatives from several villages in the case of a small watershed or a larger forest area. Equally, there could be a management committee on the commune level with participants from all villages in that particular commune. The creation of such a committee could also come earlier than step 4, e.g. already during the situation analysis phase or before the evaluation of

options for land use changes. Practical experience has shown, that the election of such a committee at the very beginning of the process will rather confuse villagers, because the PLUP work has not yet advanced and the tasks of the committee members still remain difficult to understand. 2.74. Preparation of Future Land Use Plan, Village Regulations, and Detailed Management Plans

. Future Land Use Plan. The future land use plan is a map,

2.75.

2.76.

2.77.

2.78.

preferably in the same scale as the present land use map of the planning area. On the basis of the present land use map and a transparent laid over the mapping base (e.g. aerial or satellite photos), the new map is first drawn by hand, but could later be digitised for GIS treatment and printing. All areas, which require any type of change and all decisions taken during the discussion on the options should be copied to the future land use plan. The various land units should be given the new codes according to the classification system and all remarks on the required changes within a particular unit could be added in a small database sheet. Together with the document on the village regulations and eventually some detailed management plans for specific areas under communal control, the future land use map is one of the core outputs of the entire PLUP process. The future land use map and the regulations are the main documents submitted to the authorities for endorsement and official approval of the PLUP work. In terms of timing, the elaboration of the future land use map in many cases will directly follow the decision making process. Village Regulations. Village regulations (VR) are another core element of land-use planning exercises, as they reflect the decisions taken by the community on the future management of all local resources. The agreed upon management rules and regulations will vary from one village to the other. Therefore, the drafting of the VRs should be kept flexible and adapted to local conditions. It is highly problematic if projects or village facilitators promote "standard" regulations or impose good examples of such documents from other areas to the villagers. Instead, every community should be encouraged to evaluate their own situation, discuss openly and come to their own conclusions. Unless this is done, villagers will always consider the village regulations as those of outsiders and not as their own. This would mean, that the rules and regulations would be less respected and adhered to. Still, the villagers and the PLUP team need certain guidelines for the elaboration of the VR. The PLUP team needs to introduce the concept of VRs, describe the main topics to be covered in the VRs and give a short introduction on the respective responsibilities of the villagers and the PLUP team during the drafting process. The best option for the PLUP team is to use simple guiding questions in order to make sure that villagers and the village NRM committee have thought of all the main aspects and possible issues. Management Plans for Communal Areas. Once the village regulations are officially recognized and approved, the village NRM committees should be encouraged to draft more specific management plans for all areas under communal management. These could be fishing areas, such as ponds, lakes, parts of rivers and streams or forest areas such as community production forests or protected forests.

2.79. The management plans define specific management activities and timeframes. These plans are essentially more "technical" than the village regulations. The community prepares the management plans after analyzing their user needs, the condition of the forests or water bodies and discussing issues like prohibitions, protection and management responsibilities and benefit sharing mechanisms. 2.80. The plans need to be based on a participatory resource inventory exercise, which for example will include assessing the number of trees standing in community forest areas, describing the species composition, assessing approximate volumes and sustainable yield rates. Correspondingly, in the case of fishery resources the predominant fish and aquatic animal species, the approximate productivity rates and specific protection requirements (spawning seasons, migration periods etc.) need to be identified. These inventories are conducted jointly between the NRM committee, other knowledgeable villagers and the PLUP team members. In this exceptional case, the PLUP team members split up according to their technical specialization, with the fishery staff assisting villagers in the fishery resources inventory and the foresters supporting the participatory forest inventory. The results of these inventories will help in the elaboration of the management plans.

Figure Illustration Management Plans for Communal Areas 2.81. The final document of a communal management plan should include the following details: objectives, forest type and condition, forest product harvesting, natural regeneration, forest rehabilitation needs, land use and land allocation, distribution of benefits, management activities, bio-diversity considerations, roles and responsibilities (see Annex 14).

Figure Illustration Participatory Forest Inventory 2.82. Once, the approval is granted to the community, such areas need to be physically demarcated on the ground, either by the use of signboards, painted poles or other boundary marks. The village NRM committee then has the overall responsibility of supervising the implementation of the management plans, enforcing the prohibitions and making sure that eventual benefits are shared equally, as planned in the document. 2.83. Submit Land Use Plan, Regulations, and Management Plans for Official Endorsement and Approval

. The village regulations are a tool towards getting

recognized collective rights on cracking down on illegal activities and introducing sustainable management practices in village/commune areas and this requires official recognition from the district, provincial and sometimes the national level. The future land use plan reflects all state land areas, all areas which should fall under community management in future and areas which are considered part of the private domain. The management plans present the detailed management guidelines for all areas under community control. On the last page or at the bottom of all these documents space is left for the official signatures of approval. All these proposals, which have essentially been prepared by villagers and present their views and priorities, need to be counterchecked and approved by Government officials from technical services and local authorities. 2.84. In general, the role of the PLUP team is to submit the regulations and possibly present them to a committee, follow up the endorsement procedures of the documents and eventually mediate between the wish for changes by district or provincial officials and villagers. Very often, the final product of the plan, the regulations and the management plans will constitute a compromise between the various views and opinions. PLUP team members play a mediating, but sometimes also a lobbying role during this stage

2.85. Implementation of Action Plans and Land Allocation Programs, Link to Extension Services and Conflict Resolution

. Once all the land-use planning documents

2.86.

2.87.

2.88.

2.89.

have been agreed and officially endorsed, the implementation phase will start. Ideally, the implementation of activities should follow the village NRM activity plan (also called NRM action plan or village work plan by other organizations). This plan is usually set up and modified during the process of elaborating the future land use plan, the village regulations and the management plans. Typically, the activity plan will include village tree nursery establishment, tree planting, fish breeding, environmental education, energy saving stoves, fruit tree promotion, improved agricultural production or rural credit activities. For the planned land use changes to succeed, villagers require outside support during the transformation process. This support has to come through qualified agricultural, forestry and fishery staff providing extension and training. If well documented, the village plans can serve as a basis for extension work, development support and a program of demonstrations (e.g. on improved land management techniques) by NGOs and Government services (see Annex 12). The Provincial Offices of Land Management, Urban Planning, Construction and Cadastre should always receive a copy of all future land use plans elaborated for any area within the province. This map will clearly specify the areas in need of land demarcation and allocation procedures outside the private domain (rice fields, homegardens, homesteads), see next page. In addition, the PLUP team should specifically inform the cadastral staff on the land registration and allocation needs of each planning area or village. Once clear implementation guidelines for land allocation are available, the cadastral services could then start demarcation and registration work in the respective PLUP areas according to the future land use plans. PLUP on village or commune level can lead to the need to renegotiate the boundaries of protected or concession areas (e.g. fishing lots). This re-evaluation of boundaries can only be down under the supervision of the respective land conflict resolution committees in the various provinces or special committees on boundary demarcation Despite the fact that PLUP can in itself be regarded as a conflict resolution mechanism for land conflicts by searching for equitable and transparent solutions in land management, some land use problems will usually even persist after PLUP. Most of these conflicts will involve the villagers on the one hand and outsiders on the other. The outsiders could be neighbouring villagers. Even more frequently under the Cambodian conditions, these outsiders are demobilized or active soldiers, private businessmen or Government officials. Therefore, conflict resolution remains a crucial issue even after the PLUP documents have been officially endorsed.

Figure Illustration Land Demarcation For Cadastral Services

2.90. Monitoring and Evaluation

. In the case of PLUP there are various forms of

monitoring and evaluation activities involved. In a village where the PLUP process has been successfully implemented this could be: 1. Self-monitoring of the entire PLUP process, e.g. by counter-checking the activities of the PLUP team against the recommendations made in this PLUP manual.

• Monitoring of extension and demonstration activities carried out by NGO or Government services in support of the planned land use changes. 3. Monitoring of the activities included in the village NRM activity plan. 4. Monitoring of the village regulations and management plans: their enforcement, rates of compliance, collection of fines, incidences of conflicts with outsiders etc., which could possibly lead to periodic revisions of the documents. 5. Monitoring of changes in land use practices and tenure systems as well as their direct effects. 6. Monitoring of the overall impact of the PLUP work on natural resources and socio economic situation (wanted/unwanted effects). 2.91. The village NRM activity plan and all the extension activities promoted in the area should be reviewed periodically by the villagers and the extension staff (possibly every 6 months). This will help both sides to critically evaluate which activities were successful, what has not been implemented at all or only with delays and will help to improve the accurateness of future work-plans. Particularly successful extension or demonstration activities can be further promoted in other areas. 2.92. The village NRM committee will monitor the compliance with the village regulations and management plans. Periodically the village NRM committee should meet with the PLUP team to jointly discuss and assess the enforcement of the regulations and management plans. These meetings should also include joint field visits to critical sites. Typical indicators to evaluate whether the enforcement of the regulations has been carried out successfully, are the number of violations observed, the amount of funds collected in fines, the cases of conflicts with outsiders and their resolution. The PLUP team has to make sure, that the village NRM committee gets regular support through such supervision and joint evaluation visits the village. In the beginning, these visits should be more frequent (e.g. every 2 weeks) and intervals could then gradually decrease, as the NRM committee becomes more self-confident and independent. 2.

B.

MoHA Regulation, Definitions and administrative procedures 27 & 28 of 2006.

I. MoHA Regulation No 27/2006 2.1. 2.2. Regulation of Ministry of House Affair number 27 of 2006 is about determination and village boundary affirmation. Local Government is the implementation of government affairs by the local government and parliament according to the principle of autonomy and assistance with the principles of autonomy within the system and principles of the Unitary State of the Republic of Indonesia as defined in the Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia Year 1945; Local Government is the governor, regent, or mayor and the region as an element of the regional administration; The village is the unity of the legal community who have boundaries that authority to control and manage the interests of the local community, based on the origin and

2.3. 2.4.

2.5.

2.6. 2.7. 2.8.

2.9. 2.10. 2.11. 2.12. 2.13. 2.14.

2.15. 2.16. 2.17.

2.18.

2.19.

2.20.

2.21. 2.22.

customs that are recognized and respected in the system government of the Republic of Indonesia. The village administration is administration of government affairs by the Government Rural and Village Consultative Board to regulate and manage the interests of the local community based on the origin and local customs that are recognized and respected in the administration system of the Republic of Indonesia. The village government or called by any other name is the village head and village device as part of administrators Village. Boundary is a sign of separation between neighboring villages either natural boundaries and artificial boundaries. Natural boundaries are natural elements such as mountains , rivers, beaches , lakes and so forth, expressed or defined as beaches, lakes and so forth, expressed or designated as village boundaries. Boundaries are artificial man-made elements such as pillars boundaries, roads, railways, irrigation and so on are declared or designated as village boundaries. Limit the jurisdiction of the village is the boundary dividing the area of government affairs administration under the authority of a village with other villages. Determination of the village boundary is the demarcation of village cartometric on a pedestal base map agreed. Affirmation of the village boundary is the implementation process in the field by providing mark the village boundaries based on results of the determination. Tuning is an activity improvement , adjustment and improvement of village boundaries. Base map is a map that presents the elements of the natural and or man-made, which are described on the surface of the earth a flat field with Scale, numbering, projections and certain geo-referenced. Scale is the ratio of the size of the distance of an element on the base map with the distance element on earth and revealed the magnitude comparison. Village boundary map is a map that presents all boundary elements and other elements, boundary pillars, boundary lines, water and transportation toponimi. Geodetic principles are things that include measurements (data collection), calculation (the process of measurement results), depiction (presentation of results information measurement and calculation), GPS measurement activities, polygon, detailed situation, spirit and cross-sectional and longitudinal in organizing the village boundary. Determination and confirmation village limits to provide legal certainty to the village boundaries in the land and as a reference in conducting the determination and affirmation of the village limits orderly and coordinated . Determination of the village boundary is realized through the stages of document research , the determination of the base map used , and the delineation of the boundary line is kartometrik above the base map . Affirmation of the village boundary determination is realized through the stages of document delimitation , boundary tracking , installation of boundary pillars along the line , measuring and positioning boundary pillars , as well as map-making boundary line with a particular corridor . Boundary map making is done when both villages bordering considers necessary. Stages affirmation village boundaries conducted by the principles of geodesy.

2.23. Each of the stages outlined in the minutes of an agreement among the bordering villages. 2.24. Emphasis village as determined by the regent / mayor. 2.25. Team Determination and Confirmation of the village boundary shall coordinate with Emphasis Team District / City. 2.26. Team Membership Determination and Confirmation of the village boundary of elements relevant technical agencies coupled with elements derived from : (i) Subdistrict; (ii) Village Government ; and (iii) Public figures from the villages that border. 2.27. Elements related technical institutions, among others, namely : (i) Governance Unit; (ii) Bappeda; (iii) Land Office; (iv) Land and Building Tax Office; (v) Department of Public Works; (vi) Department of Spatial Planning; (vii) Department of City Planning; (viii) and others. 2.28. Emphasis Determination Team and village has a duty : (i) a. the basis of the written law inventory and other sources of law relating to village boundaries; (ii) conduct an assessment of the legal basis of writing or other legal sources to determine the boundary line while on a map; (iii) plan and implement village boundary determination and affirmation; (iv) technical supervision / field within the village limits affirmation; (v) Determination and socialize Emphasis village; (vi) funding proposed in the Budget Revenue and Expenditure District / City for the implementation and the establishment of village boundaries affirmation: (vii) and report all activities of the establishment and affirmation of the village boundary to the Regent / Mayor with a copy to the Governor. 2.29. The village has made the assertion made news event village boundary agreement between the bordering villages and witnessed by Team of Determination and Confirmation of the village boundary. 2.30. Minutes of the agreement with attachments village boundary maps and other documents submitted to the Regent / Mayor through the District Head. 2.31. Pillar boundary and village boundary maps that have been verified by a team of Determination and Confirmation of the village limits and approved by the head of the village bordering submitted for approval by the Regent / Mayor. 2.32. Regent / Mayor Decree establishes the Regent / Mayor of the village boudnary. 2.33. Village boundary disputes between villages in the subdistrict resolved deliberation facilitated by sub-district. 2.34. Village boundary disputes between villages in different districts were settled amicably by the elements difasihtasi District / City. 2.35. If efforts deliberations is not reached, the dispute resolution specified by Bupati / Walikota and his decision is final. II. MoHA Regulation No 28/2006 2.1. 2.2. Regulation of Ministry of House Affair number 28 of 2006 is about formation, removal, village merger, and changing status from village to kelurahan. Agency Consultative Village hereinafter referred to as BPD is board the realization of democracy in the maintenance of the rule of Countryside Rural Governance organizer elements.

2.3.

Kelurahan is the working area as the district / city in the working area of the Sub District. 2.4. Village Consultative Board, hereinafter referred to BPD is an institution is a manifestation of democracy in village governance as an element of Village Government. 2.5. Formation of village is merging several villages, or parts of villages by side, or the expansion of the village into two or more villages, or establishment of villages outside the existing village. 2.6. Removal of the village is the act of negating the existing village as a result no longer meet the requirements. 2.7. The merger of the village is the union of two or more village into a new village. 2.8. Establishment of village aims to improve public services in order to accelerate the realization of public welfare . 2.9. Establishment of village, must meet the following requirements: a. population, namely : (i) Java and Bali at least 1500 inhabitants or 300 families; (ii) Sumatra and Sulawesi, at least 1000 people or 200 families; and (iii) Kalimantan, NTB, NTT, Maluku, Papua, at least 75 families or 750 souls. b. area can be reached in improving services and community development ; c. working area has a transportation network or communication between the sub village; d . social culture that can create inter-religious harmony and social life in accordance with local customs; e . potential which includes the village of natural resources and human resources ; f. village boundary stated in the form of a map of the village defined by local regulations ; and g . infrastructure is the availability of the infrastructure of the village administration and transportation. 2.10. The village was established on the initiative of the community to pay attention to the village of origin, customs and local social and cultural conditions. The formation of the village can be done after reaching the age of village governance at least 5 ( five ) years. 2.11. Procedure for established of the Village are as follows : 1. The existence of community initiatives and agreements antuk forming village ; 2. Society proposed the establishment of the village and the village chief to BPD ; 3. BPD held a joint meeting to discuss the proposed village chief public about the establishment of the village , and meeting the agreement set forth in the Minutes of the Meeting BPD on the Formation of the Village ; 4. Village Chief propose the establishment of the village to the Regent / Mayor through the District Head , 5. Minutes of Meeting with BPD and village administrative region plan will formed ; 6. Having regard to the proposal documents Village Head , the Regent / Mayor commissioned the Team 7. District / City with the District team to make observations to the village which will formed , the results are the subject of recommendations to the Regent / Mayor ; 8. When the observation team recommendations stated worthy formed a new village, the Regent / Mayor prepared a Draft Regulation on the Establishment Village ;

9.

2.12. 2.13. 2.14. 2.15. 2.16. 2.17. 2.18. 2.19.

2.20.

Preparation of Draft Regulation on the establishment of the village must involve the village government , BPD , and community elements village , in order to set appropriate boundaries rural areas to be set up ; 10. Regent / Mayor filed a Draft Regulation on the Establishment Village discussion of the results of the village government, BPD, and elements of the villagers to Parliament DPRD plenary meeting in the forum ; 11. Parliament along Regent / Mayor discussions on the Draft Regulations On the establishment of the village area , and if necessary can include Village Government, BPD, and elements of rural communities; 12. Draft Regulation on the Establishment Village mutually agreed by Parliament and the Regent / Mayor submitted by the Governing Council to Regent / Mayor to set out into regional regulation; 13. Peryampaian Draft Regulation on Establishment of the Village submitted by the Chairman of Parliament not later than 7 ( seven ) days as of the date mutual consent ; 14. Draft Regulation on the Establishment Village defined by the Regent / Mayor no later than 30 (thirty ) days from the The plan agreed upon ; and 15. In terms of validity Draft Regulation on the Establishment village that has been set by the Regent / Mayor, the Regional Secretary regional regulation enacted in the Regional Gazette. The village is because the development is no longer eligible to be combined with other village or deleted. Merger or deletion Village, first discussed by the village government and BPD with each rural community. The results set out in the Joint Decision deliberation village head is concerned. Joint Decree of the Head of the Village submitted by one of the village head to the Regent / Mayor through the District Head. The result of merging or elimination of village stipulated by District / City. The village can be changed or adjusted status to the Kelurahan by village government initiative with BPD with the aspirations of the local community. aspiration of the people approved by at least 2/3 (two thirds) Village residents who have the right to vote. Changes in the status of the village into the kelurahan shall meet the following requirements: (i) area has not changed; (ii) population of at least 4500 inhabitants or 900 households in Java and Bali as well as at least 2,000 or 400 households for regions outside Java and Bali; (iii) infrastructure and facilities are adequate for the implementation of government Urban governance; (iv) economic potential in the form of the type, the amount of effort and production services as well as the diversity of livelihood; (v) social and cultural conditions in the form of diversity and population status changes in the value of services to the agricultural and industrial; and (vi) increasing the volume of services. The village changed its status to the kelurahan, the lurah and The Personnel is filled from the Civil Service are available at the District / State concerned.

