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Mary E.

Twomey

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan Class Description: Art studio classes in drawing, painting, sculpture, and ceramics. Demonstrations, group, and individual critiques will be given throughout the courses. Safe studio practices are emphasized. Ceramics: Students will learn to create forms as the foundation for sculpture design. Techniques for throwing on the potters wheel are studied along with firing procedures and the characteristics and formulation of basic glazes. Kiln theory is introduced as students learn to stack and monitor the kiln. Drawing: Students will learn to see with an artists eye. Emphasis is on experimentation in the use of drawing mediums, and techniques. Proportion, perspective, shading, controlling tones, composition, contour drawing, blind contour drawing, and gesture drawing methods will be explored. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased competence in the expressive use of form and techniques. Painting: Acrylic will be the primary medium for this class. Visual perception, spatial concepts, linear perspective, compositional structure, figure/ground relationships, color theory, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized. Major painting styles and movements will be studied in historical context. Grade(s): High School, Grades 9 Number of Students: 22 students Ethnicity: 7% Hispanic, 3% Black, 30% Asian, 2%, Other, 38% Caucasian Students With Disabilities: Two Student A: GAD

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan

Mary E. Twomey

General functioning: This student is easily frustrated and may have difficulty completing work. He/she may suffer from perfectionism and take much longer to complete work. Or he/she may simply refuse to begin out of fear that they will not be able to do anything right. His/her fears of being embarrassed, humiliated, or failing may result in school avoidance. Accomodations include: more time, chunking assignments, organizational skills (e.g., schedule, study habits), peer tutoring, allow student a flexible deadline for worrisome assignments, adapting the curriculum to better suit the students learning style. Student B: ADHD General functioning: This student may experience episodes of over-whelming emotion such as sadness, embarrassment, or rage. Possible fluctuations in mood, energy, and motivation, cause difficulty concentrating, remembering assignments, understanding assignments with complex directions. Poor social skills can sometimes cause difficulty with peers. Accommodations include: recorded books, a flexible curriculum more time, chunking assignments, organizational skills (e.g., schedule, study habits), monitor progress. Level of StructureHigh A moderate level of structure will most likely suffice at the high school level but I would prefer to start out with a high level of structure and after the first few weeks relax bit by bit into the more relaxed mode. As it turned out the results of the questionnaires supported my thoughts about the appropriate level of structure in my classroom. As a part of this structure, I would implement assigned seating. On the first day of class I explain to students that alphabetical seating works best for me and makes it easier for me to learn their names, after we settle into a routine I will sometimes switch seats around to mix things up.

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan

Mary E. Twomey

As Sprick suggests I would periodically re-evaluate and make adjustments based on behavior and the climate of the class. Are students functioning as a cooperative community? If yes, after the first 4-5 weeks of school then I would relax on some aspects and maintain the same level of structure but possibly shake things up a bit by allowing the students do something outside of the norm such as go outside and sketch. With the condition, that they have to return to class within 30 minutes and present a minimum of 4-5 quick sketches or gesture drawing. Accountability of sketches is to prevent the student from behaving as though it is a free period. Any one who does not complete the requirement will not participate in the next activity/reward. Considerations for Scheduling (not an actual schedule) A larger class requires a tighter schedule at a pace designed to keep the students moving, making it more difficult for off task behavior to occur, and minimizing waste of valuable instruction time. The schedule must be varied enough that the students need to be focused on the work, while taking into account the developmental age of the students in the class. For my ninth grade art class the first 2-3 minutes is an independent warm up exercise, followed by 2-3 minutes of teacher led review, 30 minutes of independent work, 2-3 minutes for clean up, and 5 minutes of review and discussion of artists related work. Classroom Physical Arrangement My incredible art classroom has lots of easy to use display space with white tack board. Some display walls in the room are for cyclical changing displays while other walls are designated to hang student work for critiques and discussions. There is additional space in the halls surrounding the art room for sharing work with the rest of the student body, teachers and

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan

Mary E. Twomey

visitors. Additional display cases for showing student artwork are placed near the main office and at the schools main entrance. There is sufficient storage shelving and drying racks for in-process projects, including several flat files, allowing for one drawer per student a designated space to secure their in progress or finished work and supplies. Ample storage cabinets for supplies, some are lockable and accessible only by me to protect materials and equipment that are too dangerous or valuable for student use without supervision or special instruction. There is also a large lockable walk in closet with shelving to store bulk materials and next door my office/closet with my personal art books which students may use for inspiration or reference during class. The classroom has general lighting, but has also been set up for zoned lighting options housed on a movable track suspended from the ceiling, that can be adjusted and used as needed. There are also tripods for direct lighting options for small displays and provides options for backlighting and uplighting. Electrical outlets are plentiful and installed every six feet, the floors are made of sealed vinyl. The room is equipped with blackout shades for viewing art on either the smart board or projected screen. A large bank of windows supplies natural light and allows for classroom ventilation. A ventilation booth is set up for more harmful operations such as spraying adhesive and fixative. Exhaust fans are in the kiln room extending through to the potters wheels next door to remove harmful dust and fumes. The kiln room has two kilns, shelving for greenware, glazed, and fired items as well as cupboard for storage of ceramic and sculpture supplies. Two Potters wheels partitioned with ventilation and a sink with a clay trap. The main space has two sinks located on peninsulas allowing greater simultaneous access for students.

