DIY Arcade by C Conway

How to build an arcade machine that works with MAME®
© 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
version December 7, 2006
Table of contents
1. Introduction
Important stuff, that's why it's at the beginning.
2. Shopping
Covers tools, materials, and accessories needed.
3. Construction 1
Covers side panels, studs, center panels, and casters.
4. Construction 2
Covers television shelf, speaker panel, coin door hole, wood filler, sanding, routing for t-
molding, painting, brush care, coin door installation, t-molding installation, speaker
installation, and marquee retainer installation.
5. Securing the television and television glass
Covers making the TV retention studs, installing the TV, Making the TV glass retention
strips, cutting acrylic.
6. Preparing the cabinet art
Covers downloading and manipulating the cabinet art.
7. Constructing the control panel
Covers printing and applying the control panel overlay, cutting the button and stick holes,
covering the control panel with acrylic, and securing the acrylic with screws.
8. Wiring and mounting the control panel
Covers the anatomy of the microswitch and keyboard encoder, MAME keymap, wiring
the control panel using quick-connects, attaching the control panel with brackets.
9. Preparing and applying the cabinet art
Covers protecting the cabinet art with clear coat or contact paper, and applying the
cabinet art.
10. The finishing touches
Covers mounting the power strip, wiring the speakers, making the amplifier, making the
volume control, mounting the computer, and using a car audio amplifier.
11. The computer part 1
Covers what computer to choose, and extending the power button, and sorting the
ROMs.
12. The computer part 2
Covers installing and configuring Windows 98se.
13. The computer part 3
Covers installing and configuring MAME32, and optimizing Windows 98se.
Appendix 1. My favorite arcade related links
Covers website links to cabinet plans and other important information.
Appendix 2. How to build a keyboard hack or The poor man's keyboard encoder
Covers building an inexpensive keyboard encoder.
Appendix 3. Printable MAME keymap
A useful printable keymap.
Appendix 4. The one button power solution
Covers turning everything in the cabinet on/off with a single button press.
Appendix 5. Mini cabinets
Covers building scaled arcade cabinets for children.
Appendix 6 : Building the computer
Covers assembling a computer from parts.
Appendix 7 : Inches / Millimeter converter
Covers converting standard and metric measurements.
Appendix 8 : Wiring the control panel, part 2
Covers soldering the controls and using the keywiz for a 4 player control panel.
This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
DIY Arcade by C Conway
How to build an arcade machine that works with MAME®
© 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter one : Introduction
Hello from Maine, USA. My name is Craig and I like to build arcade machines!
I have an extensive background in construction and computers.
In this tutorial I will show you step-by-step how to build an arcade cabinet that is inexpensive, strong, and very fun to play. I will
try to make this tutorial as simple and thorough as possible, comments and suggestions for future revisions are always
appreciated and can be sent to the e-mail address above. If contacting me please title the e-mail "ARCADE" so I don't mistake it
as spam.
Copyright statement
This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
This tutorial is NOT to be sold, auctioned, or bundled with your auction.
Mission statement
This is my contribution to the arcade cabinet builder's community. Are you new to the community? If so, check out Saint's site
"Build your own arcade controls" , The BYOAC forums, and MAME's official site. It's a great hobby that keeps the fading classic
arcade games alive, challenges our skills in construction, inspires our creativity in design, and brings friends together for a fun
game.
Disclaimer
Operating power tools and working with electricity can be dangerous. Read the manuals that come with your tools to familiarize
yourself with proper and safe usage, heed the manufacturer's safety warnings. Always wear hearing and eye protection when
operating electric tools. Work in a well lit area while sober and well rested. Televisions, monitors, and power supplies should not
be opened without the aid of a certified repairman. Open televisions and monitors may store enough electricity to kill you and
must be discharged, a tutorial on discharging monitors can be found here. I encourage you to take safety measures very
seriously, I will not be held liable for injury or misuse as a result of these instructions.
Chapter two : Shopping
After you find a cabinet plan that suits you, you'll need to go shopping.
For this tutorial I will be building a "William's Defender Stargate 2&1
cabinet" (Manufacturer's picture below) and a few other cabinets, illustrating the most
useful parts of each one. I will be using particle board but I will recommend MDF as it is
very smooth and adequately tough.
Tools :
Notes:
1. Do not buy battery powered tools, they haven't enough strength.
2. You can use inexpensive tools for this project, the cheapest available, except for the
paint brush.
3. If you can't find these locally at a good price check out Harbor Freight
3/8" (10mm) Drill (or larger, keyless chuck is a plus)
with the following bits :
"pilot point" drill bit set
regular drill and driver bit set
1-1/8" (30mm) Bi metal hole saw and arbor (for buttons and sticks)
up to 5/8" (16mm) Countersink bit (so you can drive your screws flush or below the
surface of the material)
Long phillips head bit
(for driving the screws)

Optional:
"Countersink drill bit" These bits drill a pilot hole and make a countersink in one step! I
just recently discovered these and they look like they could save allot of time. The drill bit
should be between 7/64" (2.4mm) and 7/64" (2.8mm) and the countersink should be
between 5/16" (8mm) and 3/8" (9.5)

Jig-Saw (this will be the tool used most)
with "fine" wood cutting blades (at least 3, 1 blade per sheet of MDF)

Finishing Sander
Plunge Router
You will only be using this tool for three hours per cabinet, so you may rent or borrow
one instead of buying. Although it is a great tool to have if you are trying to build up a
nice workshop. Also note that routers and router bits come in 1/4" (6mm) and
1/2" (13mm), so be sure to get the correct size for your router.
with the following bits:
flush trim bit
straight cutting bit (sometimes called double fluted bit)
1/16" (1.6mm) slot cutting bit (if you want t-molding)
or
with 5/8" (16mm) (or slightly larger) round over bit (if you do not want t-molding)
Optional:
10" (250mm) (or larger) Table saw
A table saw is not needed to build an arcade cabinet, but is a great tool to have if you are
trying to build up a nice workshop. Pictured left is a standard table saw, and right a table
saw with a router base to double as a router table.
Rubber Mallet (for closing the paint can and for pounding the t-molding into place)

Paint can opener (or large flat-head screwdriver)

Material :
(call around, your local lumber yard may deliver these to your door for less than it costs
to haul them yourself from the hardware store)
3 sheets of 4'X8' X 3/4" (1220x2440mm x19mm) MDF (medium density fiberboard)

MDF is adequately tough, and holds a screw pretty well. I think it is ideal for the new
builder as it is very smooth and sturdy enough for a home arcade. It's best feature is it's
very smooth and easy to work with. The down side is it's very heavy.
If weight is more of a consideration than cost, I recommend plywood.
If cost is more of a consideration than anything else, you can use 5/8" (16mm) or
3/4" (19mm) particle board and paint it flat black, particle board's poor texture is covered
well in flat black paint.
(5) of 2"X8" (50x200mm) board "two by eights"
(200) 2" (50mm) coarse thread drywall screws (wood screws are too soft and strip easily)
(4) 2" (50mm) casters
(front of cabinet : "swivel/brake casters" rear of cabinet : "fixed" casters)
make sure your casters total weight specifications = 300 lbs (136 kgs)
i.e.: 4 casters rated @ 75 lbs (34 kgs) = 300 lbs (136 kgs), can hold your finished cabinet


