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Thursday, May 1, 2014 50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Wildcats rally past Musketeers,
p6
Lincolnview receives ‘Every Kid
Healthy’ award, p3
www.delphosherald.com
Mansfield: Parks and
Rec ‘paper thin’
BY NANCY SPENCER
Herald Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Local voters will decide on a
.25-percent income tax increase on Tuesday with
the projected $400,000 generated earmarked for
Delphos Parks and Rec.
Department head Craig Mansfield wants resi-
dents to know what they will get for their money.
“We run the parks and everything that entails
with a paper-thin budget,” Mansfield said. “We
have the lowest budget in the game and offer the
‘best bang for the buck’. We provide a safe and
very clean environment for the community and
keep our youth involved. The other city services
are important but the parks are, too.”
His 2013 parks budget was $282,686, includ-
ing a $22,000 Dienstberger Foundation Grant.
The pool budget was $98,554 and concessions
were $15,249. Mansfield said his $396,000 bud-
get goes pretty quickly.
“We employ two full-time parks personnel,
a recreation director, 45-50 kids for seasonal
work at the parks and pool and 10 umpires,” he
said. “What people don’t realize is we run five
parks covering more than 100 acres for about
eight months out of the year on that money and
I kept my overtime to $1,200 last year. All time
is flexed so there’s someone here at 8 a.m. and
8 p.m. If things are going on in the parks, we’re
here.”
Keeping things tidy and in order takes the
bulk of Mansfield’s and his crew’s time. First
thing in the morning, all trash cans are “poked”
and the more than 40 receptacles are emptied
twice a week at a minimum. Restrooms are
cleaned and supplies stocked and when the pool
is open, two seasonal helpers suit up and dive the
pool-cleaning and vacuuming. The pool deck is
cleared of debris and the restrooms and showers
are cleaned and stocked.
Paint disposal added
to monthly collection
BY NANCY SPENCER
Herald Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Residents who have started their spring
cleaning can unload those unwanted items from 8 a.m. to
noon on Saturday in the parking lot across from the Municipal
Building on Canal Street.
Allen County Refuse offers the program as part of its ser-
vice to the city.
May’s collection will also include an opportunity for resi-
dents to dispose of latex paint. American Paint Recyclers will
be at this pick up and there will be no charge for the disposal
of latex paint. The only paint they accept is latex paint (interior
or exterior), acrylic latex paint and water-based paint. They
cannot take oil-based paint or stains.
ACR General Manager John Berens said the monthly offer-
ing is as much for his crews as residents.
“We hold the big-item pick-ups once a month so we don’t
have to send a truck to Delphos every day,” Berens said. “The
trucks that come through and empty the trash and recycle
receptacles can’t take the bigger items.”
Berens said he and his workers haul an average of 10 tons
from Delphos the first Saturday of every month.
“People seem to like it,” Berens said. “We have a lot of
people who take advantage of it.”
Schmit’s Market
checking out
Through a grant of close to $1,200 from Moving Ohio Forward, the old Schmit’s Market building on the corner of Canal and
Second streets was razed Wednesday by Hume Supply Company out of Lima. Grant Coordinator of Van Wert County Mike Jackson
said the program has enabled the county to demolish 16 dilapidated homes in Convoy, Willshire, Wren, Middle Point and Delphos
through grants of close to $150,000. He said the Schmit building qualified for the grant since the second story was residential.
Read more about Schmit’s Market in Friday’s Herald. (Delphos Herald/Stephanie Groves)
Curran
Van Wert
County Dairy
Princess
The 2014 Van Wert
County Dairy Princess
Morgan Curran was
recently crowed at the
annual Van Wert Dairy
Banquet. She is the
daughter of Michael and
Karyn Curran of Delphos.
A freshman at Delphos
St. John’s High School,
Curran is active as the
football and basketball
mascot, is in SAAD and
plays soccer. She is a
member of the Udder
Dairy 4-H Club, serves
as club secretary and
will show Jersey cows
at several county fairs
this summer. (Submitted
photo)
Cloudy and
windy with
a chance
of showers
today and
tonight.
Highs in
the mid
50s. Lows
in the
mid 40s.
See page 2.
Relay team
offers brat dinner
The K&M Tire
Kruisin’ For a Miracle
Relay for Life Team
offer a brat dinner from
4-7 p.m. on May 19.
Tickets need to be
purchased by May 9 by
calling 419-695-1061.
The meal consists of
one or two brats, chips,
pasta salad and a cookie.
Meals are $4 for one
brat and $5.50 for two.
Meals are carry-out only.
Dinners can be picked up
in the parking lot on the
south side of K&M Tire.
Proceeds benefit the
Relay for Life of Delphos.
Middle Point
sets sand v-ball
tourney
The Middle Point
Ballpark will be host-
ing a Co-Ed 6’s Sand
Volleyball Tournament at
10 a.m. on May 24 (after
the Run for Warriors 5k).
The cost is $60 per team.
Basic power
rules will apply.
Champions will
receive T-shirts.
Contact Ryanne
Bollenbacher to register:
bolly33@bright.net or 419-
968-2834. Registration
deadline is May 21.
St. John’s juniors give back
St. John’s High School juniors on the Post Prom Committee gave some-
thing back to their supporters on Wednesday. The students performed ser-
vice work for local businesses who have ensured the school’s Post Prom
activities are funded. Above are Lydia Schwinnen, left, Lexi Martz, Kestley
Houlihan and Emilee Grothouse washing windows at the home of Bob
Schmit. Schmit is one of the namesakes of Schmit, Massa, Lloyd Insurance.
(Delphos Herald/Nancy Spencer)
See PAINT, page 10
See PARKS, page 10
2
BOULDERS • DECORATIVE RIVER ROCK GRAVEL
• BLACK MULCH • PEAT MOSS • COMPOST
• TOPSOIL • SAND • LIMESTONE
B & K TRUCKING
1415 N. MAIN, DELPHOS, OH
419-692-4155
Open M-F 7:00am-5:00pm; Sat. Hours (Weather permitting) - 8-noon
www.bktruck.com
AVAILABLE IN OUR YARD
IN BULK SUPPLY!
HAULING • FIXING EXISTING
DRIVEWAYS & PARKING LOTS
• NEW DRIVEWAYS & PARKING LOTS
• •
Pickup or Delivery
ATTENTION
WALNUT
GROVE
CEMETERY
Walnut Grove Cemetery
will be raising fees
charged for burial lots
effective
June 1st, 2014.
Contact for more information
Tom McKee, Superintendent
419-230-6133
or Dave Higbea
WG Secretary/Treasurer
419-516-3585
650 W Ervin Rd
Van Wert, OH 45891
419.238.5902
866-LEEKINSTLE • LEEKINSTLE.COM
Stop by and say “hi” to
Lee Kinstle’s newest
sales consultant,
BILLY KNOLL
bknoll@leekinstle.com
ph 419.238.5902 | cell 419.203.1966
2 – The Herald Thursday, May 1, 2014
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERAL
LOTTERY LOCAL PRICES WEATHER
FROM THE ARCHIVES
VAN WERT COURT NEWS
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CORRECTIONS
2
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 144 No. 228
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary,
general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.48 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.

405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TODAY: Cloudy with a
40 percent chance of showers.
Windy. Cooler. Highs in the
mid 50s. Southwest winds 10
to 20 mph becoming 20 to 30
mph in the afternoon.
TONIGHT: Cloudy
through midnight then becom-
ing mostly cloudy. A 30 per-
cent chance of showers. Lows
in the mid 40s. Southwest
winds 15 to 20 mph.
FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
showers. Highs in the upper
50s. West winds 15 to 20 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly
cloudy with a 20 percent
chance of showers. Lows in
the mid 40s. Southwest winds
10 to 15 mph.
Wheat $6.92
Corn $4.89
Soybeans $15.46
Nov. 22, 1928-
April 30, 2014
OTTOVILLE — George
J. Knippen, 85, of Ottoville
died 7:56 a.m. Wednesday,
surrounded by his wife of
58 years and all his children,
at Sarah Jane Living Center,
Delphos.
He was born Nov. 22,
1928, in Ottoville to George
and Caroline (Miller)
Knippen, Sr.
On Sept. 10, 1955, he mar-
ried Jeanette Smith, who sur-
vives in Ottoville.
Also surviving are his
children, Janice (Charles)
Pohlman of Delphos, Karen
(Dennis) Ricker of Ottoville,
Debra (Timothy) Verhoff of
Kalida, Doneta (Rex) Free of
Panama City Beach, Florida,
Kevin (Cindy) Knippen of
Ottoville, Michael (Jackie)
Knippen of Ottoville and
Rita (Patrick) Klosterman of
Brookville; a sister, Margaret
Hesseling of Delphos; 19
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren with one
on the way.
George is preceded in
death by five sisters, Sister
Mary Berchmans, Sister
Mary Clara, Agnes Kehres,
Lucille Pohlman and Sister
Vita; four brothers, Father
Carl Knippen, Sylvester
Knippen, William Knippen,
Sr., and Joseph Knippen.
George was a self-
employed dairy farmer. He
was a member of Immaculate
Conception Catholic Church,
Ottoville, where he was a
member of the parish coun-
cil and had been an usher.
He served as the director
for the Farmers Mutual Aid
Association and was a for-
mer member of the Delphos
Knights of Columbus.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be 10:30 a.m. Saturday
at Immaculate Conception
Catholic Church, Ottoville,
with Father Jerome Schetter
officiating. Burial will fol-
low in St. Mary’s Cemetery,
Ottoville.
Visitation will be from
2-8 p.m. Friday at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township, where a
Scripture service will be held
at 2 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, con-
tributions may be made to
Putnam County Hospice or
the charity of the donor’s
choice.
George J. Knippen
May 1, 1932
April 30,
2014
LANDECK — Richard
J. “Bunny” Bonifas, 81,
of Landeck died at 9 a.m.
Wednesday at his resi-
dence.
He was born May 1,
1932, in Van Wert County
to Albert Peter and Mary
Catherine (Picker) Bonifas,
who preceded him in death.
He married Jane Hilvers
on Nov. 25, 1954. She sur-
vives in Landeck.
He is also survived by
three sons, James “Rabbit”
(Jann) Bonifas of Landeck,
Daniel “Boomer” (Janet)
Bonifas of Landeck and
Carl “Fred” (Di ane)
Bonifas of Delphos; three
daughters, Debra (Joseph)
Armanini of Vandaillla,
Linda (Duane) Schulte
of Landeck and Darlene
(Brent) Wells of Dublin;
a sister, Dorothy (Elmer)
Hoffman of Delphos; three
brothers, Arther (Alice)
Boni fas of Del phos,
Albert Jr. (Eileen) Bonifas
of Landeck and John
(Lori) Bonifas of Alpena,
Michigan; 14 grandchil-
dren, Melinda (JW) Aiken,
Tony (Elizabeth) Bonifas,
Nathan Armanini, Hannah
Armanini, Annette (Aaron)
Haines, Bridgette (Josh)
Smith, Juliette Bonifas,
Brice Schulte, Colleen
Schulte, Samantha Bonifas,
Al ex Boni fas, Lucy
Bonifas, Taylor Wells and
Lauren Wells; two great-
grandchildren, Madison
and Lillian Aiken; and a
sister-in-law, Catherine
Bonifas.
He was also preceded
in death by two broth-
ers, Norbert and Jerome
Bonifas; and a sister-in-
law, Ann Bonifas.
He was a lifelong farmer
and also quarry supervi-
sor, retiring from National
Stone. He served in the
Army during the Korean
War.
He was a member of St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church in Landeck, VFW
Post 3035 in Delphos,
Landeck Foresters and
Holy Name Society.
He was the organizer
of the Landeck Sausage
and Sauerkraut supper. He
loved traveling around on
his four-wheeler. His true
passion was his family,
especially grandchildren.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday at St. John the
Baptist Catholic Cemetery
in Landeck, the Rev. David
Reinhart officiating, and
military graveside rites
by the Delphos Veterans
Council.
Visitation will be from
5-8 p.m. today and 2-8
p.m. Friday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home. A
Parish Wake will be at 7:30
p.m. Friday.
Memori al cont ri bu-
tions may be made to St.
John the Baptist Catholic
Church in Landeck.
To leave condolences
for the family, visit www.
harterandschier.com.
Richard J. ‘Bunny’
Bonifas
The following individuals appeared
in Van Wert County Common Pleas Court
Wednesday:
Arraignments
Robert Spooner, 37, Fort Wayne, was
arraigned on three counts of breaking and
entering, each a felony of the fifth degree; and
one count of safecracking, a felony four.
He entered a not guilty plea.
His case was set for pretrial on Wednesday.
No bond was set as he is currently in prison
in Indiana.
Chad Mcross, 19, Van Wert, entered a not
guilty plea to breaking and entering, a felony
five; and receiving stolen property, a misde-
meanor of the first degree.
He was released on a surety bond and his
case set for pretrial on Wednesday.
Bond violation
Ryan Schaadt, 29, Van Wert, appeared for
a bond violation for failing to report to proba-
tion. He admitted the violation and his bond
was changed to $10,000 cash.
Sentencing
Anthony Oliver, 19, Van Wert, was sen-
tenced on two separate cases. The first case
was for breaking and entering, a felony of
the fifth degree; and the second case was
for attempted burglary, felony of the fourth
degree.
He was sentenced to: three years com-
munity control on each case, to be served
concurrently, to include up to six months at
the WORTH Center; an additional 30 days
jail at a later date; 200 hours community
service; two years intensive probation; and
was ordered to pay court costs and partial
appointed counsel fees.
A 12-month prison term in the breaking
and entering case and 15-month prison term
on the attempted burglary case were deferred
pending completion of Community Control.
Plea changes
Savannah Williams, 27, Mendon,
changed her plea to guilty to attempted
complicity to burglary, a felony of the third
degree. She was originally charged with
complicity to burglary, a felony of the sec-
ond degree.
The court ordered a pre-sentence investi-
gation and set sentencing for May 21.
Ethan Mezuk, 23, Convoy, changed his
plea to guilty to possession of heroin, a felony
of the fifth degree. He then requested and was
granted Treatment in Lieu of Conviction. His
case was stayed pending completion of the
counseling program.
Dennis Gallaspie, 65, Lima, changed his
plea to guilty to trafficking in marijuana, a
felony of the fifth degree. He also admitted to
using a 2006 Honda Civic and $214 cash in
the commission of the crime.
The court ordered a pre-sentence investi-
gation and set sentencing for May 21.
Tyler Mohr, 19, Van Wert changed his plea
to guilty to grand theft, felony third degree.
The court ordered a pre-sentence investi-
gation and set sentencing for May 21.
Fort Jennings Park
Giveaway
Week 3: No. 343 Trent
Siefker
Week 4: No. 887 Scott
Gasser
Week 5: No. 867 Andrew
Aldrich
UTRUP, Roman A.,
86, of Delphos, funeral
services will begin at 11
a.m. Friday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, the
Rev. David Howell offi-
ciating. Burial will be in
Resurrection Cemetery,
with military graveside rites
conducted by the Delphos
Veterans Council at the
cemetery. Friends may call
from 2-8 p.m. today at the
funeral home. Preferred
memorials are to Van Wert
Inpatient Hospice Center.
To leave condolences, visit
harterandschier.com.
One Year Ago
Social media, includ-
ing Facebook, Twitter and
Instagram, were booming
Monday afternoon with the
appearance of 90s rapper
Vanilla Ice in the Van Wert
community. The celebrity’s
appearance was not an iso-
lated incident as he is cur-
rently filming a portion of his
new reality show, “Vanilla Ice
Goes Amish,” in the county
this week.
25 Years Ago – 1989
Fort Jennings pushed eight
runs across the plate in the
third inning en route to a 13-4
win over Jefferson Saturday
in the Class A sectional at
Elida. Bernie Berelsman and
Rod Schroeder delivered bas-
es-loaded singles in the third
inning to drive in two runs
each. Fort Jennings was aided
by five walks and an error in
the inning.
Ottoville Senior Citizens
met recently and played cards
in the Ottoville Municipal
building with 20 in atten-
dance, including two guests,
Margaret Fortman and
Hildagard Unterbrink of
Ottawa. President Albert
Wieging conducted the meet-
ing. Names drawn to serve on
the committee for both parties
in May were Valeria Siefker,
Matilda Eickholt and Edwin
Wannemacher.
Ruth Bigelow, Americanism
chairman of Veterans of
Foreign Wars 3035, presented
an American flag to Delphos
fire and police departments
in celebration of Loyalty Day
May 1. Accepting the flag for
the police department was
Police Chief Dennis Kimmet.
Randy Carder represented the
fire department.
50 Years Ago – 1964
A new homemaker’s
club was organized here this
week as a group of women
met at the home of Margaret
Adams. Election of offi-
cers was held and the name
Happy Homemaker’s Club
was chosen. Officers elected
were: Bernice Dunn, president;
Lucretha Ralston, vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Nelson Fry, sec-
retary-treasurer; and Margaret
Adams, reporter.
Members of the American
Lutheran Church Women of
St. Peter Evangelical Lutheran
Church held a mother-daughter
tea Tuesday evening in the par-
ish hall. Greeting guests as they
arrived were three generations
of the Ed Mox family; Mrs. Ed
Mox, Mrs. Ronald Rice and
Deborah Rice. Flowers were
presented to Nora Bindel for
being the oldest mother pres-
ent, and to Mrs. Elmer Freund,
Sr. and Mrs. George Roth for
the most grandchildren.
An atmosphere of Spring
greeted the guests attending
the library benefit card party
held Wednesday evening at the
Delphos Public Library. The
party was sponsored by the
Green Thumb Garden Club.
Pink, red and white petunias,
which served as individual
table prizes, centered the card
tables and a foil-wrapped glad-
ioli bulb, furnished by Mrs.
Henry Fettig and Mrs. J. V.
DeWeese, served as consola-
tion prize for each table.
75 Years Ago – 1939
A group of Jefferson High
School students were in
Oberlin Saturday to compete
in the state solo and ensemble
contest. The clarinet quartet
composed of Helen Fettig,
Alice Mox, Ruby Kloeppel and
Robert Lindemann received
a rating of three. Eloise Bell
received a three rating in the
piccolo solo competition. In
the mezzo-soprano com-
petition, Irma Dienstberger
received a four rating.
Helen Kaverman, daughter
of Mrs. James Mollenkopf, and
Martha Helmkamp, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. William
Helmkamp, will be included
in a class of 15 young women
who will be graduated from
St. Rita’s Hospital Training
School for nurses at the com-
mencement exercises to be
held May 7 in St. Rose High
School auditorium in Lima.
Both Delphos young women
are graduates of St. John’s
High School.
The Old Time ‘Coon
Hunters will meet Wednesday
night at the Frank Osting farm,
south of Delphos. Following
the business meeting a fish
fry will be enjoyed. A number
of members of the Delphos
club were in Kalida Sunday
in attendance at a coon chase.