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan

Mary E. Twomey

There are two separate six by ten foot long worktables in the room for students, set up parallel to each other allowing for unobstructed movement when observing students at work. Every student has a clear line of sight to the whiteboard and SmartBoard when they are in use. The worktables are on casters that can be unlocked to re-position with a mobile platform and can be placed according to need for drawing a central still life or model. The large table surface provides plenty of space for students to work on projects of all dimensions as well as provide a suitable environment for collaboration and sharing. There is also the option to use an easel if the student prefers. Classroom Rules Be Respectful. Be Responsible. Be Prepared. Be Safe. All my classroom rules fall beneath these four simple expectations. Following these types of rules are necessary to foster a sense of community in the classroom where students feel safe and are willing to take creative risks. These systems are intended to foster participation in class discussions and the critique of one anothers work without fear of recrimination. The goal is to create a positive classroom environment where each student feels accepted and respected. Because there are multiple art classes throughout the day it will be best to already have rules and expectations developed as Sprick suggests. I believe it is best practice to include the students in the engineering of classroom policy. This practice can prompt students to envision what the classroom should be like and shared decision making can ensure that students view any consequences as fair. If students feel a consequence is unfair and, during a discussion, they suggest plausible alternatives the consequences could, potentially, be altered. A hierarchy of consequences according to the level of infraction, low level, medium, etc., including a clause detailing outcomes as a result of serious behavior infractions.

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan

Mary E. Twomey

My classes will design and create classroom rules posters which I will display next to the areas most frequently looked at by students, the clock, window, window shades, white board near the posted do now, agenda, and assignments. The rules will also be in the class syllabus and in a letter to the students and parents sent at the beginning of the school year. Classroom Expectations 1. Class begins when the bell rings. If you are not in the room at that time, you are tardy. Tardy #1 Verbal warning Tardy #2 Written warning. Tardy #3 Written warning and parent or guardian is notified. Tardy #4 Afterschool detention. Each successive tardy is an afterschool detention. 2. Be Prepared. Have all materials necessary to work. 3. FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY No open food or beverages may be brought into the art studio. Use of materials and equipment appropriately Follow all safety rules for equipment use Use safety glasses when needed Report ALL injuries incurred in class immediately 4. Class ends when I dismiss you. Not when the bell rings. Your area and any assigned areas must be clean before you leave class. Materials and equipment must be returned to their designated storage areas Monitoring Students Classroom Behavior Tracking data can let us know whether a problem that needs to be addressed exists, and to determine what causes it. By collecting baseline data, recording the behaviors of individual

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan

Mary E. Twomey

students in the class on the rule monitoring chart (Appendix D) daily it will become evident over time which students are the chronic rule breakers, which rules are broken and what behaviors are the most prevalent. Graphing the data will reveal any patterns of behavior which could be indicative of deeper issues, such as emotional problems like anxiety and emphasize which students are at risk. Data can reveal long-term trends and assist in setting priorities for improvement. Using codes allows quick notations to be made for multiple students concurrently and determine what behaviors need to be addressed. Once the behaviors have been identified, and interventions determined, continued monitoring and data collection will inform us which interventions are working and where adjustments may be necessary. Secondary Intervention Plan A secondary intervention plan is required when primary preventions such as CBM (Classwide Behavior Management) systems prove ineffective for certain students. If students undesirable behavior is not reduced, nor are the replacement behaviors learned it is necessary to escalate the intervention. The teacher can use alternative classroom management strategies such as: Diligent supervision, Token economy (fewer or no points earned that period), Response cost (removal of previous earned reward or privilege), Take time (temporary removal), Problem solving, Self-management (self-recording, self-evaluation, self-reinforcement), Behavioral contract, DRO, DRA, DRI, DRL, Timeout (in class), and Parent conferences. Encouragement Procedures to Reinforce Appropriate Classroom Behaviors My first strategy is to make contact in the beginning of the year with an introductory letter and questionnaire. I will describe the upcoming coursework and invite parents to share their knowledge of their child, and request volunteers for chaperoning or other types of involvement.