1 quart (or larger) can of latex interior primer (can be tinted to better match the color of
your cabinet)
1 quart (or larger) can of latex interior semi-gloss paint (the color of your cabinet)
2 1/2" (60mm) trim brush (with nylon bristles)
Make sure to buy a paint brush with nylon bristles, it may cost more than the cheap
brushes but will apply the paint without leaving unsightly brush strokes. Purdy brand
brushes are a good budget choice.
painter's pail
7" (178mm) smooth foam roller with tray
(2) Sawhorses These can be bought assembled or made using "sawhorse brackets" and
boards. There are also many free plans across the internet.
work lights

Drywall T square
clamps
square
tape measurer (I recommend getting one that lists the fractions)
many pencils and pencil sharpener
hearing protection and a pair of safety goggles
Wear hearing protection and safety glasses whenever you operate electric tools.
optional : T-molding, 40' (12.19m) 3/4" (19mm) black
($20, shipped, from T-molding.com)
T-molding.com also sells other sizes ranging from 1/2" (13mm) to 1 1/2" (32mm)

Cabinet parts
01. Joysticks and buttons
There are different brands of arcade joysticks and buttons available across the internet,
ranging in price and quality. Happ controls are the industry standard in quality (but their
parts cost less from vendors then from their official site). Click the logos below to visit the
vendors.
02. Marquee
(eBay)
Or you can print your own, using the printing method in chapter 6, and wedge it between
two pieces of acrylic.
03. Marquee retainer ( www.happcontrols.com )
If you order this item from Happ's website it will cost $12.05 + $30.00 shipping as they
use UPS by default. However, if you call Happ at 888-BUY-HAPP (289-4277) and order
it with USPS shipping it will only cost $20 total! It is part # 49-1000-00 Retainer for video
game marquee.
If cost is more of a consideration than anything else, you can buy aluminum angle from
the hardware store, cut it and paint it black with automotive spray paint.
04. Keyboard encoder (Groovy Game Gear)
Pictured below are the Eco (left) and Max (right) versions of the "KeyWiz" keyboard
encoder. The Eco (economy) version requires soldering, one wire for each microswitch,
and a single ground wire. The Max version features screw terminals and does not require
soldering. There is a price difference of $15 between the two.

If cost is more of a consideration than anything else, and you are proficient with and
enjoy small scale soldering, you can make your own keyboard encoder following this
tutorial.
23" (584mm) - 27" (685mm) Television
Televisions can be easily interfaced to computers, and their resolution is in keeping with
real arcade monitors. A large screen will have a large impact on everyone that plays your
arcade machine - so go big! I have seen many example pics of homemade arcade
machines across the internet that have tiny little screens. These out of proportion trends
are a result of the high price and small size of the average computer monitor.
Televisions, on the other hand, are inexpensive and large.
optional : Coin door (eBay, Happ Controls)
In this tutorial I will be building an arcade cabinet with a non-functional coin door. There
will be a 'coin' button for credits, alternately it would be easy to build an arcade cabinet
that requires quarters. Either way, in my opinion, coin doors go a long way towards
building an authentic looking arcade cabinet, and can be acquired for as little as $20,
shipped, off eBay.
Alternately - If you plan to double your arcade machine as an MP3 jukebox, you could
place a large sub woofer in place of the coin door. Note that for a sub woofer to boom
properly it will need to be in an enclosure (the front of the cabinet could be the front of
the enclosure, simply build a box behind the woofer) and have a passive crossover (one
can be made from a coil or bought at a store) An excellent audio resource can be found
here and here.
This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Appendix 1. My favorite arcade related links
Click the picture of the plan/info you would like to view.
Cabinet measurements
A.P.B.
Assault
Asteroids
Atari Football
Aussie Lowboy cabinet
Blasteroids
Bob's space invader
Centipede
Defender
Donkey Kong
Donkey Kong Jr.
Donkey Kong 3
Dragon's Lair
Dragon's Lair 2
Dynamo 34 in. Showcase
Frostillicus
Galaga
Galaxian
Gauntlet 4 player
Hankin tabletop
Happy hour bartop
Jakobud's mameCab
LuSiD's Arcade Flashback
Mario Bros
Moon Patrol
Mortal Kombat
Ms Pac-Man
NeoGeo MVS-4-25 ver 3
Nintendo VS
Pac-Man
Pong cocktail
Popeye
Q*bert
Robotron cocktail
Sinistar Cockpit
Space Invader cocktail
Stargate
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles / Sunset Riders
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2
Tempest
The Simpsons / GI Joe / Bucky O'Hare
Track & Field cocktail
Tron mini cabaret
Weaver MAME cab
XMEN (6 player)
Midway style cocktail
Tron
Printable Pac-Man, Galaxian, Rally-X, Pac-Man Plus cutting template
Cabinet Plans with tutorials
Happy Hour bartop MAME
Mini Pac-Man
Mini MAME
Talking Octopuss
Ms Pac-Man cocktail
Pac-Man cocktail
Tutorials
Keyboard Hack tutorial
Monitor Discharge
PC to arcade monitor adapter
Build your own trigger stick
Build your own Spinner
BYOAC, the #1 site for DIY arcade
BYOAC message boards. over 4,000 arcade builders sharing ideas
Get your ROM collection here
(be sure to donate $10 as he is a non-profit burner)

This tutorial and its entire contents copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com

Welcome to the new home of ArcadeDimensions.8K.com!
The website featuring the original printable Pac-Man cutting template.
Brought to you by Mr. Mike MC and SpyStyle, kindly hosted by Saint.
Using Mr Mike's printable cutting template from this site, in combination with the Pac-Man
cabinet blueprints from JakoBud.com, the printable artwork from The Arcade Art Library, and my
cabinet building tutorial, you will be able to easily build an authentic Pac-Man arcade machine!
The godfather of all arcade cabinets.
This template can be used to build a Pac-Man, Galaxian, Rally-X, or Pac-Man Plus as they all
used the same cabinet. Ms. Pac-Man and Galaga appear slightly different (only at top back).
The Set Up
To print out these plans you will need 27 pieces of 8.5" X 11" paper. The template can then be
assembled into a life size blueprint. Pretty cool, eh?
You may notice a ruler running across the blueprints, line these up with a real ruler to make sure
everything is OK.
A final note on printing. When you print you may get an error message telling you the image is
too large and will be cropped, that is OK, you can fill in the missing spots. If you know how to
correct this on your printer do that first. If not, it only requires a little bit of fixing.
Click here to download the full size printable template
The pages need to be printed out at 75 DPI
Putting it all together
Pictured above is the complete template assembled from the prints. As you can see it is full
sized. Each sheet tells you which other sheets attach it to. It is very simple.
The additional info needed to finish
Here are some basic measurements taken off the cabinet. These are given for you to compare
to your full size template and adjust as needed.
Pictured above is additional info needed to figure out where to put the glass bezel, control panel
marquee, and roof panel.
The marquee sits back from the front as shown here, refer to the above documents for more
detail.
End of line
Chapter six : Preparing the cabinet art
There are allot of arcade art contributors across the internet, and it is easy to find the art for your
cabinet. However, having the art printed at a print shop is very expensive, in this tutorial I will
show you how to print your own cabinet art in segments onto sticker paper.
Of course, bringing the images on disk to a print shop would yield better results, but the price
may be $10 per foot. This tutorial's printing method costs less than $1 per foot.
First I downloaded the 'Stargate Side art' from from The Arcade Art Library and manipulated it
to suit the 'Defender Stargate 2&1 cabinet'
before after