Among those in attendance
were V. A. Brenneman, Doyle
Burkholder, Ed. Gerdemann,
Frank Osting, N. S. Diltz,
Pete Matson and James
Counsellor.
PARK
GIVEAWAY
'Who Framed
Roger Rabbit'
actor Hoskins
dies at 71
LONDON (AP) —
Bob Hoskins never lost his
Cockney accent, even as he
became a global star who
charmed and alarmed audi-
ences in a vast range of roles.
Short and bald, with a
face he once compared to “a
squashed cabbage,” Hoskins
was a remarkably versa-
tile performer. As a London
gangster in “The Long Good
Friday,” he moved from bra-
vura bluster to tragic under-
statement. In “Who Framed
Roger Rabbit,” he cavorted
with a cast of animated char-
acters, making technological
trickery seem seamless and
natural.
A family statement released
Wednesday said Hoskins had
died in a hospital the night
before after a bout of pneumo-
nia. He was 71 and had been
diagnosed with Parkinson’s
disease in 2012.
Helen Mirren, who starred
alongside Hoskins in “The
Long Good Friday,” called
him “a great actor and an even
greater man. Funny, loyal,
instinctive, hard-working,
with that inimitable energy
that seemed like a spectacular
firework rocket just as it takes
off.”
“I personally will miss him
very much, London will miss
one of her best and most lov-
ing sons, and Britain will miss
a man to be proud of,” Mirren
said.
The 5’6” (1.68 meters
tall) Hoskins, who was built
like a bullet, specialized in
tough guys with a soft cen-
ter, including the ex-con who
chaperones Cathy Tyson’s
escort in Neil Jordan’s 1986
film “Mona Lisa.” Hoskins
was nominated for a best-
actor Academy Award for the
role.
“Neil Jordan’s ‘Mona
Lisa’ and Bob Zemeckis’
‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’
were just two of the films
that showed Bob Hoskins’ tre-
mendous range,” said Steven
Spielberg, who produced
“Roger Rabbit” and later
directed Hoskins in his Peter
Pan tale “Hook.”
“He was an actor who
loved to work and the work
loved him. And so did
every audience,” Spielberg
said.
Hoskins’ breakout
Hollywood role was as a
detective investigating car-
toon crime in “Who Framed
Roger Rabbit,” a tribute to
hard-boiled 1940s entertain-
ment that was one of the first
major movies to meld anima-
tion and live action. The 1988
Zemeckis film was a huge
global success that won three
Oscars and helped revive ani-
mated filmmaking.
CLEVELAND (AP) --
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
11 - 1 8 - 2 2 - 2 6 - 3 6 - 4 9 ,
Kicker: 6-4-3-3-2-2
Est. jackpot: $68.6 million
Mega Millions
Est.jackpot: $81 million
Pick 3 Evening
9-3-0
Pick 3 Midday
2-2-6
Pick 4 Evening
4-8-8-6
Pick 4 Midday
6-4-1-6
Pick 5 Evening
3-3-3-5-1
Pick 5 Midday
6-7-7-1-4
Powerball
0 2 - 0 9 - 1 1 - 1 9 - 5 0 ,
Powerball: 32, Power Play: 3
Rolling Cash 5
18-23-24-30-36
Est. jackpot: $411,000
Thursday, May 1, 2014 The Herald – 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Information submitted
MARION TOWNSHIP
— The Marion Township
Trustees held their regu-
lar schedule meeting on
Monday with Jerry Gilden,
Joseph Youngpeter and
Howard Violet present.
The purpose of the
meeting was to pay bills
and conduct ongoing busi-
ness. The minutes of the
previous meeting were
read and approved as read.
The trustees then reviewed
the bills and gave approv-
al for 12 checks totaling
$6,965.99.
Road Foreman Elwer
reported that the Road and
Sign Inventories for April
have been completed.
There has been water
issues in the area of 7807
Redd Road. A section of
tile was full of tree roots,
which Elwer replaced and
should take care of the
problem.
Police Chief Vermillion
and Zoning Inspector Elwer
sent letters to the owner
of the property at 5670
Hartman Road regarding
numerous issues, which
they are in violation of.
There being no further
business Youngpeter made
a motion to adjourn, which
was seconded by Gilden
and passed unanimously.
Township officials
send letters to
owner about
property violations
Information submitted
RURAL MIDDLE POINT — Lincolnview was thrilled to
celebrate Every Kid Healthy™ Week with Action for Healthy
Kids and other organizations dedicated to children’s health
and academic success, along with some more than 500 other
schools around the country.
Launched by Action for Healthy Kids® (AFHK) in 2013,
Every Kid Healthy Week is an annual observance shared by
AFHK’s network of schools, partner organizations and volun-
teers as part of a national movement to create healthier school
environments for kids.
Formally observed the last week of April, this special
week, which is recognized on the calendar of National Health
Observances, provides an opportunity for Lincolnview to
celebrate our contributions to students’ health and wellness.
Locally, as a winner of the Zone 2 Ohio Action for Healthy
Kids Every Kid Healthy Week Challenge, Lincolnview
received a banner, $100 towards school wellness program-
ming and a cooking demo for students during the lunch hour
to be scheduled in May.
Lincolnview is working to do its part to put the students
on a healthier path by doing a Fruit and Vegetable Challenge
in the elementary and also a taste testing of fruits and veg-
etables during lunch. Lincolnview is also taking the Every
Kid Healthy Pledge to get the information and free resources
needed to create healthier school environments for kids. Your
family can take the Pledge too!
Lincolnview receives award
for Every Kid Healthy Week
Lincolnview Local Schools won the Every Kid Healthy Week challenge and received a banner, $100 for a
school wellness program and a cooking demonstration for students. (Photo submitted)
Information submitted
There are still seats avail-
able for the Museum of Postal
History Chicago Tour June
5-8.
The tour leaves Delphos
on June 5 with the first stop
at the Prime Outlet Mall
in Michigan City, Ind. An
alternative is the Blue Chip
Casino. The remainder of the
afternoon will be spent travel-
ing to the Hilton Garden Inn in
Oakbrook Terrace. Thursday
evening participants will dine
at Tommy Guns Garage for
a dinner and a show, all of
which is included in the price.
Friday through Sunday,
participants can use their
Go Chicago Pass that gives
free access to 26 different
attractions from the Skywalk
atop the Willis Tower to the
Chicago River Architecture
cruise.
Transportation around
Chicago is provided in two
ways: the Go Chicago Pass
gives the holder unlimited
hop-on, hop-off trolleys to
explore independently; and
for everyone following the
itinerary, the motorcoach is
available all the time.
Frank Lloyd Wright’s
home and studio, the limit-
ed time exhibit at the Field
Museum of the 1893 Chicago
World’s Fair, the Museum of
Science and Industry, the Art
Institute, the planetarium and
aquarium and 20 other attrac-
tions are also included on the
Go Chicago Pass.
Travelers will return home
on June 8.
All lodging, transportation,
breakfasts, dinner theater, all
attractions and tours, taxes,
fees and tips are all included
in the double occupancy price
of $599 per person. What’s
left for participants is just a
handful of meals.
Call Gary Levitt at 419-
303-5482 or Ruth Ann Wittler
419-296-8443 to reserve a
spot.
Seats still available
for Chicago tour
Information submitted
Memorial Day marks the unofficial
start of the summer season and sun-
filled, carefree days ahead. The true
meaning of the holiday is to honor mem-
bers of the United States Armed Forces
who gave the ultimate sacrifice while
protecting and defending our country’s
freedoms. We can honor these brave
service men and women by making and
keeping an appointment to donate blood
through the American Red Cross.
“Your blood donation at this time
of year works as both a tribute and a
testament to our nation’s armed forces,”
said Tracy Fox, spokesperson for the
Indiana-Ohio Blood Services Region
of the American Red Cross. “By rolling
up your sleeve, you’ll also help main-
tain a strong blood supply at a time of
year when blood donations traditionally
decline.”
Every two seconds, someone in the
United States needs blood. While that
need is constant, the number of people
donating blood can fluctuate, particu-
larly over the summer. Someone seri-
ously injured in an automobile accident,
for instance, may need up to 40 units
of blood for their emergency care. It’s
the blood already on the shelf that saves
lives, so it’s very important that donors
give blood throughout the year.
“We hope citizens recognize the ongo-
ing need and will mark the Memorial
Day holiday by donating blood,” said
Fox. “Your donation will honor those
who sacrificed for our country, as well
as help ensure a stable blood supply for
those in need.”
Upcoming blood donation opportuni-
ties in your area:
Allen County
— May 17 from 9:30 a.m. until
1:30 p.m. at Allen County Fairgrounds,
located at 2750 Harding Hwy. in Lima.
— May 19 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.
at Spencerville High School, located at
2500 Wisher Drive in Spencerville.
— May 19 from 1-5 p.m. at Heritage
Elementary School, located at 816
College Ave. in Lima.
— May 20 from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.
at HCF Management, located at 1100
Shawnee Road in Lima.
— May 20 from 1-6:30 p.m. at the
American Red Cross Allen County
Chapter House Lima, located at 610 S.
Collett Street in Lima.
— May 22 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
at Lima Memorial Medical Park, located
at 525 N. Eastown Road in Lima.
— May 30 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
at Lima Memorial Hospital, located at
1001 Bellefontaine Avenue in Lima.
— May 31 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.
at Layman Feed and Lawn, located at
705 East Main St. in Elida.
Donate blood to honor Memorial Day heroes
Governor grants
clemency to
condemned inmate
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Republican Gov. John Kasich
on Wednesday spared a prison
inmate set to die later this month
for the killing of a Cleveland
produce vendor while rejecting
calls that he be made eligible
for parole and possible release.
Kasich’s clemency decision
followed the recommendation a
day earlier of mercy for Arthur
Tyler by the Ohio Parole Board,
which cited several statements
by Tyler’s co-defendant tak-
ing responsibility for the 1983
shooting.
Tyler, 54, was scheduled to
die May 28 for the killing of
Sander Leach during a robbery.
Leach’s relatives opposed clem-
ency for Tyler.
Kasich called the irregulari-
ties in the court proceedings
troubling. His decision com-
muted Tyler’s sentence to life
with no chance of parole.
“Arthur Tyler’s crime
against Sander Leach and his
family was heinous, and this
commutation in no way dimin-
ishes that,” Kasich said in a
statement.
Attorneys for Tyler told the
board on April 24 that he is
innocent and should be freed.
Defense attorney Vicki Werneke
said in an email Wednesday she
continues to believe in Tyler’s
innocence and was hopeful
after the parole board report
that Tyler “would eventually be
released from prison.”
Cleveland prosecutors
argued that Tyler’s sentence
should be changed to life
without parole because of
questions about the convic-
tion, though they maintain
Tyler fatally shot the produce
vendor.
The case doesn’t meet the
office’s current standards for
a capital punishment prosecu-
tion, Cuyahoga County assis-
tant prosecutor Allan Regas
told the board. He said the
office wouldn’t seek the death
sentence in such a case today
based on the evidence, which
includes what appears to be
a lack of intent to shoot the
victim.
Tyler’s first death sentence
was overturned by a state
appeals court in 1984 on the
basis of poor legal assistance.
He was convicted at a second
trial and again sentenced to
death.
1
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General Dentist
419.692.GRIN
(4746)
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This message published as a public service by these civic minded firms.
Please support and thank them.
7
th
ANNUAL
Allen County Master Gardeners
SPRING
PLANT SALE
SAT., MAY 3, 2014
9:00 AM-NOON
EAGLE PRINT GARDEN LOT
314 N. MAIN ST., DELPHOS
LOTS OF PERENNIALS, ORNAMENTAL GRASSES
AND HOSTAS FOR SALE
RAISING FUNDS TO “GREEN UP”
THE DOWNTOWN DELPHOS AREA
Perennials donated by Master Gardeners
AUTO DEALERS
•Delpha
Chev/Buick Co.
AUTO PARTS
•Pitsenbarger Auto
FINANCIAL
INSTITUTIONS
•First Federal Bank
FURNITURE
•Lehmann’s Furniture
•Westrich
Furniture & Appliances
GARAGE
•Omer’s Alignment Shop
HARDWARE
•Delphos Ace Hardware
& Rental
This message published
as a public
service by these civic
minded firms.
Interested sponsors call
The Delphos Herald
Public Service Dept.
419-695-0015
CA 309
6” & 8”
Work Boot
242 N. Main St., Ph. 419-692-0921
Mon.-Fri. 8-6:30 Sat. 8-5
Hardware
Delphos
We Carry
AMERICAN-MADE
Carolina Shoes
11 models of work
shoes & boots in stock
all with 30-day
Comfort Guarantee
Information submitted
VAN WERT — Last
weekend things were
hoppin’ at the Van Wert
Fairgrounds.
The Van Wert Youth
Rabbit Club and the Van
Wert Bunny Hoppers 4-H
Club hosted their annual
spring rabbit show. This
show is a national sanc-
tioned show bringing
exhibitors to Van Wert from
the tri-state area.
There were rabbits
everywhere representing
the 47 sanctioned breeds
from the American Rabbit
Breeders Association. At
the end of the day in the
adult (open) division, the
best rabbit of the day was
John Platt’s Champagne
D’Argent from Roanoke,
Indiana.
The reserve grand cham-
pion rabbit was Katelyn
Welch’s Havana from Van
Wert.
In the youth division,
the best rabbit of the day
was Gene Gillespie’s
Californian from Van Wert.
The second best youth rab-
bit was Brenna White’s
Holland Lop from Goshen,
Indiana.
For more information
and a list of upcoming rab-
bit shows, go to www.arba.
net or www.vanwertrabbit.
org.
AGRIBUSINESS
4 — The Herald Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.delphosherald.com
Harsh winter weather damages alfalfa
JAMES HOORMAN
Putnam County Extension
Ag Educator
The following information is from the free Ohio State
University Crop Observation and Recommendation Network
(C.O.R.N.) and can be found at corn.osu.edu. The winter was
hard on alfalfa stands according to Mark Sulc, OSU Forage
Specialist and Rory Lewandowski.
“They found severe heaving damage in alfalfa with some
fields showing heaving of 70 percent of the stand. Heaving
is usually more severe in areas with less than ideal internal
and surface soil drainage and on soils with high shrink/swell
potential. It is more likely where a mid to late fall harvest was
taken. Fall harvesting can weaken plants and it reduces the
plant residue that serves to moderate soil temperature fluctua-
tions and catch snow that also insulates against wild tempera-
ture swings during the winter.
“Plants with crowns heaved up two or more inches are
probably already dead or in the process of desiccating and
will soon die. Plants that are heaved 1 to 1.5 inches above the
soil surface or less may on casual inspection appear normal
and be greening up. But closer inspection will reveal crowns
above the soil surface, which will likely limit the productive
life of the plant. Such plants will desiccate more quickly, be
injured by wheel traffic and crowns may break or be cut off at
the first harvest. Some of those plants may survive through the
first harvest, but yield potential is compromised and they will
likely disappear from the stand.
“Walk your fields and get a broad view to determine
whether spring growth appears uniform. If growth is spotty
or nonexistent, it is very likely that plants have suffered some
injury or heaving. Visually estimate the ground cover of desir-
able forage plants as the stand develops four to six inches of
new growth. Stands with more than 80 percent ground cover
and good vigor should produce excellent yields assuming
good growing conditions, stands with 60-80 percent ground
cover should produce fair yields, stands with 40 to 60 percent
ground cover will probably produce yields in the 60 percent
range of normal, and stands with less than 40 percent ground
cover will generally not yield much. Weeds will become a real
problem in the thinner stands, and over seeding with Italian
ryegrass or with oats will boost first harvest yields. Destroying
the stand and rotating out to another crop should also be
considered where substantial damage has occurred.” (CORN
Newsletter 2014-10)
“In Ohio, some wheat stands look very good while oth-
ers have several bare patches. Overall, wheat fields on well
drained soils and planted shortly after the fly-free date are
in good condition, while fields that were planted wet and
late tend to be in poorer condition. Cool conditions and an
extended winter have caused the growth of the 2014 wheat
crop to be behind what is considered to be normal in Ohio at
this time of year. The current growth stage is between Feekes
5 and Feekes 7. Remember, short-looking wheat does not
mean that the crop is not developing and advancing through
the different growth stages.
“Growers who rely on the height of the crop as an indicator
of crop development may miss Feekes GS 6, a critical growth
stage for herbicide application and top-dressing. Do not relay
on the height of the plants or calendar dates alone to make
your management decisions. Walk fields, pull tillers from
multiple places, remove the lower leaves and examine these
tillers for the presence of nodes. At Feekes 6, the first node is
visible at the base of the stem, about an inch or so above the
soil line. For pictures of wheat throughout the Feekes growth
stages and a summary of appropriate pesticide/fertilizer man-
agement timing go to Managing Wheat by Growth Stage ( K.
Wise, et al) at https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/
ID/ID-422.pdf.
Feekes 6 is still too early to be concerned about apply-
ing fungicides for foliar disease management. Septoria leaf
blotch and powdery mildew are usually the first to show up.
Results from our studies have shown that the greatest benefits
from foliar fungicide applications were obtained when treat-
ments were made between Feekes 8 (flag leaf emergence) and
Feekes 10 (boot). This is largely because most of our major
foliar diseases usually develop and reach the flag leaf after
Feekes 8-9. Continue to scout fields for diseases over the next
few weeks. If it continues to rain as temperatures increase,
you may want to consider a fungicide application at Feekes 8,
especially if the variety is susceptible.” (Paul, Culman, Lentz,
Lindsey, and Watters, CORN 2014-11)
Two Pathfinders receive scholarships
Samantha Bonifas (left) and Alicia Buettner (right), both of the Pathfinders
of Delphos 4-H club, were awarded a Van Wert County 4-H college schol-
arship at the 2014 Senior and Volunteer Banquet held at the Van Wert
County Fairgrounds. (Submitted photo)
Elida FFA teams compete
The Elida FFA Cooperative Education Team competed in the State FFA Career
Development Event and placed fifth in the state out of 43 schools. The contest
is a written test on business practices in the United States with an emphasis
on farm cooperatives. The members on the team were (left to right) front row,
Emily Siefker, 11th out of 433 contestants; A.J. Siefker 12th; Lindsey Seiberling
19th; Riley Overholt 27th; and Mitchel Kamine 28th. Standing are (left to right)
Paige Wherly 48th, Lexi Moyer 59th, Kyle Hambleton 63rd, Caleb Lohr 149th,
Max Stambaugh 191st and Ali Skinner 331st. (Submitted photos)
Rabbit Club, Bunny Hoppers hop into spring show
Youth division winners are, front row left to
right, Brenna White, reserve champion; and Gene
Gillespie, champion. Judge Swartz, back left, and
Adams stand with the winners. (Submitted photo)
The Elida FFA Agricultural Engineering Team placed seventh out of 35 schools in the
State FFA Career Development Event. The contest consisted of a written test on build-
ing structures, pesticide safety, conservation, machinery and equipment operations and
maintenance. Team members are (seated left to right) A.J. Siefker, who placed 7th out of
315 individuals; Travis Watkins 24th; Jared Blymyer 64th and Vanessa Stolzenburg 70th.