2.21. Village Chief and Village Personnel and BPD members of the village changed its status to the kelurahan , was honorably discharged from his position and awarded in accordance with the socio-cultural values of the local community. 2.22. Procedures for filing and determination of changes in the status of the village into the Village are as follows : 1. The existence of community initiatives and agreements to change the status of the village into the kelurahan; 2. Society proposed changes to the status of the village into the kelurahan to Village Chief and BPD ; 3. BPD held a meeting with the village chief to discuss proposed changes to the public about the status of the village into the kelurahan, and meeting the agreement set forth in the Official BPD Meeting on Status Change Becomes Urban Village/Kelurahan ; 4. Village Chief to propose changes to the status of the village into the kelurahan. 5. Regent / Mayor through the District Head, Minutes of Meeting with BPD ; 6. Having regard to the proposal documents Village Head, the Regent / Mayor commissioned the Team District / City with the District team to the village to observe the status will be changed into the kelurahan, the results are the subject of recommendations to the Regent / Mayor ; 7. When the observation team recommendations expressed feasible to change the status of the village into the kelurahan, the Regent / Mayor prepared a Draft Regulation on Change Status to Become kelurahan/Urban Village ; 8. Regent / Mayor filed a Draft Regulation on Change Status to Become kelurahan/Urban Village to Parliament in a plenary meeting of the forum Parliament ; 9. Parliament along Regent / Mayor discussions on the Draft Regulation on Change Status Being kelurahan/Urban Village, and when needed can include the Village Government, BPD, and elements of rural communities ; 10. Draft Regulation on Change Status to Become kelurahan/Urban Village which has been approved jointly by the Parliament and the Regent / Mayor submitted by the Governing Council to the Regent / Mayor to set out into regional regulation ; 11. Submission of Draft Regulation on Change Status to Become kelurahan/Urban Village, the Governing Council was delivered by no later than 7 ( seven ) days from the date mutual consent ; 12. Draft Regulation on Change Status to Become kelurahan/Urban Village, defined by the Regent / Mayor no later than 30 (thirty ) days from the draft agreed upon ; and 13. In terms of validity Draft Regulation on Change Status to Become Urban Village which has been set by the Regent / Mayor as domaksud in letter 14. Regional Secretary of the Regional Regulations enacted in the Regional Gazette. 15. The changing status of the village into the kelurahan, all the wealth and resources income into wealth of District / City.

16.

Wealth and income sources managed by the kelurahan for the purpose of the local community .

C.

GIS, GNSS and UAS.

I. Geographic Information System (GIS) 1.1. A geographic information system (GIS) is a computer system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present all types of geographical data. The acronym GIS is sometimes used for geographical information science or geospatial information studies to refer to the academic discipline or career of working with geographic information systems and is a large domain within the broader academic discipline of Geoinformatics. GIS can be thought of as a system that provides spatial data entry, management, retrieval, analysis, and visualization functions. The implementation of a GIS is often driven by jurisdictional (such as a city), purpose, or application requirements. Generally, a GIS implementation may be custom-designed for an organization. Hence, a GIS deployment developed for an application, jurisdiction, enterprise, or purpose may not be necessarily interoperable or compatible with a GIS that has been developed for some other application, jurisdiction, enterprise, or purpose. What goes beyond a GIS is a spatial data infrastructure, a concept that has no such restrictive boundaries. In a general sense, the term describes any information system that integrates, stores, edits, analyzes, shares, and displays geographic information for informing decision making. GIS applications are tools that allow users to create interactive queries (usercreated searches), analyze spatial information, edit data in maps, and present the results of all these operations. Geographic information science is the science underlying geographic concepts, applications, and systems. Modern GIS technologies use digital information, for which various digitized data creation methods are used. The most common method of data creation is digitization, where a hard copy map or survey plan is transferred into a digital medium through the use of a CAD program, and geo-referencing capabilities. With the wide availability of ortho-rectified imagery (both from satellite and aerial sources), heads-up digitizing is becoming the main avenue through which geographic data is extracted. Heads-up digitizing involves the tracing of geographic data directly on top of the aerial imagery instead of by the traditional method of tracing the geographic form on a separate digitizing tablet (heads-down digitizing). Relating information from different sources. GIS uses spatio-temporal (space-time) location as the key index variable for all other information. Just as a relational database containing text or numbers can relate many different tables using common key index variables, GIS can relate unrelated information by using location as the key index variable. The key is the location and/or extent in space-time. Any variable that can be located spatially, and increasingly also temporally, can be referenced using a GIS. Locations or extents in Earth space–time may be recorded as dates/times of occurrence, and x, y, and z coordinates representing, longitude, latitude, and elevation, respectively. These GIS coordinates may represent other quantified

1.2.

1.3.

1.4.

1.5.

1.6.

systems of temporo-spatial reference (for example, film frame number, stream gage station, highway mile-marker, surveyor benchmark, building address, street intersection, entrance gate, water depth sounding, POS or CAD drawing origin/units). Units applied to recorded temporal-spatial data can vary widely (even when using exactly the same data, see map projections), but all Earth-based spatial–temporal location and extent references should, ideally, be relatable to one another and ultimately to a "real" physical location or extent in space–time. 1.7. Related by accurate spatial information, an incredible variety of real-world and projected past or future data can be analyzed, interpreted and represented to facilitate education and decision making. This key characteristic of GIS has begun to open new avenues of scientific inquiry into behaviors and patterns of previously considered unrelated real-world information. 1.8. GIS accuracy depends upon source data, and how it is encoded to be data referenced. Land surveyors have been able to provide a high level of positional accuracy utilizing the GPS-derived positions. High-resolution digital terrain and aerial imagery, powerful computers and Web technology are changing the quality, utility, and expectations of GIS to serve society on a grand scale, but nevertheless there are other source data that have an impact on overall GIS accuracy like paper maps, though these may be of limited use in achieving the desired accuracy since the aging of maps affects their dimensional stability. 1.9. In developing a digital topographic data base for a GIS, topographical maps are the main source, and aerial photography and satellite images are extra sources for collecting data and identifying attributes which can be mapped in layers over a location facsimile of scale. The scale of a map and geographical rendering area representation type are very important aspects since the information content depends mainly on the scale set and resulting locatability of the map's representations. In order to digitize a map, the map has to be checked within theoretical dimensions, then scanned into a raster format, and resulting raster data has to be given a theoretical dimension by a rubber sheeting/warping technology process. 1.10. A quantitative analysis of maps brings accuracy issues into focus. The electronic and other equipment used to make measurements for GIS is far more precise than the machines of conventional map analysis. All geographical data are inherently inaccurate, and these inaccuracies will propagate through GIS operations in ways that are difficult to predict. 1.11. Data representation. GIS data represents real objects (such as roads, land use, elevation, trees, waterways, etc.) with digital data determining the mix. Real objects can be divided into two abstractions: discrete objects (e.g., a house) and continuous fields (such as rainfall amount, or elevations). Traditionally, there are two broad methods used to store data in a GIS for both kinds of abstractions mapping references: raster images and vector. Points, lines, and polygons are the stuff of mapped location attribute references. A new hybrid method of storing data is that of identifying point clouds, which combine three-dimensional points with RGB information at each point, returning a "3D color image". GIS thematic maps then are becoming more and more realistically visually descriptive of what they set out to show or determine.

1.12. Data Capture. Existing data printed on paper or PET film maps can be digitized or scanned to produce digital data. A digitizer produces vector data as an operator traces points, lines, and polygon boundaries from a map. Scanning a map results in raster data that could be further processed to produce vector data. 1.13. Survey data can be directly entered into a GIS from digital data collection systems on survey instruments using a technique called coordinate geometry (COGO). Positions from a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) like Global Positioning System can also be collected and then imported into a GIS. A current trend in data collection gives users the ability to utilize field computers with the ability to edit live data using wireless connections or disconnected editing sessions. This has been enhanced by the availability of low-cost mapping-grade GPS units with decimeter accuracy in real time. This eliminates the need to post process, import, and update the data in the office after fieldwork has been collected. This includes the ability to incorporate positions collected using a laser rangefinder. New technologies also allow users to create maps as well as analysis directly in the field, making projects more efficient and mapping more accurate.

Figure Illustration GIS Modelling

1.14. Remotely sensed data also plays an important role in data collection and consist of sensors attached to a platform. Sensors include cameras, digital scanners and LIDAR, while platforms usually consist of aircraft and satellites. Recently with the development

1.15.

1.16.

1.17.

1.18.

1.19.

1.20.

1.21.

1.22.

of Miniature UAVs, aerial data collection is becoming possible at much lower costs, and on a more frequent basis. For example, the Aeryon Scout was used to map a 50acre area with a Ground sample distance of 1 inch (2.54 cm) in only 12 minutes. The majority of digital data currently comes from photo interpretation of aerial photographs. Soft-copy workstations are used to digitize features directly from stereo pairs of digital photographs. These systems allow data to be captured in two and three dimensions, with elevations measured directly from a stereo pair using principles of photogrammetry. Analog aerial photos must be scanned before being entered into a soft-copy system, for high-quality digital cameras this step is skipped. Satellite remote sensing provides another important source of spatial data. Here satellites use different sensor packages to passively measure the reflectance from parts of the electromagnetic spectrum or radio waves that were sent out from an active sensor such as radar. Remote sensing collects raster data that can be further processed using different bands to identify objects and classes of interest, such as land cover. When data is captured, the user should consider if the data should be captured with either a relative accuracy or absolute accuracy, since this could not only influence how information will be interpreted but also the cost of data capture. After entering data into a GIS, the data usually requires editing, to remove errors, or further processing. For vector data it must be made "topologically correct" before it can be used for some advanced analysis. For example, in a road network, lines must connect with nodes at an intersection. Errors such as undershoots and overshoots must also be removed. For scanned maps, blemishes on the source map may need to be removed from the resulting raster. For example, a fleck of dirt might connect two lines that should not be connected. Raster-to-vector translation. Data restructuring can be performed by a GIS to convert data into different formats. For example, a GIS may be used to convert a satellite image map to a vector structure by generating lines around all cells with the same classification, while determining the cell spatial relationships, such as adjacency or inclusion. More advanced data processing can occur with image processing, a technique developed in the late 1960s by NASA and the private sector to provide contrast enhancement, false colour rendering and a variety of other techniques including use of two dimensional Fourier transforms. Since digital data is collected and stored in various ways, the two data sources may not be entirely compatible. So a GIS must be able to convert geographic data from one structure to another. Projections, coordinate systems, and registration. The earth can be represented by various models, each of which may provide a different set of coordinates (e.g., latitude, longitude, elevation) for any given point on the Earth's surface. The simplest model is to assume the earth is a perfect sphere. As more measurements of the earth have accumulated, the models of the earth have become more sophisticated and more accurate. In fact, there are models called datums that apply to different areas of the earth to provide increased accuracy, like NAD83 for U.S. measurements, and the World Geodetic System for worldwide measurements. Spatial analysis with GIS. GIS spatial analysis is a rapidly changing field, and GIS packages are increasingly including analytical tools as standard built-in facilities, as

1.23.

1.24.

1.25.

1.26.

optional toolsets, as add-ins or 'analysts'. In many instances these are provided by the original software suppliers (commercial vendors or collaborative non commercial development teams), whilst in other cases facilities have been developed and are provided by third parties. Furthermore, many products offer software development kits (SDKs), programming languages and language support, scripting facilities and/or special interfaces for developing one's own analytical tools or variants. The website "Geospatial Analysis" and associated book/ebook attempt to provide a reasonably comprehensive guide to the subject. The increased availability has created a new dimension to business intelligence termed "spatial intelligence" which, when openly delivered via intranet, democratizes access to geographic and social network data. Geospatial intelligence, based on GIS spatial analysis, has also become a key element for security. GIS as a whole can be described as conversion to a vectorial representation or to any other digitisation process. Data analysis. It is difficult to relate wetlands maps to rainfall amounts recorded at different points such as airports, television stations, and schools. A GIS, however, can be used to depict two- and three-dimensional characteristics of the Earth's surface, subsurface, and atmosphere from information points. For example, a GIS can quickly generate a map with isopleth or contour lines that indicate differing amounts of rainfall. Such a map can be thought of as a rainfall contour map. Many sophisticated methods can estimate the characteristics of surfaces from a limited number of point measurements. A two-dimensional contour map created from the surface modeling of rainfall point measurements may be overlaid and analyzed with any other map in a GIS covering the same area. This GIS derived map can then provide additional information - such as the viability of water power potential as a renewable energy source. Similarly, GIS can be used compare other renewable energy resources to find the best geographic potential for a region. Additionally, from a series of three-dimensional points, or digital elevation model, isopleth lines representing elevation contours can be generated, along with slope analysis, shaded relief, and other elevation products. Watersheds can be easily defined for any given reach, by computing all of the areas contiguous and uphill from any given point of interest. Similarly, an expected thalweg of where surface water would want to travel in intermittent and permanent streams can be computed from elevation data in the GIS. Topological modelling. A GIS can recognize and analyze the spatial relationships that exist within digitally stored spatial data. These topological relationships allow complex spatial modelling and analysis to be performed. Topological relationships between geometric entities traditionally include adjacency (what adjoins what), containment (what encloses what), and proximity (how close something is to something else). Map overlay. The combination of several spatial datasets (points, lines, or polygons) creates a new output vector dataset, visually similar to stacking several maps of the same region. These overlays are similar to mathematical Venn diagram overlays. A union overlay combines the geographic features and attribute tables of both inputs into a single new output. An intersect overlay defines the area where both inputs overlap and retains a set of attribute fields for each. A symmetric difference overlay defines an output area that includes the total area of both inputs except for the overlapping area.

1.27. Data extraction is a GIS process similar to vector overlay, though it can be used in either vector or raster data analysis. Rather than combining the properties and features of both datasets, data extraction involves using a "clip" or "mask" to extract the features of one data set that fall within the spatial extent of another dataset. 1.28. In raster data analysis, the overlay of datasets is accomplished through a process known as "local operation on multiple rasters" or "map algebra," through a function that combines the values of each raster's matrix. This function may weigh some inputs more than others through use of an "index model" that reflects the influence of various factors upon a geographic phenomenon. II. GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) 1.29. GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) is a satellite system that is used to pinpoint the geographic location of a user's receiver anywhere in the world. Two GNSS systems are currently in operation: the United States' Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Russian Federation's Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS). A third, Europe's Galileo, is slated to reach full operational capacity in 2008. Each of the GNSS systems employs a constellation of orbiting satellites working in conjunction with a network of ground stations. 1.30. Satellite-based navigation systems use a version of triangulation to locate the user, through calculations involving information from a number of satellites. Each satellite transmits coded signals at precise intervals. The receiver converts signal information into position, velocity, and time estimates. Using this information, any receiver on or near the earth's surface can calculate the exact position of the transmitting satellite and the distance (from the transmission time delay) between it and the receiver. Coordinating current signal data from four or more satellites enables the receiver to determine its position. 1.31. Depending on the particular technologies used, GNSS precision varies. For example, the United States Department of Defense originally used an intentional degradation (known as "Selective Availability," or "SA") of GPS signals to prevent potential military adversaries from using the positioning data. Because of SA, GPS accuracy was limited to a 100-meter range for civilian users, although military equipment enabled accuracy to within a single meter. In May 2000, a presidential order mandated that SA be discontinued. Without SA, all GPS receivers are potentially accurate to within 15 meters. When available, Galileo will provide position accuracy to within one meter.

Figure Illustration GNSS Tools

Figure Illustration UAV for UAS

III. An Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) 1.32. An unmanned aerial systems (UAS), an innovation from this project to provide image acquisition campaigns need to produce high resolution, geo-referenced aerial imagery of critical cultural and natural resource areas within the villages 1.33. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly known as drone, is an aircraft without a human pilot aboard. Its flight is controlled either autonomously by onboard computers or by the remote control of a pilot on the ground or in another vehicle. The typical launch and recovery method of an unmanned aircraft is by the function of an automatic system or an external operator on the ground. Historically, UAVs were simple remotely piloted aircraft, but autonomous control is increasingly being employed. 1.34. They are usually deployed for military and special operation applications, but also used in a small but growing number of civil applications, such as policing and firefighting, and nonmilitary security work, such as surveillance of pipelines. UAVs are often preferred for missions that are too "dull, dirty or dangerous" for manned aircraft. 1.35. A vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft is one that can hover, take off, and land vertically. This classification includes fixed-wing aircraft as well as helicopters and other aircraft with powered rotors, such as cyclogyros/cyclocopters and tiltrotors. Some VTOL aircraft can operate in other modes as well, such as CTOL (conventional takeoff and landing), STOL (short take-off and landing), and/or STOVL (short take-off and vertical landing). Others, such as some helicopters, can only operate by VTOL, due to the aircraft lacking landing gear that can handle horizontal motion. VTOL is a subset of V/STOL (vertical and/or short take-off and landing).