To print it out I open it in 'Paint Shop pro 7'
Free demo available on the internet
Then resize it to suit the cabinet side (28" @ 300 pixels per inch)
This is done by clicking : Image > Resize
Click 'Actual / print size'
Change the units to 'inches'
Make sure the 'resolution' is set to '300 Pixels / inch'
Input the width, make sure 'Maintain aspect ratio' is checked
Now the image is 28" (711mm) wide, perfect for the side art but too large to print, so we must
cut it into segments smaller that 8 1/2" x 11" (216x280mm) (the standard size of printer paper)
To cut the image into segments we will use a grid that makes 7 1/2" x 10" (191x254mm)
rectangles over the image
Click 'View' then 'Change Grid and Guide Properties'
Change the 'Units' to 'Pixels' and the 'Spacing' to '2250' X '3000'
('2250' X '3000' for vertical printing, or '3000' X '2250' for horizontal printing)
After that click 'View' > 'Grid'
Now the image has a grid over it consisting of 7 1/2" X 10" (191x254mm) rectangles, this is an
ideal size for printing onto 8 1/2" X 11" (216x280mm) paper
Click the square 'Selection' tool (see arrow below)
Then trace over the first rectangle, when finished the rectangle should look like this :
click 'Edit' > 'Cut'
When 'Cut' that segment will disappear :
Now click 'Edit' > 'Paste' > 'As New Image'
Now the section you just 'Cut' appears.
Save it to a directory on your Hard Drive by clicking 'File' > 'Save As'
Change the 'Save as type' to 'JPEG'
Click 'Options' and set the 'Compression factor' to 1 (maximum quality)
(this will only have to be done once)
Then Input the 'File name' and save it to a directory on your Hard Drive
Repeat this process until your cabinet art is cut into printable segments and saved to your hard
drive.
This can be done for all of the cabinet art, printing is covered in the next chapter.
This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter five : Securing the television and television glass
Now to make the television retention studs.
We want the television to be secure under all circumstances, in the event that arcade cabinet is moved/
shipped/tipped/flipped etc. I will secure the television so that it does not move when the cabinet is laying
face down or on it's back. I will use brackets so the studs will be removable to access/remove the
television if necessary in the future. (televisions need to be repaired occasionally)
If you are going to have an additional on/off switch installed in the television for a 'one button power
solution', now would be the best time, see appendix 4
(you will notice in the pictures I did a few things out of sequence, don't let it confuse you)
With the television's screen horizontally centered in the cabinet, measure the gap on both sides
between the television and the inside of the cabinet, we will call this the "gap width"
and measure the internal width of the cabinet around the television
Then measure and cut studs, 3 to the internal width of the cabinet, and 2 to "gap width"
(I used 2X3 hardwood boards)
test fit the studs and trim if necessary
Pictured below, dry fitting the television retention studs.
Pictured below, dry fitting the "gap width" studs.
mark the best location to attach the "gap width" studs (I used a silver marker)
If one of the studs covers the remote control port or presses against the buttons it must be routed.
I measured the height and width of the button area and the remote control port.
Then marked the stud accordingly
Using the router with a straight cutting bit I trimmed out the button area, 1/4" (6mm) deep. For the
remote control area I used the 1/2" (13mm) pilot point drill bit
Now it fits without pressing the buttons and the remote control can still be used
To attach the television retention studs we use brackets, this makes the studs and the television
removable by backing out screws in the event that the television needs to be repaired or replaced.
To attach the brackets first position the bracket and mark the screw holes.
Then drill small pilot holes,
and attach with screws.
Now is a good time to paint the studs.
Next, attach the front television retention stud so that it is flush with where the television acrylic
will mount, and attach the television "gap width" studs as marked.
Pictured below : rear of cabinet with studs attached.
Then install the television and the rear retention stud as shown
Next, I lay the cabinet on it's back and installed the final television retention stud to the top of the
television
Pictured below : top of cabinet
To test this television retention method I lay the cabinet face down, and the heavy television
remained securely in place.
To retain the television acrylic (often referred to as monitor bezel) I ran 1X1 wood strips from the
front television retention stud to behind the speaker panel
Pictured below : the television and television acrylic retention studs
Then painted them
Cutting the acrylic
The best way to cut acrylic is with a router and flush cutting bit. Leaving the protective film on the
acrylic, measure and mark the acrylic to the internal width and height of the television area.
Then place a sheet of wood equal in length to the mark onto the saw horses, align the mark on
the acrylic up with the edge of the wood (for best results use the wood's factory cut edge) Clamp
the acrylic to the wood.
I used clamps and placed a heavy toolbox on top of the acrylic to keep it in place while routing.
Test fit the acrylic and trim if necessary.
Attaching the acrylic with screws.
With your 5/8" (16mm) countersink bit, drill in REVERSE at your drill's highest speed to create a
countersink in the acrylic, at the corner.
Next, with a 1/8" (3mm) non-pilot point drill bit, drill in REVERSE in the center of the countersink
to drill through the acrylic. After, drill forward through the wood to make a pilot hole.
Then slowly drive a screw through the countersunk pilot hole, take care not to drive it too tight as
the pressure could crack the acrylic, do this on all 4 corners to secure the acrylic.
Now the television and television acrylic is in place.
Optional : extending the television's power button.
(This would not be necessary if you are installing the 'one button power solution', illustrated in
appendix 4)
There are a few options for powering on the television. If you consider keeping track of the
remote control a pain, and don't want to modify the power button, you may like to extend the
button externally so it is flush with the television acrylic.
Shown below : a vertical cab with the television's power button flush mounted to the acrylic, as
you can see it is not noticeable once painted.
To extend the power button I measure the distance from the center of the button to the side of
the cabinet and make a note of it. I also mark onto the side of the cabinet where the center of
the button lines up.
Then I measure the depth from the power button to where the acrylic will rest and make a note
of it.
Then I cut a block of wood with a height that is 1 1/2" (38mm) greater than the distance from the
button to the side, and a depth 1/2" (13mm) less than the distance from the button to where the
acrylic will rest and test fit it.
Next I drilled a small pilot hole in the wooden block exactly where the power button would be
underneath, then enlarged it to 1/2" (13mm) and attached brackets as shown. For the long
button I can use 7/16" (11mm) or 3/8" (10mm) wooden dowel or aluminum rod : just a bit smaller
than 1/2" (13mm)
Then mount it with the hole centered over the power button.
After, the button was trimmed to be 1/8" (3mm) taller than the block, and was painted. The
television acrylic was marked and a 1/2" (13mm) hole was drilled. The button rests flush with the
acrylic and makes it very easy to power the television on and off.
Painting the television acrylic
There are two options for finishing the television acrylic : paint and bezel art. Bezel art can be
printed and applied using the methods in chapter 5, or you can use spray paint. Flat black paint
is a nice option as it does not draw the player's attention away from the screen.
With the protective film still on the acrylic, outline the outside of the screen area with painter's
tape as seen below. This will serve as a marker.
I placed the tape 1" (25mm) beyond the screen area so bystanders could see the game from an
angle.
Measure the top, middle, and bottom of each line of tape to be sure it is square against the side
of the cabinet and adjust as needed (the painter's tape lifts easily)
Once you've finished taping and all is square, remove the acrylic from the cabinet and lay it tape-
down onto a tarp. Then remove the acrylic's protective film from the side without tape.
Now the acrylic is bare on top, carefully run painter's tape along the bare side using the tape
below as a marker. This will be the painted edge so use scissors to shape the corners perfectly
square as pictured below.
Next, cut out newspaper in the shape of the tape and secure it to the tape with more painter's
tape about 1/4" (6mm) lower than the edge, as pictured below.
When the weather is good bring the tarp and acrylic outside and spray paint it following the
manufacturer's instructions printed on the can. For best results paint several light coats.
Once the paint has dried, slowly remove the tape and re-install the acrylic into the cabinet.