Back row standing are (left to right) Hailey Skeins 83rd, Garce Martin 114th, Clark Etzler
79th, Jake Hunter 264th, Andrew Troyer 151st and Sean Cook 272nd.
The Elida FFA Outdoor
Power Team recently placed
third at the FFA District 4
Outdoor Power contests
held at Cory Rawson High
School. The contest con-
sisted of tools and small
engine parts identification,
troubleshooting engines
and using computers and
engine manuals to look up
parts and information. Team
members are, left to right,
Travis Watkins sixth-place
individual; Robert Wortman
16th; and Jared Blymyer
fourth place out of 45.
2
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC EDS-5422A-A
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant:
financial independence and providing for family.
Striking a balance between saving for goals, such
as education and retirement, and allocating money
for daily expenses can be challenging. But you
can do it.
Learn how you can redefine your savings
approach toward education and retire-
ment. Call or visit today.
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC EDS-5422A-A
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant:
financial independence and providing for family.
Striking a balance between saving for goals, such
as education and retirement, and allocating money
for daily expenses can be challenging. But you
can do it.
Learn how you can redefine your savings
approach toward education and retire-
ment. Call or visit today.
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC EDS-5422A-A
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant:
financial independence and providing for family.
Striking a balance between saving for goals, such
as education and retirement, and allocating money
for daily expenses can be challenging. But you
can do it.
Learn how you can redefine your savings
approach toward education and retire-
ment. Call or visit today.
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC EDS-5422A-A
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant:
financial independence and providing for family.
Striking a balance between saving for goals, such
as education and retirement, and allocating money
for daily expenses can be challenging. But you
can do it.
Learn how you can redefine your savings
approach toward education and retire-
ment. Call or visit today.
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC EDS-5422A-A
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant:
financial independence and providing for family.
Striking a balance between saving for goals, such
as education and retirement, and allocating money
for daily expenses can be challenging. But you
can do it.
Learn how you can redefine your savings
approach toward education and retire-
ment. Call or visit today.
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
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FROM BABY TO GRADUATE
It seemed like just a few short years...
--Graduate--
Graduate’s Name
Name of School
Date of Birth
Parents Name
Grandparents
--Graduate--
Graduate’s Name
Name of School
Date of Birth
Parents Name
Grandparents
NOTE: These are a reduced version of what your picture will actually look like.
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405 N. Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
DEADLINE MAY 9, 2014
Now’s the time to reserve your graduates, from the Tri-County
area, a spot in this “special edition” just for them.

Any type of graduation applies:
PRE-SCHOOL, GRADE SCHOOL, 8th GRADE,
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Just bring in or mail: completed coupon below, graduate’s
favorite baby picture, graduate’s current picture, and payment.
The pictures will be published side by side on May 19. Pictures
may also be emailed to: graphics@delphosherald.com.

“Baby To Graduate Review”
Return photo to: Name
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Pain Doctor Discovers Blood Flow-
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for Diabetics and Foot Pain Sufferers!
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PAÌD ADVERTÌSEMENT
What part of your swollen, tired,
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Good news comes in the form of
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The ‘miracle sock’ is made from
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When this material comes in con-
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The 3D-weave technology used
in the material has been compared
to infrared light therapy to help re-
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manufacturer, who also makes a
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Anne M. from California agrees.
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Doctor
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of 30 years, Dr.
Jahner comments
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Thursday, May 1, 2014 The Herald — 5 www.delphosherald.com
COMMUNITY
Landmark
Calendar of
Events
TODAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Museum of Postal History,
339 N. Main St., is open
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m.-2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
SENIOR
LUNCHEON CAFE
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
Some Like It
Hot Brunch
1 pound hot pork sau-
sage, cooked and drained
2 cans (4 ounces
each) diced green chilies,
drained
1/2 cup sliced green
onions (including green
tops)
2 cups grated
Monterey Jack cheese (or
Cheddar cheese)
1/3 cup picante sauce
(milk, medium or hot)
1-1/4 cups buttermilk
baking mix
1 cup milk
6 eggs
Salt and pepper, to
taste
Spray a 13x9-inch
baking dish with non-
stick spray. Layer cooked
sausage, chilies, green
onions, cheese and pican-
te sauce in dish.
In a mixing bowl,
combine baking mix,
milk, eggs, salt and pep-
per. Gently pour over
layered mixture in dish.
Bake at 350 degrees
for 30 minutes, or until
brown.
Spicy Cheese Dip
1 1/2 pounds Monterey
Jack cheese, shredded
1/4 cup flour
2 1/2 cups heavy
cream
1 to 2 jalapeno chile
peppers, minced
1/2 cup sour cream
Toss together cheese
and flour in a large
resealable plastic bag
until cheese is coated
with flour.
Heat cream in a dou-
ble boiler over medium
heat. When cream begins
to simmer, add 1/2 cup
cheese, stirring to incor-
porate. When cheese is
melted, add another 1/2
cup cheese and stir until
it melts; repeat until all
cheese is melted.
Stir in jalapenos and
sour cream. Keep dip
warm over low heat, but
don’t allow it to boil.
Makes 6 cups.
You can duplicate
the cheese dip popular
in Mexican restaurants.
Keep it warm to avoid a
skin forming.
Make these speedy
versions of
Tex-Mex favorites!
If you enjoyed these recipes, made changes or have
one to share, email kitchenpress@yahoo.com.
May 2
Alyssa Boecker
Mandy Pavel
Noah Ledyard
Aimee Banks
Kyle Berelsman
Keith Pavel Jr.
Paul Sever
Ava Rose Ellerbrock
Janet Rowbotherm
MAY 1-3
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Beth Metzger, Eloise
Shumaker, Pattie Thompson, Sandy Hahn and Kathy Vorst;
Annex — Sharon Schroeder and Mary Lee Miller.
FRIDAY: Mary Jane Watkins. Vera Chiles, Valeta Ditto
and Diana Muller; Annex — Eloise Shumaker and Judy
Pohlman.
SATURDAY: Millie Minning, Millie Spitnale, Valeta
Ditto and Robin Wark; Annex — Judy Green and Carol
Hohman.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m.
Friday; and 9 a.m.-noon Saturday.
Anyone who would like to volunteer should contact
Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-8440; Alice Heidenescher,
419-692-5362; Linda Bockey, 419-692-7145; or Lorene
Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
MAY 5-9
MONDAY: Sub sandwich
with lettuce and tomato, mac-
aroni salad, mixed fruit, cof-
fee and 2 percent milk.
TUESDAY: Marinara
meat sauce over spaghetti
noodles, cauliflower, garlic
toast, cookie, coffee and 2
percent milk.
WEDNESDAY: Baked
fish, redskin potatoes, cole
slaw, bread, margarine, fruit,
coffee and 2 percent milk.
THURSDAY: Cube steak,
mashed potatoes, mixed veg-
gies, dinner roll, margarine,
apricots, coffee and 2 percent
milk.
FRIDAY: Pork chop,
baked beans, cabbage, bread,
margarine, dessert, coffee and
2 percent milk.
For all the latest
www.delphosherald.com
Jubilee Flower Show June 7 and 8
The Van Wert County Jubilee Flower Show will hold
its 53rd Flower at the Wassenberg Art Center at 214 S.
Washington St., Van Wert.
Entries are open to the public.
Entries will be accepted from 8-10:30 a.m. on June 7.
Entry tags and books may be picked up at Balyeat’s Coffee
Shop.
The flowers may be viewed from 1-5 p.m. on June 7 and
from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. on June 8.
There is no entry fee nor admission fee to the flower show.
This show will be in the heart of the Peony Festival week-
end.
For all the news that matters,
subscribe to The Delphos Herald, 419-695-0015
Newspapers provide a
daily source of informa-
tion from around the globe.
Expand your horizons.
Subscribe today!
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015

Description Last Price Change
American Electric Power Co., Inc. 53.81 -0.07
AutoZone, Inc. 533.89 +4.27
Bunge Limited 79.65 -0.16
BP plc 50.62 +0.33
Citigroup Inc. 47.91 -0.25
CenturyLink, Inc. 34.91 +0.11
CVS Caremark Corporation 72.72 -0.75
Dominion Resources, Inc. 72.54 +0.08
Eaton Corporation plc 72.64 +0.49
Ford Motor Co. 16.15 +0.15
First Defiance Financial Corp. 27.02 -0.12
First Financial Bancorp. 16.19 -0.09
General Dynamics Corp. 109.45 +1.19
General Motors Company 34.48 +0.49
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 25.20 +0.09
Huntington Bancshares Incorporated 9.16 +0.11
Health Care REIT, Inc. 63.09 +0.13
The Home Depot, Inc. 79.51 -0.01
Honda Motor Co., Ltd. 33.30 +0.51
Johnson & Johnson 101.29 +0.26
JPMorgan Chase & Co. 55.98 -0.12
Kohl’s Corp. 54.79 -0.55
Lowe’s Companies Inc. 45.91 -0.52
McDonald’s Corp. 101.38 -0.12
Microsoft Corporation 40.40 -0.11
Pepsico, Inc. 85.89 +0.13
The Procter & Gamble Company 82.55 +0.11
Rite Aid Corporation 7.30 +0.21
Sprint Corporation 8.50 +0.23
Time Warner Inc. 66.46 +1.72
United Bancshares Inc. 15.31 -0.46
U.S. Bancorp 40.78 +0.21
Verizon Communications Inc. 46.73 -0.04
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. 79.71 +0.04
Dow Jones Industrial Average 16580.84 +45.47
S&P 500 1883.95 +5.62
NASDAQ Composite 4114.56 +11.01
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business April 30, 2014
By JIM METCALFE
Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
I don’t know if I can add anything to the situation
involving 80-year-old curmudgeon Donald Sterling, cur-
rently — and I write currently because this may change in
a hurry — the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers.
His being banned for life by new National Basketball
Association Commissioner Adam Silver from really doing
anything with his team reminds me of what happened to the
late former owner of the Cincinnati Reds, Marge Schott,
when Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig
basically forced her into selling the team due to similar
“open mouth and put in both feet” comments.
In many ways, both owners and their stances on simi-
lar issues regardless non-Caucasians — and other issues
regarding how they ran their teams — were bad for their
respective teams and leagues.
Schott was bad for MLB and the Reds because of
her seeming support of that definitely-not-a-good-human-
being, Adolf Hitler — what the heck was going through
HER mind when she made those utterances? — as well as
how she felt about others simply because of the color of
their skin or their ethnicity.
She also really didn’t have a clue about how to build and
maintain a baseball team — she was quoted one time as
asking the question “why do we need so many scouts? All
they do is watch baseball games?” — and under her watch,
a once teeming farm system was reduced to rubble.
She did have some positives to her personality — out-
side of the spotlight, she was known to be charitable — but
she will be forever stained with her negative comments and
not her good actions.
6 – The Herald Thursday, May 1, 2014
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Karam gives up prom for chance to race Indy 500
Associated Press
Sage Karam has found only one speed bump
in landing a ride in the Indianapolis 500: He
can’t go to the prom.
Karam was set to bring girlfriend Anna de
Ferran, daughter of 2003 Indianapolis
500 winner Gil de Ferran, to his
Nazareth Area High School prom
until his new job got in the way. The
19-year-old Karam, the reigning Indy
Lights champion, struck a deal this
week to drive the No. 22 Chevrolet
in his Indianapolis 500 debut.
Qualifying is on May 17, the same day as
his prom, forcing Karam to start his engine
in Indianapolis instead of renting a limo in
Pennsylvania.
“I’d never been to a prom before,” he said.
“I was kind of looking forward to it. It’s a good
excuse to miss it.”
Securing a ride for the “Greatest Spectacle in
Racing” from Chip Ganassi isn’t a bad gradua-
tion gift.
“I always said when I was younger, I wanted
to race in the 500 my senior year,” Karam said.
“Some kids kind of laughed at that idea. Even
adults. I always stuck by it. That’s what I always
was going to do. Now, it’s turned into a reality.
It’s a cool feeling to be 19 and know you’re
going to race in the biggest race in the world.”
Karam is from Nazareth, Pa., the hometown
of the Andretti family. He spent months wonder-
ing if he could parlay his feeder system champi-
onship into an IndyCar ride. He got the break he
needed when he signed with Ganassi in a driver
development role.
Karam will race in his first Indianapolis
500 next month in a car fielded jointly by
Chip Ganassi Racing and Dreyer & Reinbold
Kingdom Racing.
“I’ve worked my whole life to get to this
point,” Karam explained. “To finally
sign a contract with my name on it that
means I’m racing in the 500, it’s an
insane feeling.”
Driving for Sam Schmidt
Motorsports, Karam won the Indy
Lights championship, the ultimate
reward for a season built on three wins, nine
podiums, two poles and 163 laps led. He ditched
a final year of class for online courses as he
chased his open-wheel dream.
Karam ran the first two Tudor United Sports
Car races with Ganassi’s organization. Ganassi
plans to use Karam in the remaining endurance
races. But there are no immediate plans for
Karam to race in IndyCar after the 500.
“I knew if I was given the opportunity, I had
to impress,” Karam said. “It’s an awesome feel-
ing knowing that these guys are really putting
a lot of time and effort into me to groom me.”
Karam, a high school wrestler, just signed
a 6-month lease for a place in Carmel, Ind.,
and plans to absorb all he can in IndyCar’s
epicenter.
Karam’s prom is on hold but he does plan
on walking with his class for the June 10 grad-
uation ceremony, maybe with one more acces-
sory to go with his mortarboard hat and gown.
“Hopefully, I’ve got that Indy 500 champi-
ons ring on,” he added.
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
See MUSINGS, page 7
Local Roundup
Wildcats rally in 7th for baseball ‘W’
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — High school baseball
is a “simple” matter of making routine
plays in the field, getting crucial hits
at the plate, plus getting solid enough
pitching to keep a team in the game.
Jefferson did all three Wednesday
versus Fort Jennings, scoring four in the
top of the seventh to escape with a 7-5
non-league triumph on an overcast after-
noon/evening at Wildcat Field.
The game was moved from Fort
Jennings Village Park due to wet
grounds but the Musketeers (6-11) were
the home team on the scoreboard.
Trailing 5-3 to enter the seventh
frame, Ryan Bullinger ripped a single
to left against Musketeer starter Alex
Vetter (6-plus innings, 5 hits, 5 runs,
3 earned, 1 free pass, 1 strikeout; 76
pitches, 49 for strikes) and Nick Fitch
was hit by a pitch, ending Vetter’s stint
on the mound for Ryan Rau (1 IP, 1 hit,
2 runs, 1 earned, 1 BB, 1 K, 1 hit batter).
Pinch-hitter Tyler Rice got aboard on a
2-base throwing error, plating Bullinger
for a 5-4 deficit and putting Fitch at
third. Jace Stockwell walked to load
the bases and a wild pitch tied it at 5 as
Fitch touched the dish. Hunter Binkley
slashed a liner to center, getting pinch-
runner Josh Teman and Stockwell home
for a 7-5 lead. Binkley burgled sec-
ond and Ross Thompson was plunked.
Austin Jettinghoff bounced out and
Gage Mercer bounced to third, when
Alex Vetter gunned down Binkley trying
to score. Adam Rode was fanned for the
final out.
That uprising gave the fourth
Jefferson hurler, Jettinghoff (2
IPs, 1 hit, 1 BB) the victory as
he sent down the Musketeers in
order in the home seventh.
The hosts got two on in the first
on a 2-out infield hit to short by
Mark Metzger (3-for-4) and a liner
to left by Rau (2-for-4) but left
them stranded (8 for the game).
Jennings put up a 4-spot in
the third against Jefferson start-
er Jordan Herron (2 1/3 IPs, 5
hits, 4 ERs, 1 BB, 1 HB, 1 K).
Jared Hoersten was plunked but
was forced at second by Conner
Wollenhorst’s attempted sacrifice. He
stole second and scored as Dylan Van
Loo (2-for-4) went opposite way for a
double to left center. Metzger beat out
an infield hit to deep short. Rau lined a
singled to left that plated Van Loo for
a 2-0 lead. Vetter walked to load the
bases and finish Herron on the hill for
Stockwell (1 2/3 IPs, 2 hits, 2 Ks). Sam
Vetter’s bouncer to third forced Metzger
at home on Herron’s throw. However,
Kyle Hellman’s bloop to right center got
Rau and A. Vetter home for a 4-0 bulge.
The Wildcats (11-6) didn’t touch
A. Vetter until Stockwell led off the
Jefferson fourth with a bunt single down
the third-base line. Binkley earned a free
pass. However, Stockwell was forced
at third by Thompson and the next two
batters were retired to maintain a 4-run
Musketeer edge.
Hoersten led off the Musketeer fifth
with a liner to left center but
was caught stealing by Fitch.
Jefferson challenged again
in the visitor fifth on a leadoff
liner to right by Herron. Pinch-
runner Damien Dudgeon was
running as Bullinger bounced
out and reached third on a
Fitch bounceout. However,
he could not score.
The hosts got a leadoff rip
to center by Metzger in the
bottom of the fifth against
third Jefferson pitcher Teman
(1-plus IP, 2 hits, 1 ER, 2 BBs,
1 K), then stole second with one down.
A. Vetter walked and the Orange and
Black left both on the bases.
The Wildcats made it a 4-3 deficit
in the sixth. Stockwell got aboard via
an error, advanced on Binkley’s come-
backer and touched the dish courtesy
of Thompson’s double to the left-center
gap. Thompson swiped third and scored
via an error on the play. Jettinghoff
bunted his way aboard (third base), gar-
nered third via a 2-base throwing miscue
and scored the third Red and White run
on an RBI grounder by Gage Mercer.
Jettinghoff
See WILDCATS, page 7
LATE TUESDAY
Spencerville tri-meet vs.
St. John’s & Perry
Girls Team Rankings:
Spencerville 82, St. John’s
41, Perry 29.
Boys Team Rankings:
Spencerville 74, Perry 39, St.
John’s 30.
Points 5-3-2-1 except
relays 5-3
Girls 4x800 Meter Relay: 1.
Spencerville ‘A’ (Emilee Meyer,
Karri Purdy, Cierra Adams,
Tori Hardesty) 10:58.8; 2. St.
John’s ‘A’ (Breece Rohr, Maya
Gerker, Anna Mueller, Baylee
Lindeman) 11:44.0.
Boys 4x800 Meter Relay: 1. Perry ‘A’
9:01.6; 2. St. John’s ‘A’ (Curtis Pohlman,
Tyler Conley, Brian Pohlman, Tyler
Ledyard) 9:11.6.
Girls 100 Meter Hurdles: 1. Jenna
Kahle (SV) 17.1; 2. Schylar Miller (SV)
17.6; 3. Madelyn Buettner (SJ) 18.2; 4.