II.
A. 1.1.

Methodology
Objectives, Location and Phase Completion Methodology is the systematic, theoretical analysis of the methods applied to a field of study, or the theoretical analysis of the body of methods and principles associated with a branch of knowledge. It, typically, encompasses concepts such as paradigm, theoretical model, phases and quantitative or qualitative techniques. A methodology does not set out to provide solutions but offers the theoretical underpinning for understanding which method, set of methods or so called “best practices” can be applied to a specific case. As described in the terms of reference, sensitization village boundary setting/village mapping (VBS/VM) using a PLUP, MoHA Regulation and GIS as an approach of procedures reaching objectives. Objective of this activity as described in TOR page 111 is, to help MCA-Indonesia to pilot the implementation of the GP PLUP Guidelines for Participatory Village Boundary Setting and Community Mapping in four selected geographic areas corresponding to: Sungai Tenang Landscape in the District of Merangin and Berbak Landscape in the District of Muaro Jambi, Province of Jambi on the Island of Sumatra and the Bonehau-Kalumpang Landscape in the District of Mamuju, the Mambi-

1.2.

1.3.

1.4.

Bambang Landscape and the Sumarorong-Pana Landscape in the District of Mamasa Province of West Sulawesi on the Island of Sulawesi (see general location maps below). The pilots are expected to provide MCA-I and selected district governments with technical, financial and logistical information that will inform the broader roll-out of the participatory VBS/CM process in other districts that are candidates for GP investments. in the completion of this work, the implementation is divided into 2 phase. where in the first phase will include: (i) testing of the GP PLUP participatory VBS/CM process in the Berbak Landscape in Muaro Jambi District and the Sumarorong-Pana Landscape in Mamasa District; (ii) analysis and evaluation of the VBS/CM process, discussions with MCA-I and final adjustments to the participatory VBS/CM process if determined necessary; and (iii) preparation of the Operations Manual for the Implementation of the Participatory VBS/CM and a Detailed Analysis of Costs. The anticipated timing for Phase One is four months . Once the analysis, adjustments and evaluation of the VBS/CM process from testing in the villages of the Berbak and Sumarorong-Pana landscapes is completed and the Operations Manual and Analysis of Costs is completed and agreed with MCA-Indonesia, then Phase Two can commence for another four months period. Phase Two will consist of the full implementation of the participatory VBS/CM process in the Sungai Tenang Landscape in Merangin District, the BonehauKalumpang Landscape in Mamuju District and the Mambi-Bambang Landscape in Mamasa District. Phase 1 Process of PLUP VBS/CM
Phase 1. 3 Step following ; 1. 1st step. Testing of The GP Participatory VBS/CM. 2. 2nd step. Analysis and evaluation of the VBS/VM. 3. 3rd step. Preparation of the Operation Manual of the Participatory VBS/CM and Detail Analysis of Cost.

Agree with MCA – Indonesia

Not Agree with MCA – Indonesia

Phase 2.

1.5.

There are a total of 68 villages in the 4 (four) districts. For Phase One, there are an estimated 12 villages in the Berbak Landscape and 10 in the Sumarorong-Pana Landscape. For Phase Two there are 12 villages in the Sungai Tenang Landscape, 22

in the Bonehau-Kalumpang Landscape and 12 in the Mambi-Bambang Landscape. See maps and tables below for area (in hectares) of each Landscape and village.

Phase 1. Indicative Village for VBS/CM in Berbak, District Muaro Jambi

Phase 1. Indicative Village for VBS/CM in Sumarorong - Pana, District Mamasa

Phase 2. Indicative Village for VBS/CM in Sungai Tenang, District Merangin

Phase 2. Indicative Village for VBS/CM in Bonehau - Kalumpang, District Mamuju

Phase 2. Indicative Village for VBS/CM in Mambi - Bambang, District Mamasa

B. 1.1. 1.2.

Process and Method as stated in the terms of reference on page 130. there are 18 stages of execution of work to accomplish. The following table and associated schematic flowchart presents the eighteen discrete steps that comprise the proposed GP PLUP Participatory VBS/CM Process, as well as the entity responsible for each step. Some of the steps there is a shared responsibility among one or more of the entities involved in the process. Some aspects of this process have been implemented in Indonesia, the GP PLUP Participatory VBS/CM process is unique in that it attempts to successfully combine the more technically-based village boundary setting process with the more socially-focused participatory community mapping process all in a more efficient, effective and systematic manner. important messages within the framework of the process PVBS / VM to consultants in addition to testing the 18 stages PVBS / CM is finding constraints and bottlenecks in the process. so the consultants are required to cooperate with MCA - Indonesia to provide adjustments, alternatives and recommendations in an effort to improve the PVBS / CM.
GREEN PROSPERITY PLUP PARTICIPATORY VILLAGE BOUNDARY SETTING AND COMMUNITY MAPPING (VBS/CM) PROCESS

1.3.

No 1

Task Determine Landscape/Subdistricts within approved District. MCA-I will collaborate with the Provincial Bappeda to determine the geographic location and extend of the landscapes. Establish Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee of District Government and District Government (Bupati) stipulates use of GP PLUP VBS/CM Process and Guidelines Convene Landscape VBS/CM Planning Meeting at Bupati Office to explain VBS/CM Process and Guidelines, responsibilities of each party and develop a Landscape VBS/CM Work Plan (attendees: Bupati officials, MCA-I, Bappeda, BPN, selected consultant and Camats of each sub district located in the subject landscape). MCA-I will work with the Bupati to organize and hold this meeting. Convene Sub district VBS/CM Planning Meeting at sub district capital to explain VBS/CM (attendees: Camat, selected consultant, Kepala Desa of each village within sub district). The Consultant will work with the Camat to organize and hold this meeting. Establish Village Participation Team (VPT) representing each village within the sub district. The Camat will work directly with the Kepala Desa and in collaboration with the Consultant to establish this team. MCA-I will oversee the process of establish of the VPT.

Implementation Responsibility MCA-I GP PLUP

Share Responsibility -

2

Governance Unit of Bupati

Consultant

3

MCA-I

-

4

Consultant

Camat & Kepala Desa

5

Camat

Camat & Kepala Desa

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Compile Existing Information including maps of concessions, licenses, permits, land tenure, cadastral maps, spatial plans, land cover/use and land disputes Compile Landscape VBS/CM Base Map in GIS format and prepare hard copy maps for use at various meetings, workshops and public expositions (see Guidelines for technical specifications) Convene 1st Landscape VBS/CM Workshop at Bupati Office (attendees: Bupati, Consultant and all Camats and VPTs within the sub district). The Consultant will work with the Bupati and the Camat to organize and hold this Workshop including a technical training to Village Participation Team, in the form of basic training to brief and confirm technicalities before and during the field work. Convene Village VBS/CM Technical Meeting(s) in each village using VBS/CM Base Map to initially ‘determine’ boundaries cartometrically and identify critical natural and cultural resources areas to be mapped. It is expected that there will need to be a series of technical meetings depending on the complexity of the situation in the village. The Consultant will work with the VPTs to organize and hold these meetings. Compile/Collect Boundary and Resource Data, through office research, interviews and field visits as needed to refine and adjust boundaries and to map resource areas (field data will be captured on-site with GNSS receivers and other survey instruments including the use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to collect high-resolution georeference images and map areas of critical natural and cultural resources13). The Consultant will be responsible for training the VPT to support the collection of the data, the role of the Facilitators and Technicians is critical in these step to guide and assist the VPT. Identification and mediation of disputes, it is expected that various types of land-based disputes may be identified as part of the VBS/CM process, in particular during the field work step. These disputes will be identified categorized and geographically located (geolocated) and a process for willingness based mediation should be used to resolve dispute when and where possible. The role of the VPT is important in assisting the parties to the dispute to resolve the issue and also to provide community acknowledgment of the willingness of the parties and the legitimacy of the process. Arrange and Convene Public Exposition of VBS/CM Results, this exposition should include one public meeting and at minimum 14 days of public review and comment. The Consultant will work in collaboration with the Kepala Desa to determine the appropriate location within the village for posting the results and for accommodating the villagers during their review of the results.

Consultant

Consultant

Consultant

Bupati, Camat & VPT

Consultant

VPT

Consultant

VPT

Consultant

VPT

Consultant

Kepala Desa

13

14

15

16

Convene 2nd Landscape VBS/CM Workshop with all VPTs to review results from each village and achieve consensus at the landscape level or identify areas to be confirmed in the field (attendees: Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee, Camats and VPTs) Finalize fieldwork to affirm boundaries and place markers at boundary limits (see Guidelines for technical specifications). This work will be done with the support of the VPTs. Prepare final Minutes of VBS/CM Activity Report in each village and for the sub district (including: description of process, village history, geographic coordinates of boundary markers, maps, imagery and GIS database etc. as defined in the GP PLUP VBS/CM Guidelines Verification of Consultant Deliverable, in accordance with GP PLUP VBS/CM Guidelines

Consultant

VPT

Consultant

VPT

Consultant

-

17

Final Review and Approval of VBS/CM Activity Report

Delivery of Final VBSCM Activity Report and GIS databases to Kepala Desa of each village Sources: TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014 18

MCA-I GP PLUP (with assistance of external quality control/supervision consultant(s) if needed) Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee MCA-I GP PLUP

Consultant

Bupati

-

5 6

1

2

3

4 7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Green Prosperity Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP) Village Boundary Setting/Community Mapping Process Flow Sources: TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014

Green Prosperity Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP) Village Boundary Setting/Community Mapping Process, Method, Technic Approach and Reponsibility No 1 Task of Process Determine Landscape/Subdistricts within approved District. MCA-I will collaborate with the Provincial Bappeda to determine the geographic location and extend of the landscapes. Establish Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee of District (VD2C) Government and District Government (Bupati) stipulates use of GP PLUP VBS/CM Process and Guidelines Convene Landscape VBS/CM Planning Meeting at Bupati Office to explain VBS/CM Process and Guidelines, responsibilities of each party and develop a Landscape VBS/CM Work Plan (attendees: Bupati officials, MCA-I, Bappeda, BPN, consultant and Camats of each sub district located in the subject landscape). MCA-I will work with the Bupati to organize and hold this meeting. Convene Sub district VBS/CM Planning Meeting at sub district capital to explain VBS/CM (attendees: Camat, consultant, Kepala Desa of each village within sub district). The Consultant will work with the Camat to organize and hold this meeting. Establish Village Participation Team (VPT) representing each village within the sub district. The Camat will work directly with the Kepala Desa and in collaboration with the Consultant to establish this team. MCA-I will oversee the process of establish of the VPT. Technical Approach MCA Method Meeting Deliverable Minute of Meeting Implementation Responsibility MCA-I GP PLUP Share Responsibility Place Gov/Bappeda Province Office Bupati Office

2

3

1. Regulation of MoHA 27/2006 & 28/2006 2. GP PLUP VBS/VM GP PLUP VBS/VM

Meeting

Decree of Bupati

Governance Unit of Bupati MCA-I

MCA

Convene

Minute (reports)

-

Bupati Office

4

GP PLUP VBS/VM

Convene

Minute (reports)

Consultant

Camat & Kepala Desa

Sub District Place

5

Basic and Principle of GP PLUP VBS/VM

Workshop

6

Compile Existing Information including maps of concessions, licenses, permits, land tenure, cadastral maps, spatial plans, land cover/use and land disputes

7

Compile Landscape VBS/CM Base Map in GIS format and prepare hard copy maps for use at various meetings, workshops and public expositions

8

9

10

Convene 1st Landscape VBS/CM Workshop at Bupati Office (attendees: Bupati, Consultant and all Camats and VPTs within the sub district). The Consultant will work with the Bupati and the Camat to organize and hold this Workshop including a technical training to Village Participation Team, in the form of basic training to brief and confirm technicalities before and during the field work. Convene Village VBS/CM Technical Meeting(s) in each village using VBS/CM Base Map to initially ‘determine’ boundaries cartometrically and identify critical natural and cultural resources areas to be mapped. It is expected that there will need to be a series of technical meetings depending on the complexity of the situation in the village. The Consultant will work with the VPTs to organize and hold these meetings. Compile/Collect Boundary and Resource Data, through office research, interviews and field visits as needed to refine and adjust boundaries and to map resource areas (field data will be captured on-site with GNSS receivers and other

1. Fundamental of GIS, GPS, GNSS, UAS 2. Law 4/2011, BIG 3. Gov Reg (PP) 8/2013, accuracy of spatial planning map 4. Gov Reg (PP) 62/2013, Badan Pertanahan Nasional (BPN) 5. RTRWN, RTRW Province, RTRW Kabupaten, MoF 1. Fundamental of GIS, GPS, GNSS, UAS 2. Law 4/2011, BIG 3. Gov Reg (PP) 8/2013, Accuracy of Spatial Planning Map 4. Gov Reg (PP) 62/2013, Badan Pertanahan Nasional (BPN) GP PLUP PVBS/VM, GPS, GNSS, UAS, Regulation/Law ; of MoHA, BIG, BPN, Spatial Plan

Workshop

Minute (reports); Sub groups of : (i) boundary setting and mapping (ii) community research; (iii) dispute mediation Softfile Spatial Data, Image Satellite, GIS database

Camat

Camat & Kepala Desa

Village/BPD Office

Consultant

-

Consultant Office/ Workshop

Workshop

Hardcopy map

Consultant

-

Consultant Office/ Workshop

Convene

Modul Technical Training For VPT

Consultant

Bupati, Camat & VPT

Bupati Office

GP PLUP PVBS/VM, GPS, GNSS, UAS, Regulation/Law of MoHA

Convene

Technical Base Map of VBS/VM/Field

Consultant

VPT

Village/BPD Office

GP PLUP PVBS/VM, GPS, GNSS, UAS, Regulation/Law of MoHA

Field Work/ Office/Workshop

Field Data

Consultant

VPT

Consultant Office/Field/ Village

11

12

13

14

survey instruments including the use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to collect high-resolution georeference images and map areas of critical natural and cultural resources13). The Consultant will be responsible for training the VPT to support the collection of the data, the role of the Facilitators and Technicians is critical in these step to guide and assist the VPT. Identification and mediation of disputes, it is expected that various types of landbased disputes may be identified as part of the VBS/CM process, in particular during the field work step. These disputes will be identified categorized and geographically located (geolocated) and a process for willingness based mediation should be used to resolve dispute when and where possible. The role of the VPT is important in assisting the parties to the dispute to resolve the issue and also to provide community acknowledgment of the willingness of the parties and the legitimacy of the proc ess. Arrange and Convene Public Exposition of VBS/CM Results, this exposition should include one public meeting and at minimum 14 days of public review and comment. The Consultant will work in collaboration with the Kepala Desa to determine the appropriate location within the village for posting the results and for accommodating the villagers during their review of the results. Convene 2nd Landscape VBS/CM Workshop with all VPTs to review results from each village and achieve consensus at the landscape level or identify areas to be confirmed in the field (attendees: Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee, Camats and VPTs) Finalize fieldwork to affirm boundaries and place markers at boundary limits. This work will be done with the support of the VPTs. Prepare final Minutes of VBS/CM Activity Report in each village and for the sub district (including: description of process, village history, geographic coordinates of boundary markers, maps, imagery and GIS database etc. as defined in the GP PLUP VBS/CM Guidelines Verification of Consultant Deliverable, in accordance with GP PLUP VBS/CM Guidelines

GP PLUP PVBS/VM, GPS, GNSS, UAS, Regulation/Law of MoHA

Field Work/ Mediation

Field data

Consultant

VPT

Consultant Office/Field/ Village

GP PLUP PVBS/VM, GPS, GNSS, UAS, Regulation/Law of MoHA

Public Convene

Minutes (Result) each village

Consultant

Kepala Desa

Village/BPD Office

GP PLUP PVBS/VM, GPS, GNSS, UAS, Regulation/Law of MoHA

Convene

GP PLUP PVBS/VM, GPS, GNSS, UAS, Regulation/Law of MoHA GP PLUP PVBS/VM, GPS, GNSS, UAS, Regulation/Law of MoHA

Workshop/Field Work Workshop

22 Minutes (Result) of VBS/CM of Muaro Jambi District and Mamasa Minutes (Result)

Consultant

VPT

Sub District Office

Consultant

VPT

15

Final Minutes of VBS/CM (22 Village#Phase 1) General Deliverables, Specific Deliverables, Specific product.

Consultant

-

Consultant Office/Field/ Village Consultant Office/ Workshop MCA Office

16

-

Meeting

17

Final Review and Approval of VBS/CM Activity Report

-

Meeting

General Deliverables, Specific Deliverables, Specific product. Specific product

Delivery of Final VBSCM Activity Report and GIS databases to Kepala Desa of each village Sources: TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014 18

-

Public Meeting

MCA-I GP PLUP (with assistance of external quality control/supervision consultant(s) if needed) Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee MCA-I GP PLUP

Consultant

Bupati

MCA Office

-

Village/BPD Office

Methodology Green Prosperity Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP) Village Boundary Setting/Community Mapping (Phase 1)
3 week Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Stage 5 5 week Stage 6 Stage 7 Stage 8 Stage 9 Stage 10 Stage 11 5 week Stage 12 Stage 13 Stage 14 Stage 15 Stage 16 3 week Stage 17 Stages 18

Preparation

Determine Landscape/Sub districts within approved District

Establish Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee of District

Process and Guidelines, responsibilities VBS/CM Planning

Activity

VBS/CM Planning Meeting

Establish Village Participation Team (VPT)

Compile Existing Information

Compile Landscape VBS/CM Base Map

Convene 1st Landscape VBS/CM Workshop

Convene Village VBS/CM Technical Meeting(s)

Compile/Collect Boundary and Resource Data

Identification and mediation of disputes

Arrange and Convene Public Exposition of VBS/CM Results

Convene 2nd Landscape VBS/CM Workshop

Finalize fieldwork to affirm boundaries and place markers

Prepare final Minutes of VBS/CM Activity Report

Verification of Consultant Deliverable

Final Review and Approval of VBS/CM Activity Report

Delivery of Final VBSCM Activity Report and GIS

Location (sub District) Consultant Office Method: Meeting Attendes: 1. Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee 2. Camat (s) 3. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district Meeting Meeting Convene Convene workshop workshop workshop Convene Convene Field Field Convene Convene Workshop Workshop Meeting Meeting Public Meeting Main City Of Province Main City of District Main City of District Sub district of Berbak Landscape (12 Village), Muaro Jambi District Consultant Office Sub district of Sumarorang – Pana (10 village), Mamasa District MCA Office Main City of District Main Sub District

Expert (s) each group (district)

Gov/Bappeda Province

Gov Unit of Bupati

1. 2. 3. 4.