This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Appendix 4: The one button power solution
Note: all said prices are in USD
Forward : It is convenient to be able to turn the arcade machine and all of it's components on and off with a
single button press. To accomplish this the computer's power button is mounted on the front of the cabinet and
when it is turned on the power strip automatically delivers power to all the other devices plugged into it, then off
when the computer is turned off. The strips are commonly referred to as "Automatic power strips" and can be
purchased for about $20.
Or you can make your own from a power strip and an $8 relay in about an hour, and enjoy the satisfaction of
creation.
If you are buying an automatic power strip instead of making one skip down to "The one button power solution in
theory", otherwise continue reading.
Caution: Electricity can kill you! Keep your power strip unplugged at all times when working on it. Do not plug the
power strip in until it is properly closed the same way as when you bought it.
The anatomy of a power strip
Shown below are the two power strips I will disassemble as examples.
As you can see both power strips have six outlets and a toggle switch. One strip has horizontal outlets and the
other has vertical. They also both claim to have surge protection which would be very beneficial for the computer.
Next, they are opened. The first one had screws in the bottom making it easy to open. The second did not and
had to be pried apart with a small flat-head screwdriver.
The first strip has a telephone line surge protector on the left side and horizontal outlets. The second strip has
vertical outlets and no additional accessories.
They both have the three AC wires connecting to copper strips, friction fit in plastic channels.
Black is hot, white is neutral, and green is ground.
The anatomy of the relay
The relay used in this project has eight lugs. The top two are for normally closed connections and are not used
(like the control panel's microswitch). The bottom two connect to the computer, when the computer is turned on
it sends 12 volts of DC electricity to lug 7 and 8, that activates the relay which connects 3 to 5, and 4 to 6.
Hacking the power strip
The relay will be put in-line in the power strip, in place of outlets two and three. This will leave the first outlet as
normal to power the computer, and the rest controlled by the relay.
First, the power strip was opened and disassembled. Placing the enclosure and copper strips side by side
clearly illustrates which section of the copper strip corresponds to which outlet.
Next, the relay was test fitted into the power strip's enclosure, it looks hopeful.
Then, the hot and neutral copper strips were cut, just below outlet 1.
The remainder of the copper strips were placed back in the enclosure to mark outlets 2 and 3 on both the
copper and plastic.
Outlets 2 and 3 were cut off
Then the enclosures were placed side by side and the mark was transferred. All the plastic that falls inside these
lines will be removed to fit the relay inside the enclosure.
To remove the plastic I used a dremel with cutting disk.
Then test fit the proposed layout, it looks good.
Next, I cut appropriate lengths of 16 gauge lamp wire and 22 gauge hook-up wire. The lamp wire will be for the
AC wiring and the hook-up wire for the DC.
A paper thin coat of flux was placed on all contacts
and the wires were soldered to the relay as shown below. White for neutral, black for hot, and PC for computer.
The black and white sides can be swapped.
Electrical tape was placed around the connections on the relay to ensure nothing would touch when it was put
into the enclosure. The AC wires were soldered to the copper strips.
When soldering the wire to the copper strip I spread the strands (as opposed to twisting) and lined the insulation
up with the edge of the strip. This results in a soldered wire that is thin enough to fit in the enclosure's plastic
channel.
The copper strips were fitted into the enclosure and the DC wires were threaded through the ground hole of the
third outlet.
Then the power strip was reassembled.
To test the power strip I plugged a lamp into outlet one and it worked, then into outlet six, and it didn't. This looks
hopeful.
I put a piece of electrical tape around the power strip covering outlet three's hot and neutral outlet holes, this will
ensure someone doesn't accidentally insert a two prong plug into that outlet and bump the relay. Then I attached
a two position terminal over outlet two with super glue
and labeled everything.
The anatomy of the molex connector
Inside the computer are drives and fans connected to the power supply by molex connectors. 4-pin connectors
are generally used for drives, and the smaller 3-pin connector is generally used for fans. Shown above is a 4-pin
to 3-pin adapter.
The color scheme on the 4-pin connector is : yellow 12 volt, red 5 volt, and black ground.
The color scheme on the 3-pin connector is : red 12 volt, black ground, and yellow sensor (sometimes present).
Connecting the computer to the hacked power strip.
I cut and stripped the ends of a 4-pin to 3-pin molex connector and used butt connectors to extend the red and
black (12v and ground) wires with 22 gauge hook-up wire.
Then, with computer turned off and unplugged, I plugged the 4-pin connectors in
and the extended wires.
Then I plugged the computer in and turned it on, success :)
The one button power solution in theory
Using the hacked power strip pictured above, one could plug the computer into the "AC" outlet, and the television into
one of the "12v relay" outlets (along with marquee light and amplifier). With the computer's power button extended and
mounted to the cabinet (see chapter 11) a single button press turns the computer ON and sends power to everything,
that same button pressed again turns the computer OFF and removes power from everything.
The television can be a problem if it doesn't automatically turn on when given power, some do, most don't. The power
button must be pressed for those that don't. The good news is, in most cases, the power button is just a momentary
microswitch (like the buttons on the control panel) and it can be held permanently in the ON position.
This could be done one of two ways:
1. Jammed : The power button is jammed into the ON position with a toothpicks or similar. This makes for an easy and
removable modification.
2. On/off switch : The television's momentary power switch's 2 contact points are soldered to wires leading to an
on/off switch (a non-momentary switch) that can be discreetly mounted in the back of the television. With this
switch the television would be "always on" (with the switch ON) or "as normal" (with the switch OFF).
I do not recommend that you open your television as it contains capacitors with enough electrical charge to kill you! A
certified TV repair man would surely be willing to add an on/off switch for you for a small fee. However, if you insist on
opening the television be sure to read about discharging it first.
The one button power solution in testing
To test the one button power solution theory I refer to an arcade cabinet which contains an open television. The
television inside is a GE model manufactured in 2004 and does not automatically turn on when given power.
The picture on the right shows the television's board suspended below the speaker
Shown below are the momentary switches on the television's board. The power button is in the middle and the volume
buttons are to the right.
To simulate "jamming" I clamp the power button down and plug the television into the hacked power strip.
The results were good, the television turned on and off with the computer. While the power button was clamped the other
buttons were not usable (channel, volume, and menu). Therefore, a television should not be "jammed" until the menu
and channel have been set.
To simulate the on/off switch in the ON position, I solder wires to the contact points under the momentary power switch,
and twist them together.
The results were good, the television turned on and off with the computer. While the wires were twisted the other buttons
were not usable (channel, volume, and menu). In this configuration the on/off switch could be switched OFF to make
adjustments in the menu, or change the channel.
Adding an On/Off switch to a television
Although I do not recommend that you open up your television as it contains dangerous voltages, I will illustrate
how I added an on/off switch to a television for use in a cabinet. You could show these instructions to a TV
repair man and have him perform the modification for you, which is what I recommend. Or you could discharge
the television and attempt it yourself, if you are comfortable with working on electronics and around electricity.
I followed Massivemame's monitor discharge tutorial before attempting this modification, only the television did
not have a steel chassis like the arcade monitor in his tutorial so I used a steel shelf instead.
The television is an Orion 19" model manufactured in 2003 and does not automatically turn on when given power.
Shown below is the layout of the front buttons
I start by placing a towel on the workbench to protect the television's glass from scratches
then place the television face down. Using the appropriate screwdriver I remove the back case.
My intention is to remove the board and solder 2 wires to the 2 solder points below the power button. But this
particular television has a board held to the front case by screws which are not accessible with the tube in place,
so I remove the screws attaching the tube to the front case and separate the tube from the front case by
carefully lifting it out and placing it on the towel. Then I am able to remove the screws attaching the board to the
front case.
Shown below is the top of the board. The buttons from left to right are power, volume down, volume up, channel
down, and channel up. The object left of the power button is the infrared receiver for the remote control.