Healey (P) 18.3.
Boys 110 Meter Hurdles:
1. Anthony Schuh (SV) 15.9;
2. Cole (P) 18.7; 3. Conner
Britt (SJ) 19.2; 4. Bailey Croft
(SV) 19.3.
Girls 100 Meter Dash: 1.
Samantha Bonifas (SJ) 14.1;
2. Sanks (P) 14.7; 3. Madelyn
Buettner (SJ) 15.4; 4. Ashlyn
Troyer (SJ) 15.5.
Boys 100 Meter Dash: 1. Nick Martz
(SJ) 12.1; 2. Brian Pohlman (SJ) 12.3;
3. Andrew Emery (SV) 12.3; 4. Neal
(P) 12.4.
Girls 4x200 Meter Relay: 1.
Spencerville ‘A’ (Kennedy Sharp, Caitlin
Wurst, Amelia Wood, Patricia Riley)
2:04.5; 2. Perry ‘A’ 2:12.3.
Boys 4x200 Meter Relay: 1. St. John’s
‘A’ (Draven Dickman, Elliott Courtney,
Devin Haggard, Conner Britt) 1:41.5; 2.
Spencerville ‘A’ (Andrew Emery, Bailey
Croft, Mason Nourse, Evan Pugh) 1:42.1.
Girls 1,600 Meter Run: 1. Tori
Hardesty (SV) 5:56.2; 2. Cierra Adams
(SV) 6:05.8; 3. Breece Rohr (SJ) 6:09.6;
4. Baylee Lindeman (SJ) 7:18.3.
Boys 1,600 Meter Run: 1. Godfrey
(P) 5:06.9; 2. Lane-Harvey (P) 5:08.7;
3. Matthew Hurles (SV) 5:35.3; 4. Byron
Gay (SV) 5:42.1.
Girls 4x100 Meter Relay: 1.
Spencerville ‘A’ (Katie Merriman, Jenna
Kahle, Caitlin Wurst, Patricia Riley) 56.6;
2. Perry ‘A’ 59.7.
Boys 4x100 Meter Relay:
1. Spencerville ‘A’ (Logan
Vandemark, Calvin Wilson, Andrew
Emery, Anthony Schuh) 46.8; 2.
St. John’s ‘A’ (Brian Pohlman,
Curtis Pohlman, Tyler Conley, Nick
Martz) 47.6.
Girls 400 Meter Dash: 1. Kennedy
Sharp (SV) 1:06.7; 2. Maya Gerker (SJ)
1:06.8; 3. DeMoss (P) 1:17.4.
Boys 400 Meter Dash: 1. Trevor
McMichael (SV) 55.4; 2. Brandon
Patterson (SV) 58.2; 3. Hairston (P) 58.6.
Girls 300 Meter Hurdles: 1.
Samantha Bonifas (SJ) 50.9; 2. Erin
Williams (SJ) 53.0; 3. Jenna Kahle (SV)
53.6; 4. Schylar Miller (SV) 54.2.
Boys 300 Meter Hurdles: 1. Anthony
Schuh (SV) 43.0; 2. Conner Britt (SJ)
44.8; 3. Bailey Croft (SV) 48.4; 4. Cole
(P) 54.2.
Girls 800 Meter Run: 1. Karri Purdy
(SV) 2:33.0; 2. DeMoss (P) 3:15.3; 3.
Kelsi Gillespie (SJ) 3:33.9.
Boys 800 Meter Run: 1. Godfrey
(P) 2:10.1; 2. Grant Goecke(SV) 2:11.7;
3. Daniel (P) 2:28.8; 4. Ed Smith (SV)
2:38.9.
Girls 200 Meter Dash: 1. Sanks (P)
29.9; 2. Kennedy Sharp (SV) 30.5; 3. Ally
Gerberick (SJ) 30.9; 4. Ashlyn Troyer
(SJ) 31.8.
Boys 200 Meter Dash: 1. Hawthorne
(P) 24.5; 2. Cole (P) 24.5; 3. Calvin
Wilson (SV) 25.2; 4. Andrew Emery (SV)
25.7.
Girls Shot Put: 1. Katie
Merriman (SV) 32-11; 2. Cox (P)
29-5.5; 3. Allison Adams (SV)
29-3.25; 4. Audrey Bowsher (SV)
28-2.
Girls Discus: 1. Shania
Johnson (SV) 115-2; 2. Beth Griffin (SV)
102-10; 3. Allison Adams (SV) 89-6; 4.
Sydney Fischbach (SJ) 88-0.
Boys Discus: 1. Evan Pugh (SV)
141-0; 2. Tyler Reynolds (SV) 105-10; 3.
Logan Vandemark (SV) 104-9; 4. Derek
Anthony (SJ) 103-2.
Girls Long Jump: 1. Schylar
Miller (SV) 14-9; 2. Karri Purdy
(SV) 13-10; 3. Ashlyn Troyer
(SJ) 13-9; 4. Sanks (P) 13-5.
Boys Long Jump: 1.
Trevor McMichael (SV) 18-7;
2. Mulcahy (P) 17-1; 3. Elliott
Courtney (SJ) 16-11; 4. Smith
(P) 16-5.
Girls High Jump: 1. Davis
(P) 4-10; 2. Erin Williams (SJ) 4-6; 3.
Caitlin Wurst (SV) 4-4.
Boys High Jump: 1. Trevor
McMichael (SV) 5-10; 2. Bailey Croft
(SV) 5-6; 3. Devin Haggard (SJ) 5-0.
Girls Pole Vault: 1. Schylar Miller
(SV) 8-6; 2. Ally Gerberick (SJ) 7-6; 3.
Patricia Riley (SV) 7-0.
Boys Pole Vault: No results.
————
Bluffton Tri vs. Fort
Jennings and Ada (15
events)
Points 5-3-2-1 except
relays 5-3 (no more than 2
per team can score in any one
event)
Girls Team Rankings:
Bluffton 63, Ada 59, Ft.
Jennings 25.
100 Meter Dash: 1. Archer (A) 13.0;
2. Emily Grone (F) 13.8; 3. Mitchell (B)
14.8; 4. Oberly (B) 14.9.
200 Meter Dash: 1. Archer (A)
27.2; 2. Monday (B) 29.7; 3. Stuart
(A) 30.3; … 4. Lindsey Trentman
(F) 35.1.
400 Meter Dash: 1. Steinmetz
(B) 1:06.3; 2. Baker (B) 1:06.3; 3.
Milks (A) 1:07.9; 4. Bagais (A) 1:07.9.
800 Meter Run: 1. Steinmetz (B)
2:46; 2. Hunter (A) 2:48.4; 3. Marshall (B)
2:52.7; … 4. Sutton (A) 2:57.4.
1,600 Meter Run: 1. Steinmetz (B)
6:10.3; 2. Sommers (B) 6:10.7; … 3.
Alyssa Schimmoeller (F) 6:30.3; … 4.
Donnal (A) 6:54.
100 Meter Hurdles: 1. Baker (B)
16.6; 2. Emily Grone (F) 18.3; 3. Wright
(B) 20.4; 4. Vore (A) 20.4.
Track and Field Results
See RESULTS, page 7
A heavy — and costly — price to pay for the ‘other’ Donald
Information Submitted
Big Green bashes by
Raiders
HAVILAND — The
Ottoville baseballers opened
up with a 5-run first frame
and went on to bash host
Wayne Trace 12-1 in non-
league action Wednesday at
Wayne Trace.
Kyle Bendele twirled a
complete-game 1-hitter and
gave up an unearned run,
walking five and fanning two.
The Big Green amassed
14 hits versus Raider starter
Denver Burkley (4 innings,
12 hits, 11 earned run, 7 BBs)
and Blaine Jerome.
Joel Beining led the Big
Green attack with a 4-for-
4 night (3 runs scored, 1
run batted in), while Alex
Horstman (2 runs, 1 RBI) and
Brandon Boecker (1 run, 1
RBI) went 2-for-3 and Jared
Fanning (4 RBIs) and Joe
Vanoss (2 runs, 1 RBI) 2-for-
4.
Colby Speice had the only
knock for the Raiders.
Ottoville hosts Continental
today.
Ottoville
ab r h rbi
Bailey Seibert 3 1 1 0, Cory
Honigford 1 0 0 0, Joel Beining 4 3 4 1,
Brandon Boecker 3 1 2 1, Alex Horstman
3 2 2 1, Luke Schimmoeller 2 2 0 0, Joe
Vanoss 4 2 2 1, Jared Fanning 4 0 2 4,
Trent Miller 3 0 1 1, Kyle Bendele 1 1 0
1. Totals 28 12 14 10.
Wayne Trace
ab r h rbi
Blaine Jerome 2 0 0 0, Austin Fast
2 1 0 0, Colby Speice 2 0 1 0, Noah
Stoller 1 0 0 0, Aaron Stoller 2 0 0 0, Seth
Yenser 1 0 0 0, Foreigner 1 0 0 0, Grant
Gillett 1 0 0 0, Denver Burkley 1 0 0 0,
Jake Baska 1 0 0 0, Marcus McVay 1 0
0 0. Austin Winebrenner 0 0 0 0. Totals
15 1 1 0.
Score by Innings:
Ottoville 5 1 1 1 4 - 12 14 1
Wayne Trace 0 0 0 1 0 - 1 1 1
2B: Seibert; SF: Boecker; SB:
Schimmoeller, Gillett.
IP H R ER BB SO
Ottoville
K Bendele (W) 5.0 1 1 0 5 2
Wayne Trace
Burkley (L) 4.0 12 11 11 7 0
Jerome 1.0 2 1 0 1 0
P-S: Bendele 70-39; Burkley 94-46,
Jerome 16-9.
——-
Lady Rams rally past
Lancers
By Kevin Wannemacher
Times Bulletin Business
Manager
kwannemacher@times-
bulletin.com
MIDDLE POINT —
Upper Scioto Valley scored
five runs in the sixth inning,
rallying from an early 3-0
deficit to post a 9-3 win over
Lincolnview in non-league
softball action Wednesday
evening.
It was the Lady Lancers
who struck first, plating a
pair of runs in the opening
frame.
See ROUNDUP, page 7
2
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11260 ELIDA RD. DELPHOS, OH (419) 692-0055 Toll Free 800-589-7876
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Sales
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Sales
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Darlene Powell
Sales
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Sales
2 Years
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Sales
HOURS:
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7 Time Winner
By JIM METCALFE
Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
I don’t know if I can add anything to the situation
involving 80-year-old curmudgeon Donald Sterling, cur-
rently — and I write currently because this may change in
a hurry — the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers.
His being banned for life by new National Basketball
Association Commissioner Adam Silver from really doing
anything with his team reminds me of what happened to the
late former owner of the Cincinnati Reds, Marge Schott,
when Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig
basically forced her into selling the team due to similar
“open mouth and put in both feet” comments.
In many ways, both owners and their stances on simi-
lar issues regardless non-Caucasians — and other issues
regarding how they ran their teams — were bad for their
respective teams and leagues.
Schott was bad for MLB and the Reds because of
her seeming support of that definitely-not-a-good-human-
being, Adolf Hitler — what the heck was going through
HER mind when she made those utterances? — as well as
how she felt about others simply because of the color of
their skin or their ethnicity.
She also really didn’t have a clue about how to build and
maintain a baseball team — she was quoted one time as
asking the question “why do we need so many scouts? All
they do is watch baseball games?” — and under her watch,
a once teeming farm system was reduced to rubble.
She did have some positives to her personality — out-
side of the spotlight, she was known to be charitable — but
she will be forever stained with her negative comments and
not her good actions.
6 – The Herald Thursday, May 1, 2014
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Karam gives up prom for chance to race Indy 500
Associated Press
Sage Karam has found only one speed bump
in landing a ride in the Indianapolis 500: He
can’t go to the prom.
Karam was set to bring girlfriend Anna de
Ferran, daughter of 2003 Indianapolis
500 winner Gil de Ferran, to his
Nazareth Area High School prom
until his new job got in the way. The
19-year-old Karam, the reigning Indy
Lights champion, struck a deal this
week to drive the No. 22 Chevrolet
in his Indianapolis 500 debut.
Qualifying is on May 17, the same day as
his prom, forcing Karam to start his engine
in Indianapolis instead of renting a limo in
Pennsylvania.
“I’d never been to a prom before,” he said.
“I was kind of looking forward to it. It’s a good
excuse to miss it.”
Securing a ride for the “Greatest Spectacle in
Racing” from Chip Ganassi isn’t a bad gradua-
tion gift.
“I always said when I was younger, I wanted
to race in the 500 my senior year,” Karam said.
“Some kids kind of laughed at that idea. Even
adults. I always stuck by it. That’s what I always
was going to do. Now, it’s turned into a reality.
It’s a cool feeling to be 19 and know you’re
going to race in the biggest race in the world.”
Karam is from Nazareth, Pa., the hometown
of the Andretti family. He spent months wonder-
ing if he could parlay his feeder system champi-
onship into an IndyCar ride. He got the break he
needed when he signed with Ganassi in a driver
development role.
Karam will race in his first Indianapolis
500 next month in a car fielded jointly by
Chip Ganassi Racing and Dreyer & Reinbold
Kingdom Racing.
“I’ve worked my whole life to get to this
point,” Karam explained. “To finally
sign a contract with my name on it that
means I’m racing in the 500, it’s an
insane feeling.”
Driving for Sam Schmidt
Motorsports, Karam won the Indy
Lights championship, the ultimate
reward for a season built on three wins, nine
podiums, two poles and 163 laps led. He ditched
a final year of class for online courses as he
chased his open-wheel dream.
Karam ran the first two Tudor United Sports
Car races with Ganassi’s organization. Ganassi
plans to use Karam in the remaining endurance
races. But there are no immediate plans for
Karam to race in IndyCar after the 500.
“I knew if I was given the opportunity, I had
to impress,” Karam said. “It’s an awesome feel-
ing knowing that these guys are really putting
a lot of time and effort into me to groom me.”
Karam, a high school wrestler, just signed
a 6-month lease for a place in Carmel, Ind.,
and plans to absorb all he can in IndyCar’s
epicenter.
Karam’s prom is on hold but he does plan
on walking with his class for the June 10 grad-
uation ceremony, maybe with one more acces-
sory to go with his mortarboard hat and gown.
“Hopefully, I’ve got that Indy 500 champi-
ons ring on,” he added.
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
See MUSINGS, page 7
Local Roundup
Wildcats rally in 7th for baseball ‘W’
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — High school baseball
is a “simple” matter of making routine
plays in the field, getting crucial hits
at the plate, plus getting solid enough
pitching to keep a team in the game.
Jefferson did all three Wednesday
versus Fort Jennings, scoring four in the
top of the seventh to escape with a 7-5
non-league triumph on an overcast after-
noon/evening at Wildcat Field.
The game was moved from Fort
Jennings Village Park due to wet
grounds but the Musketeers (6-11) were
the home team on the scoreboard.
Trailing 5-3 to enter the seventh
frame, Ryan Bullinger ripped a single
to left against Musketeer starter Alex
Vetter (6-plus innings, 5 hits, 5 runs,
3 earned, 1 free pass, 1 strikeout; 76
pitches, 49 for strikes) and Nick Fitch
was hit by a pitch, ending Vetter’s stint
on the mound for Ryan Rau (1 IP, 1 hit,
2 runs, 1 earned, 1 BB, 1 K, 1 hit batter).
Pinch-hitter Tyler Rice got aboard on a
2-base throwing error, plating Bullinger
for a 5-4 deficit and putting Fitch at
third. Jace Stockwell walked to load
the bases and a wild pitch tied it at 5 as
Fitch touched the dish. Hunter Binkley
slashed a liner to center, getting pinch-
runner Josh Teman and Stockwell home
for a 7-5 lead. Binkley burgled sec-
ond and Ross Thompson was plunked.
Austin Jettinghoff bounced out and
Gage Mercer bounced to third, when
Alex Vetter gunned down Binkley trying
to score. Adam Rode was fanned for the
final out.
That uprising gave the fourth
Jefferson hurler, Jettinghoff (2
IPs, 1 hit, 1 BB) the victory as
he sent down the Musketeers in
order in the home seventh.
The hosts got two on in the first
on a 2-out infield hit to short by
Mark Metzger (3-for-4) and a liner
to left by Rau (2-for-4) but left
them stranded (8 for the game).
Jennings put up a 4-spot in
the third against Jefferson start-
er Jordan Herron (2 1/3 IPs, 5
hits, 4 ERs, 1 BB, 1 HB, 1 K).
Jared Hoersten was plunked but
was forced at second by Conner
Wollenhorst’s attempted sacrifice. He
stole second and scored as Dylan Van
Loo (2-for-4) went opposite way for a
double to left center. Metzger beat out
an infield hit to deep short. Rau lined a
singled to left that plated Van Loo for
a 2-0 lead. Vetter walked to load the
bases and finish Herron on the hill for
Stockwell (1 2/3 IPs, 2 hits, 2 Ks). Sam
Vetter’s bouncer to third forced Metzger
at home on Herron’s throw. However,
Kyle Hellman’s bloop to right center got
Rau and A. Vetter home for a 4-0 bulge.
The Wildcats (11-6) didn’t touch
A. Vetter until Stockwell led off the
Jefferson fourth with a bunt single down
the third-base line. Binkley earned a free
pass. However, Stockwell was forced
at third by Thompson and the next two
batters were retired to maintain a 4-run
Musketeer edge.
Hoersten led off the Musketeer fifth
with a liner to left center but
was caught stealing by Fitch.
Jefferson challenged again
in the visitor fifth on a leadoff
liner to right by Herron. Pinch-
runner Damien Dudgeon was
running as Bullinger bounced
out and reached third on a
Fitch bounceout. However,
he could not score.
The hosts got a leadoff rip
to center by Metzger in the
bottom of the fifth against
third Jefferson pitcher Teman
(1-plus IP, 2 hits, 1 ER, 2 BBs,
1 K), then stole second with one down.
A. Vetter walked and the Orange and
Black left both on the bases.
The Wildcats made it a 4-3 deficit
in the sixth. Stockwell got aboard via
an error, advanced on Binkley’s come-
backer and touched the dish courtesy
of Thompson’s double to the left-center
gap. Thompson swiped third and scored
via an error on the play. Jettinghoff
bunted his way aboard (third base), gar-
nered third via a 2-base throwing miscue
and scored the third Red and White run
on an RBI grounder by Gage Mercer.
Jettinghoff
See WILDCATS, page 7
LATE TUESDAY
Spencerville tri-meet vs.
St. John’s & Perry
Girls Team Rankings:
Spencerville 82, St. John’s
41, Perry 29.
Boys Team Rankings:
Spencerville 74, Perry 39, St.
John’s 30.
Points 5-3-2-1 except
relays 5-3
Girls 4x800 Meter Relay: 1.