Bupati Official Bappeda BPN Camat Each District

1. Camat 2. Kepala Desa

1. Camat 2. Kepala Desa

Expert (s)/consultatnt

Expert (s) / consultant

1. Bupati 2. Camat (s) 3. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

1. Expert (s)/consultant 2. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

1. Expert (s)/Consultant 2. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

1. Experts/Consultant 2. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

1. Experts/Consultant 2. Camat (s) 3. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

Experts/Consultant

Experts/Consultant MCA-I GP PLUP Committee of VDD Kepala Desa dan Camat

Result: 1. VPT and 3 sub Committes; 2. Boundary setting and mapping 3. Community research 4. Dispute mediation Existing map with layering data (concessions, licences, permits, etc)

Knowledge of GP PLUP PVBS/CM

1. Landscape/Subd istricts within approved District 2. Geographic Location and Extented

Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee

Understanding of VBS/CM and work plan.

Understanding of VBS/CM

Hard copy maps for various meeting

VBS/CM Workshop Technical training for VPT(s)

VBS/CM Workshop Technical training for VPT(s) using base map

Data Field/GNSS/ Resolving/mediation

Data Field/GNSS/ Resolving/mediation

Review and coments

Review and Consesnsus

Affirmed boundary for each village

Deliberables

Deliberables

Deliberables

Deliberables

Responsibility (and Share): MCA-PLUP M Team Consultant/ Gov Unit of Bupati Bupati & MCA KTWT KTWT & Camat KTWT KTWT KTWT KTWT Consultant/ Consultant/ Consultant/ Consultant/ Consultant/ Consultant/ KTWT & VPT (s) Consultant/ KTWT & VPT (s) Consultant/KTWT & VPT (s) Consultant/ KTWT Consultant/ KTWT Consultant/ MCA-I GP PLUP KTWT Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee

Consultant

MCA-PLUP M Team

Deliverables 1. Operation Manual VBS/CM Process 2. Detail Analysis of Cost 3. Final VBS/CM Minutes (reports) of each village 4. Hard copy maps 5. GIS Databases 1. Final VBS/CM Minutes (reports) of each village 2. Hard copy maps 3. GIS Databases

Inception Report

Advance Report

Monthly Report

Monthly Report

Monthly Report

Monthly Report

Sources: TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014

Methodology Green Prosperity Participatory Land Use Planning (PLUP) Village Boundary Setting/Community Mapping (Phase 2)
7 week Stage 5 Stage 6 Stage 7 Stage 8 Stage 9 Stage 10 Stage 11 7 week Stage 12 Stage 13 Stage 14 Stage 15 Stage 16 2 Week Stage 17 Stages 18

Activity

Establish Village Participation Team (VPT)

Compile Existing Information

Compile Landscape VBS/CM Base Map

Convene 1st Landscape VBS/CM Workshop

Convene Village VBS/CM Technical Meeting(s)

Compile/Collect Boundary and Resource Data

Identification and mediation of disputes

Arrange and Convene Public Exposition of VBS/CM Results

Convene 2nd Landscape VBS/CM Workshop

Finalize fieldwork to affirm boundaries and place markers

Prepare final Minutes of VBS/CM Activity Report

Verification of Consultant Deliverable

Final Review and Approval of VBS/CM Activity Report

Delivery of Final VBSCM Activity Report and GIS

Location (sub District) Sub district of Sungai Tenang Landscape (12 Village), Merangin District Sub district of Bonehau – Kalumpang (22 village), Mamuju District Sub district of Mambi Bambang (12 village), Mamasa District Method: workshop Attendes: 1. Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee 2. Camat (s) 3. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district workshop workshop Convene Convene Field Field Convene Convene Workshop Workshop Meeting Meeting Public Meeting Consultant Office MCA Office Main City of District Main Sub District

1. Camat 2. Kepala Desa

Expert (s)/consultatnt

Expert (s) / consultant

1. Bupati 2. Camat (s) 3. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

1. Expert (s)/consultant 2. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

1. Expert (s)/Consultant 2. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

1. Experts/Consultant 2. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

1. Experts/Consultant 2. Camat (s) 3. VPT + 3 sub committes each of sub district

Experts/Consultant

Experts/Consultant MCA-I GP PLUP Committee of VDD Kepala Desa dan Camat

Result: 1. VPT and 3 sub Committes; 2. Boundary setting and mapping 3. Community research 4. Dispute mediation Responsibility (and Share): Consultant/ KTWT & Camat Deliverables 1. Final VBS/CM Minutes (reports) of each village 2. Hard copy maps 3. GIS Databases Final Report Monthly Report Monthly Report Monthly Report Monthly Report Consultant/ KTWT Consultant/ KTWT Consultant/ KTWT Consultant/ KTWT Consultant/ KTWT & VPT (s) Consultant/ KTWT & VPT (s) Consultant/KTWT & VPT (s) Consultant/ KTWT Consultant/ KTWT Consultant/ MCA-I GP PLUP KTWT Village Delineation and Demarcation Committee Existing map with layering data (concessions, licences, permits, etc)

Hard copy maps for various meeting

VBS/CM Workshop Technical training for VPT(s)

VBS/CM Workshop Technical training for VPT(s) using base map

Data Field/GNSS/ Resolving/mediation

Data Field/GNSS/ Resolving/mediation

Review and coments

Review and Consesnsus

Affirmed boundary for each village

Deliberables

Deliberables

Deliberables

Deliberables

MCA-PLUP M Team

Sources: TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014 Note: as presented in the terms of reference on page 125 that It has been estimated that the pre-field of office work, field work and post processing of data fields and reporting aspect of the participatory VBS / CM process can be completed in six calendar months.

C. 1.1.

Operational Structure PVBS/CM as described in the terms of reference on page 120, there are four groups of actors representing the various stakeholders from the village community to the local and national government and private sector Including service providers (consultants). These are, from the community level up: (i) the Village Participation Teams (VPT); (ii) the District of Technical Working Team (Consultant); (iii) the delineation and demarcation Village District Committee; and the (iv) the MCA-Indonesia PLUP Management Team. District Village Boundary Delineation and Demarcation Committee. District Village Boundary Delineation and Demarcation Committee is a requirement of the Ministry of Home Affairs regulation 27 & 28 of 2006. As stipulated in the regulations, this Committee should be comprised of representatives of the following government offices: 1. Office of Governance Assistant 1 of the Local Secretariat – serves as Chair of the Committee 2. Community Empowerment and Village Governance Agency; 3. Bappeda 4. Land Office of BPN 5. Public Works Department 6. Ministry of Forestry 7. Property and Building Tax Office 8. Spatial Planning Department 9. City Planning Department 10. Village heads (Kepala Desa) 11. Kecamatan Heads (Camat) As stipulated by MOHA Regulation 27/2006, this Committee is established by Surat Keputusan / SK Bupati (a decree of the District Head) in which the sub districts (kecamatans) and villages fall. The MCA-I PLUP Management Team, working in close collaboration with the Assistant I of each District, is responsible to ensure that the required local Bupati Regulation (Peraturan Bupati) is prepared and approved. An agreed Bupati Regulation is a requirement for initiating the participatory VBS/CM process in the District. The individual members of the Committee are proposed to the Bupati by the relevant local government work unit (SKPD) in charge of village boundary setting and will preside during the full period of participatory VBS/CM process, from planning to final agreement and approval of the Bupati. The Committee has the following tasks: 1. Working with MCA-I PLUP Management Team to plan and coordinate the implementation of participatory village boundary delineation and demarcation; 2. Performing technical/field supervision of village boundary demarcation; 3. Dissemination of village boundary delineation and demarcation information; 4. Proposing a budget plan and funding from the Bupati or regional government for implementation of the activities the Committee is responsible for; 5. Providing written regulations and any other legal documents related to existing village boundaries; 6. Reviewing the written regulations and any other legal sources to determine the provisional boundary lines for the map; and

I. 1.1.

1.2.

1.3.

7. Reporting all activities in village boundary delineation and demarcation to the Bupati, copied to the Provincial Governor.

BPMD (Badan Pemberdayaan Masyarakat dan Pemerintah Desa)

Head of Sub District (Camat)

Head of Village (Kepala Desa)

Chair Of Committee (Asisten 1 Bidang Pemerintah/Sekretaris Daerah)

Department of City Planning

Bappeda Kabupaten

Kantor Pertanahan (BPN)

Departement of Public Works

Departement of Forestry

Kantor Pelayanan Pajak Bumi dan Bangunan (Property and Building TAx Office)

Department of Spatial Plann

Figure of District Village Boundary Delineation and Demarcation Committee Source : TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014

II. 1.4.

Village Participation Team (VPT). The VPT is to be established in each village to both promote the active participation of the villagers and to ensure villagers have ownership in the final results of the VBS/CM

1.5.

1.6.

process. Specifically the VPT will serve as a liaison between the community and the Consultant contracted by MCA-I (Kecamatan Technical Working Team). Working in collaboration among the Consultant, the Camat and the Kepala Desa of each village, the VPT will be established under the authority of the Bupati and will be comprised of up-to eight members: (i) representative of the Kepala Desa; (ii) a representative of women’s organizations; (iii) a representative from the business community; (iv) a representative of the farmer organization; (v) a representative of the ADAT (or customary) community (if one exists in the region); (vi) a representative of the religious community; (vii) a representative from youth organizations; and (viii) a representative of the Camat. In the case of the organizational or association representatives, the organization themselves will be responsible for nominating the individuals. The Kepala Desa and Camat representatives will be appointed by the corresponding official. Given the nature of the work required, the individuals selected to form the VPT must be literate, have good numeric skills and be able to communicate with the various segments of the community. The VPT is established at a village meeting held specifically for this purpose and organized by the Village Consultative Body (Badan Permusyawaratan Desa -BPD) and the village government, and the VPT is stipulated by a formal decree of the Kepala Desa. The main tasks of the three working groups of the VPT are: 1. Working with MCA-I PLUP Management and the Kecamatan Technical Working Team to plan, coordinate and report on the implementation of participatory village boundary delineation and demarcation; 2. Provide initial or existing information and data related to village boundaries to the Kecamatan Technical Working Team; 3. Performing office and field based technical tasks in the participatory VBS/CM process; 4. Communicate and liaison activity to local stakeholders within village and with neighboring villages, including meeting arrangement; 5. In general, represent the village in the participatory VBS/CM process; 6. Develop and maintain good dynamics within the community and with adjacent communities in order to facilitate both the social and technical aspects of the VBS/CM activities at the village level; 7. Collect evidence of village territorial claims to be presented at workshops and meetings with neighboring villages in the sub district; 8. Actively canvas the members of the organizations or associations they represent to gather information and opinions which they bring to the attention of the VPT; 9. Attend and actively participate in the various planning workshops and technical meetings held at the sub district and village level; 10. Participate in the office-based identification, discussion, determination and location of village boundaries as well as critical cultural and natural resource areas within the village; 11. With the help of the specialists of the Kecamatan Technical Working Team, review maps and satellite imagery, and prepare maps, sketches and diagrams to guide field work and data collection efforts; 12. Participate in training sessions to learn the use of surveying and mapping equipment to collect geographic information;

13. Actively participate in the field-level collection of geographic information on boundaries, cultural and natural resource areas as identified by the VPT; 14. With the help of the Kecamatan Technical Working Team, compile information from verbal interviews and written records about the history of the village along with evidence of the village boundary claims. Additionally, specific information on land use and resource use by women is to be collected and geolocated; and 15. Participate, as needed, in the mediation of land-based disputes especially as related to boundaries between villages.

VPT Leader

Sub Committees 1. Boundary setting and mapping

Sub Committees 2. Community Research

Sub Committees 3. Dispute mediation

Figure of Village Participation Team (VPT) each village Source : TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014, VPT stipulated by a formal decree of Kepala Desa

III. 1.1.

Consultant and Kecamatan Technical Working Team The Kecamatan Technical Working Team is a team comprised of technical specialists with administrative and operational support intended to provide assistance to the Bupatis and the village communities to complete the technical aspects of the village boundary setting and community mapping in both a technically rigorous and participatory manner. Consultant will be responsible to field four Technical Working Teams, one for the subdistrict of Sungai Tenang in Merangin, one for Kumpeh sub-district in Muaro Jambi, one for Bonehau-Kalumpang sub-districts and one for the sub-districts of MambiBambang and Sumarorong-Pana in Mamasa. Given the phasing of the work as described in term of reference at Section 2, it is anticipated that once Phase One is completed, team members could be deployed to the remaining Districts/Landscapes. Consultant will provide a team consisting of a Project Director/Chief of Party and a Land Use and Tenure Advisor for responsible for overall planning and coordination and provide technical guidance and assistance to each of these teams. The Kecamatan Technical Working Team is comprised of, at minimum, the following specialists and support staff: 1. VBS/CM Field Team Leader

1.2.

1.3.

1.4.

1.5.

1.6.

2. Cartographer/GIS Specialist 3. Surveyor 4. Survey and Mapping Technician(s) 5. Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist 6. Social and Communications Facilitator(s) 7. Administrative and Operational Support Staff 8. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Surveyor Figure below presents a conceptual organization of the Kecamatan Technical Working Team. In each team, the VBS/CM Field Team Leader will be supported by one Cartographer/GIS Specialist, one Surveyor, one Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist and one Unmanned Aerial Systems Surveyor. Determining the number of administrative and operational support staff and mapping and surveying technicians and social and communications facilitators that will be needed, consultant will provide the personnel. As describe on the term of reference page 125, estimated that the pre-field office work, field work and post field data processing and reporting aspect of the participatory VBS/CM process can be completed in six calendar months. Given the planning, data compilation and mapping tasks required, it is estimated that the VBS/CM Field Team Leader and the Cartographer/GIS Specialist may require additional level of effort.

1. Project Director/Chief Of Party, Land Use and Tenure Adviser

2. Kecamatan Technical Working Team of Disrict Muaro Jambi

2. Kecamatan Technical Working Team of Disrict Merangin

2. Kecamatan Technical Working Team of Disrict Mamasa

2. Kecamatan Technical Working Team of Disrict Mamuju

Location : Sub District of Berbak Landscape (12 Village)

Location : Sub District of Sungai Tenang Landscape (12 Village)

Location : Sub District of Sumarorang - Pana (10 Village)

Location : Sub District of Bonehau Kalumpang (22 Village)

Location : Sub District of Mambi Bambang (12 Village)

Scheme of General Operational Structure Source : TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014. number 2 above figure KTWT, related to the scheme under

6 Month

2 Month
Scheme Duration of VBS/CM Process in 4 Districts Source : TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014

8 Month

1. 6 Month = pre-field office work, field work and post field data processing and reporting aspect of the participatory VBS/CM process. 2. 2 Month = Administrative, Meeting Under MCA, Review/Adjustment, Finalizing Minutes (Report). 1.7. The Kecamatan Technical Working Teams are responsible for providing the full range of planning, coordination, facilitation and communication, document preparation and reporting and technical consulting services to implement participatory VBS/CM in the aforementioned geographic areas, these include: 1. Operationally plan and coordinate with MCA-I, national and local government entities and village leaders the implementation of the eighteen step MCA-I GP PLUP participatory VBS/CM process in the geographic areas; 2. Specifically, coordinate and lead a series of technical meetings and workshops with national and local government representatives, local elected officials and villagers at the district, sub-district and village level in the geographic areas; 3. Compile existing documents on land use, land tenure, permits and licenses, geographic data, maps and remotely sensed imagery and acquire new data as needed to produce a 1:10,000 scale base map and GIS data bases of the geographic areas; 4. Provide a team of professionals and technicians who will be responsible to: (i) organize and convene a series of planning meetings and technical workshops in the identified geographic areas; (ii) train a team of villagers, up to eight in each village identified, in the use of maps and remotely sensed imagery, (iii) lead this team in gender inclusive participatory workshops aimed at the delineation of village boundaries and the identification of critical natural and cultural resource areas, (iv) plan field-survey campaigns and accompany this team in the field-based collection of geographic data related to village boundaries and critical natural and cultural resources using modern surveying, mapping and aerial imaging technologies (v) process office and field data and compile GIS databases of the information collected at the village, sub district and landscape levels; (vi) identify and assist in the mediation of land use and land tenure disputes; (vii) arrange and convene public expositions of results of the participatory VBS/CM process in each village; (viii) make final modifications to fieldwork and assist local government representatives in placing village boundary markers in the field; and (ix) prepare a Technical Report of the participatory VBS/CM activity in the various villages of the selected geographic area.

5. Work with MCA-I during the pilot exercise to identify constraints and bottlenecks of the participatory VBS/CM process which are risks to the successful implementation of the process, make recommendations for adjustments and alternatives to the process and, in agreement with MCA-I, test the implementation of these adjustments and alternatives; 6. Report on the results of the participatory VBS/CM activities including lessons learned with the implementation of the eighteen general VBS/CM tasks, discussion of problems encountered and recommendations on how to modify the process to increase its effectiveness, efficiency, overall participation and acceptance by government and villagers of the final result; 7. Reporting all activities in participatory VBS/CM to the Camat, copied to the Bupati; 8. Reporting on progress of works to MCA-I by providing operational data in line with the PLUP monitoring indicators in the Indonesia Compact Monitoring & Evaluation Plan. These indicators will draw on operational records from the consultants, and track output such as: number of stakeholders (in particular members of the VPTs) trained, number of villages assisted in determining village boundaries; and area of land mapped. 9. Prepare a written Operations Manual for the full participatory VBS/CM process, including organization of meetings and workshops, information dissemination and communications, pre and post field data collection and processing, field operations procedures, public exposition of results, public exposition of results and modifications, mapping and GIS database and preparation of final minutes and reports of participatory VBS/CM process; and, 10. Complete a detailed analysis of costs related to implementation of the participatory VBS/CM process. IV. 1.1. The Project Director/Chief of Party, Land Use and Tenure Adviser The Project Director/Chief of Party, Land Use and Tenure Adviser are not considered a direct part of the individual Kecamatan Technical Working Teams but rather are responsible for overall planning and coordination and provide technical guidance and assistance to each of these teams.