Shown below is the bottom of the board, under each button is the button's 2 solder points.
I solder a length of 22 gauge wire to each of the power button's solder points
Then carefully reassembled the television except for the back case and pull the new wires out through the back.
Shown below is the power button used in this project, it is a non momentary on/off switch.
Next I measure the outer diameter of the button shaft with a hole gauge and drill that sized hole in the
television's back case.

Then reattach the television's back case with the new wires sticking out the new hole. I place the button's nut
and washer on the wires then solder the button to the wires.
Once everything was back together I tested it. It worked as expected : when the on/off switch was "on" the
television would automatically power on when plugged in (after a 2 second delay) but the other buttons (volume,
channel) would not work. With the on/off switch turned "off" the buttons worked as normal. One would leave the
on/off switch "on" when in the cabinet only turning it "off" to make adjustments on the channel or menu.
This modification when used with an automatic or hacked power strip is the one button power solution :)
Compatible televisions
Most televisions I tested were compatible with "the one buton power solution", those that weren't could still be
almost as good with two buttons.
To test if a television is compatible with "the one button power solution" unplug it and let it sit for 24 hours, after
have a helper hold the television's power button in (jamming) while you plug in it's power coard. If the television
turns on automatically it is compatible. If it does not turn on automatically the button needs to be pressed every
time - the power button can still be extended to a momentary buttonin a convinent location and will result in "a
two button power solution"
The televisions I found incompatible were "Zenith" brand. I tried two, one was very old and another was new.
Both failed, but were compatible with "two button power solution" using momentary buttons.
Pictured below is a Zenith television. I extended the power button to a 2-position barrier strip so later I could
connect it to a momentary button mounted on the cabinet.
Shown below : The green PCB in the middle is for the buttons, the black wires are soldered to the power
button's solder points.
The wires lead to a 2-position barrier strip which will later be connected to a momentary button mounted on the
cabinet.
This tutorial and its entire contents copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter four : Construction part 2
Continue to attach panels and studs with a course thread drywall screw every 3" (76mm)
Attach the monitor shelf and under it attach the center studs (attach the studs to both side
panels and monitor shelf)
(you will notice in the pictures I did a few things out of sequence, don't let it confuse you)
under the monitor shelf
The monitor shelf
left side panel
right side panel
Now attach the marquee panel and speaker panel.
If you are going to use a coin door now is a good time to cut the hole for it.
I measured the coin door, marked the front of the cabinet accordingly, drilled pilot holes on each
side of the square I drew (large enough to insert the jig-saw blade) and cut it out with my jig-saw.
It's now time to patch over the screw holes with wood filler, using a putty knife apply wood patch
to the holes. After it dries use your finishing sander to smooth it out, it may take 3 applications.
After the filler has dried sand it down with your finishing sander.
I used 60 grit sandpaper to smooth out the wood filler.
Now is the best time to route the side panels for the t-molding.
Calibrating the router
Tighten the slot cutting bit into place on your router and adjust the plunge depth so that it is
perfectly centered on your material, taking blade width into consideration.
You only get one chance to properly route the sides of your cabinet for the t-molding
So before you cut the slot on your cabinet's side panel you must calibrate the depth of the router.
1. Cut out a few 1" (25mm) lengths of t-molding with scissors
2. Route a 1 1/2" (38mm) slot on the side of a piece of scrap material
3. Using your rubber mallet pound the 1" (25mm) t-molding piece into the slot
Adjust the plunge depth of your router accordingly and try again and again until the t-molding is
perfectly centered in the scrap material.
After you've successfully calibrated the depth of the router lay the cabinet on it's side and put
some heavy things in it so it won't move while you route it.
Now stand the cabinet up and prepare it for painting by vacuuming it inside and out and the
surrounding area so all is dust free, this is done to prevent dust from settling in the drying paint.
After vacuuming and dusting use a damp towel to wipe down the entire cabinet from top to
bottom, then a dry one.
Prepare your paint shop by spreading a tarp on the floor and rolling the cabinet onto the center,
be sure to change in to scrap clothes and shoes before painting.
When painting always outline the panel first with your trim brush, from top to bottom, then roll
out the remainder, from top to bottom.
Outlining is done because the roller can't reach every part of the cabinet.
Outline first, then roll out the remainder, from top to bottom, several light coats, keeping watch
for drips and runs (if you find a drip or run be sure to smooth it out while it's wet with the brush
or roller)
Paint 2 coats of primer, then 2 or more coats of the final color, allowing each coat to fully dry
before the next.
The two pictures below illustrate outlining. Outlining is done because the roller can not reach all
areas of the cabinet.
Make sure to wash your brush and roller out completely after each painting session, because
the paint is water based (latex) you can wash it in the sink with warm water and let it drip-dry.
When storing your brush either hang it by a nail (best) or lay it on a flat surface so the bristles
don't warp. Take good care of your brush and it will last many years.
The paint may dry before the brush, to dry the brush out before painting swing it towards the
ground rapidly a few times, in a motion that resembles swinging a baseball bat.
Next install the coin door.
I secured mine with 3/16" (5mm) carriage bolts, lock-nuts and washers as it had no mounting
frame but did have the hinge and lock.
In my previous cabinet (the Pac-Man pictured at the top of page one) the coin door had a
mounting frame and I secured it to the front panel by drilling several 3/16" (5mm) holes around
the inside of the frame, then drove nails through the holes into the front panel. After I attached
the coin door to the mounted frame and switched out the lock with a new 1" (25mm) cam lock
(mailbox lock) from the hardware store.
Next, install the T-molding. Line the t-molding up with the routed slot and pound it in with the
rubber mallet.
It's a good idea to first check and clean out the routed slots of debris using a small flat head
screwdriver.
I cut away 2" (50mm) of the T-molding channel with scissors to get around these tight corners.
If you discover the t-molding slot is off center...
If the t-molding does not line up and you discover that you routed the t-molding slot incorrectly,
you can re-route the slot so it is centered. This will leave a slot too large to friction fit the t-
molding so hot glue must be injected into the slot before the t-molding.
To install the t-molding with hot glue: inject hot glue into about 12" (305mm) of the slot, then
hold the t-molding centered in place for 30 seconds. The hot glue makes a powerful bond to the
unfinished wood in the slot so work carefully (it's difficult to dig the hot glue out if you make a
mistake)