Spencerville ‘A’ (Emilee Meyer,
Karri Purdy, Cierra Adams,
Tori Hardesty) 10:58.8; 2. St.
John’s ‘A’ (Breece Rohr, Maya
Gerker, Anna Mueller, Baylee
Lindeman) 11:44.0.
Boys 4x800 Meter Relay: 1. Perry ‘A’
9:01.6; 2. St. John’s ‘A’ (Curtis Pohlman,
Tyler Conley, Brian Pohlman, Tyler
Ledyard) 9:11.6.
Girls 100 Meter Hurdles: 1. Jenna
Kahle (SV) 17.1; 2. Schylar Miller (SV)
17.6; 3. Madelyn Buettner (SJ) 18.2; 4.
Healey (P) 18.3.
Boys 110 Meter Hurdles:
1. Anthony Schuh (SV) 15.9;
2. Cole (P) 18.7; 3. Conner
Britt (SJ) 19.2; 4. Bailey Croft
(SV) 19.3.
Girls 100 Meter Dash: 1.
Samantha Bonifas (SJ) 14.1;
2. Sanks (P) 14.7; 3. Madelyn
Buettner (SJ) 15.4; 4. Ashlyn
Troyer (SJ) 15.5.
Boys 100 Meter Dash: 1. Nick Martz
(SJ) 12.1; 2. Brian Pohlman (SJ) 12.3;
3. Andrew Emery (SV) 12.3; 4. Neal
(P) 12.4.
Girls 4x200 Meter Relay: 1.
Spencerville ‘A’ (Kennedy Sharp, Caitlin
Wurst, Amelia Wood, Patricia Riley)
2:04.5; 2. Perry ‘A’ 2:12.3.
Boys 4x200 Meter Relay: 1. St. John’s
‘A’ (Draven Dickman, Elliott Courtney,
Devin Haggard, Conner Britt) 1:41.5; 2.
Spencerville ‘A’ (Andrew Emery, Bailey
Croft, Mason Nourse, Evan Pugh) 1:42.1.
Girls 1,600 Meter Run: 1. Tori
Hardesty (SV) 5:56.2; 2. Cierra Adams
(SV) 6:05.8; 3. Breece Rohr (SJ) 6:09.6;
4. Baylee Lindeman (SJ) 7:18.3.
Boys 1,600 Meter Run: 1. Godfrey
(P) 5:06.9; 2. Lane-Harvey (P) 5:08.7;
3. Matthew Hurles (SV) 5:35.3; 4. Byron
Gay (SV) 5:42.1.
Girls 4x100 Meter Relay: 1.
Spencerville ‘A’ (Katie Merriman, Jenna
Kahle, Caitlin Wurst, Patricia Riley) 56.6;
2. Perry ‘A’ 59.7.
Boys 4x100 Meter Relay:
1. Spencerville ‘A’ (Logan
Vandemark, Calvin Wilson, Andrew
Emery, Anthony Schuh) 46.8; 2.
St. John’s ‘A’ (Brian Pohlman,
Curtis Pohlman, Tyler Conley, Nick
Martz) 47.6.
Girls 400 Meter Dash: 1. Kennedy
Sharp (SV) 1:06.7; 2. Maya Gerker (SJ)
1:06.8; 3. DeMoss (P) 1:17.4.
Boys 400 Meter Dash: 1. Trevor
McMichael (SV) 55.4; 2. Brandon
Patterson (SV) 58.2; 3. Hairston (P) 58.6.
Girls 300 Meter Hurdles: 1.
Samantha Bonifas (SJ) 50.9; 2. Erin
Williams (SJ) 53.0; 3. Jenna Kahle (SV)
53.6; 4. Schylar Miller (SV) 54.2.
Boys 300 Meter Hurdles: 1. Anthony
Schuh (SV) 43.0; 2. Conner Britt (SJ)
44.8; 3. Bailey Croft (SV) 48.4; 4. Cole
(P) 54.2.
Girls 800 Meter Run: 1. Karri Purdy
(SV) 2:33.0; 2. DeMoss (P) 3:15.3; 3.
Kelsi Gillespie (SJ) 3:33.9.
Boys 800 Meter Run: 1. Godfrey
(P) 2:10.1; 2. Grant Goecke(SV) 2:11.7;
3. Daniel (P) 2:28.8; 4. Ed Smith (SV)
2:38.9.
Girls 200 Meter Dash: 1. Sanks (P)
29.9; 2. Kennedy Sharp (SV) 30.5; 3. Ally
Gerberick (SJ) 30.9; 4. Ashlyn Troyer
(SJ) 31.8.
Boys 200 Meter Dash: 1. Hawthorne
(P) 24.5; 2. Cole (P) 24.5; 3. Calvin
Wilson (SV) 25.2; 4. Andrew Emery (SV)
25.7.
Girls Shot Put: 1. Katie
Merriman (SV) 32-11; 2. Cox (P)
29-5.5; 3. Allison Adams (SV)
29-3.25; 4. Audrey Bowsher (SV)
28-2.
Girls Discus: 1. Shania
Johnson (SV) 115-2; 2. Beth Griffin (SV)
102-10; 3. Allison Adams (SV) 89-6; 4.
Sydney Fischbach (SJ) 88-0.
Boys Discus: 1. Evan Pugh (SV)
141-0; 2. Tyler Reynolds (SV) 105-10; 3.
Logan Vandemark (SV) 104-9; 4. Derek
Anthony (SJ) 103-2.
Girls Long Jump: 1. Schylar
Miller (SV) 14-9; 2. Karri Purdy
(SV) 13-10; 3. Ashlyn Troyer
(SJ) 13-9; 4. Sanks (P) 13-5.
Boys Long Jump: 1.
Trevor McMichael (SV) 18-7;
2. Mulcahy (P) 17-1; 3. Elliott
Courtney (SJ) 16-11; 4. Smith
(P) 16-5.
Girls High Jump: 1. Davis
(P) 4-10; 2. Erin Williams (SJ) 4-6; 3.
Caitlin Wurst (SV) 4-4.
Boys High Jump: 1. Trevor
McMichael (SV) 5-10; 2. Bailey Croft
(SV) 5-6; 3. Devin Haggard (SJ) 5-0.
Girls Pole Vault: 1. Schylar Miller
(SV) 8-6; 2. Ally Gerberick (SJ) 7-6; 3.
Patricia Riley (SV) 7-0.
Boys Pole Vault: No results.
————
Bluffton Tri vs. Fort
Jennings and Ada (15
events)
Points 5-3-2-1 except
relays 5-3 (no more than 2
per team can score in any one
event)
Girls Team Rankings:
Bluffton 63, Ada 59, Ft.
Jennings 25.
100 Meter Dash: 1. Archer (A) 13.0;
2. Emily Grone (F) 13.8; 3. Mitchell (B)
14.8; 4. Oberly (B) 14.9.
200 Meter Dash: 1. Archer (A)
27.2; 2. Monday (B) 29.7; 3. Stuart
(A) 30.3; … 4. Lindsey Trentman
(F) 35.1.
400 Meter Dash: 1. Steinmetz
(B) 1:06.3; 2. Baker (B) 1:06.3; 3.
Milks (A) 1:07.9; 4. Bagais (A) 1:07.9.
800 Meter Run: 1. Steinmetz (B)
2:46; 2. Hunter (A) 2:48.4; 3. Marshall (B)
2:52.7; … 4. Sutton (A) 2:57.4.
1,600 Meter Run: 1. Steinmetz (B)
6:10.3; 2. Sommers (B) 6:10.7; … 3.
Alyssa Schimmoeller (F) 6:30.3; … 4.
Donnal (A) 6:54.
100 Meter Hurdles: 1. Baker (B)
16.6; 2. Emily Grone (F) 18.3; 3. Wright
(B) 20.4; 4. Vore (A) 20.4.
Track and Field Results
See RESULTS, page 7
A heavy — and costly — price to pay for the ‘other’ Donald
Information Submitted
Big Green bashes by
Raiders
HAVILAND — The
Ottoville baseballers opened
up with a 5-run first frame
and went on to bash host
Wayne Trace 12-1 in non-
league action Wednesday at
Wayne Trace.
Kyle Bendele twirled a
complete-game 1-hitter and
gave up an unearned run,
walking five and fanning two.
The Big Green amassed
14 hits versus Raider starter
Denver Burkley (4 innings,
12 hits, 11 earned run, 7 BBs)
and Blaine Jerome.
Joel Beining led the Big
Green attack with a 4-for-
4 night (3 runs scored, 1
run batted in), while Alex
Horstman (2 runs, 1 RBI) and
Brandon Boecker (1 run, 1
RBI) went 2-for-3 and Jared
Fanning (4 RBIs) and Joe
Vanoss (2 runs, 1 RBI) 2-for-
4.
Colby Speice had the only
knock for the Raiders.
Ottoville hosts Continental
today.
Ottoville
ab r h rbi
Bailey Seibert 3 1 1 0, Cory
Honigford 1 0 0 0, Joel Beining 4 3 4 1,
Brandon Boecker 3 1 2 1, Alex Horstman
3 2 2 1, Luke Schimmoeller 2 2 0 0, Joe
Vanoss 4 2 2 1, Jared Fanning 4 0 2 4,
Trent Miller 3 0 1 1, Kyle Bendele 1 1 0
1. Totals 28 12 14 10.
Wayne Trace
ab r h rbi
Blaine Jerome 2 0 0 0, Austin Fast
2 1 0 0, Colby Speice 2 0 1 0, Noah
Stoller 1 0 0 0, Aaron Stoller 2 0 0 0, Seth
Yenser 1 0 0 0, Foreigner 1 0 0 0, Grant
Gillett 1 0 0 0, Denver Burkley 1 0 0 0,
Jake Baska 1 0 0 0, Marcus McVay 1 0
0 0. Austin Winebrenner 0 0 0 0. Totals
15 1 1 0.
Score by Innings:
Ottoville 5 1 1 1 4 - 12 14 1
Wayne Trace 0 0 0 1 0 - 1 1 1
2B: Seibert; SF: Boecker; SB:
Schimmoeller, Gillett.
IP H R ER BB SO
Ottoville
K Bendele (W) 5.0 1 1 0 5 2
Wayne Trace
Burkley (L) 4.0 12 11 11 7 0
Jerome 1.0 2 1 0 1 0
P-S: Bendele 70-39; Burkley 94-46,
Jerome 16-9.
——-
Lady Rams rally past
Lancers
By Kevin Wannemacher
Times Bulletin Business
Manager
kwannemacher@times-
bulletin.com
MIDDLE POINT —
Upper Scioto Valley scored
five runs in the sixth inning,
rallying from an early 3-0
deficit to post a 9-3 win over
Lincolnview in non-league
softball action Wednesday
evening.
It was the Lady Lancers
who struck first, plating a
pair of runs in the opening
frame.
See ROUNDUP, page 7
2
RAABE
FORD, LINCOLN, INC.
www.raabeford.com
11260 ELIDA RD. DELPHOS, OH (419) 692-0055 Toll Free 800-589-7876
Randy Custer
Gen. Mgr.
25 Years
Kevin Lindeman
Sales
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7 Time Winner
Thursday, May 1, 2014 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
(Continued from page 6)
Fort Jennings made it 5-3 in
the next half-inning. Pinch-hitter
Alex Sealts rocked a double
down the left-field line. Pinch-
hitter Ryan Hoersten walked —
bringing in Jettinghoff to the hill
— and both stole the next base.
Wollenhorst walked to load the
sacks. Van Loo blooped a run-
scoring hit to left center (Sealts).
Metzger’s grounder to Binkley
at second forced R. Hoersten at
home. Rau flied out to left and
Wollenhorst tagged up to score
but on appeal, he was ruled to
have left early for an inning- and
rally-killing double play.
“We have struggled with
confidence at the plate since the
Allen East loss last Thursday. We
continued that for the first five
innings today; we put in extra
batting practice and talked about
it but we’re pressing,” Jefferson
coach Doug Geary explained.
“Fortunately, we got a 3-spot in
the sixth to put ourselves in a
position to win. We took advan-
tage of some mistakes they made
in the field, which we didn’t do
today. We pitched well overall
outside of one inning but got
some big at-bats; we need to get
back to hitting with confidence
because no matter how well you
pitch and field, you have to score
runs.”
Jefferson visits Columbus
Grove today and will host
Bluffton (postponed due to
weather Tuesday) Friday, pick-
ing up in the middle of the fourth
inning.
“We’d been playing well late-
ly, winning four straight before
today. We struggled before
that but especially at the plate,
seemed to be turning the cor-
ner there,” Jennings coach Eric
Schwab noted. “We had two bad
innings today. We threw the ball
around too much in the field and
Jefferson did what they had to
do. That’s really the story for us
today.”
Fort Jennings hosts Kalida
Friday.
JEFFERSON (7)
ab-r-h-rbi
Jace Stockwell ss/p 3-2-1-0, Hunter
Binkley lf/2b 3-0-1-2, Ross Thompson 3b/ss
3-1-1-1, Austin Jettinghoff 2b/p 4-1-1-0, Gage
Mercer 1b 4-0-0-1, Jordan Herron p/3b/ph
3-0-1-0, Damien Dudgeon pr 0-0-0-0, Adam
Rode rf 1-0-0-0, Ryan Bullinger rf/cf/lf 3-1-1-0,
Nick Fitch c 2-1-0-0, Kurt Wollenhaupt dh 2-0-
0-0, Tyler Rice ph 1-0-0-0, Josh Teman cf/p/pr
0-1-0-0. Totals 29-7-6-4.
FORT JENNINGS (5)
ab-r-h-rbi
Connor Wallenhorst cf 3-1-0-0, Dylan Van
Loo lf 4-1-2-2, Mark Metzger ss 4-0-3-0, Ryan
Rau 1b/p 4-1-2-1, Alex Vetter 2b/ph 2-1-0-0,
Sam Vetter c 4-0-0-0, Kyle Hellman rf 4-0-1-2,
Caleb Bankey dh 2-0-0-0, Alex Sealts 2b/ph
1-1-1-0, Jared Hoersten 3b/1b 1-0-1-0, Ryan
Hoersten ph 0-0-0-0. Totals 29-5-10-5.
Score by Innings:
Jefferson 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 - 7
Ft. Jennings 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 - 5
E: Metzger, A. Vetter, J. Hoersten; DP:
Jefferson 1; LOB: Jefferson 5, Fort Jennings
8; 2B: Thompson, Van Loo, Sealts; SB:
Thompson, Binkley, Wallenhorst, Metzger,
Hellman, Sealts, R. Hoersten; CS: J. Hoersten
(by Fitch).
IPH R ER BB SO
JEFFERSON
Herron 2.1 5 4 4 1 1
Stockwell 1.2 2 0 0 0 2
Teman 1.0 2 1 1 2 1
Jettinghoff (W, 1-1-1) 2.0 1 0 0 1 0
FORT JENNINGS
A. Vetter 6.0 5 5 3 1 1
Rau (L) 1.0 1 2 1 1 1
Teman pitched to 2 batters in 6th
A. Vetter pitched to 2 batters in 7th
WP: Rau; HBP: Fitch (by A. Vetter),
Thompson (by Rau), J. Hoersten (by Herron).
Wildcats
Famous bidders already
lining up for LA Clippers
By GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — If Donald
Sterling is compelled to sell the Los
Angeles Clippers, the list of potential
buyers has more stars than their roster.
Oprah Winfrey is contemplating a
bid. Sean Combs is a Knicks’ fan but
wants in.
Floyd Mayweather Jr. wants the
whole team. Matt Damon wants a tiny
piece.
Billionaires, entertainers and ath-
letes alike announced their intentions
to pursue the Clippers with
varying degrees of serious-
ness Wednesday, proving the
long-time losers will be quite
a prize if the NBA is able
to wrest control of the team
away from Sterling after
his lifetime ban for racist
remarks.
Winfrey led the list and the media
mogul is already bringing in her
friends.
“Oprah Winfrey is in discussions
with David Geffen and Larry Ellison
to make a bid for the Los Angeles
Clippers should the team become
available,” spokesperson Nicole
Nichols confirmed in an e-mail.
If Winfrey joins Geffen, the bil-
lionaire entertainment executive, and
Oracle CEO Ellison to pool their
vast resources for a bid, they could
be among the top contenders for a
franchise that would be among the
most valuable sports properties to
hit the market since the Los Angeles
Dodgers’ $2 billion sale in 2012 to the
Guggenheim Partners group fronted
by Magic Johnson, the Lakers great
and another potential Clippers bidder.
The Clippers spent the last three
decades rotting in the shadow of
the glamorous Lakers, who piled up
championships while the lowly Clips
only racked up losses. With Sterling’s
ouster, the Clippers suddenly became
the most attractive team in town to
wealthy fans lining up for an unlikely
chance to seize control of a Hollywood
sports franchise on the move.
David Carter, the executive direc-
tor of USC’s Sports Business Institute,
identifies multiple factors contributing
to the Clippers’ extraordinary value.
“Interest in the team results from
the combination of NBA teams being
rare assets that are seldom available for
purchase, the location of this particular
team and potential owners’ belief that
revenue streams linked to rehabbing the
brand and participating in future rev-
enue linked to a new TV deal all make
the team very attractive to prospective
buyers,” Carter said.
For a day, almost everybody seemed
interested in being those buyers — and
even entertainers without those limit-
less resources were clamoring for the
chance.
Combs, Rick Ross and Snoop Dogg
all aired their interest, as did long-
time Clippers’ fan Frankie Muniz and
Damon, who told CNBC he’d like to be
a “super tiny minority investor.” Fans
also got in on the frenzy, opening cam-
paigns on Kickstarter and Crowdtilt to
pool their resources for the club.
Mayweather spoke seriously about
his interest while preparing for his fight
with Marcos Maidana this Saturday,
although Money May would have
to curb his enthusiastic sports gam-
bling habit. Oscar De La Hoya, the
majority shareholder in Golden Boy
Promotions whose statue sits outside
Staples Center, volunteered himself as
a part-owner.
“The league has made it known
that it wants more minorities involved
and as a proud Mexican-American, I
will bring a different perspective to
the NBA in general, the Clippers in
particular,” De La Hoya said. “I was
born and raised in Los Angeles. I know
what it takes to run a successful sports
entity.”
A vocal segment of the NBA’s social
media following immediately started a
campaign to move the Clippers to
Seattle, a basketball-loving
city that has been without
a team since Clay Bennett
moved the SuperSonics to
Oklahoma City in 2008.
But much of the Clippers’
value results from their loca-
tion in the nation’s second-
largest city and their opportunity to
sign a lucrative new television rights
deal in 2016.
The Clippers’ association with
Sterling’s racist remarks could have
been crushing to their prestige and
value but they don’t seem to be a prob-
lem if Sterling is no longer associated
with the club.
“The short term damage has been
dramatic but Commissioner (Adam)
Silver provided a tourniquet that has
stopped the brand erosion,” Carter
said. “The NBA, working in conjunc-
tion with new ownership, will have
an extraordinary opportunity to reha-
bilitate the team’s reputation and then
extend its brand.”