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan

Mary E. Twomey

Another procedure is to plan ways for getting to know the students individually in the beginning of the year. Students will fill out an about me slip and/or an about me assignment. In general, I will use gentle reprimands or praise and recognition of efforts and positive behavior on a daily basis, posing comments in positive terms. However, I will not use praise indiscriminately. I will make it clear that I expect the same from them. I will encourage mistakes when making artmuch can be learned from them. I will share my own mistakes with the students when lesson plans do not quite work the way I intended. When you take risks not all of them will work out, but some will. Levels of Misbehaviors LEVEL EXAMPLES
Out of seat Not following directions Not doing class work Sleeping Not listening No homework Unprepared without materials Rude or unkind comments to peers Talking or calling out during class Tardiness

POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES
Timeout Contact Detention Loss of privileges Moving seat

1.
Lower

2.
Medium

Talking out repeatedly to the point where the student is being disruptive Visiting/talking Inappropriate noises Traveling Touching Poking Standing on furniture Constant talking Out of seat and interfering with others learning Inappropriate chair manners Consistently not following directions

Timeout in or out of room Parent contact Loss of privileges Behavior contract Admin/parent/student/teacher conference Referral to team leader

Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan

Mary E. Twomey

LEVEL

EXAMPLES
Talking back to adult Throwing things Teasing Lying Cheating Forgery Inappropriate language Tantrums Pushing Disrespect to others Leaving room without permission Banging on window Profane hand gestures Pinching Vandalizing school property Spitting on others Bullying Actions that can cause harm Physical violence Hitting another student Throwing a and book Fistfight Stealing Drugs Weapons Throwing furniture Threatening injury or bodily harm Sexual harassment Sexual behaviors

POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES
Timeout in or out of room Parent contract Loss of privileges Behavior contract Office referral Admin/parent/student/teacher conference Referral to team leader Suspension

3.
High

4.
Extreme

As per Board of Education discipline policies Referral to the office Crisis management Room clear Physical restraint Expulsion

Multicultural Considerations All students are different and cannot be treated the same. Considering the unique and individual cultural backgrounds and learning histories of the individuals involved is the key to creating and implementing CRCM (Culturally Responsive Classroom Management) Strategies. During the first few weeks of school, implementing getting to know you assignments, ice breakers, and establishing school-to-home relationships to get to know students personally will be helpful in determining the appropriate steps. Use plain language to describe expectations, have class discussions about those expectations. I will model the behavior I expect, and administer consequences consistently, and provide students with opportunities to practice to evaluate understanding. Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan 9

Mary E. Twomey

A discussion of school and/or classroom rules leads to an assignment that requires students to represent ideas pertaining to the ways critical and social justice has touched their lives that initiates further dialogue, questioning/problem-posing, critiquing bias and attitudes and teaching activism for social justice. As a new teacher I think it would be extremely helpful for me, and empowering for students, to ask them for feedback about my teaching and/or the assignment by answering a guiding question on an exit slip, such as: How did I do as a teacher today? Alternatively, what did you like/dislike about this project? Or a 3-2-1: three things you liked, two things you disliked, and one thing you would change about the lesson. Procedures for Managing Student Work Assigning Work When introducing something new students learn the process with hands on step-by-step procedures. They plan ideas and play around with it developing preliminary ideas before they start on the main project. No examples are shown at this stage, it is impossible to get the example out of mind once they have seen it making it harder for students to use their own experiences and ideas. Original thinking based on personal experiences is hard work, when students solve problems themselves they are practicing critical thinking skills. Independent Work During independent work periods, students are free to move around the room as needed, and may walk around briefly to see their classmates work. Students may speak quietly to each other as long as it is about the assignment, related to art knowledge, or current art news. No headphones or personal iPods during class. Music may be played in the background during these periods. Submit a playlist, label it according to mood and they will be rotated accordingly. Submitting Completed Work

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Mary E. Twomey

The students will hang or place their finished work in a designated area ready for critique. Incomplete artwork and assignments will not be evaluated. Students may take assignments home to work on BUT work on it has to occur in class also or it will not be evaluated. Quizzes, written reflections, artists statements and other written work are to be submitted by the end of the class and placed in the basket on my desk. Students have to write their names on the BACK of paper prior to handing it in. Some work may be required to be turned in online. Returning Graded Work Graded work may be picked up from the counter top behind and to the right of my classroom desk at the end of class. It will be laid out in alphabetical order, face down. Absence Missed work due to absence, including handouts will be available after school on my teachers web page. It is your responsibility to get the information and contact me to let me know if you are unclear about anything. Generally, you will have as many days as you were absent added to the project deadline or to turn in the missed work. Procedures and Policies for Dealing with Late/Missing Assignments A project due date is set; this is when all work on this project in the classroom will end, students may finish the project at home returnable one week later. They may also work in the studio before and after school. At the end of that week, if students need additional time, they must make further arrangements with me. If they have not requested more time and been given a new due date, 5 points are deducted for each day it is late. This gives all students time to finish and accommodates most students with disabilities in the class. Student who are submitting late art work because of absence are to place or hang their work in the corner gallery area of the current projects work space set aside for this. If possible, Class-Wide Behavior Management Plan 11