2. KTWT/Consultant. Team Leader of VBS/CM Field

Administration and Operations Support Staff

Cartographer/GIS Specialist

Community Liasion/Coordination Specialist

Surveyor

Social and communications facilitator (s)

Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Surveyor

Mapping and Survey Technician (s)

Scheme of Kecamatan Technical Working Team (KTWT)/(Consultant Team) each district Source : TOR & AOGA Expert, 2014

Chapter 2 Work Plan
A. 1.1. 1.2. Programe accordance with the terms of reference, that the plup P VBS / CM, there are 18 stages of implementation. as described in the section above. Consultant will establish offices in the Districts assigned (Merangin, Muaro Jambi, Mamuju and Mamasa) for the full duration of the performance of work in the associated areas. KTWT the consultant team will be placed in each district and will work well according to the phase of work. in the work plan, in accordance with the directions on the TOR the progress of the work will be delivered on a monthly basis (%). the consultant understands that there are three important groups in the 18 stages of the work. The first is the role of the MCA-I GP PLUP PVBS /CM role in the early stages, stage monitor in the mid and late stages. The second is the role of the boundary committee formed by the Bupati who will coordinate with the VPT group (s) in collaboration with consultants. The latter is the role of the consultant (KTWT) which dominates in the fourth stage to the final stage. in the table below can be seen on the activities of the 18 stages of phase 1 and phase 2 with each of the time taken in completion. consultants realize that this process improvement will be done after the test done in the first phase for 4 months.

1.3. 1.4. 1.5.

1.6.

B. 1.7.

Duration, Logistics and Safety The duration of the work is estimated at eight months. The Consultant’s primary place of performance will be Indonesia in the provinces of Jambi and West Sulawesi. As mentioned previously, the vast majority of this work will be performed in the District, sub-districts and villages selected these are: Sungai Tenang Landscape in the District of Merangin and Berbak Landscape in the District of Muaro Jambi, Province of Jambi on the Island of Sumatra and the Bonehau-Kalumpang Landscape in the District of Mamuju, the Mambi-Bambang Landscape and Sumarorong-Pana Landscape in the District of Mamasa Province of West Sulawesi on the Island of Sulawesi. As describe on TOR page 136, because each of the geographic areas selected is considered rural and in some cases remote. Transport on local roads is difficult and facilities for lodging and provisions are limited. Frequent air travel will be required between Jakarta and the selected Districts and by road within the Districts and between the villages. Much of the surveying and mapping work needed to accomplish village boundary setting and demarcation will need to be done by foot oftentimes in rough terrain and, in some cases, by boat. So, Coordination, availability and use of transport fully responsibility of consultant. Due to the duration of engagement as well as the intensive field-based activity required, challenging terrain and communications and continuous movement of personnel, safety of personnel and equipment is considered to be an important aspect associated with the provision of the Services. Consultant will develop and maintain a safety management plan that appropriately treats the relevant logistic and safety factors. Furthermore, safety

1.8.

1.9.

incidents will be documented and reporting to MCA-I and for the formulation of improved risk mitigation measures.

Work Plan Of GP PLUP Participatory VBS/CM (1st Phase) No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 1 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 2 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 3 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 4 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

0 1

2

Administration and Team Mobilitation Administration, Office Establish and Team Mobilitation  Determine Landscape/Sub districts within approved District District of Muaro Jambi, District of Mamasa, District of Merangin, and District of Mamuju  Establish Village Delineation and Demarcation (VDD) Committee of District 1. Bupati Decree of Muaro Jambi District  2. Bupati Decree of Mamasa District  3. Bupati Decree of Merangin District  4. Bupati Decree of Mamuju District  5. Consultant Involved  Process and Guidelines, responsibilities VBS/CM Planning 1. Member of VDD Committee District of Muaro Jambi 2. Member of VDD Committee District of Mamasa 3. Member of VDD Committee District of Merangin 4. Member of VDD Committee District of Mamuju 5. Consultant VBS/CM Planning Meeting 1. Sub District Leader (Camat) of Berbak Landscape + 12 Village Leader 2. Sub District Leader (Camat) of Sumarorang - Pana + 10 Village Leader 3. Sub District Leader (Camat) of Sungai Tenang Landscape + 12 Village Leader 4. Sub District Leader (Camat) of Bonehau Kalumpang + 22 Village Leader 5. Sub District Leader (Camat) of Mambi - Bambang + 12 Village Leader Establish Village Participation Team (VPT) Sub District of Berbak Landscape: 1. Decree of Kepala Desa of Seponjen Village 2. Decree of Kepala Desa of Sungai Bungur Village 3. Decree of Kepala Desa of Petanang Village 4. Decree of Kepala Desa of Sungai Aur Village 5. Decree of Kepala Desa of Kelurahan Tanjung 6. Decree of Kepala Desa of Pulau Mentaro Village 7. Decree of Kepala Desa of Betung Village 8. Decree of Kepala Desa of Gedong Karya 9. Decree of Kepala Desa of Pematang Raman 10. Decree of Kepala Desa of Puding 11. Decree of Kepala Desa of Jebus 12. Decree of Kepala Desa of Sogo Sub District of Sumarorang: 13. Decree of Kepala Desa of Batang Guru 14. Decree of Kepala Desa of Rate Kamase 15. Decree of Kepala Desa of Batangguru Timur 16. Decree of Kepala Desa of Banea 17. Decree of Kepala Desa of Sibanawa     

3

4

    

5

                

                

                

                

                

                

                

                

                

                

No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 1 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 2 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 3 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 4 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

6

7 8 9

10

18. Decree of Kepala Desa of Tabone 19. Decree of Kepala Desa of Tadisi Sub District of Pana: 20. Decree of Kepala Desa of Datu Baringan 21. Decree of Kepala Desa of Pana 22. Decree of Kepala Desa of Panura Compile Existing Information 1. Map of Concession 2. Licences, permits, land tenure, cadastral map 3. Spatial plans, land cover/use and land disputes Compile Landscape VBS/CM Base Map Prepare Base Map In Hardcopy for various needs Convene 1st Landscape VBS/CM Workshop Technical Training of VPT(s) Convene Village VBS/CM Technical Meeting(s) Initial ‘determine’boundary, etc using VBS/CM Base Map Sub District of Berbak Landscape: 1. Seponjen Village 2. Sungai Bungur Village 3. Petanang Village 4. Sungai Aur Village 5. Kelurahan Tanjung 6. Pulau Mentaro Village 7. Betung Village 8. Gedong Karya 9. Pematang Raman 10. Puding 11. Jebus 12. Sogo Sub District of Sumarorang: 13. Batang Guru 14. Rate Kamase 15. Batangguru Timur 16. Banea 17. Sibanawa 18. Tabone 19. Tadisi Sub District of Pana: 20. Datu Baringan 21. Pana 22. Panura Compile/Collect Boundary and Resource Data Sub District of Berbak Landscape: 1. Seponjen Village 2. Sungai Bungur Village 3. Petanang Village 4. Sungai Aur Village 5. Kelurahan Tanjung

              

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

                     

                     

                     

                     

                     

                     

                     

                     

                     

                     

    

    

              

    

    

    

    

    

No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 1 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 2 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 3 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 4 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

11

12

13

6. Pulau Mentaro Village 7. Betung Village 8. Gedong Karya 9. Pematang Raman 10. Puding 11. Jebus 12. Sogo Sub District of Sumarorang: 13. Batang Guru 14. Rate Kamase 15. Batangguru Timur 16. Banea 17. Sibanawa 18. Tabone 19. Tadisi Sub District of Pana: 20. Datu Baringan 21. Pana 22. Panura Identification and mediation of disputes 1. Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. Sub District of Sumarorang 3. Sub District of Pana Arrange and Convene Public Exposition of VBS/CM Results 1. Appropriate location in village, Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. Appropriate location in village, Sub District of Sumarorang 3. Appropriate location in village, Sub District of Pana Convene 2nd Landscape VBS/CM Workshop 1. Review results from each village and achieve consensus, Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. Review results from each village and achieve consensus, Sub District of Sumarorang 3. Review results from each village and achieve consensus, Sub District of Pana Finalize fieldwork to affirm boundaries and place markers 1. Affirmed boundary of 12 Village, Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. Affirmed boundary of 7 Village, Sub District of Sumarorang 3. Affirmed boundary of 3 Village, Sub District of Pana Prepare final Minutes of VBS/CM Activity Report Specific Product as describe in TOR on page 138; 1. 12 Village, Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. 7 Village, Sub District of Sumarorang 3. 3 Village, Sub District of Pana Verification of Consultant Deliverable General Deliverables:  1. Inception Report

                

                

      

      

      

                   

                                       

                

                

                                      

Review and comments in 14 days  Review and comments in 14 days Review and comments in 14 days

  

  

  

                                 

14

15

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

16





No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 1 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 2 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 3 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 4 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

17

18

19

2. Advance Report Specific Deliverables: 1. Operations Manual for the Implementation of the Participatory VBS/CM Process 2. Detailed analysis of costs Specific Products, as describe in TOR on page 138:  1. 12 Village, Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. 7 Village, Sub District of Sumarorang 3. 3 Village, Sub District of Pana Final Review and Approval of VBS/CM Activity Report 1. 12 Village, Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. 7 Village, Sub District of Sumarorang 3. 3 Village, Sub District of Pana Delivery of Final VBSCM Activity Report and GIS 1. 12 Village, Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. 7 Village, Sub District of Sumarorang 3. 3 Village, Sub District of Pana Deliverable Submission ; General Deliverables: 1. Inception Report 2. Advance Report 3. Monthly Report Specific Deliverables: 1. Operations Manual for the Implementation of the Participatory VBS/CM Process 2. Detailed analysis of costs Specific Products, as describe in TOR on page 138:  1. 12 Village, Sub District of Berbak Landscape 2. 7 Village, Sub District of Sumarorang 3. 3 Village, Sub District of Pana

     

           

           

           

    

  

   

       

    

    

   

Source : TOR, Analysis and Develop, AOGA Expert, 2014

Work Plan Of GP PLUP Participatory VBS/CM (2nd Phase) No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 5 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 6 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 7 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 8 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

5

Establish Village Participation Team (VPT) Sub District of Sungai Tenang Landscape: 1. Decree of Kepala Desa of Pematang Pauh Village 2. Decree of Kepala Desa of Beringin Tinggi Village 3. Decree of Kepala Desa of Tanjung Benuang Village 4. Decree of Kepala Desa of Gedang Village 5. Decree of Kepala Desa of Rantau Suli Tanjung 6. Decree of Kepala Desa of Talang Tembaga Village 7. Decree of Kepala Desa of Baru 8. Decree of Kepala Desa of Tanjung Mudo 9. Decree of Kepala Desa of Koto Teguh 10. Decree of Kepala Desa of Jangkat 11. Decree of Kepala Desa of Koto Baru 12. Decree of Kepala Desa of Tanjung Alam Sub District of Mambi Bambang: 1. Decree of Kepala Desa of Masoso 2. Decree of Kepala Desa of Rantetarima 3. Decree of Kepala Desa of Rantelemo 4. Decree of Kepala Desa of Saludengen 5. Decree of Kepala Desa of Salukadi 6. Decree of Kepala Desa of Salururu 7. Decree of Kepala Desa of Salutabang 8. Decree of Kepala Desa of Ulumambi Barat 9. Decree of Kepala Desa of Lembangmokallang 10. Decree of Kepala Desa of Sikamase 11. Decree of Kepala Desa of Ulumambi 12. Decree of Kepala Desa of Limbadebata Sub District of Bonehau: 1. Decree of Kepala Desa of Tamalea 2. Decree of Kepala Desa of Lumika 3. Decree of Kepala Desa of Hinua 4. Decree of Kepala Desa of Kinantang 5. Decree of Kepala Desa of Salutiwo 6. Decree of Kepala Desa of Banuada 7. Decree of Kepala Desa of Mappu 8. Decree of Kepala Desa of Bonehau 9. Decree of Kepala Desa of Buttuada Sub District of Kalumpang: 1. Decree of Kepala Desa of Makkaliki 2. Decree of Kepala Desa of Polio 3. Decree of Kepala Desa of Limbong 4. Decree of Kepala Desa of Lasa 5. Decree of Kepala Desa of Kalumpang 6. Decree of Kepala Desa of Karama 7. Decree of Kepala Desa of Tumonga 8. Decree of Kepala Desa of Sandapang 9. Decree of Kepala Desa of Karataun

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                         

No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 5 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 6 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 7 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 8 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

6

7 8 9

10. Decree of Kepala Desa of Kondo Bulo 11. Decree of Kepala Desa of Batu Makkada 12. Decree of Kepala Desa of Siraun 13. Decree of Kepala Desa of Salumakki Compile Existing Information 1. Map of Concession 2. Licences, permits, land tenure, cadastral map 3. Spatial plans, land cover/use and land disputes Compile Landscape VBS/CM Base Map Prepare Base Map In Hardcopy for various needs Convene 1st Landscape VBS/CM Workshop Technical Training of VPT(s) Convene Village VBS/CM Technical Meeting(s) Initial ‘determine’boundary, etc using VBS/CM Base Map Sub District of Sungai Tenang Landscape: 1. Pematang Pauh Village 2. Beringin Tinggi Village 3. Tanjung Benuang Village 4. Gedang Village 5. Rantau Suli Tanjung 6. Talang Tembaga Village 7. Baru 8. Tanjung Mudo 9. Koto Teguh 10. Jangkat 11. Koto Baru 12. Tanjung Alam Sub District of Mambi Bambang: 1. Masoso 2. Rantetarima 3. Rantelemo 4. Saludengen 5. Salukadi 6. Salururu 7. Salutabang 8. Ulumambi Barat 9. Lembangmokallang 10. Sikamase 11. Ulumambi 12. Limbadebata Sub District of Bonehau: 1. Tamalea 2. Lumika 3. Hinua 4. Kinantang 5. Salutiwo 6. Banuada 7. Mappu

             

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

                              

                              

                              

                              

                              

                              

                              

                              

                              

                              

No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 5 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 6 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 7 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 8 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

10

8. Bonehau 9. Buttuada Sub District of Kalumpang: 1. Makkaliki 2. Polio 3. Limbong 4. Lasa 5. Kalumpang 6. Karama 7. Tumonga 8. Sandapang 9. Karataun 10. Kondo Bulo 11. Batu Makkada 12. Siraun 13. Salumakki Compile/Collect Boundary and Resource Data Sub District of Sungai Tenang Landscape: 1. Pematang Pauh Village 2. Beringin Tinggi Village 3. Tanjung Benuang Village 4. Gedang Village 5. Rantau Suli Tanjung 6. Talang Tembaga Village 7. Baru 8. Tanjung Mudo 9. Koto Teguh 10. Jangkat 11. Koto Baru 12. Tanjung Alam Sub District of Mambi Bambang: 1. Masoso 2. Rantetarima 3. Rantelemo 4. Saludengen 5. Salukadi 6. Salururu 7. Salutabang 8. Ulumambi Barat 9. Lembangmokallang 10. Sikamase 11. Ulumambi 12. Limbadebata Sub District of Bonehau: 1. Tamalea 2. Lumika 3. Hinua 4. Kinantang

              

              

              

              

              

              

              

              

              

              

                           

                           

                                                                                   

                           

                                                       

                           

                           

No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 5 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 6 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 7 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 8 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

11

12

13

5. Salutiwo 6. Banuada 7. Mappu 8. Bonehau 9. Buttuada Sub District of Kalumpang: 1. Makkaliki 2. Polio 3. Limbong 4. Lasa 5. Kalumpang 6. Karama 7. Tumonga 8. Sandapang 9. Karataun 10. Kondo Bulo 11. Batu Makkada 12. Siraun 13. Salumakki Identification and mediation of disputes 1. Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. Sub District of Bonehau 4. Sub District of Kalumpang Arrange and Convene Public Exposition of VBS/CM Results 1. Appropriate location in village, Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. Appropriate location in village, Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. Appropriate location in village, Sub District of Bonehau 4. Appropriate location in village, Sub District of Kalumpang Convene 2nd Landscape VBS/CM Workshop 1. Review results from each village and achieve consensus, Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. Review results from each village and achieve consensus, Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. Review results from each village and achieve consensus, Sub District of Bonehau 4. Review results from each village and achieve consensus, Sub District of Kalumpang Finalize fieldwork to affirm boundaries and place markers 1. Affirmed boundary of 12 Village, Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. Affirmed boundary of 12 Village, Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. Affirmed boundary of 9 Village, Sub District of Bonehau 4. Affirmed boundary of 13 Village, Sub District of Kalumpang

                 

                 

    

    

    

                     

    

    

    

                 

                                                  

                                                  

Review and comments in 14 days  Review and comments in 14 days Review and comments in 14 days Review and comments in 14 days

   

   

   

                   

14

No
(1)

Task
(2)

Week 1
(3)

Month 5 Week Week 2 3
(4) (5)

Week 4
(6)

Week 5
(7)

Month 6 Week Week 6 7
(8) (9)

Week 8
(10)

Week 9
(11)

Month 7 Week Week 10 11
(12) (13)

Week 12
(14)

Week 13
(15)

Month 8 Week Week 14 15
(16) (17)

Week 16
(18)

Cumulative Work
(19)

Cumulative % Complete
(20)

15

16

17

18

19

Prepare final Minutes of VBS/CM Activity Report Specific Product as describe in TOR on page 138; 1. 12 Village, Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. 12 Village, Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. 9 Village, Sub District of Bonehau 4. 13 Village, Sub District of Kalumpang Verification of Consultant Deliverable General Deliverables:  1. Final Report Specific Products, as describe in TOR on page 138:  1. 12 Village, Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. 12 Village, Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. 9 Village, Sub District of Bonehau 4. 13 Village, Sub District of Kalumpang Final Review and Approval of VBS/CM Activity Report 1. 12 Village, Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. 12 Village, Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. 9 Village, Sub District of Bonehau 4. 13 Village, Sub District of Kalumpang Delivery of Final VBSCM Activity Report and GIS 1. 12 Village, Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. 12 Village, Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. 9 Village, Sub District of Bonehau 4. 13 Village, Sub District of Kalumpang Deliverable Submission ; General Deliverables: 1. Final Report 2. Monthly Report Specific Products, as describe in TOR on page 138:  1. 12 Village, Sub District of Sungai Landscape 2. 12 Village, Sub District of Mambi Bambang 3. 9 Village, Sub District of Bonehau 4. 13 Village, Sub District of Kalumpang