The Clippers haven’t been known
for success during most of their exis-
tence but that’s changing. And what’s
more, the Clippers are cool.
Led by point guard Chris Paul and
high-flying forward Blake Griffin —
two All-Stars signed to long-term con-
tracts — the Clippers have won two
straight Pacific Division titles and
are on the brink of their third playoff
series victory since Sterling bought the
team in 1981.
The Clippers have captured the
imagination of Los Angeles’ coun-
terculture, the transplants and con-
trarian fans who aren’t interested in
the Lakers’ bandwagon. They’re also
attracting more of an international
following with each highlight-reel per-
formance by Paul and dunking vir-
tuosos DeAndre Jordan and Griffin,
who coined the phrase “Lob City” to
describe their daredevil style of play.
And it doesn’t hurt that the Lakers
just finished their worst season in more
than 50 years, missing the playoffs for
just the third time in 38 seasons. The
Lakers appear to be years away from
title contention, while the Clippers are
built to contend every year in the near
future.
“We’re proud of this team,”
Clippers guard Jamal Crawford said.
“We’re proud of our city and we want
to make them proud of us.”
——-
NBA Capsules
Spurs 109, Mavericks 103
SAN ANTONIO — Tony Parker
had 23 points hours after the birth of
his first child and the San Antonio
Spurs never trailed in a 109-103 vic-
tory over the Dallas Mavericks on
Wednesday night,
taking a 3-2 lead
in their first-
round series.
Manu Ginobili
had 19 points and Tiago Splitter added
17 points and 12 rebounds as San
Antonio regained home-court advan-
tage in the tense series against their
intrastate rival. Tim Duncan added
16 points and 12 rebounds and Kawhi
Leonard had 15 points for the Spurs.
Vince Carter scored 28 points, mak-
ing numerous heavily-contested shots
in going 10-for-16 from the field for
Dallas.
After averaging 16 points in the
series’ first four games, Mavericks
forward Dirk Nowitzki found the
stroke in scoring 26 points. Nowitzki
was 10-for-20 shooting but it wasn’t
enough to overcome Parker and the
Spurs returning to form.
Carter’s 3-pointer with 3 minutes
left pulled Dallas within 98-94 but
Parker followed a minute later with his
only 3-pointer of the game, punctuat-
ing the shot with a loud scream.
Parker had his finest start since
the series opener despite playing on
little sleep following the early morn-
ing birth of his son, Josh, with fiancee
Axelle Francine. The All-Star point
guard mixed in three manic driving
layups and two mid-range jumpers to
start the game shooting 5-for-7.
Raptors 115, Nets 113
TORONTO — Kyle Lowry scored a
career playoff-high 36 points, including
the go-ahead 3-pointer after Toronto had
blown a 26-point lead and the Raptors
beat the Brooklyn Nets 115-113 on
Wednesday night to take a 3-2 lead in
their first-round series.
DeMar DeRozan had 23 points,
Jonas Valanciunas scored 16 and Greivis
Vasquez added 15 for the Raptors, who
would advance to face Miami in the sec-
ond round with a victory in Game 6 on
Friday in Brooklyn.
Game 7, if necessary, would be
Sunday in Toronto.
Joe Johnson scored 30 points and
Mirza Teletovic had 17 for the Nets, who
scored 44 points in the fourth quarter
but lost their final chance when Andray
Blatche fired a pass well over Deron
Williams’ head into the backcourt for a
turnover.
Toronto led 94-72 on a 3-point-
er by Vasquez with 11:23 remaining
but Brooklyn scored 15 of the next 18
points, including a 4-point play by Alan
Anderson, to make it 97-87 with 7:15
remaining.
Johnson later converted a 3-point play,
then made a 3 to tie it at 101 with 3:16
left.
Lowry put Toronto back on top with
a pair of free throws and a 3 by Vasquez
gave the Raptors a 5-point lead with 2:46
left.
Two free throws by Blatche and a 3 by
Teletovic tied it at 106 with 1:23 left but
Lowry made a 3, then followed a layup
by Blatche with a driving hook shot,
putting the Raptors up 111-108 with 27
seconds remaining.
Johnson missed a jumper and
DeRozan was fouled after grabbing the
rebound, making both to put Toronto up
by five, but Amir Johnson fouled out on
Anderson’s corner 3. Anderson’s free
throw made it 113-112 with less than 10
seconds left.
DeRozan added two more free throws
to give Toronto a 115-112 lead with 6
seconds left. After a timeout, Blatche
was fouled and made the first free
throw but missed the second. Blatche
grabbed the rebound and tried to pass it
to Williams but the ball sailed into the
backcourt for a turnover, sealing victory
for Toronto.
(Continued from page 6)
300 Meter Hurdles: 1. Baker (B) 52.2;
2. Wright (B) 54.6; 3. Vore (A) 55.9; 4. Faine
(A) 56.0.
4x100 Meter Relay: 1. Ada 54.3; 2. Ft.
Jennings (Alyssa Wiedeman, Emily Grone,
Keri Eickholt, Kaylynn Noriega) 58.4.
4x200 Meter Relay: 1. Ada 1:54.4; 2.
Bluffton 1:56.6.
4x800 Meter Relay: 1. Ada 11:52; 2.
Ft. Jennings (Alyssa Schimmoeller, Alyssa
Wiedeman, Keri Eickholt, Jenna German)
12:11.
High Jump: 1. Marshall (A) 5-0; 2.
Oberly (B) 4-8.
Pole Vault: 1. Linnon (A) 6-0.
Long Jump: 1. Marshall (A) 15-2.5; 2.
Baker (B) 14-6.5; 3. Stuart (A) 13-9; … 4.
Keri Eickholt (F) 12-6.
Shot Put: 1. Edgington (B) 29-0.5; 2.
Kylie Jettinghoff (F) 28-9.5; 3. Emily Kehres
(F) 27-7.25; 4. Nelson (A) 27-4.25.
Discus: 1. Edgington (B) 92-8; 2. Kylie
Jettinghoff (F) 82-9; 3. Nelson (A) 78-0; 4.
Emily Kehres (F) 76-5.
Boys Team Rankings: Bluffton 78.5, Ada
62, Ft. Jennings 15.5.
100 Meter Dash: 1. Little (B) 11.6; 2. R.
Stratton (B) 11.9; … 3. Drew Grone (F) 12.3;
… 4. Long-Green (A) 12.4.
200 Meter Dash: 1. Jolliff (A) 24.8; 2.
Collins (A) 25.4; … 3. Bonifaz (B) 25.9; … 4.
Noble (B) 26.2.
400 Meter Dash: 1. Roberts (A) 59.6; 2.
Tabor (A) 1:00; 3. Harnish (B) 1:03.2; 4. Tyler
Blankemeyer (F) 1:04.
800 Meter Run: 1. N. Stratton (B) 2:02.6;
2. Wilcox (A) 2:06.4; 3. Dylan Wiechart (F)
2:20.5; 4. Demellweek (B) 2:21.
1,600 Meter Run: 1. Harnish (B)
5:01.7; 2. Dylan Wiechart (F) 5:02.3; 3. Alex
Berelsman (F) 5:09; 4. Hoff (B) 5:23.3.
110 Meter Hurdles: 1. Hughart (A) 18.4;
2. Bassitt (B) 19.5; 3. Haines (B) 20.0; 4.
Francis (A) 20.3.
300 Meter Hurdles: 1. Haines (B) 46.5;
2. Bassitt (B) 47.8; 3. Hughart (A) 48.5; 4.
Francis (A) 51.5.
4x100 Meter Relay: 1. Bluffton 44.7; 2.
Ada 47.5.
4x200 Meter Relay: 1. Ada 1:41; 2. Ft.
Jennings (Drew Grone, Quinton Neidert,
Craig Stewart, Chad Wurst) 1:51.6.
4x800 Meter Relay: 1. Bluffton 9:47; 2.
Ada 9:52.
High Jump: 1. (tie) Wilson (B) and R.
Stratton (B) 5-8; 2. (tie) Garrett Berelsman
(F) and Willeke (A) 5-4.
Pole Vault: 1. Wilson (B) 13-0; 2. Craig
(A) 7-6; 3. (tie) Spencer (B) and Roberts
(A) 7-0.
Long Jump: 1. Jolliff (A) 18-1.5; 2.
Willeke (A) 16-9; 3. Bassitt (B) 16-1.5; … 4.
Chad Wurst (F) 15-4.
Shot Put: 1. Smith (B) 43-5; 2. Ansley
(A) 41-7.5; 3. Kistler (B) 37-10.25; 4. Agin
(A) 35-9.
Discus: 1. Smith (B) 139-8; 2.
Dumbaugh (A) 133-1; 3. Parkins (B) 120-10;
… 4. Agin (A) 100-4.
Results
(Continued from page 6)
Sterling is very much in line with
Schott on how not to run a franchise. Up
until the last few years, his Clippers were
amongst the worst franchises of all time,
regardless of league.
They didn’t know how to build a fran-
chise — their drafts were usually horrible
and even when they stumbled into a solid
pro, they never ponied up the moolah to
keep them.
He got extremely lucky by drafting
Blake Griffin and got Chris Paul only
because then-NBA Commish David Stern
would not allow him to be traded to the
more established Lakers.
He is what I call someone that, despite
himself, could touch a pile of, ahem, and
it would turn into a pile of gold. The
franchise that he bought and eventually
moved — against the NBA’s wishes — to
Los Angeles for $12 million is now sup-
posedly worth in the neighborhood of a
billion bucks — despite his incompetence.
I guess I get that Silver felt he had no
choice — based on the increasing crescen-
do of anger within the NBA community
and actions of Clippers’ sponsors — but to
take this radical move or else potentially
see the demise of the now-thriving NBA
(remember when the NBA Finals was on
tape-delay at 11:30 on evening nights on
CBS? I do, watching it on one of those
small black-and-white TV sets).
Here is the thing: if the NBA Board of
Governors vote to force Sterling to sell the
team (or even if the league decides to buy
it), he will not get what the franchise is
worth because potential owners, including
the man that caused Sterling’s current out-
rage, one Earvin “Magic” Johnson, know
he has no leverage.
That $2.5 million fine will in essence
be walking-around money compared to
the losses he will take selling his team,
even if he tries to fight it.
What a heavy price to pay.
Hopefully, we will figure it out before
he leaves this mortal coil.
Musings
(Continued from page 6)
Macey Ashbaugh started the Lancer rally with a double to left field
before a single by Autumn Proctor put runners at the corners. After
Proctor took second without a throw, Devann Springer flied to center
field for the first out. The Lancers got on the scoreboard as a wild pitch
to Baylee Neate plated Ashbaugh and moved Proctor to third to make
it 1-0. Neate then followed with an infield single that scored Proctor as
the blue-and-gold went in front 2-0.
Upper Scioto Valley escaped further damage, though, when catcher
Maddy Lowery threw out Neate attempting to steal second for the
second out followed by a groundout by Julia Thatcher.
Lincolnview pushed the margin to 3-0 in the bottom of the second.
Kelsey Mohr flew out to start the inning before Mikenna Klinger drew
a walk. Klinger stole second and came around to score on a 2-out single
by Ashbaugh to make it 3-0.
Lancer pitcher Ashley McClure cruised through the Ram half of the
third, getting a pair of strikeouts in the frame, to give the hosts a chance
to widen the lead further.
The Lady Lancers loaded the bases with two outs after a Neate
single and a walk to Mohr, sandwiched around Thatcher reaching via a
USV error. Ram hurler Kylie Hites stopped the threat, though, getting
Klinger to pop out to end the inning.
“We have to do a better job of taking advantage of opportunities
when we get them,” noted Lancer head coach Kent McClure. “Doing
the little things and eliminating mistakes are two key areas we need to
improve on.”
With Lincolnview in front 3-0, the Rams started their comeback in
the fifth.
Chloe Hunsicker ignited the rally with a double to start the inning
and scored on a RBI single by Bree Mullins. Following a single by
Ashley Hoy that put runners on first and second, a wild pitch advanced
both runners one base.
The inning, though, took a big shift in momentum on the next play.
Maddy Lowery’s ground ball was fielded by Neate at shortstop who
threw home to shoot down Mullins at home plate for the second out.
Lancer freshman pitcher Macala Ashbaugh, who had entered in relief
to start the inning, then fanned the Rams’Abby Fry to end the threat.
“Macala is young yet and she is going to just keep getting better,”
added the elder McClure. “She will just keep getting stronger. We
wanted to get Ashley a few innings and then get her out before tomor-
row’s league game and Macala has done a nice job for us this year.”
Upper Scioto Valley, though, took control in the sixth.
Payton Sanders, Hites and Hunsicker drew consecutive walks to
start the inning before a bases-loaded walk to Taylor Lawrence plated
Sanders and made it 3-2.
Mullins then followed with a single to center that got away from the
Lancer center fielder, clearing the bases and putting the Rams on top
5-3 with Mullins at third.
“Opportunities were there and we didn’t take advantage offen-
sively,” commented the Lancer mentor. “Defensively, we made some
errors and we weren’t able to overcome those things. It’s been an issue
for us this year and we have to find a way to get better in those areas.”
Bree Mullins then scored on a RBI single by Shelby Mullins to give
Upper Scioto Valley a 6-3 advantage.
The Lady Rams then put the game away in the seventh.
With two outs and runners at second and third, Bree Mullins picked
up her fourth hit of the night with a double to right center that scored
both runners for an 8-3 lead. Hoy followed with a single that plated
Bree Mullins to make it 9-3 Rams.
From there, Hites shut the door. The Ram pitcher got Springer and
Neate to fly out before Macala Ashbaugh grounded out to end the
contest.
Bree Mullins finished the night with three singles and a double
while driving in five runs to lead the Lady Rams, who move to 7-10
on the season. Hoy added two singles and an RBI with Hunsicker
recording a double. Shelby Mullins, Hites, Sanders and Lowery also
had singles.
Hites tossed the complete game victory, giving up 10 hits and two
walks with one strikeout.
Macala Ashbaugh suffered the loss for Lincolnview, allowing nine
hits, nine runs and five walks with two strikeouts in three innings of
work. Ashley McClure tossed four innings, scattering a pair of hits and
two walks while fanning nine.
Macey Ashbaugh posted a single and a double for the Lady Lancers,
who drop to 6-10. Proctor also had two singles for Lincolnview with
Neate recording three singles. Macala Ashbaugh added a single and
Ashley McClure chipped in a pair of singles.
The Lancers visit Allen East tonight.
Roundup
Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 17 9 .654 —
New York 15 11 .577 2
Washington 15 12 .556 2½
Philadelphia 13 13 .500 4
Miami 13 14 .481 4½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 20 8 .714 —
St. Louis 15 14 .517 5½
Cincinnati 12 15 .444 7½
Pittsburgh 10 16 .385 9
Chicago 9 17 .346 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Fran 16 11 .593 —
Colorado 16 12 .571 ½
L Angeles 14 12 .538 1½
San Diego 13 15 .464 3½
Arizona 8 22 .267 9½
___
Wednesday’s Results
St. Louis 9, Milwaukee 3
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, ppd., rain
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, ppd., rain
Miami 9, Atlanta 3
Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 4
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Washington at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Today’s Games
Dodgers at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m., 1st game
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m., 1st game
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Dodgers at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m., 2nd game
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
——-
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 15 11 .577 —
Baltimore 12 12 .500 2
Boston 13 14 .481 2½
Toronto 12 14 .462 3
Tampa Bay 11 16 .407 4½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 14 9 .609 —
Minnesota 12 11 .522 2
Kansas City 13 12 .520 2
Chicago 14 15 .483 3
Cleveland 11 17 .393 5½
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 17 10 .630 —
Texas 15 12 .556 2
L Angeles 14 13 .519 3
Seattle 11 14 .440 5
Houston 9 18 .333 8
___
Wednesday’s Results
Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 1
L.A. Angels 7, Cleveland 1
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, ppd., rain
Seattle at New York, ppd., rain
Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., rain
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Washington at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Today’s Games
Tampa Bay at Boston, 1:05 p.m., 1st
game
Dodgers at Minnesota), 1:10 p.m., 1st game
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m., 1st game
Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Dodgers at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m., 2nd game
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m., 2nd game
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
MLB Glance
8 – The Herald Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.delphosherald.com
DRIVER(S) WANTED
Local company is in need of part-time delivery
drivers. All deliveries are to Ohio and surround-
ing states. Must be able to move skids with a
pallet jack and secure a load properly. No CDL
is required. Driver must submit to pre-employ-
ment physical/drug screening and random drug
screening during employment. Must pass MVR
and have clean driving record. Retirees wel-
come. Please apply to BOX 123, c/o Delphos
Herald, 405 N. Main St., Delphos, Ohio 45833.
TWO POSITIONS OPEN:
WAREHOUSE INSTALLER and
ROUTE DRIVER
Installer must be willing to travel. Must be at least 21
years old & able to lift 75 lbs. for both positions. In-
staller hours are Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Route
Driver hours are Mon.-Fri. 6:00a.m-5:00 p.m.
Email Rachel.Mitchell@kmtire.com;
Fax 419-695-7991;
K&M Tire Attn.: Rachel
965 Spencerville Rd.
Delphos, Ohio
www.kmtire.com
PUBLIC AUCTION
Saturday, May 10
th
, 2014 9:00 a.m. Sharp!
AUCTION LOCATION:
Leipsic Fishing & Hunting Club
10605 C.R H, Ottawa
Conducted by:
SIEFKER REAL ESTATE
& AUCTION CO. OTTAWA, OH
Aaron Siefker, Broker/Auctioneer
419-538-6184 OFFICE • 419-235-0789 CELL
Tom Robbins & Darrel D. Yoder Assisting
Auctioneers
Licensed and Bonded in favor of State of Ohio
View on Web@ www.siefkerauctions.com
Espana Brand Yellow Ceramic Dishware 8 Place Setting, Red Ceramic Dishware,
Several Wine Glasses, Water Goblets, 8 Green Margarita Glasses, Longaberger &
Pampered Chef Cookie Molds, Blue Ribbon Canning Jar Sets in Basket, Large As-
sortment Various Longaberger Baskets & Dishes, Collectable Roseville-Pampered
Chef- Longaberger Items, Pampered Chef Serving Dishes, Lg Assortment Collect-
able Shot Glasses, Set Circulon Cookware, Assorted Cutlery, Basket Weave Stain-
less Silverware, Serving Utensils, Misc. Kitchen Items, Gadgets, Serving Dishes
& Other Items for Catering, Jimmy Buffet Pro. Margaretville Margarita Machine
w/ 2 Pitchers, Black Iron Serving Trays, Assorted Flower Vases, 12’ WOK, 3 Tier
Pie Stands, Crocks Various Sizes, Maroon Distressed 3 Drawer Chest, Maroon
End Table, Round Oak Pedestal Table 3 Leaves, Various Assorted Pieces Sterling
Silver, Teapots, Creamers, Serving Trays, Unique 7’ Decorative Planter 2’x2’ Glass
Enclosed Terrarium w/ Doors, Heavy Wrought Iron Wicker Basket Top Cocktail
Table, Vintage Shelf, Slant Top Writing Desk, 3 Sets HD Brass Candle Stick Lamps,
Polished Nichol Table Lamp, Wooden Swing Cradle, Office Computer Desk w/ Side
Bookcases, Locking File Cabinets, Child’s Semi Luna Makeup Table, Baby Bed &
Mattress, Storage Shelves, White Wicker Desk , Mirror, Chair Set, Green Wicker
Chair, Small Child’s Rocker, 2 & 4 Matching T Back Chairs, Old Barrister Kneehole
Desk, Kids Bikes, Ice Skates, Roller Skates, 15 Bottle Grape Vine Wine Rack,
Men’s Downhill Ski’s w/ Poles Size 15, 2pc Regulation Ping Pong Table w/ Acces-
sories, Microwave Oven, 18 CF Ropr Refrigerator, Yard Furniture, 3 HD Display
Cabinets 7.5 Ft Tall x5’10” 17” Deep w/ Glass Doors, 2 Vintage Fur Coats, Amish
2 Seat Storm Buggy w/ Lights 2 Draw Tongues, Mounted Boars Head, Assorted
Linen Table Clothes, Napkins, Collectable Dolls, Toys, Vintage Hats, Seasonal
Décor, Other Household Goods. GO TO OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAIL
DESCRIPTIONS AND PICTURES.