After the t-molding is installed mount the speaker(s).
Now cut the marquee retainer to your cabinet's internal width, drill several holes along the
bottom and install it with screws.
I mounted my marquee and retainer by first mounting the marquee in place with little brad nails.
Then drilled several 3/16" (5mm) holes in the bottom of the retainer
Then held it in place and drove short black screws through the holes.
These pictures illustrate the mounting holes in the marquee retainer.
This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter three : Construction part 1
It is a good idea to measure the doorways and stairways leading to where your finished cabinet
will live. (optionally you can mount the control panel with brackets so it can be removable should
it be too wide for your doorways)
Remember : taking your time on this project will save you from making costly mistakes, if you
begin to feel rushed and anxious while working, take a break.
It's a good idea to measure your television's depth before drawing out the side panels, should
your television be deeper than the cabinet plan's depth simply scale the cabinet plan's depth to
that of the television plus 2" (50mm)
Lay the 1st sheet of 4'X8' (1220x2440mm) material onto the saw-horses, using a sharp pencil
draw out the left side of your cabinet, check your measurements twice before cutting it out with
your Jig-Saw, while cutting it out be sure to wear safety goggles and hearing protection.
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When cutting angles you may need to drill a pilot hole to reposition the jigsaw blade.
Once you have cut out the left side panel place it on top of another sheet of
4'X8' (1220x2440mm) material, line it up square and clamp it in place, using a sharp pencil trace
the side panel onto the new sheet and cut it out. For best results switch to a new jig-saw blade
now.
If you are NOT going to install T-molding in your cabinet now is a good time to route all sides of
the side panels, front and back (except bottom) with the 5/8" (16mm) round over bit .
If you ARE going to install T-molding do NOT get your router out yet.
Now that the side panels are cut out all that remains to be cut will be the center panels
(rectangles and squares) following your cabinet plan cut out the remaining pieces. For best
results switch to a new jig-saw blade now.
It's a good idea to measure your television before cutting out the other panels, should your
television be wider than the cabinet plan's width simply scale the width to that of the television
plus 2" (50mm)
If you plan on using acrylic (plexiglass) on top of your control panel cut the control panel out of
5/8" (16mm) material : 5/8" (16mm) wood + 1/8" (3mm) acrylic = 3/4"(19mm) panel (covered in
chapter seven)
After all of the panels are cut out it's time to cut the studs. The studs made of
2"X8" (50x200mm) boards will help reinforce the cabinet and make it very strong. Cut out 5
studs to the same width of the panels.
2 studs for the bottom, 2 studs for the middle (to reinforce monitor shelf) and a stud for the top.