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

    

    

    

            

            

            

        

 

     

     

Source : TOR, Analysis and Develop, AOGA Expert, 2014

Chapter 3 Organization and Staffing
A. 1.1. Organization as already described in the previous chapter, several groups form a coherent unified organization of this work consists of; 1. MCA-I PLUP Management Team 2. District Village Boundary delineation and demarcation Committee 3. Technical Working Sub-District Team 4. Village Participation Team See figure MCA – I PLUP MANAGEMENT TEAM DISTRICT VILLAGE BOUNDARY DELINEATIONA AND DEMARCATION

KECAMATAN TECHNICAL WORKING TEAM (KTWT)

VILLAGE PARTICIPATION TEAM

VILLAGE PARTICIPATION TEAM

VILLAGE PARTICIPATION TEAM

VILLAGE PARTICIPATION TEAM

Figure of Groups involved in Participatory Village Boundary Setting/Community Mapping

Phase 1

KTWT - Sub district of Berbak Landscape, District of Muaro Jambi, Kumpeh

Phase 2

KTWT - sub district of Sungai Tenang Landscape, district of Merangin

Figure of KTWT VBS/CM Deployment

Phase 1

KTWT - Sub District Sumarorang - Pana, District of Mamasa

Phase 2

KTWT - Sub district of Mambi Bambang, District of Mamasa

Figure of KTWT VBS/CM Deployment

Phase 2

KTWT - Sub district of Bonehau Kalumpang, District of Mamuju

Figure of KTWT VBS/CM Deployment

VBS/CM Field Team LEader

Administrative and Operation Support Staff

Cartographer/GIS Specialist

Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist

Surveyor

Social and Communications Facilitator(s)

Mapping and Survey Technician(s)

Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Surveyor Figure Organization of KTWT VBS/CM

B. 1.1.

Staffing in the execution of this work, based on terms of reference. There are several experts including: 1. The Project Director/Chief of Party, Land Use and Tenure Adviser. 2. Administrative and Operations Support Staff 3. VBS/CM Field Team Leaders 4. Cartographer/GIS 5. Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist 6. Social and Communications Facilitator(s) 7. Surveyor 8. Mapping and Surveying Technician(s) 9. Unmanned Aerial Systems Surveyor according to the stage of implementation, the team that worked on the first phase of the district KTWT Muaro Mamasa Jambi and will continue in the second phase. where KTWT Muara Jambi district will handle Merangin. while KTWT Mamasa will handle Bambang Mambi sub district in the same district. and a new KTWT on the second phase is for the district of Mamuju. See tabel below. Staffing Deployment and Duration

1.2.

No

1

2

3

4

KTWT Phase 1 4 month 1. The Project Director/Chief of Party, Land Use and Tenure Adviser. 2. Unmanned Aerial Systems Surveyor KTWT Berbak Landscape, District of Muaro Jambi, Kumpeh (5 Expert): 1. VBS/CM Field Team Leaders 2. Administrative and Operations Support Staff 3. Cartographer/GIS 4. Surveyor 5. Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist 6. Mapping and Surveying Technician KTWT Sumarorang-Pana, District of Mamasa (5 Expert):

Completi on   

KTWT Phase 2 4 Month 1. The Project Director/Chief of Party, Land Use and Tenure Adviser. 2. Unmanned Aerial Systems Surveyor KTWT Sungai Tenang Landscape, District of Merangin (5 Expert): 1. VBS/CM Field Team Leaders 2. Administrative and Operations Support Staff 3. Cartographer/GIS 4. Surveyor 5. Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist 6. Mapping and Surveying Technician KTWT Mambi Bambang, District of Mamasa (5 Expert):

Total Duration 8 Month

8 Month

8 Month

8 Month

KTWT Phase 2 4 Month 1. 1. VBS/CM Field Team Leaders 2. 2. Administrative and Operations Support Staff 3. 3. Cartographer/GIS 4. 4. Surveyor  5. 5. Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist 6. 6. Mapping and Surveying Technician KTWT Bonehau 5 Kalumpang, District of Mamuju (5 Expert): 1. VBS/CM Field Team Leaders 2. Administrative and Operations Support Staff 3. Cartographer/GIS 4. Surveyor 5. Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist 6. Mapping and Surveying Technician 6 Operational Support Operational Support Personnel (Senior & Personnel (Senior &  Junior): Junior): 1. Document Management 1. Document Management And Data Entry; And Data Entry; 2. Logistics Planning; 2. Logistics Planning; 3. Event/Meeting Planning 3. Event/Meeting Planning And Coordination; And Coordination;  4. Document Editing And 4. Document Editing And Translation; And Translation; And 5. Operation And 5. Operation And Maintenance Of Maintenance Of Vehicles. Vehicles. Source: TOR, Analysis and develop, AOGA Expert, 2014 No Completi on

KTWT Phase 1 4 month VBS/CM Field Team Leaders Administrative and Operations Support Staff Cartographer/GIS Surveyor Community Liaison/Coordination Specialist Mapping and Surveying Technician

Total Duration

4 Month

8 Month

Attachment of Permendari 27 Tahun 2006
LAMPIRAN I : PERATURAN MENTERI DALAM NEGERI NOMOR TANGGAL : 27 TAHUN 2006 : 10 OKTOBER 2006

PROSEDUR PENETAPAN DAN PENEGASAN BATAS DESA
I. Tim Penetapan dan Penegasan Batas desa (selanjutnya dalam peraturan ini disebut Tim) adalah Tim yang dibentuk oleh Bupati/Walikota. Tim ini bertugas melaksanakan penetapan dan penegasan batas desa.

II. Prinsip Penetapan Batas desa

Penetapan batas desa adalah proses penetapan batas dilakukan secara kartometrik di atas suatu peta dasar yang disepakati. Proses penetapan ini terdiri atas tiga tahapan kegiatan, antara lain:

A. B. C.

Penelitian Dokumen Batas Penentuan Peta Dasar Pembuatan Peta Batas desa Secara Kartometrik A. Tahap Kesatu : Penelitaian Dokumen Batas

1. Dokumen batas yang perlu disiapkan adalah, perundang-undangan dan peraturanperaturan lainnya, baik yang tertulis maupun yang tidak tertulis tentang pembentukan batas desa yang bersangkutan.

2. Selain ketentuan pada butir 1 (satu) di atas, dokumen batas lainnya yang perlu disiapkan, antara lain adalah: a. Peta administrasi desa yang telah ada b. Peta batas desa yang sudah ada c. Peta lainnya, seperti: peta rupabumi, peta topografi, peta pajak bumi dan bangunan, peta pendaftaran tanah, peta laut dan citra satelit. d. Data lainnya dan dokumen sejarah.

B. Tahap Kedua: Penentuan Peta Dasar

1. Peta dasar yang dapat digunakan untuk menggambarkan batas desa secara kartometrik dapat menggunakan peta rupabumi, peta topografi, peta pajak bumi dan bangunan, peta pendaftaran tanah, peta laut dan citra satelit. 2. Sebagai kesepakatan penggunaan peta batas secara kartometrik dibuat berita acara. C. Tahap Ketiga: Pembuatan Peta Batas desa Secara Kartrometrik 1. Pembuatan peta batas desa secara kartometrik dibuat sesuai spesifikasi teknis yang sudah ditentukan. 2. Peta penetapan batas desa akhir yang dihasilkan mempunyai spesifikasi pemetaan seperti tabel di bawah ini: Tabel 1. Spesifikasi Teknis Pemetaan Wilayah Desa No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Jenis Datum Horisontal Elipsoid Referensi Skala Peta Sistem Proyeksi Peta Sistem Grid DGN 95 WGS 1984 1:1.000 – 1: 10.000 Transverse Mercator (TM) Universal Transverse Mercator (TM) Dengan Grid geografis dan metrik 6. Ketelitian Planimetris 0.5 mm diukur di atas peta Persyaratan

I.

Prinsip Penegasan Batas

A. B.

Batas desa terdiri atas batas alam dan batas buatan manusia. Jika dasar hukum untuk penegasan batas desa belum ada atau belum jelas, maka dapat diterapkan prinsip-prinsip sebagai berikut: 1. Menggunakan Batas Alam Penggunaan bentuk alam sebagai batas desa memudahkan penegasan batas di lapangan karena tidak perlu memasang banyak pilar batas. Bentuk alam yang umum digunakan sebagai batas desa adalah sungai, watershed dan danau. a. 1) Sungai Garis batas pada sungai adalah garis imajiner (garis khayal) yang berada di tengah sungai yang membagi dua sama besar lebar sungai tersebut dijadikan sebagai garis batas.

desa A


P1
Keterangan :



Batas desa Pilar Batas

□ P K desa B B

■ P2

PKB (Pilar Kontrol Batas)

Gambar 1 Batas yang berpotongan dengan sungai seperti pada Gambar 1, yaitu P1 dan P2 dipasang pilar untuk mengetahui awal/akhir perpotongan garis batas dengan sungai tersebut. Pemasangan pilar harus pada lokasi yang stabil. Pilar batas tidak dapat dipasang tepat di perpotongan garis tengah sungai dengan pinggir sungai karena umumnya kondisi tanahnya labil. Jarak dari pilar P1 diukur ke tepi sungai terdekat dan ke tepi sungai terjauh, serta arahnya juga diukur. Demikian pula untuk pilar P2. 2) Dalam kondisi tanah yang labil, pilar dipasang cukup jauh dari pinggir sungai sehingga pilar tersebut bukan merupakan pilar batas tetapi sebagai pilar kontrol batas (PKB). Dalam contoh seperti Gambar 1, perlu dilakukan pengukuran situasi, termasuk pengukuran untuk penentuan garis batas sepanjang sungai untuk pembuatan peta garis batas skala 1:1.000. antara gunung

3)

b. Watershed (Garis Pemisah Air) Pada umumnya batas yang menghubungkan menggunakan prinsip watershed (lihat Gambar 2).

Gambar 2 Garis batas pada wathersed merupakan garis imajiner yang dimulai dari puncak suatu gunung (A), mengikuti punggung-punggung bukit yang mengarah ke puncak

gunung berikutnya (B). Pada Gambar 2 dapat dilihat dengan jelas garis pemisah air yang terpendek adalah garis putus-putus yang menghubungkan Gunung A–Q– Gunung B. Watershed yang terputus dihubungkan dengan garis lurus atau disepakati bersama. Ketentuan untuk menetapkan garis batas pada wathersed sebagai berikut: 1) Garis tersebut tidak boleh memotong sungai. 2) Jika terdapat lebih dari satu garis pemisah air maka garis batasnya adalah garis pemisah air yang terpendek. c. Danau Danau dapat dibagi dalam dua wilayah, yaitu wilayah darat dan wilayah air. 1) Wilayah Darat Yang masih dianggap wilayah darat adalah batas air surut yang terendah. 2) Wilayah Air Pembagian wilayah air dapat dilakukan sebagai berikut: a) Seluruh danau masuk ke salah satu desa, dengan demikian tepi danau yang merupakan batas, atau b) Danau merupakan batas antara dua desa.


P2 Desa A

garis batas

danau


P1
P1, P2 = Pilar Batas

Desa B
Gambar 3

Garis batasnya adalah garis lurus yang menghubungkan P1 dan P2. P1 dan P2 adalah Pilar batas yang dipasang di perpotongan garis batas dengan tepi danau, atau terdapat lebih dari dua desa yang berbatasan dengan danau tersebut, berlaku menurut peraturan daerah atau kesepakatan yang telah ada di antara Desa yang berbatasan. 2. Menggunakan Batas Buatan Unsur buatan yang umum digunakan sebagai batas desa antara lain: jalan, jalan kereta api, dan saluran irigasi. Untuk batas jalan, jalan kereta api, saluran irigasi, dan kanal, dapat digunakan as atau tepinya sebagai tanda batas wilayah antara dua desa yang berbatasan sesuai kesepakatan dua desa yang berbatasan.

a. Jalan 1) As Jalan
garis batas

Desa B


jalan

PKB

□ □
PKB

PKB

Desa C

Desa A

P1 (garis perpotongan batas tiga desa)

Gambar 4 Untuk jalan yang digunakan sebagai batas sewperti pada Gambar 4, maka garis batasnya adalah pada perpotongan as/sumbu jalan tersebut. Untuk mengetahui as jalan maka perlu dipasang beberapa titik kontrol terutama pada belokan jalan, atau pada perpotongan jalan untuk menentukan posisi garis batas (as jalan) tersebut, kemudian diukur ke kedua tepi jalan untuk mengetahui lebar jalan. 2) Pinggir Jalan

Desa B


jalan

garis batas

PKB


PBU


PBU

Desa A Desa C
P1

Gambar 5. Titik P1 merupakan perpotongan garis batas 3 desa Khusus untuk batas yang terletak di sekitar pertigaan jalan seperti Gambar 5, maka perlu ditempatkan titik kontrol batas dan pilar batas untuk menentukan posisi batas di pertigaan jalan tersebut. Penempatan titik kontrol diletakkan di pinggir/tepi jalan. Penempatan pilar-pilar harus memperhatikan kemungkinan adanya pelebaran jalan. Selanjutnya, dilakukan pengukuran jarak dan sudut dari ke-3 pilar tersebut (PBU dan PKB) ke titik perpotongan garis batas antara desa A, desa B dan Desa C di titik P1. Dalam contoh seperti Gambar 4 dan Gambar 5 perlu dibuatkan peta situasi dengan skala peta 1:1.000.

b. Jalan Kereta Api Untuk jalan kereta api digunakan prinsip yang sama penetapan/pemasangan tanda batas pada jalan (lihat Gambar 6). dengan

Desa A

□ PKB (Pilar Kontrol Batas
garis batas desa

□ PKB (Pilar Kontrol Batas)
Desa B

Gambar 6 Jalan Kereta Api Sebagai Batas desa c. Saluran Irigasi Untuk saluran irigasi digunakan prinsip yang sama pada jalan sebagai batas desa (lihat Gambar 7).

Desa A

PKB (Pilar Kontrol Batas)
garis batas desa


Desa B

PKB (Pilar Kontrol Batas)

Gambar 7

IV.

Teknis Penegasaan Batas desa

A.

Tahap kegiatan penegasan batas desa di lapangan dilakukan oleh Tim Penetapan dan Penegasan Batas Desa. Pada pelaksanaan di lapangan Tim dapat menunjuk atau dibantu oleh Tim Teknis.

B.

Tahapan kegiatan penegasan batas desa meliputi:

1. Penggunaan Dokumen Penetapan Batas. 2. Pelacakan Batas 3. Pemasangan Pilar Batas desa

4. Pengukuran dan Penentuan Posisi Pilar Batas desa 5. Pembuatan Peta Batas desa Setiap kegiatan tersebut perlu didokumentasikan dalam formulir yang diisi oleh pelaksana dan disyahkan oleh pejabat yang berwenang.

C.

Apabila tidak diperoleh kesepakatan terhadap hasil setiap tahap kegiatan penegasan batas, akan diselesaikan oleh Camat, Bupati/Walikota, dan Gubernur sesuai dengan tingkat permasalahan yang timbul di wilayah tersebut.

1. Tahap Kesatu : Penggunaan Dokumen Penetapan Batas a) Tim beranggotakan dari pemerintah Kabupaten/Kota, Kecamatan dan desa serta masyarakat. b) Tim ini melakukan pengkajian terhadap dasar hukum tertulis maupun hukum yang tidak tertulis yang berkaitan dengan batas desa c) Jika tidak ada sumber hukum tertulis maka anggota tim bermusyawarah untuk membuat kesepakatan baru dalam menentukan batas desa. d) Menentukan metode pelacakan, pemasangan pilar batas, pengukuran dan penentuan posisi pilar batas dan pembuatan peta batas desa. e) Menyiapkan formulir-formulir dan peta kerja serta penentuan koordinat pilar batas di atas peta kerja. f) Berdasarkan hasil pengkajian dokumen dibuatkan berita acara penelitian dokumen batas desa (lihat Form 1). Dalam hal tidak terdapat dokumen batas desa, dibuatkan berita acara kesepakatan batas desa.

2. Tahap Kedua: Pelacakan Batas desa Dalam proses pelacakan dokumen sudah harus ditentukan berapa jumlah pilar batas yang akan dipasang beserta sistem penomoran dari pilar batas (apakah PBU, PAB atau PKB. Teknis pelacakan batas desa mencakup dua kegiatan, yaitu: a) Penentuan garis batas sementara di atas peta Penentuan garis batas sementara adalah menentukan garis batas desa di atas peta yang sudah disepakati yang dilaksanakan pada:

1) Tanda/simbol batas yang tertera di atas peta, baik batas administrasi maupun batas kenampakan detail lain di peta. 2) Koordinat titik batas yang tercantum dalam dokumen batas desa. 3) Nama-nama geografis dan unsur geografis sepanjang garis batas baik unsur alam, buatan manusia, maupun unsur administratif.