OWNER: JULIA SIEFKER Glandorf, Ohio
OIL PAINTINGS HOUSEHOLD COLLECTABLES
FURNITURE *ANTIQUES*GLASSWARE *COLLECTABLES* BUGGY
COLLECTABLES GLASSWARE ANTIQUE FURNITURE
World Frame Picture, 7 Water Color Pictures, Accutray Quartz Pocket
Watch 25yr, Older Wrist Watch, Older Wrist Watch, Old Bulova Men’s
Watch, Woman’s Watch “Mother’s Possible Rubies, Silver Pocket
Watch, Oval & Heart Lockets, Sm Oval Turquoise Ring, Wood End
Table Lamps, Blue Wing Back Chair, Secretary Writing Desk, Oval
Coffee Table, White Door Cupboard, Wood Carvings, Wood Carving
Tools, Carved Ducks, Mexico Plates, 20 Hummels, Box of Trivets,
Barometer, Dresser Lamps, Chest of Drawers w/ Mirror, Lamp, 2
Drum Tables, Mission Style Stands, Sm Tables, Stack Tables, Silver-
ware, Kenmore Canister Sweeper, Water Color Paints & Sketching
Items, Frames, Light Arm, Work Bench, Collection 7 Old Cameras,
Sunglass Collection, Shelving Unit, Scroll Saw, Router, 3 Levels, Car-
penter Tools, Sewing Box, Cooler, 3 Blue Folding Chairs, Huffy Bike
Multi Speed, Sm Plaque,
SHOP TOOLS HAND TOOLS BARN COLLECTABLES
IH Hit & Miss Engine, Craftsman Table Saw, Delta Bench Type Drill
Press, Skil-Saw Compound Mitre Saw, Dayton Metal Band Saw, Con-
crete Tools, Concrete Saw, Vice, Duo-Fast 8’s Air Nailer, Spike Nailer,
Buzz Saw Blades, Cross Cut Saws, Torch & Cart, Red Tool Box,C
Clamps, Ball Hitches, Chains, Binders, Jumper Cables, Hand Tools,
Socket Sets, Wrenches, Shovels, Rakes, Basement Jacks, Furnace
Bricks, Air Compressor, Misc Pumps, Sm Propane Tanks, Wood &
Iron Pulleys, Stilard Scale, Hay Trolley, Horse Harness, Saddle Hold-
er, 30 Gal Copper Kettle, Old Dr Pepper Cooler
TERMS: CASH or GOOD CHECK Day of Auction
 
VIEW PICTURES @ www.siefkerauctions.com
OWNER: Estate of Warren Peterson Ladonna Peterson, Executor
Van Wert Probate Case # 2013-1121
Garver Excavating
419.203.0796
rgarv42@yahoo.com
Locally Owned and Operated | Registered Van Wert Contractor
Registered and Bonded Household Sewage Treatment System Installer
Fully Insured
Call
Today!
Digging • Grading • Leveling • Hauling • Fill Dirt
Topsoil • Tile and Sewer Repair • Stone Driveways
Concrete Sidewalks • Demolition
Ditch Bank Cleaning • Snow Removal • Excavator
Backhoe • Skid Loader • Dump Truck
30 ton & 35 ton up to 135’
Crane - Millwright - Welding
419-305-5888 • 419-305-4732
B&S Crane Service
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU
can place a 25 word
classified ad in more
than 100 newspapers
with over one and a half
million total circulation
across Ohio for $295. It’s
easy...you place one or-
der and pay with one
check through Ohio
Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you.
No other classified ad
buy is simpler or more
cost effecti ve. Cal l
419-695-0015 ext. 131
BUYING USED mopeds.
Moped Service $18.00.
Helmets $31 & up. Lyle’s
Mopeds, 12th & Main,
Delphos. 419-692-0249
GARDEN CENTER now
open! Onion sets, plants,
seed potatoes are in.
Out back at Delphos
ACE Hardware, 242 N.
Main, 419-692-0921
IS IT A SCAM? The
Delphos Herald urges
our readers to contact
The Better Business Bu-
reau, (419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
205
Business
Opportunities
OWNER RETI RI NG
-established Lima flower
shop. Turn key opera-
tion. Contact Ed at
419-302-4938
235 Help Wanted
NOW HIRING!!
DIETARY
AIDE
P/T and every other
weekend.
STNA classes
available soon.
Please stop in and fll
out an application at
VANCREST OF DELPHOS
1425 E 5th St.,
Delphos, OHIO
EOE

We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
235 Help Wanted
HOME DAILY drivers,
Dedicated Teams and
regional drivers wanted.
Great benefits: Health in-
surance, Vision, Dental,
Paid Vacation, Safety
Bonus, East Coast Bo-
nus and Yearly Raises.
Teams can run west
coast or east coast
routes 5,000+ miles a
week. New dedicated
trucks. Pl ease cal l
419-692-1435, ask for
Glen.
Home Health
Aides
IMMEDIATE HIRING
– Part-time.
Due to increased patient
demand in Delphos,
Spencerville,
Allen/Putnam Co.
Home Care &
Hospice Respite.
STNA a plus, not required.
Good work ethic, able to
work weekends & all shifts.
Community Health
Professionals
602 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
ComHealthPro.org
WANTED: EXPERI -
ENCED Farm Equip-
ment Mechanic. Must
have own tools. Contact
Dan at 419-453-3353.
D&R Ag Repair
305
Apartment/
Duplex For Rent
DELPHOS, NON-SUB-
SIDIZED, 2 Bedroom
Senior Apartment. No
pet s, Non-smoki ng.
$550/mo. 419-692-6646
320 House For Rent
4BR, 5-ACRE, Country
Home with pond. No
smoking or pets. Lan-
deck area. References
r e q u i r e d . C a l l
419-302-2767
SEVERAL MOBI LE
Homes/House for rent.
View homes online at
www.ulmshomes.com or
inquire at 419-692-3951
425 Houses For Sale
217 S Main, Delphos
Owner seeking rent to
own and lease option
candidates for this
charming 3 bedroom
home. Garage, full
basement, wood floors
and much more. $475
per month. pics, video
tour and more details at
chbsinc.com or
419-586-8220.
510 Appliance
40” ZENITH, and 19” TV
(both older style and
work good), and TV
st and. Best of f er.
419-302-2103
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
20652 RD S, Fort Jen-
nings. Lawn Furniture,
Bedroom Furni t ure,
Desks, Boat Trailer, TV,
Laser Jet Printer, Bow
Flex, Toys, Battery Jeep,
Crib, Car Seat Stroller
System, Boys & Girls
0-5T, Misses Clothing.
Wednesday 4-8pm,
Thursday, Friday, Satur-
day 8am-8pm.
40 W. 2nd St., Fort Jen-
nings. Lots of Miscella-
neous! Thursday & Fri-
day 8am-7pm, Saturday
8am-3pm
615 CAROLYN Dr.
Friday 9am-4pm, Satur-
day 9am-2pm. Spider
lamp, Aquarium, Mate-
rial, Magnetix, Size 18
Wedding Dress, Play-
pen, Girls Clothes, Misc.
735 E. 2nd, Delphos.
Fri. 8a-5p, Sat. 8a-2p.
Stove, Tabl e Saw,
Full-size Bedroom Suite,
Weight Bench/Weights,
Microwave, Surround
Sound, Home Decor,
Teen-Young Adult Cloth-
ing, Scrubs, misc.
827 N. Washington St.,
Delphos. May 1-2-3.
Kirby Sweepers, Cook-
ware, Home Decor,
Amer i cana Decor ,
Lamps, Speaker s,
Queen Size Bedframe,
Bedding, Exercise Bike,
Men & Women Clothing,
purses, Depth Finders,
Fishing Supplies, Mow-
ers, Weed Wackers,
Kerosene Heaters, Elec-
tric Pressure Washer,
Nautical Items, Laptop,
much more! Thursday
3-7pm, Friday 9am-5pm,
Saturday 9am-1pm.
MIDDLE POINT Com-
muni ty-Wi de Garage
Sales. Friday May 2nd
9am-6pm, Saturday May
3rd 9am-4pm.
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
OTTOVILLE COMMU-
NITY Garage Sale,
May 2nd-3rd, 9am-5pm.
Balloons mark 42 loca-
tions, maps available.
577 Miscellaneous
230 ROMANCE Novels,
100 Love-inspired, Ro-
mance & Suspense in
Large Print. 25¢ each or
ALL for $45. Cal l
419-692-9440
LAMP REPAIR, table or
floor. Come to our store.
Ho h e n b r i n k TV.
419-695-1229
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Sunday, May 4th
Auto Parts Swap Meet
8:00am-4:00pm
Fairgrounds
Wapakoneta, Ohio
Info: 419-394-6484
Check The
Service
Directory
to Find A
Repairman
You Need!
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 -- mignon
6 Fold-up mattresses
12 Isis’ lover
14 Muse of astronomy
15 Regard highly
16 Ford fascoes
17 Dernier --
18 Astronaut Grissom
19 TV screen
21 London lav
23 Pixie
26 Blue or green
27 CSA monogram
28 Santa --, Calif.
30 Mdse. bars
31 Recipe word
32 Fall fower
33 Command to bark
35 Mac rivals
37 Mao -- -tung
38 Line of bushes
39 -- Dawn Chong
40 Coast Guard off.
41 Ruby or Sandra
42 “-- -Tiki”
43 Family mem.
44 Size above med.
46 Ames inst.
48 Relented (2 wds.)
51 Undeliverable mail
55 Like evening gowns
56 Rusts away
57 Afternoon nap
58 Cure salmon
DOWN
1 Ally opposite
2 NASA destination
3 Afre
4 Vertical
5 Row
6 Tierra del --
7 Language of Pakistan
8 Cornstalk tips
9 -- for the books
10 Zilch
11 Stockholm carrier
13 Lightened up
19 Held gently
20 Inch back slowly
22 Seasoned veteran
(2 wds.)
24 More recent
25 Raisin center
26 Pipe down
27 Gather leaves
28 Beer buy
29 War god
34 Forever young
36 Eyetooth
42 Safari country
43 Busty
45 Main idea
47 Knights’ titles
48 Whse. inventory
49 Onassis nickname
50 Peace gesture
52 Bride’s reply (2
wds.)
53 A mouse!
54 Weathervane dir.
Answer to Puzzle
Strength-training exercise can help slow bone loss
DEAR DOCTOR K:
I’ve heard that weight-
bearing exercises are
a good way to prevent
osteoporosis. Can you
describe a few?
DEAR READER:
Use it or lose it: That
message applies to most
parts of our body. We see
it most clearly with the
muscles. If we don’t use
them, they wither. But if
we regularly challenge
them, they bulk up.
The same is true with
bones. Most of our bones
bear our weight, except
when we’re lying down.
That’s what they “want”
to do. If we don’t give
them enough time each
day to do that, they tend
to get thin.
This is a particular
problem if a person also
has a genetic tendency
to develop osteoporosis.
Inactivity speeds the
thinning of the bones that
occurs in osteoporosis.
This makes them more
susceptible to fractures.
We i g h t - b e a r i n g
(or strength-training)
exercise is any activity
that puts stress on
bones. Walking and
climbing stairs are
examples. Weight-
bearing exercises can
help to slow bone loss
and stimulate new bone
growth.
A complete strength-
training workout
involves eight to 12
exercises. Together, they
exercise all your major
muscle groups.
Below, I’ll describe
three strength-training
exercises. They are
designed for older adults
and people who are new
to strength training.
Do strength-training
exercises two or three
times a week. Allow at
least 48 hours between
workouts. Try to do
each exercise eight to
12 times, or repetitions
(“reps”). These
repetitions make up
one set. Do two to four
sets of each exercise.
Rest for 30 to 60 seconds
between sets.
To do these exercises,
you’ll need a sturdy
chair, athletic shoes,
an exercise mat and
weights. (You should
be able to do no more
than eight to 12 reps of
each exercise with the
weights you choose.)
-- Bridge: Lie on your
back with your knees
bent and your feet flat on
the floor. Put your hands
next to your hips with
palms flat on the floor.
Keep your back straight
as you lift your buttocks
as high as you can off
the floor. Pause. Lower
your buttocks without
touching the floor, then
lift again.
-- Standing calf raise:
Stand with your feet flat
on the floor. Hold on to
the back of your chair for
balance. Raise yourself
up on the balls of your
feet, as high as possible.
Hold briefly, then lower.
-- Overhead press:
Stand with your feet
slightly apart. Hold a
dumbbell in each hand
on either side of your
shoulders, at shoulder
height, with your palms
facing forward. Slowly
lift the weights straight
up until your arms are
fully extended. Pause.
Slowly lower the
dumbbells to shoulder
level.
I’ve put additional
s t r e n g t h - t r a i n i n g
exercises, as well as
illustrations of the
exercises I’ve described
above, on my website,
AskDoctorK.com. You
don’t need to go to a
gym; a small investment
in buying exercise mats
and weights allows you
to do all the exercises at
home.
(Dr. Komaroff
is a physician and
professor at Harvard
Medical School. To
send questions, go to
AskDoctorK.com, or
write: Ask Doctor K,
10 Shattuck St., Second
Floor, Boston, MA
02115.)
670 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
GESSNER’S
PRODUCE
May 11
Celebrate Mother’s Day!
Assortment of beautiful
fowers and hanging baskets.
Gift Certifcates Available
9am-5pm Daily; Sunday 11am-4pm
9557 State Route 66
Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-5749
419-234-6566
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
665
Lawn, Garden,
Landscaping
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
DAY’S PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
LLC
Brent Day
567-204-8488
• Mowing
• Landscaping
• Lawn Seeding
www.dayspropertymaintenance.com
419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured
Mueller Tree
Service
Tree Trimming,
Topping & Removal,
Brush Removal
650 Health/Beauty
Style
Trends
Hair & Tanning Salon
413 Skinner St. • Delphos
(419)692-7002
Tanning
10 sessions $30
15 sessions $35
20 sessions $40
Get 5 FREE
655
Home Repair
and Remodel
Harrison
Floor Installation
Carpet, Vinyl, Wood,
Ceramic Tile
Reasonable rates
Free estimates
harrisonfoorinstallation.com
Phil 419-235-2262
Wes 567-644-9871
“You buy, we apply”
Hohlbein’s
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
Home
Improvement
Windows,
Doors, Siding,
Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
610 Automotive
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
625 Construction
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
Classifieds
Sell!
To advertise
call
419-695-0015
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Dr. Komaroff
On
Health
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Thursday, May 1, 2014 The Herald - 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Daughter can’t accept
mother’s new relationship
Dear Annie: I was wid-
owed fve years ago, after 36
years of marriage. Recently,
I reunited with my boyfriend
from junior high school.
“Harry” is in the fnal weeks
of a divorce.
It turns out that
Harry and I are
very much in love.
Unfortunately, my
oldest daughter is
extremely angry
that I am dating a
man whose divorce
is not fnal. She re-
fuses to meet Har-
ry and wants me
to stop seeing him.
She will not visit
me or permit me
to spend time with my two
grandchildren as long as I am
with Harry.
I have always been close
to my three adult children. I
am terribly hurt by my daugh-
ter’s refusal to allow contact.
We have gone to counseling
separately, and I am hoping,
in time, that we can get some
joint counseling. But right
now, my daughter won’t
even talk to me. We are at
an impasse. Any advice? --
Widow
Dear Widow: If your
daughter truly objects to your
seeing a man who is not yet
legally divorced, then there
will be no change until his
status is resolved. And you
might consider waiting.
While you knew Harry as a
young girl, your current re-
lationship is new. Please take
your time.
Your daughter also may
feel that you are trying to
replace her father, and she
could reject any man you
date. Many grown children
have a diffcult time accept-
ing that their widowed par-
ent is in love with someone
else. They feel that as long as
you remain a grieving widow,
your late husband is the love
of your life. Anything else
is a betrayal. It is, of course,
terribly selfsh of any child
to deny parents such future
happiness and expect them
to live in the past. We hope
counseling helps you both.
Dear Annie: My 83-year-
old husband has always been
a quiet man. He now lives at
a nursing home for medical
reasons and comes home ev-
ery day to visit me.
After a few words of greet-
ing, he sits down and remains
silent, expecting me to enter-
tain him with conversation.
He’s turning into his father,
who never said more than
fve sentences to
me. I’m not in the
best of health and
don’t do much so-
cializing, but I can
speak pleasantly
about current world
affairs and events in
our children’s lives.
Some days I don’t
feel like talking at
all and would like
to just sit and watch
television.
My husband’s
attitude is making me angry
and exhausted. I’ve spoken
to him about it, but he is too
lazy to contribute anything.
He has two friends and no so-
cial activities. He makes me
feel like screaming. Any sug-
gestions? -- Iceberg
Dear Iceberg: You are
taking on a bigger burden
than necessary. The fact that
your husband visits doesn’t
mean he is a guest whom you
have to entertain. You are not
obligated to make conversa-
tion with someone who nei-
ther contributes nor cares.
While he undoubtedly appre-
ciates news of the children,
there is nothing wrong with
having a visit where the two
of you watch TV together.
Accept him as he is, and talk
only as much as you want.
We hope this alleviates some
of your frustration.
Dear Annie: I have an-
other perspective on “Con-
cerned Cousin,” who worried
about grandchildren occa-
sionally sharing a bed with
the grandparents.
My husband and I have
12 grandchildren. When they
sleep over, we put them in the
same little tent our daugh-
ter once slept in when we
camped out, along with a sec-
ond small tent we purchased
later. The kids love it, and
we can keep an eye on them
throughout the night.