Now that all of the pieces are cut out, it is good to mark boundaries on the inside of both side
panels before assembly begins. I use an inset of 1/2"(13mm) on all sides except the bottom,
and the material is 3/4" (19mm) so I will draw a line 1/2" (13mm) in on all sides (except bottom)
of the inside of my side panels, this will provide a boundary line when assembling the panels so
I don't accidentally compromise my inset. I will also draw a line 1 1/4" (32mm) in on all sides
(except bottom) to provide a visual marker for the back of the panels :1/2" (13mm) inset +
3/4" (19mm) material = 1 1/4" (32mm)
When I draw my long boundary lines I use the square to mark 1/2" (13mm) and 1 1/4" (32mm)
(point A and point B) then connect them by clamping my long ruler and drawing the line.
Next, attach the floor panel. Place your side panel up on the sawhorses and clamp it into place,
then mark with a sharp pencil where the floor panel will go, have a helper hold the floor panel
while you attach it from under.
Pay attention that the floor panel is not flush with the front of the cabinet : inset plus width of
front panel, 1 1/4" (32mm) in this example.
You can use your square and level to help align the panels before attaching them.
Remember : measure everything twice before attaching and verify by 'dry fitting' the panels, if
you take your time on this project you will have no costly mistakes.
The procedure for screwing the panels in is a 2" (51mm) coarse thread drywall screw every
3" (76mm), this results in a very strong arcade cabinet.
For every screw :
1st drill a pilot hole using the 3/32" (2.5mm) pilot point drill bit.
(you may like to attach a small level to the top of your drill with duck tape or epoxy to get those
pilot holes drilled straight)
2nd use the 5/8" (16mm) countersink bit to make a shallow countersink.
3rd use the phillips head bit to drive the screw in, the screw should be recessed just a tiny bit to
later allow for wood patch to cover it up.
Do this every 3" (76mm) of each panel and stud, but not closer than 2" (50mm) to the edge of
each panel.
(driving a screw through the edge of a panel could split the wood)
After you attach the floor panel to the side panel, attach the floor studs to the floor panel and
side panel, position the floor studs so that the center of each stud is 10% from the front of the
cabinet and 10% from the back.
Mark the location of the studs on the bottom of the cabinet as a guide for later attaching the
casters.
Next, attach the roof stud. If you are going to have a roof make sure the roof stud is
appropriately recessed.
Now attach the front lower panel, make sure it's position is in keeping with your cabinet's inset.
Then attach the rest of the front panels (excluding control panel and speaker panel)
After, attach the lower rear panel.
I leave my cabinets open on the back for passive cooling of the components and open on the
top for passive lighting of the marquee. Alternately, if you prefer a back door, DC fans mounted
in the back door and roof connected to a 5v line on the computer power supply could cool the
components quietly, and a light can be placed behind the marquee. In this cabinet the lower rear
panel is a 2"X8" (50x200mm) board.
Now it's time to attach the other side panel, lay the cabinet on it's side, and line up the other side
panel using the boundary lines, dry fit and verify before attaching it with screws.
Then attach the casters to the bottom of the cabinet (into the floor studs).
Locking swivel casters in front, fixed casters in rear, for maximum stability attach the casters
close to the edges (I recommend an inset of only 10% on all sides)
Cutting the speaker panel
Now is a good time to cut the speaker panel to accommodate the speaker(s)
First, measure and mark the vertical center on the sides of the panel, then draw a horizontal line
connecting them.
Then measure and mark the center of the horizontal line, and draw a vertical line through it
using the right-angle.
The horizontal line is now divided into two sides. Measure and mark the center of the left and
right sides of the horizontal line, and draw a vertical line through it using the right-angle. This
creates the template for either a mono (one speaker) stereo (two speaker) or 2.1 channel
system (two speakers and a sub woofer)
An example of mono
An example of stereo
Place the speaker(s) on center with the lines drawn and trace it's shape.
Then measure the speaker's lip and carefully draw it onto the material, as pictured below.
Now, with the router and cutting bit, carefully cut out the inner circle. Cut very sparingly, not
completely up to the line : about 1/8" (3mm) from the line all around. Because a hole too small
can be fixed much easier than a hole too large.
Test fit the speaker and mark where the hole must be enlarged, then shave the marked areas
larger with the router, a very small amount at a time, until the speaker fits flush.
Note how the speaker will be mounted, this shows that the routing does not have to be perfect
as it will not be seen.
Now the speaker panel is finished, do not install the speakers until after you've painted the
cabinet.
This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter seven : Constructing the Control Panel
Now that the cabinet is built we make the control panel, I will be using a control panel overlay
and acrylic to make a smooth and authentic style control panel, you can also use t-molding.
Shopping List :
5/8" (16mm) material, if you want to use 3/4" (16mm) t-molding. : 5/8" (16mm) material +
1/8" (3mm) acrylic = 3/4" (16mm) thickness
1/8" (3mm) clear acrylic
8 1/2" X 11" (216x280mm) Sticker Paper
Straight cutting router bit
Flush trimming router bit
1-1/8" (29mm) hole saw and arbor
In this tutorial I will be using a printed control panel overlay as a cutting template, then covering
the control panel with acrylic. Of course an overlay, acrylic and t-molding are not necessary for a
working control panel but adds to the authenticity of the cabinet.
First I downloaded a nice control panel overlay graphic from The Arcade Art Library.
Using 'Paint Shop Pro' (or your favorite image editing software) open the control panel overlay
image and resize it's width to match your control panel, then manipulate it as you see fit.
Before - The Neo Geo control panel overlay.
After - a modified Neo Geo control panel overlay that has the emulator's system buttons on top
Cut it into sections smaller than 8 1/2" X 11" (216x280mm) so you can print it out onto the
sticker paper.
(see chapter six)
Then print it out onto the sticker paper, cut the excess with scissors, and stick it to your control
panel.
Make sure you have your program set up to print at 100% size (no scaling).
The modified Neo Geo control panel overlay shown can be downloaded here
After attaching the control panel overlay to the control panel, carefully measure and mark the
center of each button and stick hole.
Clamp the control panel to your saw-horses and drill small pilot holes in the center of each
button and stick hole. Using 'step drilling' (starting with the smallest bit, then larger bits, one size
larger each time) drill up to the size of your hole saw arbor's bit. : I started at 3/32" (2mm) and
worked up to 1/4" (6mm)
'Step drilling' is used to ensure maximum accuracy.
Cutting the control panel overlay
Next, use the 1-1/8" (29mm) hole saw in REVERSE to cut through each button and stick hole of
the control panel overlay, the pilot holes center the arbor. This step is necessary to avoid ripping
the overlay.
Then, drill forward to cut out each button and stick hole.
Disassemble and clean out the hole saw after cutting each hole.
Next, I used a joystick cutting template to line up the holes for the carriage bolts, the template
can be downloaded here. Print the template @ 100% using paint shop pro (or your favorite
image editing software) and check it against your joystick base to verify it is accurate, then cut
out the center hole and hold it against the control panel's stick hole, use a sharp object to mark
through the center of each carriage bolt hole. (I used a drywall screw)
Using step drilling, drill the carriage bolt holes up to 5/16" (8mm).
Now remove the protective cover from one side of the acrylic, align the uncovered side to the
control panel and clamp it in place.
Attaching the acrylic with screws.
With your 5/8" (16mm) countersink bit, drill in REVERSE at your drill's highest speed to create a
countersink in the acrylic, at the corner of the control panel.
Next, with a 1/8" (3mm) non-pilot point drill bit, drill in REVERSE in the center of the countersink
to drill through the acrylic.
After, drill forward through the wood to make a pilot hole.
Then slowly drive a screw through the countersunk pilot hole, take care not to drive it too tight
as the pressure could crack the acrylic, do this on all 4 corners of the control panel to secure the
acrylic.
Once the acrylic is attached to the control panel, use your router with a flush trimming bit to trim
the acrylic flush with the control panel.
Now we drill the carriage bolt holes through the acrylic, using step drilling and non-pilot point drill
bits, drill in REVERSE at your drill's highest speed, up to 5/16" (8mm), flush with the carriage
bolt holes in the wood.
Next, using the router's straight cutting bit, make a hole in the acrylic large enough to fit the flush
trimming bit through, in each button and stick hole.
Then use the router's flush trimming bit to match the acrylic to the button and stick holes.
If you want to add t-molding to the bottom of the control panel, now is the best time (see
"calibrating the router" in chapter 4)
Using 60 grit sandpaper, smooth out the underside of the button, stick, and carriage bolt holes.
So all is smooth for mounting.
Then install the buttons and sticks, the buttons attach with a nylon nut and the sticks attach with
four 3/16" (5mm) carriage bolts (also called #10-24 carriage bolts).
Tighten the carriage bolt nuts with a 3/8" (10mm) wrench.
Shown below for reference are exploded views of the Happ (left) and X-Arcade (right) sticks
To add the C clip to the joystick shaft, use needle nose pliers.
To remove the C clip, use a small flathead screw driver.
Attach a microswitch to each button as shown below.
Now the control panel is finished :)
This tutorial in its entire contents copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter eight : Wiring and mounting the control panel
Shopping list :
Crimping tool/Wire stripper
22 gauge wire (1 spool red, 1 spool black)
.187 Female quick disconnects (2 per microswitch)
They can be purchased here, here, or at an electronics store.
Pictured below : both regular female quick disconnect (left) and insulated (right)
Alternately you could skip these and solder the wires.
To connect the buttons and sticks to the KeyWiz keyboard encoder we need to review the
anatomy of some things.
The Microswitch
Above is an enlarged picture of a microswitch, there are 3 posts :
NC (normally closed) is not used
NO (normally open) will be referred to as "positive" and will use the red wire.
COM (common) will be referred to as "ground" and will use the black wire.
If you like, you can clip off the NC posts with a wire cutter
The KeyWiz keyboard encoder, part 1
Pictured above is the KeyWiz Max keyboard encoder, it has 36 screw terminals, 2 PS2 ports,
and a switch.
The purple PS/2 port connects to your computer, the green PS/2 port is for an optional PS/2
keyboard, if you connect a PS/2 keyboard to the green PS/2 port you can use the switch to
choose between the encoder and the keyboard. The encoder and the keyboard can not be used
simultaneously.
Pictured below for reference are the instructions included with the KeyWiz encoder.
Notice the map below is the same shape as the encoder, each terminal character has a
keyboard key next to it, those are the keys used by the MAME emulator.
Notice on the right side there are duplicate characters U D L R (meaning Up Down Left Right).
The encoder board is marked with a small 1 next to the top four characters and a small 2 next to
the bottom four characters, we will refer to these as U1 D1 L1 R1 and U2 D2 L2 R2.
The KeyWiz keyboard encoder supports 2 sticks with 4 buttons each right out of the box, which
will be covered in this chapter. If you have more than 2 sticks with 4 buttons each on your
control panel you'll have to create a custom layout which is explained here.
MAME keymap
(click here for a printer friendly version of the table below)
Key KeyWiz terminal Function
5 L Player 1 coin
6 M Player 2 coin
1 I (eye) Player 1 start
2 J Player 2 start
ENTER N Enter game from menu
ESC P Exit game to menu
TAB O Access in-game menu*
Up arrow U1 Player 1 up
Down arrow D1 Player 1 down
Left arrow L1 Player 1 left
Right arrow R1 Player 1 right
Left Ctrl 1 (one) Player 1 button 1
Left Alt 2 Player 1 button 2
Space 3 Player 1 button 3
Left Shift 4 Player 1 button 4
R U2 Player 2 up
F D2 Player 2 down
D L2 Player 2 left
G R2 Player 2 right
A A Player 2 button 1
S B Player 2 button 2
Q C Player 2 button 3
W D Player 2 button 4
*The TAB key is for the operator only, it can be used to make adjustments in the game, like how
many lives Doug has on Dig-Dug, and at what score do you earn an extra ship on Galaga. You
can also enable cheats from this menu, which is great for small children. Because this button
has advanced features you do NOT want it where players will find it, or bump it on accident. A
good place to put this button would be on the roof of the cabinet, or recessed behind the
cabinet, where only the operator would find it. Real arcade machines often had their power
switches on the roof of the cabinet, recessed, where players would never see it.
Now that we know what keys we need we can begin to wire the control panel.
Note the location of the +5 volt terminal on the KeyWiz, this will not be used and if accidentally
connected could cause damage to your equipment.
Wiring the control panel
We will start by wiring the negative posts (COM). Pictured below are three views of the example
control panel, you will notice it has 2 sticks (each with 4 microswitches) 4 regular buttons (each
with 1 microswitch) and 6 tiny momentary buttons (each with 2 posts)
To start I measure the distance between each negative post, as illustrated in green below. We
will refer to this as "negative post distance"
Next, I cut a length of wire to each negative post distance +3" (76mm), the extra length is to
compensate for wire stripping and to add slack (too much is better than too little). I will make
wire #1 30" (760mm) long as it has to reach the KeyWiz encoder.
Making a wiring harness
We can make a removable wiring harness using quick disconnects.
Using the wire strippers, remove the insulation from about 1/2" (13mm) of both ends of each
wire, then line the stripped wires up in order. Pick up wires #1 and #2, twist the stripped portions
together, slip a quick connect on, then crimp it tight with the crimping portion of the wire
stripper. All steps are pictured below.
Do this for all the negative post wires, connecting #1 to #2 to #3 and so on, when finished you
will have the negative post wiring harness. Connect the quick connects to their negative posts
(COM) and the end of the negative post wiring harness to one of the screw terminals labeled
"G" (ground) on the KeyWiz encoder.
Next cut a 30" (760mm) length of red wire for each positive post (NO), strip about 1/2" (13mm)
of insulation off from each end of the wires. Attach a quick disconnect to one end of each wire
and plug it in to a positive post, then attach the other end of the wire to the corresponding
terminal on the KeyWiz encoder, following the "MAME keymap" table above.
It is important to note that the joystick's switches are opposite, when you push up on a joystick
the shaft below pushes downward, when you push left on the joystick the shaft below pushes to
the right, and so on. Give it a try and you'll see, then wire the switches accordingly.
Now the control panel is wired :)
Attaching the control panel to the cabinet
To attach the control panel to the cabinet I will use double wide brackets and 1/2" (13mm) wood
screws, this will make the control panel removable for future upgrades.
Measure and place the brackets so they match the internal width of your cabinet.
To attach the brackets to the control panel trace the bracket holes with a pencil.
Then drill very shallow pilot holes.
After, attach the brackets with 1/2" (13mm) wood screws.
Have a helper hold the control panel in place while you secure the control panel brackets to the
inside of the side panels with 1/2" (13mm) wood screws.
Pictured below: inside the cabinet, under the control panel.
Pictured below: the back of the coin door and under the control panel.
Placing the 'coin up' buttons discretely under the coin door keeps the control panel uncluttered.
This tutorial in its entire contents copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Appendix eight : Wiring the control panel, part 2
The KeyWiz keyboard encoder, a second look.
Forward : The KeyWiz keyboard encoder supports "2-player, 4-buttons each", right out of the box
(covered in chapter 8), yet can easily support a 4-player control panel with a custom layout. In this
chapter I will illustrate how.
For this example I purchased a "KeyWiz eco 2". "Eco" is for "economy" as the encoder cost only
$20.95 +$6.05 shipping (USD) .
The KeyWiz has 32 inputs (without using the "Shazaaam" shift key). Each microswitch uses 1 input,
meaning joysticks use 4 inputs each and buttons use 1 input each.
The minimum function keys required for an arcade machine are:
Coin (1 coin button can function as all player's coin buttons)
TAB (operator's menu)
Enter (to enter game from game list)
Esc (to exit game to game list)
Notice there are no "start buttons". That is because I will save inputs by making each player's
"button 2" double as that player's start.
ie : "player 1 button 2" is also "player 1 start"
This leaves 28 inputs to be distributed however you choose.
28 inputs can support:
4 joysticks with 3 buttons each.
4 joysticks with 4 buttons for players 1 and 2, and 2 buttons for players 3 and 4.
2 joysticks with 6 buttons each (with 8 inputs left over).
3 joysticks with 4 buttons each (with 4 inputs left over).
Creating a custom layout for the KeyWiz
As you can see some of the inputs (white letters) have the same name, to avoid confusion I split the
layout like this:
Therefore, "U top" cannot be confused with "U bottom" and "D block 2" cannot be confused with "D
block 4 top" and so on.
Then I printed a keymap containing Mame's default keys, each with 2 boxes. The first is a checkbox
to check if the key is used, the 2nd is where I wrote the KeyWiz input (click the images below to
enlarge and print)