4) Jika tidak ada tanda-tanda batas yang tertera sebelumnya maka penentuan garis batas sementara di atas peta ini dilakukan melalui kesepakatan. b) Kegiatan pelacakan garis batas di lapangan meliputi: 1) Menentukan letak batas secara nyata di lokasi berdasarkan garis batas sementara atau berdasarkan hasil kesepakatan. 2) Kegiatan pelacakan dimulai dari titik awal yang diketahui, kemudian menyusuri garis batas sampai dengan titik akhir sesuai dengan peta kerja. 3) Sesuai kesepakatan, pada jarak tertentu dapat dipasang tanda batas sementara berupa patok kayu yang dicat dengan warna merah untuk memudahkan pemasangan pilar-pilar batas sebagai batas tetap. 4) Dalam melakukan pelacakan batas desa di lapangan Tim Teknis dapat mengikutsertakan aparat desa antara lain tokoh/pemuka masyarakat dan Badan Perwakilan Desa dari masing-masing desa. 5) Berdasarkan hasil pelacakan batas desa di lapangan (Data Survei Pelacakan, Form. 2) dibuatkan berita acara hasil pelacakan batas desa yang ditandatangani oleh kepala desa yang berbatasan dan Ketua Tim (Form. 3). 3. Tahap Ketiga: Pemasangan Pilar Batas desa

a) Pembuatan dan pemasangan pilar batas desa ditujukan untuk memperoleh kejelasan dan ketegasan batas antar desa sesuai dengan kesepatakan yang telah ditetapkan sebelumnya. b) Jenis-jenis pilar batas desa adalah: 1) Pilar Batas Utama (PBU), yaitu pilar batas yang dipasang di titik-titik tertentu, terutama di titik awal, titik akhir garis batas, dan atau pada jarak tertentu di sepanjang garis batas. 2) Pilar Batas Antara (PBA), yaitu pilar batas yang dipasang di antara PBU dengan tujuan untuk menambah kejelasan garis batas antara dua desa atau pada titik-titik tertentu yang dipertimbangkan perlu untuk dipasang PBA. 3) Pilar Kontrol Batas (PKB), yaitu pilar yang dipasang di sekitar batas desa dengan tujuan sebagai petunjuk keberadaan batas desa. Pilar Kontrol Batas dipasang sehubungan pada batas yang dimaksud tidak dapat dipasang pilar batas karena kondisinya yang tidak memungkinkan (seperti pada kasus sungai atau jalan raya sebagai batas) atau keadaan tanah yang labil. c) Ketentuan untuk kerapatan pemasangan PBU, PKB dan PBA sesuai dengan ketentuan sebagai berikut:

1) Untuk batas desa yang mempunyai potensi tinggi (tingkat kepadatan penduduk, nilai ekonomi, nilai budaya dan lain-lain), kerapatan pilar setidaknya setiap 0.5 km sampai dengan 1 km. 2) Untuk batas desa yang mempunyai potensi rendah kerapatan pilar setidaknya setiap 1 km sampai dengan 3 km. d) Pemasangan pilar batas harus memenuhi kriteria sebagai berikut: 1) Ditempatkan pada kondisi tanah yang stabil, terhindar dari erosi dan abrasi. 2) Mudah ditemukan dan mudah dijangkau. 3) Aman dari gangguan aktivitas manusia maupun binatang. 4) Punya ruang pandang ke langit yang relatif terbuka (untuk pilar batas yang akan diukur dengan metode Global Positioning System). e) Ketentuan pemasangan pilar adalah sebagai berikut: 1) Sebagai tanda pemisah batas desa dipasang pilar tipe D dengan ukuran 20 cm panjang, 20 cm lebar dan 25 cm tinggi di atas tanah dan kedalaman 75 cm di bawah tanah. 2) Jika dipandang perlu di antara dua PBU dapat dipasang PBA sesuai dengan kebutuhan dan kondisi lapangan. PBA pada batas desa dipasang dengan ukuran 20 cm panjang, 20 cm lebar, 20 cm tinggi di atas tanah dengan kedalaman 40 cm di bawah tanah. 3) Pada setiap pilar harus dipasang brass tablet pada bagian atas pilar sebagai indentitas dari pilar. Selain itu harus dipasang satu buah plak pada salah satu dinding pilar yang menghadap ke arah utara sebagai keterangan tentang pilar batas wilayah dua atau lebih desa. Pada plak harus ditulis nama-nama desa yang berbatasan. 4) Hasil pemasangan pilar batas dituangkan dalam berita acara penetapan/pemasangan pilar batas desa (lihat Form. 4) yang ditandatangani Kepala Desa yang berbatasan dan diketahui oleh Ketua Tim. 4. Tahap Keempat: Pengukuran dan Penentuan Posisi Garis Batas desa a) Pengukuran Garis Batas. 1) Apabila diperlukan dilakukan pengukuran garis batas. 2) Pengukuran garis batas yang dimaksud adalah pengukuran situasi detail sepanjang garis batas dengan koridor tertentu. 3) Pengukuran detail dilakukan dengan metode poligon dan tachimetri. 4) Data yang berupa deskripsi pilar-pilar batas dan titik-titik pada garis batas didokumentasikan bersama buku ukur dan Berita Acara kesepakatan batas desa yang ditandatangani oleh pihak-pihak yang berbatasan. b) Penentuan Posisi Pilar Batas desa 1) Setelah pemasangan pilar batas desa selesai dilaksanakan segera dilakukan pengukuran penentuan posisi. 2) Standar ketelitian koordinat pilar batas desa (simpangan baku) adalah: untuk PBU dan PKBU ± 5 cm

-

untuk PBA dan PKBA ± 5 cm

Untuk menghasilkan ketelitian seperti tersebut di atas, pengukuran dilakukan dengan metode pengukuran GPS menggunakan peralatan GPS tipe geodetik. Apabila tidak memungkinkan, pengukuran dilakukan dengan metode poligon dengan mengikatkan minimal pada satu titik kontrol horisontal nasional (sehingga koordinat yang dihasilkan dalam sistem referensi nasional, yang saat ini menggunakan Datum Geodesi Nasional 1995 (DGN 95). 5. Tahap Kelima: Pembuatan Peta Batas desa Peta harus dapat menyajikan informasi dengan benar sesuai dengan kebutuhannya. Untuk setiap peta harus memenuhi spesifikasi yang sesuai dengan tema informasi yang disajikan. a) Aspek-aspek spesifikasi peta antara lain: 1) Aspek Kartografis. a) b) c) d) e) Jenis peta (penyajian): peta foto, peta garis. sistem simbolisasi/legenda dan warna. Isi peta dan Tema. Ukuran peta. Bentuk penyajian: hard copy atau digital.

2) Aspek Geometris. a) Skala/resolusi. b) Sistem proyeksi peta yang digunakan c) Ketelitian planimetris (x,y) dan tinggi di atas permukaan laut 3) Metode Pemetaan Batas desa. a) Diambil dari peta yang sudah ada, atau b) Pemetaan secara terestris, atau c) Pemetaan dengan metode yang lain (fotogrametris, dll). Spesifikasi Teknis Pilar Batas desa A. Bentuk dan Ukuran Pilar Batas Pilar Batas Desa berukuran panjang=20 cm, lebar=20 cm, tinggi dari permukaan tanah=25 cm dengan kedalamaan=75 cm. Uraian bentuk, ukuran, konstruksi dan rangkaian besi/tulang dapat dilihat pada Gambar 8 berikut ini.

V.

(a) Konstruksi Pilar Gambar 8 Pilar Tipe D – Batas desa

d

c

b

a

(b) Rangkaian besi B. Brass Tablet dan Plak Setiap pilar harus dilengkapi dengan brass tablet dan plak yang merupakan identitas dan kelengkapan pilar seperti terlihat pada Gambar 9 dan 10. Ukuran plak tergantung pada tipe pilar batas.

KOTA BOGOR

PBU. 7101.11185
MILIK NEGARA DILARANG MERUSAK DAN MENGGANGU TANDA INI

satuan dalam cm tampak samping

Gambar 9 Brass Tablet (terbuat dari kuningan) Plak untuk pilar Batas Desa

BATAS DESA Kd. Waringin – Kd. Jaya

Tampak muka

Tampak belakang

Satuan dalam cm

C.

Gambar 10. Plak, terbuat dari kuningan Jenis Bahan/Material Jenis bahan-bahan yang dipergunakan untuk membuat Pilar Batas Tipe D adalah sebagai berikut: 1) Material Beton a) Semen : 1 sak b) Pasir : 1/6 Kubik c) Batu Pecah : ¼ Kubik d) Besi Beton, diameter 6 mm : 23 meter 2) Cetakan/Begezting Kayu yang diperlukan adalah berukuran 20 cm x 400 cm dan tebal 3 cm, masing-masing sebanyak: 1 buah

Cara pembuatan Pilar Batas Tipe D adalah sebagai berikut: 1) Buatlah lobang dengan ukuran 60 cm x 60 cm dengan kedalaman 75 cm. Pembuatan lobang tersebut harus disesuaikan dengan wilayah yang berbatasan. Perhatikan Gambar 11, Gambar 12, dan Gambar 13 berikut ini.

A

B

Gambar 11 Dua wilayah yang berbatasan
B

C

A

Gambar 12 Tiga wilayah yang berbatasan

B

C

A

D
Gambar 13 Empat wilayah yang berbatasan, masing-masing Desa A, Desa B, Desa C dan Desa D

Keterangan: A, B, C, D : : :

Wilayah masing-masing Bentuk Galian Lubang Arah

Khusus untuk kondisi tanah yang labil seperti rawa, maka pada dasar lobang tersebut dipancangkan kayu atau paralon agar posisi pilar yang akan dicor lebih kuat. 2) Campurlah semua kerikil dan pasir (perhatian: jangan dahulu dicampur dengan semen). 3) Buatlah rangkaian besi beton yang telah dipotong dengan bentuk dan ukuran seperti Gambar 8. D.

Sistem Penomoran Pilar Batas Desa Sistem penomoran pilar untuk satu kabupaten/kota mengacu pada kode kabupaten/kota yang telah diterbitkan oleh Badan Pusat Stasistik (BPS), dilanjutkan dengan penomoran pilar batas, dimulai dari angka 00001 sampai 99999, sebagai berikut: 1) Batas desa dalam satu kabupaten/kota Cara penomoran adalah sebagai berikut: PBU XXXX XXXXX Kode Nomor Kabupaten/Kota NP: Nomor Pilar dari 1-99999 2) Pilar Batas Desa yang langsung berbatasan dengan desa terluar dari kecamatan/kabupaten/kota/provinsi otomatis menjadi Pilar Batas Antara (PAB) dari kecamatan/kabupaten/kota/provinsi tersebut. 3) Untuk lokasi yang tidak dimungkinkan pemesangan PBU seperti pada sungai, jalan, dll, maka PBU diganti dengan PKB. 4) Untuk pilar perapatan, penamaannya disesuaikan (PBA, PKBA).

VI.

Metode Pengukuran Pilar Batas desa Setelah selesai pemasangan seluruh pilar batas desa perlu dilakukan pengukuran untuk memperoleh nilai koordinat definitif yang mengacu pada sistem referensi koordinat nasional. Teknologi yang umum dilakukan saat ini untuk pengukuran posisi pilar batas adalah dengan menggunakan metode poligon atau dapat juga menggunakan teknologi Global Positioning System (GPS). Agar nilai posisi pilar-pilar batas mengacu ke suatu sistem nasional, maka pengukuran pilar-pilar batas harus terikat pada titik kontrol yang secara teknis mempunyai tingkat ketelitian yang memadai. Titik-titik kontrol ini dapat diperoleh dari instansi-instansi teknis pemetaan, antara lain BAKOSURTANAL, BPN dan Departemen Kehutanan. Dua metode penentuan posisi pilar batas yang direkomendasikan adalah metode poligon dan metode GPS. A. Metode Poligon Peralatan yang digunakan adalah theodolit dan alat ukur jarak elektronik (EDM=Electronic Distance Measurement). Pada metode poligon, hal yang dilakukan adalah pengukuran sudut dan jarak horisontal seperti pada Gambar 14.

▲ PILAR REFERENSI
D1 S1 S3 S2 D2

Desa B
S5 D4 S4 D5


PBU 1


PBU 3
D3


PBU 2


PBU 5
D6

garis batas desa

Desa A
Keterangan: ▲ Pilar referensi (nilai koordinat diketahui) ■ PBU 1, s.d. PBU 5 adalah pilar batas D1, s.d. D6, adalah jarak mendatar antar pilar batas S1 s.d. S5, adalah sudut poligon pada pilar batas garis batas desa

PBU 4


PILAR REFERENSI

Gambar 14. Poligon Terbuka Pada Gambar 14, diperlukan dua titik referensi (titik ikat) yang sudah diketahui nilai koordinatnya. Sudut-sudut S1, S2, S3, S4 dan S5 diukur dengan theodolit, sedangkan jarak-jarak D1, D2, D3, D4, D5 dan D6 diukur dengan menggunakan alat ukur jarak (misal dengan EDM). Dari hasil ukuran sudut dan jarak dapat dihitung nilai koordinat setiap PBU, yaitu dengan cara melakukan pengikatan ke titik referensi yang sudah diketahui nilai koordinatnya. B. Metode Global Positioning System (GPS) Metode ini memanfaatkan satelit GPS untuk menentukan posisi dari pilar batas. Beberapa hal yang harus diperhatikan dalam penentuan posisi pilar batas desa adalah sebagai berikut: 1 Pengamatan GPS menggunakan metode relatif. Dapat dilakukan secara radial dari titik referensi yang nilai koordinatnya telah diketahui dalam sistem koordinat nasional ke pilar batas yang dimaksud. Minimal 2 (dua) unit receiver GPS tipe geodetik, single frequency atau dual frequency. Lama pengamatan: tergantung pada panjang base line (jarak antara PBU dengan titik ikat) seperti Tabel 2 di bawah ini:

2 3

Tabel 2. Lama Pengamatan GPS basarkan panjang base line Panjang Base Line Lama Pengamatan Untuk Receiver GPS Satu Frekuensi 1– 3– 3 km 5 km 15 menit 20 menit 30 menit 2 jam Dua Frekuensi 10 menit 15 menit 20 menit 1 jam

5 – 10 km 10 – 20 km

20 – 100 km 100 – 200 km

4 jam 6 jam

2 jam 3 jam

PBU 5

Desa B

Titik ikat GPS nasional

▲ ■
PBU 4 pengikatan secara radial (baseline pendek) dari titik ikat GPS

PBU 3

pengikatan secara radial (baseline panjang) dari titik ikat nasional

Titik ikat GPS


Desa A

PBU 2

PBU 1

garis batas desa

Gambar 15 VI. Hitungan Koordinat A) B) Apabila metode poligon yang digunakan, maka perhitungan data ukuran menggunakan metode hitungan perataan sederhana seperti metode Bowdith. Apabila menggunakan metode GPS, maka perhitungan dilakukan dengan metode perataan menggunakan perangkat hitungan yang dikeluarkan oleh pabrik peralatan GPS (Commersial Software). Hasil hitungan diberikan dalam dua sistem koordinat, yaitu: 1 2 Koordinat geodetik (lintang, bujur dan tinggi elipsoid) dan nilai deviasi standar setiap komponen koordinatnya. Koordinat UTM (utara, timur) dan nilai deviasi standar untuk setiap komponen koordinatnya.

C)

VII.

Pengukuran Situasi A. Metode Tachimetri Apabila dianggap perlu, sepanjang garis batas dapat dilakukan pengukuran garis batas dengan lebar koridor batas 50 meter ke sebelah kiri dan 50 meter ke sebelah kanan dari garis batas. Dilanjutkan dengan pembuatan peta wilayah desa (peta situasi) dengan skala antara 1: 1.000 s.d. 1: 10.000. Salah satu metode pengukuran untuk pembuatan

peta situasi adalah metode tachimetri di mana objek-objek diukur menggunakan theodolit dan pengukuran jarak secara optis atau elektronis.

1 a b koridor 50 m ke sebelah kiri dan kanan garis batas desa

c

d

2

Gambar 16 Pengukuran tachimetri sepanjang garis batas wilayah

Keterangan: 1 dan 2 a, b, c, d,... : Titik poligon (tempat berdirinya instrument) : Tempat berdirinya rambu

garis batas dan koridor batas 50 meter ke sebelah kiri dan 50 meter ke sebelah kanan

Yang diukur/dibaca: - Sudut horisontal (mendatar) - Benang tengah rambu. - Sudut vertikal - Jarak antara tempat berdirinya instrument dengan masing-masing posisi rambu.

Gambar 17. Pengukuran Tachimetri B. Spesifikasi Teknis Pengukuran Poligon Spesifikasi pengukuran poligon seperti pada Tabel 3 di bawah ini. Tabel 3. Spesifikasi Pengukuran Poligon Uraian Selisih bacaan Biasa (B) dan Luar Biasa (LB) dalam pengukuran sudut Jumlah seri pengamatan suatu sudut (minimum) Selisih ukuran sudut antar sesi Pengecekan kesalahan kolimasi Jumlah pembacaan untuk satu ukuran jarak (minimum) Sudut jurusan (minimal) Teknik pengadaan sudut jurusan Ketentuan Persyaratan ≤ 10” 2 seri ≤ 5” sebelum pengamatan 5 kali di awal dan akhir jaringan pengamatan menggunakan tinggi matahari atau dari 2 titik koordinat referensi dari Badan Pertanahan Nasional (BPN), Badan Planologi Kehutanan, dll.

VIII.