In this day and age, it is
important to take precautions.
We are loving, caring grand-
parents, but the reality is, if a
parent decides to punish you,
you can be accused of terrible
things you never did. -- Pro-
tect the Grandparents
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, MAY 2, 2014
Nothing will be too difficult
for you to take on this year. Your
courage and insight will carry you
to the finish line, and you’ll be able
to overcome many obstacles and
achieve your goals. Don’t waste time
when you should be taking action.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Get serious about your career goals.
The position you desire is there for
the taking. Get working to obtain
whatever qualifications you need to
pursue your dreams. Believe and
achieve.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Things may not turn out as you
expected. Avoid an emotional
outburst by taking a step back from
whatever situation you face, and look
at the facts objectively.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Rumors and speculation could
seriously hurt your reputation.
Choose your confidants carefully,
or you could set yourself up for a
real problem both personally and
professionally.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Examine your motives before
offering your leadership services.
The situation should be of benefit
to all concerned, not just to you.
Sharing and a willingness to take
responsibility will be required.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- You need to work on solitary
projects today. Keep a low profile.
Confrontations are likely if you are
trying to deal with friends, relatives
or your peers.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- This
will be an educational day for you.
Be prepared to listen to people with
more experience. You could learn
about valuable strategies that can
improve your future and help you
achieve your objectives.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
Carefully deal with authority figures
regarding legal or health issues.
Ask questions and do your best to
obtain the necessary information to
efficiently solve whatever problem
you face.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Tensions will mount if your
intentions are misunderstood. Be
considerate toward others, but clear
and concise about what you want
and are willing to offer.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- A prospective career move should
be put on hold for the moment. Your
peers will be glad to give you a hand
if you are willing to ask for help.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- It’s time for a little pampering. You
will feel revived if you get together
with someone you love. A change of
scenery will do you a world of good.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- A
current personal dilemma should be
shared with a close friend. If a family
situation has deteriorated, an outside
perspective may shed some light on
a solution.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Don’t hesitate to delve into unfamiliar
territory. Keep your mind open to new
experiences. Lucrative possibilities
could be the result of an educational
trip, excursion or conference.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United
Feature Syndicate, Inc.
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419-695-0015
In 1948, Babe Ruth
appeared at Yankee Stadium
for the last time, on the
occasion of the New York
Yankees’ Silver Anniversary
Day, during which his No.
3 jersey was ceremonially
retired.
Trivia
10 – The Herald Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
The denomination of the first U.S. coin put into
circulation with the motto In God We Trust was two
cents. The coin was issued from 1864 to 1873.
On Mad Men, TVs 1960s-ear ad agency drama,
Don Draper’s name was Dick Whitman before he stole
his dead lieutenant’s identity during the Korean War.
Draper is played by Jon Hamm.
Today’s questions:
In the world of commercial motor oil additives,
what does the corporate acronym STP represent?
What celebrity MD was the first man to appear on
the cover of Oprah Winfrey’s O magazine?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
Tankers carrying oil
derail, catch fire in Va.
MICHAEL FELBERBAUM
Associated Press
LYNCHBURG, Va. —
Several CSX train cars carrying
crude oil derailed and caught
fire Wednesday along the James
River, with three black tankers
ending up in the water and leaking
some of their contents, becoming
the most recent crash involving
oil trains that has safety experts
pushing for better oversight.
Nearby buildings were evac-
uated for a time in downtown
Lynchburg, but officials said there
were no injuries and the city on its
website and Twitter said firefight-
ers decided to let the fire burn
out. Three or four tankers were
breached on the 15-car train that
CSX said was on its way from
Chicago to an unspecified des-
tination. Most of the cars were
knocked off the tracks.
Online photos and videos
showed large flames and thick,
black smoke right after the crash
before the fire burned itself out.
Still, officials were keeping peo-
ple out of the area.
Nicole Gibs, 32, a server at
the Depot Grille, just across the
street, said she was waiting on a
table when she heard a train that
sounded louder than usual. She
saw several train cars wobbling,
and then one fell over, spark-
ing a fire immediately. Several
other cars also toppled “like Tyco
trains,” she said.
The manager yelled:
“Evacuate!” and the restaurant
immediately began emptying,
with some people in wheelchairs
being carried down steps as the
fire raged, filling the air with
black smoke. The people from
the restaurant moved a block
away, then two.
“You could feel the heat like
you were standing by a camp-
fire,” Gibs said. “It was hot.”
Concern about the safety of
oil trains was heightened last July
when runaway oil train derailed
and exploded in Lac-Megantic,
Quebec, near the Maine border.
Forty-seven people died and
30 buildings were incinerated.
Canadian investigators said the
combustibility of the 1.3 million
gallons of light, sweet Bakken
crude released in Lac-Megantic
was comparable to gasoline.
“This is another national
wake-up call,” Jim Hall, a for-
mer National Transportation
Safety Board chairman, said of
the Lynchburg crash. “We have
these oil trains moving all across
the United States through com-
munities and the growth and dis-
tribution of this has all occurred,
unfortunately, while the federal
regulators have been asleep.”
“This is just an area in which
the federal rulemaking process is
too slow to protect the American
people,” he said.
There have been eight sig-
nificant oil train accidents in the
U.S. and Canada in the past year
involving trains hauling crude oil,
including several that resulted in
spectacular fires, according to the
safety board. Also Wednesday,
two locomotives and three freight
cars of a CSX train derailed near
the East Carolina University
campus in North Carolina, and
leaked a chemical for fertilizer.
Environmental officials said it
posed little danger.
Military benefits
survive defense cuts
By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — An Army corporal
would get a full housing allowance to rent
an off-base apartment while a military fam-
ily will see little change in their grocery
costs at the commissary as an election-year
Congress rebuffed Pentagon efforts to trim
military benefits.
The House Armed Services person-
nel subcommittee voted unanimously on
Wednesday to leave intact the current mili-
tary health care system, the housing allow-
ance and much of the Pentagon’s $1.4 bil-
lion in direct subsidies to the commissaries.
“I’m just really concerned about mili-
tary families and this doesn’t need to be,”
Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., chairman of the
personnel subcommittee, said of the pro-
posed Pentagon cuts after the panel vote.
“To me the primary focus of the national
government is national defense. We will be
providing.”
The panel’s action marked the first
step in the defense budget process on
Capitol Hill, with the full Armed Services
Committee expected to approve the bill
next week.
Facing diminished budgets, three defense
secretaries and senior officers have main-
tained that the cost of personnel benefits
have become unsustainable and threaten
the Pentagon’s ability to prepare the force
for warfighting.
The department has proposed gradual
reductions that would increase out-of-pock-
et expenses for current and retired military
as it faces a sober reality — military pay
and benefits comprise the largest share of
the budget, $167.2 billion out of $495.6
billion.
“America has an obligation to make
sure service members and their families
are fairly and appropriately compensated
and cared for during and after their time in
uniform,” Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel
told Congress last month. “We also have a
responsibility to give our troops the finest
training and equipment possible — so that
whenever America calls upon them, they
are prepared.”
Every attempt by the Pentagon to trim
benefits has faced fierce resistance from
congressional Republicans and Democrats
as well as powerful outside military orga-
nizations that argue the benefits help attract
men and women to the all-volunteer force.
They also contend that service members
and their families make unique sacrifices
and deserve all the benefits.
Still, concerns about fiscal realities
emerged during the panel’s brief discussion
about the legislation.
Hundreds rescued from
floodwaters in Fla., Ala.
By MELISSA NELSON-GABRIEL and
MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press
PENSACOLA BEACH, Fla. — People were plucked off
rooftops or climbed into their attics to get away from fast-
rising waters when nearly 2 feet of rain fell on the Florida
Panhandle and Alabama coast in the span of about 24 hours,
the latest bout of severe weather that began with tornadoes in
the Midwest.
On Wednesday, roads were chewed up into pieces or wiped
out entirely and neighborhoods were inundated, making res-
cues difficult for hundreds of people who called for help when
they were caught off guard by the single rainiest day ever
recorded in Pensacola.
Boats and Humvees zigzagged through the flooded streets
to help stranded residents. A car and truck plummeted 25 feet
when portions of a scenic highway collapsed, and one Florida
woman died when she drove her car into high water, officials
said.
Near the Alabama-Florida line, water started creeping
into Brandi McCoon’s mobile home, so her fiance, Jonathan
Brown, wrapped up her nearly 2-year-old son Noah in a blan-
ket and they swam in neck-deep water to their car about 50
feet away.
Then, the car was flooded.
“Every which way we turned, there was a big ol’ pile of
water,” she said.
Brown called 911 and eventually a military vehicle picked
them up and took them to a shelter.
Kyle Schmitz was at his Pensacola home with his 18-month-
old son Oliver on Tuesday night when heavy rain dropped dur-
ing a 45-minute span. He gathered up his son, his computer and
important papers and left.
“I opened the garage and the water immediately flowed in
like a wave,” he said. “The water was coming up to just below
the hood of my truck and I just gassed it.”
Schmitz and his son also made it out safely.
In Alabama, Capt. David Spies of Fish River/Marlow Fire
and Rescue said he was part of a team who found two women
and a young boy trapped in the attic of a modular home.
Spies said they received the first call of help before mid-
night Tuesday but they couldn’t find the group until about 8
a.m. Wednesday. By then, the water was 2 feet below the roof.
A firefighter used an axe to punch a hole through the roof and
free them.
“They were very scared, they were very upset. I would’ve
been, too,” Spies said.
There were at least 30 rescues in the Mobile area of
Alabama. Florida appeared to be the hardest hit. Gov. Rick
Scott said officials there received about 300 calls from strand-
ed residents.
At the Pensacola airport, 15.55 inches of rain fell on
Tuesday before midnight — setting a record for the rainiest
single day in the city, according to data since 1880. By compar-
ison, the airport in drought-stricken Los Angeles has recorded
15.9 inches of rain — since Jan. 1, 2012.
Pensacola and nearby Mobile are two of the rainiest cities
in the U.S., averaging more than five feet of rain in a year,
according to the National Climatic Data Center.
The National Weather Service said forecasters issued flash
flood warnings as early as Friday, yet many people were still
caught unaware.
Colorado eyes
edibles rules as
more people eat pot
By KRISTEN WYATT
Associated Press
DENVER — Colorado’s
marijuana experiment is
threatened by the popularity
of eating it instead of smoking
it, leading the pot industry to
join health officials and state
regulators to try to curb the
problem of consumers ingest-
ing too much weed.
A task force gathered
Wednesday to start brain-
storming ways to educate con-
sumers, including a standard
warning system on popular
edibles, which is the industry
term for marijuana that has
been concentrated and infused
into food or drink.
One idea was to fashion
labels on edible pot like the
difficulty guidelines on ski
slopes, a system very familiar
to Colorado residents. Weak
marijuana products would
have green dots, grading up to
black diamonds for the most
potent edibles.
“We should have a marking
so that when people come in,
they know what they’re get-
ting,” said Chris Haslor of the
Colorado District Attorneys’
Council.
Marijuana-infused foods
are booming in the state’s new
recreational market.
GOP blocks Democrats' minimum wage try in Senate
By ALAN FRAM
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Senate
Republicans derailed a Democratic drive
Wednesday to raise the federal minimum
wage, blocking a cornerstone of President
Barack Obama’s economic plans and
ensuring the issue will be a major feature
of this fall’s congressional elections.
Facing the threat of a GOP Senate
takeover, Democrats have forced votes on
a procession of bills designed to ampli-
fy their message of economic fairness.
Republican senators accused Democrats
of playing politics by pushing a minimum
wage measure designed to lure voters but
too expensive for employers and sure to
result in lost jobs and higher inflation.
“This is about trying to make this side
of the aisle look bad and hard-hearted,
and to try to rescue this midterm elec-
tion,” said No. 2 Senate GOP leader John
Cornyn of Texas.
The legislation by Sen. Tom Harkin
of Iowa would increase the $7.25 hourly
minimum wage for American workers in
three steps until it reached $10.10 after 30
months, with annual increases for infla-
tion afterward. The minimum has been
at $7.25 since 2009, with 3.3 million
Americans — including disproportionate
numbers of women and younger people
— earning that figure or less last year.
“We saw this morning a majority of
senators saying yes, but almost every
Republican saying no to giving America
a raise,” Obama said in pointedly political
remarks at a White House event with low-
wage workers. “And then if they keep put-
ting politics ahead of working Americans,
you can put them out of office.”
All but daring Republicans to vote
against the measure, Harkin said before
the vote, “Who’s going to vote to give
these people a fair shot at the American
dream? And who’s going to vote against
it?”
The answer came moments later when
senators voted 54-42 to continue debating
the legislation — six votes short of the
60 needed to keep the measure moving
forward. Every voting Republican but one
— Bob Corker of Tennessee — voted no.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of
Nevada was the only Democrat to vote
with Republicans. That was a procedural
move that will let Reid stage a future vote
on the measure, underscoring the political
value Democrats see in it.
Though Obama backed Harkin’s
legislation, the president proposed a $9
minimum wage in his 2013 State of the
Union address. That has fueled talk by
lawmakers including Maine’s two sena-
tors, Republican Susan Collins and inde-
pendent Angus King, that compromise is
possible.
But election-year politics suggests that
would be difficult.
Leaders of the GOP-run House have
shown no interest in even allowing debate,
giving Senate Democrats little incentive
to cut a deal. And Obama has recently
signed executive orders requiring a $10.10
minimum for many federal contractors,
making it hard for him to agree to a lower
figure for everyone else.
Polls show that while the overall pub-
lic favors an increase, Democratic voters
strongly support one but Republicans —
especially tea party backers — are against
it. Powerful interest groups on each side
are also against a middle ground, with
unions backing a full increase and busi-
ness groups opposing one.
“We are not going to compromise on
locking people into poverty,” Reid told
reporters, adding later, “We’ll compro-
mise, but not on the number.”
Republicans in turn point to a report
by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget
Office, which estimated that an increase
to $10.10 could cost about 500,000 jobs in
2016. They did not mention that the report
also found the boost would mean higher
incomes for 16.5 million earners and lift
900,000 people out of poverty.
“To pay for the raises, the money has
to come from somewhere,” said Sen. Mike
Enzi, R-Wyo. “So if you like the dollar
deal at your fast food, get ready for $1.50.”
Instead of a minimum wage increase,
Congress should work on bills creating
jobs, such as allowing construction of
the controversial Keystone XL oil pipe-
line from Canada to Texas, Republicans
said.
TODAY’S
SMILE
Wyatt Wilson
(Continued from page 1)
Users of the service will
need to provide proof of
residency in the form of a
Delphos Utilities bill.
The collection includes
furniture, mattresses, etc.
ACR will not accept refrig-
erators, air conditioners, flo-
rescent light bulbs or building
materials such as shingles or
dry wall.
Paint
(Continued from page 1)
“All those duties are completed by
11:30 a.m. so everything’s ready when the
pool opens at noon,” Mansfield said.
When the diamonds are in full use,
parks employees check the dugouts sev-
eral times a day and move bases and the
pitcher’s mound for the various levels of
play. The outfield foul lines are also kept
refreshed.
“We use 3-4 seasonal helpers every day
for an hour or so on the 4-6 diamonds to
get them ready for the day,” Mansfield
said. “In June and July, there’s not a dia-
mond open in the evening.”
Groundskeeping is by far Mansfield’s
biggest task.
“We have 100 acres of parks to mow
and trim as well as the retention ponds,
the wastewater and water treatment plant
and all the lift stations; the right-of-ways
on Gressel Drive, Shenk Road, in front
of Cabo’s, the ambulatory care center and
Arby’s; and the reservoir, which alone
takes 3-3 1/2 days, is mowed every three
weeks,” he said. “During the mowing sea-
son, someone is on a mower every day. It
also has to be someone who is trained to
operate the equipment. Not just anyone can
hop on the mower and go.”
On top of that, Mansfield said the job of
mowing residential properties also falls to
his department, which takes two employ-
ees for safety reasons.
“About 15-20 times each summer, we
mow properties that have violated the city’s
ordinance,” Mansfield added. “Either the
homeowner is unable to keep up with the
mowing or the owner is absent.”
Parks workers also help with larger
events like the two-day Kiwanis Fourth of
July Celebration, including City and Minor
League tournaments, softball tournaments
and the Families United softball tourna-
ment; six Rotary Club Music in the Parks
concerts, an average of 70 shelterhouse
rentals and 8-9 pool parties. The pool also
hosts a Day Camp with 100-120 kids.
During football season, Mansfield’s
flex plan is a must. With gridders on the
field Friday, Saturday and Sunday, parks
employees are kept hopping seven days a
week. They have to spread those hours out
to cover everything.
While manpower takes the bulk of
Mansfield’s budget, utilities, supplies,
repairs, fuel and maintenance also take
their chunk. Utilities are more than
$20,000 a year, maintenance is $7-8,000,
maintenance of the buildings is $17,000,
fuel is $11,000 and two mower decks
were replaced at $6,000. Remainder of
his budget is cleaning supplies, grass
seed, chemicals and paper supplies for
the restrooms.
“If the Parks and Rec is combined with
the Maintenance Department, a lot of this
stuff just won’t get done and some pro-
grams will be eliminated,” Mansfield said.
“There just won’t be enough people or time
to take care of everything.”
Parks
Gov't report says US lost $11.2B on GM bailout
NEW YORK (AP) — A new report says taxpayers lost $11.2
billion on the government’s bailout of General Motors.
The estimate comes from a quarterly report Wednesday to
Congress by a government watchdog that oversees the bailout, and
is up from a previous estimate of $10.5 billion.
The Detroit automaker needed the $49.5 billion bailout to sur-
vive its bankruptcy restructuring in 2009. The company went pub-
lic again in November 2010, and the government sold its last shares
of GM in December. The report says the Treasury Department
wrote off an $826 million administrative claim against General
Motors Co. in March, ending its involvement with the company.
In an interview last year, Special Inspector General Christy
Romero said there was “no question” the department and the tax-
payers would lose money on GM. The agency said last year that
the government lost $2.9 billion on the bailout of Chrysler, which
cost $12.5 billion.
Treasury Department spokesman Adam Hodge said the agency
was not looking to make money.
“The goal of Treasury’s investment in GM was never to make
a profit, but to help save the American auto industry, and by any
measure that effort was successful,” he said.
Only one auto-related company is still partly under government
control: auto lender Ally Financial Inc. Ally is the former financing
business of GM, and earlier this month it went public again with an
IPO that raised $2.38 billion. The Treasury Department owns a 17
percent stake in the company.
Auto companies received $79.7 billion in the bailout, and the
Treasury Department has been repaid $59.1 billion.
The department allocated $474.8 billion to the Troubled Asset
Relief Program, or TARP, to bail out banks, insurers, auto compa-
nies and others during the financial crisis. It says it has recovered
$438.4 billion.

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