Mary E. Twomey

a short critique will be held at the end of class that day otherwise, the critique will be incorporated into the next class critique. Record Keeping Grades are recorded promptly into the schools software and students are provided access to this information. I will encourage them to keep track of their grade and continually monitor their own progress. Should a student be falling behind I will provide them with a printout of the report and discuss with them any missing assignments and/or areas they are having difficulty. As a teacher I will try to discern if there are particular circumstances at home that could be mitigating factors and come up with a plan to get them caught up. Classroom Routines and Transitions Start of Class As soon as students enter class, they will do a daily drawing exercise to warm up, improve skills, thinking, and get into the right mindset for the upcoming lesson. Write in their planner any reminders or assignments listed under the agenda before we begin or continue a project. End of Class Five minutes before the end of class, students are responsible for cleaning their own work area and assigned area, such as sinks. All the equipment used by a student, must be cleaned, and put away in its designated storage area, by that student. Everyone will remain in his or her seat until cleanup has been checked. Students will be dismissed once check-up is completed. Attention Signal When the noise level has risen to an unacceptable level or there are instructions to be given I will verbally request attention and then raise my arm and count down backwards from 5 slowly, using my fingers as a visual cue, to signal for everyones attention. As each student notices, they

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are to put their hand up and signal to others a warning to pay attention. When teaching, if I feel that no one is listening, I will stop talking mid-sentence and mark the amount of time it takes to get their attention. The rule is If you waste my time, I waste yours. For every minute I spend waiting for the class to quiet down, they lose one minute of their time and will be required to come at lunch or after school for detention. Description of a Classroom Routine Wrap Up At the end of a class period or project to support the artwork just completed discuss the outcomes to review what is learned and what was discovered. Show students examples of great art dealing with similar issues integrating Art History and contemporary art ideas, art criticism, and aesthetics into the lesson. Their own work provides a meaningful frame of reference for reflections. Students have a greater appreciation and interest in the ways the artists had to deal with issues because students had to deal with similar issues in their own work. Ask questions What will we notice more after today's class? What did we learn to see today? questions that will require them to continue to think about art when they are not in the classroom.

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References Bartel, M. (2009). Warm-Ups and Closing Rituals. Art Rituals and Warm-ups. Retrieved from http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/ritual.html Classroom Printables and Charts. Behavior Charts for Teachers, Classroom Management Printables. Retrieved from http://www.freeprintablebehaviorcharts.com/teacher%27s_page.htm#Classroom_Behavior_ Evaluation_Individual Edwards, B. (1979). Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. J. P. Tharcher, Inc., Los Angeles Goalbook. Self-Assessment, Behavioral Monitoring, Social Skills Chart. Self-Monitoring|UDL Adaptation Strategies. Retrieved from https://goalbookapp.com/toolkit/adaptation/selfmonitoring Scheuermann, B., & Hall, J. A. (2008). Positive behavioral supports for the classroom. Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall. Sprick, R. S., Garrison, M., & Howard, L. M. (1998). Champs: a proactive and positive approach to classroom management for grades K-9. Pacifice Northwest Publishing.

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Appendices Management and Discipline Planning Questionnaire (Teachers Needs) ......................... A Management and Discipline Planning Questionnaire ........................................................ B Classroom Layout .............................................................................................................. C Daily Rule-Monitoring Chart............................................................................................. D

Mary E. Twomey

Mary E. Twomey

Mary E. Twomey
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Mary E. Twomey Daily Rule-Monitoring Chart Art Class: Studio Experience


NAME Student A Student B Student C* Student D Student E Student F* Student G Student H Student I* Student J Student K Student L Student M Student N Student O Student P* Student Q Student R Student S Student T
NS NH TO IH IH NH OT DC UB NL DC NS TO OT IU T U CI TO TO OT OT NL U NH OT IC OT OT IH U OT CI NS

Grade: 9 Period: 7

NH OT NS OT OT NS T NS NH U NL OT

* Monitor and chart after 2 weeks


U NH IH IC T NL NS Unprepared for class No Homework Incomplete Homework Incomplete Classwork Tardy Not Listening Not Seated RD DT DC TO OT CX CI Refused to Follow Directions Disrespectful to Teacher Disrespectful to Classmates Talking Out Off Task Clean up not done Clean up incomplete/sloppy TX IU US GX Tools Not Returned Inappropriate Use of Materials Unsafe Behavior No Safety Glasses