Peta Batas Wilayah A Jenis Peta Batas Jenis peta batas wilayah dibuat berdasarkan prosedur pembuatannya terdiri dari: 1.) Peta Hasil Penetapan batas Peta hasil penetapan batas adalah peta batas wilayah yang dibuat secara kartometrik dari peta dasar yang telah ada dengan tidak melakukan pengukuran di lapangan. Hal ini biasanya dibuat pada waktu pemekaran desa. 2.) Peta Hasil Penegasan batas Peta hasil penegasan batas adalah peta batas wilayah yang dibuat dengan peta dasar yang ada ditambah dengan data yang diperoleh dari hasil pengukuran dilapangan. 3.) Peta Hasil Verifikasi

Peta hasil verifikasi adalah peta batas wilayah yang telah dibuat oleh desa dan hasilnya dilakukan verifikasi (penelitian dan penyesuaian) oleh Tim Penetapan dan Penegasan Batas Daerah Kabupaten/Kota, sebelum ditanda tangani oleh Bupati/Walikota. B Proses Pembuatan Peta Desa Proses pembuatan peta batas desa dapat dilakukan dengan berbagai cara, antara lain dengan cara pembuatan peta situasi atau dibuat dari peta yang sudah ada (diturunkan dari peta dijital). 1.) Penurunan dari peta yang sudah ada: a) Peta batas desa dapat diperoleh dari peta–peta yang sudah ada seperti peta-peta dasar, peta pendaftaran tanah, peta blok, atau berdasarkan foto udara, citra satelit, dan sumber data lainnya; b) Prosesnya dapat dilakukan secara kartografis manual atau digital, dan jika perlu diadakan penyesuaian skala dengan peralatan (misal: pantograf) atau metode yang sesuai. c) Detil yang digambarkan adalah unsur-unsur yang berkaitan dengan batas desa seperti lokasi pilar batas, jaringan jalan, perairan, dan detil lainnya sesuai dengan keperluan desa. d) Pada cara digital, peta dasar tersebut didigitasi dan dipilih melalui layar komputer untuk digambarkan kembali oleh alat cetak (plotter, atau printer). 2.) Pembuatan peta situasi Pengukuran untuk pembuatan peta situasi secara teristris dapat dilakukan. Skala peta yang disarankan adalah skala 1:1.000. Pengukuran-pengukuran yang diperlukan adalah: a) Pengukuran kerangka kontrol horisontal menggunakan metode poligon dengan spesifikasi seperti pada Tabel 3. b) Pengukuran situasi menggunakan metode tachimentri, dimana objek-objek detil yang diambil sesuai dengan pembuatan peta teknis skala 1:1.000 sampai skala 1:10.000. 3) Seluruh nilai koordinat defititif dari pilar batas, baik PBU, PBA atau PKB, harus dicantumkan dalam peta batas desa. C. Pengesahan Peta Peta batas desa yang telah diverifikasi oleh Tim Kabupaten/Kota dan disetujui oleh Kepala Desa yang berbatasan dicetak dalam jumlah rangkap tertentu untuk mendapatkan pengesahan dari Bupati/Walikota. Peta batas antar desa yang merupakan batas antar Provinsi dan/atau batas antar Kabupaten/Kota pengesahannya dilakukan berdasarkan ketentuan sebagaimana diatur dalam Peraturan Menteri Dalam Negeri No.1 Tahun 2006 tentang Pedoman Penetapan dan Penegasan Batas Daerah. D. Penyimpanan Dokumen Batas desa Seluruh dokumen yang terkait dengan penataan wilayah desa dibuat dalam jumlah yang cukup dan salah satunya harus diserahkan ke instansi pengelola arsip (Arsip Daerah). Dokumen dan peta batas desa terdiri dari: 1.) Berita Acara penelitian dokumen batas desa 2.) Data survei pelacakan 3.) Berita Acara penetapan/pemasangan pilar batas desa 4.) Peta batas desa 5.) Dokumen lainnya yang berkaitan dengan kegiatan batas desa Format Peta Batas desa

IX.

Produk akhir dari pekerjaan Pemetaan Batas desa adalah Peta Batas desa, yaitu suatu peta skala besar (skala 1:1.000 s.d. 1:10.000). Peta acuan yang dapat dipakai untuk pembuatan peta ini dapat berasal dari peta Pendaftaran Tanah yang dibuat oleh BPN atau Peta Pajak Bumi dan Bangunan yang dibuat oleh Direktorat Pajak Bumi dan Bangunan dengan spesifikasi peta sebagaimana tersebut pada Tabel 1. Berikut contoh format sebuah peta batas desa.

B C D E F A (isi peta) G H Gambar 18. Tata Letak Peta Batas desa

Simbol Kabupaten Judul, skala, nama kab., kec., desa Diagram Lokasi Info tentang datum, sistem proyeksi, sistem grid, kontur Legenda dan Riwayat Peta. Daftar koordinat Pengesahan

A. Peta dasarnya format dan tata letak peta tersebut masih bersifat umum. Dalam hal-hal tertentu dapat berubah, misalnya berubah karena bentuk geografis wilayah desa yang sedemikian rupa sehingga bentangannya memerlukan bentuk kerangka yang khusus. B. Jika jumlah koordinat pilar batas cukup banyak maka penempatan koordinat titik dari pilar batas tersebut disesuaikan dengan muka peta yang kosong.

C. Legenda peta batas wilayah umumnya berupa simbol seperti:
Simbol Arti

Sungai Jalan Raya Jalan Kereta Api Batas Provinsi

Batas Kabupaten/Kota Batas Kecamatan Batas Desa Garis Kontur

MENTERI DALAM NEGERI ttd. H. MOH. MA’RUF, SE.

LAMPIRAN II:

PERATURAN MENTERI DALAM NEGERI NOMOR TANGGAL : 27 TAHUN 2006 : 10 OKTOBER 2006

Form.1 BERITA ACARA PENELITIAN DOKUMEN BATAS DESA Nomor …………………..(1) Nomor …………………..(1)

Pada hari ini ………… (2) tanggal ………… (3) bulan ……… (4) tahun ……….. (5) bertempat di Desa ………………………(6) Kecamatan ………………(7), Kabupaten/Kota ………………….(8) Provinsi…………………..(9) telah dilaksanakan penelitian dokumen-dokumen batas, antara Desa …………….10) dengan Desa ……………………10) dengan hasil sebagai berikut: 1. Dokumen-dokumen batas desa…………….10) dengan Desa ………………….10) yang disepakati adalah: a. ………………………………………… 11) b. ………………………………………… 11) c. dst……………...............……………… 11)

2. Peta batas desa antara Desa ……………10) dengan Desa……………….10) yang disepakati adalah : a. ………………………………………… 12) b. ………………………………………… 12) 3. Titik-titik dan garis batas antara Desa ………….…10) dengan Desa ……………. 10) yang akan dilacak dan akan dipasang pilar adalah: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. ………………………………………...(13) ………………………………………...(13) ………………………………………...(13) ………………………………………...(13) dan seterusnya

yaitu dengan menandai lokasi-lokasi dimaksud pada peta kerja dengan tinta berwarna merah. Data lebih rinci mengenai hasil penelitian dokumentasi batas desa Nomor : ……………………….(14), terlampir TIM PENETAPAN DAN PENEGASAN BATAS DESA Desa.....................................................10) 1. …………………………………15) 2. …………………………………15) Menyetujui ..16) Kepala Desa................................ 10) Desa........................................................10) 1. ………………………...…………15) 2. ………………….....…...…………15) Menyetujui ..16) Kepala Desa................................... 10)

.............................................

.............................................

TIM PENETAPAN DAN PENEGASAN BATAS DESA KABUPATEN/KOTA ………………………. ………………………………(17) ………………………………(17)

PETUNJUK PENGISIAN BERITA ACARA PENELITIAN DOKUMEN BATAS DESA

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

Diisi nomor agenda desa yang berbatasan Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Diisi nama Desa yang berbatasan, dimana penelitian dokumen-dokumen batas dilakukan Diisi nama kecamatan, dimana penelitian dokumen batas dilakukan Diisi nama kabupaten/Kota, dimana penelitian dokumen batas dilakukan Diisi nama provinsi, dimana penelitian dokumen batas dilakukan

(10) Diisi nama desa yang berbatasan. Jika lebih dari dua desa yang berbatasan, harus dicantumkan semua nama desanya. (11) Diisi nama dan jenis dokumen batas desa yang disepakati (12) Diisi nama dan jenis peta dasar yang disepakati (13) Diisi Nomor-nomor dan nama-nama titik batas yang akan dilacak dan dipasang batas. Sistem penomoran harus sudah ditentukan secara sistematis dan terintegrasi (lihat Sistem Penomoran Pilar, butir V.D, Lampiran I) (14) Diisi dengan nomor surat Data hasil penelitian dokumen batas Desa; contoh : No…………….. (seluruh dokumen harus diarsipkan secara baik dan benar) (15) Ditandatangani oleh pihak-pihak yang terkait pada jajaran masing-masing desa, tokoh masyarakat kedua desa. (16) Disetujui oleh Kepala Desa yang berbatasan. (17) Diisi nama jelas dan tanda tangan Ketua dan Anggota Tim Penetapan dan Penegasan Batas desa.

Form.2 DATA SURVEI PELACAKAN LOKASI PENETAPAN/PEMASANGAN PILAR BATAS DESA Antara Desa ……………………….....................……………… dengan Desa ……………………………….....................……... Nomor : ……………………………….(1) LOKASI : ……………………………………………………………………….(2) Desa Kecamatan Kabupaten Provinsi : ……………………… / …………………………...(3) : ……………………… / …………………………...(4) : ……………………… / …………………………...(5) : ……………………… / …………………………...(6)

I

Terletak di :

Survei pada tanggal Pelaksana survei

………………………………………………………………… (7) ……………………………………………………….................(8) ……………………………………………………….................(8) ……………………………………………………….................(8) ……………………………………………………….................(8) ……………………………………………………….................(8) ……………………………………………………….................(8) …………………………………...……………………..(9)

Peta/Data yang digunakan Situasi:

1. Letak Geografis (bila ada data) - Lintang - Bujur - Tinggi 2. Kondisi Tanah Jenis tanah Bentuk Tanah Keadaan tanah Tanah diduga bekas : Karang/Pasir/Tanah Liat/Gambut *) (11) : SegiEmpat/Trapesium/Tak Beraturan*) (11) : Datar/Miring/Bergelombang/Bukit (11) : Sawah/Ladang/Rawa/Tanah Bangunan/Hutan Lebat*) (11) : Baik/kurang baik/tidak baik tetapi lereng terlalu terjal/curam *) (11) : ……………………………………………….....…………….(10) : ……………………………………………….....…………….(10) : …………………………………………….....……………….(10)

- Tanah untuk bangunan

3. Letak Lokasi - Jarak dengan jalan terdekat - Jarak dengan sungai terdekat

: ……………..…………………………… (12) : ……………………………..…………… (12)

- Jarak dengan perkampungan : ………………………..………………… (12) terdekat - Di sekitar tanah lokasi terdekat : …………………………..……………… (12) 4. Status Tanah : Tanah Negara/Tanah Milik Perorangan/tanah adat lainnya *) .......………………………………………………………….. (13) Pemegang hak atas tanah : …………………………………………… ………(14) DATA LOGISTIK

II.

1. Dari ibukota provinsi : ………(15) Ke Ibukota Kabupaten ………………….(16) Menggunakan sarana transportasi …………(17) Lamanya ………………….(18) 2. Dari Ibukota Kabupaten ….. …(19) Ke Ibukota Kecamatan ………………….(20) Menggunakan sarana transportasi …………(21) Lamanya ………………….(18) 3. Dari Ibukota kecamatan …… ..(22) Ke desa ………………………(23) Menggunakan sarana transportasi …………..(24) Lamanya …………………( 18) 4. Dari Desa ………… .. (25) Ke perbatasan …………………………..(26) Menggunakan sarana transportasi …………(27) Lamanya ………… ………(18) III. PEMBORONG PERUSAHAAN SETEMPAT 1. …………………………………...(28) IV. MATERIAL BANGUNAN Diperoleh di ……………………………………………………………………………..(30) V. BURUH LOKAL : : Rp. Rp. ………………….......……….. (31) …………………….......……... (31) di …………………………………... (29)

1. Ongkos buruh harian 2. Ongkos buruh tukang VI. SOSIAL BUDAYA

Masyarakat/penduduk di skitar lokasi ……………………....……......………………..(32) . Pemuka Masyarakat di sekitar lokasi :

a. Nama Jabatan b. Nama Jabatan c. Nama Jabatan

: : : : : :

………………………………………………………. ………………………………………………………. ………………………………………………………. ………………………………………………………. ………………………………………………………. ……………………………………………………….

(33) (34) (33) (34) (33) (34)

Keadaan Ekonomi Masyarakat : ………………………………………...……………(35) Keterangan lain yang dianggap perlu : …………………………………………………………………………………………. …………………………………………………………………………………………. …………………………………………………………………………………….(36) …………… , (37) ……………….. Ketua Tim Pelacakan ( …...…(38) ………) *) coret yang tidak perlu.

PETUNJUK PENGISIAN DATA SURVEI PELACAKAN LOKASI PENETAPAN/PEMASANGAN PILAR BATAS DESA

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

(11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) (26) (27) (28) (29) (30) (31) (32) (33) (34) (35) (36) (37) (38)

Di isi nomor agenda surat di kantor desa yang berbatasan Di isi nama lokasi yang di lacak Di isi nama desa yang berbatasan Di isi nama kecamatan yang bersangkutan Di isi nama kabupaten yang bersangkutan Di isi nama provinsi yang bersangkutan Cukuo jelas Di isi nama petugas survei dan jabatannya Di isi bilamana ada nama peta/data yang digunakana Di isi bilamana ada data posisi geografi yang menyatakan hal tersebut. Posisi pendekatan yang belum akurat. Posisi yang definitif setelah dilakukan pengukuran posisi sesuai spesifikasi teknis. Cukup jelas, pilih jenis tanah yang sesuai Sebutkan berapa perkiraan jarak lokasi rencana pemasangan pilar dari jalan, sungan, atau perkampungan yang terdekat Diisi dengan status kepemilikan tanah rencana penempatan pilar Sebutkan nama pemegang hak atas tanah tersebut Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Dalam hitungan jam atau hari, tergantung jarak Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Sebutkan jika ada masyarakat di sekitar lokasi Cukup jelas Sebutkan jabatannya jika ada Sebutkan keadaan ekonomi masyarakat secara umum di sekitar lokasi Jika ada informasi lain yang perlu ditulis Lokasi dan tanggal pembuatan data Nama dan tanda tangan Ketua Tim Pelacakan

Form.3 BERITA ACARA PELACAKAN BATAS DESA Nomor ………………… (1) Nomor ………………… (1)

Pada hari ini ………… (2) tanggal …………(3) bulan …………(4) tahun ……… (5) bertempat di: Desa…………………(6) Kecamatan ………(7), Kabupaten/Kota*) …………………(8) Provinsi…………………(9), menyatakan bahwa: telah dilakukan pelacakan lokasi-lokasi untuk pemasangan pilar batas desa di : 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. ………………………………………………………………………………….. (10) ………………………………………………………………………………….. (10) ………………………………………………………………………………….. (10) ………………………………………………………………………………….. (10) dan seterusnya

dengan menandai lokasi dengan patok kayu sementara yang dicat warna merah, pilar batas, dan lainnya. Data lebih rinci mengenai hasil survei pelacakan lokasi penetapan/pemasangan pilar batas desa, nomor : …………………………(11). Terlampir. TIM PENETAPAN DAN PENEGASAN BATAS DESA Desa.....................................................12) 1…………………....………………13) 2. …………………………………13) Menyetujui ..14) Kepala Desa................................ 12) ............................................. Desa.......................................................12) 1…………………....………..………13) 2. ………………….....……..………13) Menyetujui ..14) Kepala Desa.................................. 12) .............................................

TIM PENETAPAN DAN PENEGASAN BATAS DESA KABUPATEN/KOTA...............(15) ………………………………(16) ………………………………(16)
*)

Coret yang tidak perlu.

PETUNJUK PENGISIAN BERITA ACARA PELACAKAN BATAS DESA

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16)

Diisi nomor agenda wilayah yang berbatasan. Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Diisi nama Desa yang berbatasan, dimana pilar batas tersebut dipasang. Diisi nama Kecamatan, dimana pilar batas tersebut dipasang. Diisi nama Kabupaten/Kota, dimana pilar batas tersebut dipasang. Diisi nama Provinsi, dimana pilar batas tersebut dipasang. Diisi nama lokasi yang dilacak, dengan menyebutkan nama Dusun/Lingkungan dan nama Desa. Diisi dengan nomor Surat Data Survei Pelacakan Lokasi Penetapan/Pemasangan Tanda Batas desa; contoh : No. ………………. Diisi nama Desa yang berbatasan Ditandatangani oleh pihak-pihak yang terkait pada jajaran masing-masing desa, tokoh masyarakat kedua desa. Di1si nama jelas dan tanda tangan Kepala Desa yang berbatasan. Cukup jelas Diisi nama jelas dan tanda tangan dari Ketua dan anggota Tim Batas desa yang telah dibentuk.

Form.4 BERITA ACARA PENETAPAN/PEMASANGAN PILAR BATAS DESA Nomor …………………..(1) Nomor …………………..(1)

Pada hari ini ………… (2) tanggal ………… (3) bulan ……… (4) tahun ……….. (5) bertempat di: Desa ………………………(6) Kecamatan ………………(7), Kabupaten/Kota*) ………………….(8) Provinsi…………………..(9), berdasarkan Berita Acara Pelacakan Batas Wilayah Nomo: ………………….(10), ………………………(13), telah diadakan kesepakatan penetapan/pemasangan tanda batas wilayah antara Desa ……………………..(14), dan ………………………(15), dalam bentuk batas buatan, dengan nomor pilar sebagai berikut : 1. ………………………………(16) 2. ………………………………(16) 3. dan seterusnya …………………. Demikian Berita Acara ini dibuat untuk dipergunakan semestinya dan masing-masing pihak harus mentaatinya. Ditetapkan di ………………………(17) Pada tanggal ……………………….(18) TIM PENETAPAN DAN PENEGASAN BATAS DESA Desa.....................................................19) 1…………………....………………20) 2. …………………………………20) Menyetujui ..21) Kepala Desa................................ 19) ............................................. Desa........................................................19) 1…………………....…...……………20) 2. ………………….....…..…………20) Menyetujui ..21) Kepala Desa.................................. 19) .............................................

TIM PENETAPAN DAN PENEGASAN BATAS DESA KABUPATEN/KOTA...............(22)

………………………………(23) ………………………………(23)
*)

Coret yang tidak perlu.

PETUNJUK PENGISIAN BERITA ACARA PENETAPAN/ PEMASANGAN PILAR BATAS WILAYAH DESA

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23)

Diisi Nomor Agenda Wilayah Desa yang berbatasan Cukup jelas Idem Idem Diisi nama Desa di mana pilar batas dipasang Diisi nama Kecamatan di mana pilar batas dipasang Diisi nama Kabupaten/Kota, di mana pilar batas dipasang Diisi nama Provinsi, di mana pilar batas dipasang Diisi nomor Berita Acara Pelacakan Batas desa Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Diisi nomor-nomor pilar batas yang dipasang sesuai dengan jumlah pilarnya Cukup jelas Cukup jelas Diisi nama Desa yang berbatasan Ditandatangani oleh pihak-pihak yang terkait pada jajaran masing-masing desa, tokoh masyarakat kedua desa. Diisi nama dan tanda tangan Kepala Desa yang berbatasan Cukup jelas Diisi nama dan tanda tangan Ketua dan Anggota Penetapan dan Penegasan Batas desa

MENTERI DALAM NEGERI ttd. H. MOH. MA’RUF, SE.

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