After, I planned my layout by marking the printed sheets. I check marked box 1 if the key was used,
and I wrote in box 2 what KeyWiz input it uses.
When making the layout I recommend you leave "player 1 keys" as default, because the arrow keys
control the game list in MAME. Also "Enter and Esc" because those keys control entering and
exiting the game list. All other keys can be configured as you choose.
Next, I attached the KeyWiz to the underside of the control panel using hot glue (nylon spacers and
small screws would probably be a better choice). I applied a paper-thin layer of flux to the KeyWiz
solder points and the microswitch's posts. Then soldered the wires to the KeyWiz (starting with the
bottom row, working left to right).
Soldering the KeyWiz and controls
I used two soldering irons. To solder wires to the small points on the KeyWiz I used a 15 watt
soldering iron, to solder wires to the large microswitch posts I used a 30 watt soldering iron.
To solder wires to the KeyWiz, I insert the stripped portion of the wire into the small hole with one
hand, and applied a small drop of solder to it, using the 15 watt soldering iron, with the other.
Pictured below is a closeup of the microswitches. I used red wire for the "NO" (positive) post and
black wire for the "COM" (ground). To solder wires, I inserted the stripped portion of the wire
through the post's hole with one hand and applied solder, using the 30 watt iron, with the other. The
ground posts are "daisy chained" so each has two wires.
Configuring MAME to use the new layout
Once finished we have to configure MAME to use the new layout, to do this plug the control panel
into the computer and start MAME. Launch any game and press the TAB button.
The TAB button opens up the operator's menu. To configure Mame to use the new layout press
Enter while "Input (general)" is selected.
This opens the Mame default keymap, to adjust it to use the new layout use the arrow keys (player
1 joystick) to highlight a key, press ENTER, then press the corresponding button the the control
panel.
For example I will change Mame's default "Player 1 start" to use "player 1 button 2". I scroll down to
"1 Player Start", press enter, then press "Player 1 button 2" on the control panel.
Now Mame is configured to start player 1 when I press "player 1 button 2". Do this for all the buttons
on your control panel and Mame will be configured to use your new layout. When finished press
ESC twice to exit the operator's menu.
This tutorial in its entire contents copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
MAME keymap for KeyWiz default keys
Key KeyWiz terminal Function
5 L Player 1 coin
6 M Player 2 coin
1 I (eye) Player 1 start
2 J Player 2 start
ENTER N Enter game from menu
ESC P Exit game to menu
TAB O Access in-game menu*
Up arrow U1 Player 1 up
Down arrow D1 Player 1 down
Left arrow L1 Player 1 left
Right arrow R1 Player 1 right
Left Ctrl 1 (one) Player 1 button 1
Left Alt 2 Player 1 button 2
Space 3 Player 1 button 3
Left Shift 4 Player 1 button 4
R U2 Player 2 up
F D2 Player 2 down
D L2 Player 2 left
G R2 Player 2 right
A A Player 2 button 1
S B Player 2 button 2
Q C Player 2 button 3
W D Player 2 button 4
Chapter nine : The cabinet art
Laminating options
To protect the cabinet art from moisture we laminate it with either clear contact paper or clear
coat automotive spray paint. The clear contact paper method has the advantage of protecting
the art and holding it down so the edges don't curl up over time, however it is only available with
a width of 18" (457mm) . According to the manufacturer the largest self adhesive clear contact
paper is 18"X75" (457x1905mm), Pliant Solutions1-800-770-7375.
Therefore, if the cabinet art is wider than 17" (432mm) we give it a coat of clear automotive
spray paint before applying it to the cabinet. If it is less than 17" (432mm) wide we use clear
contact paper to cover it after applying it to the cabinet. Both methods are documented below.
Laminating with clear automotive spray paint
If the cabinet art is wider than 17" (432mm) it is too large to be covered by clear contact paper
and should be sprayed with clear automotive spray paint to protect it.
Shopping List :
Automotive clear top coat
Tarps
In the morning when the weather is fair lay a tarp outside, or in a well ventilated area. Set up the
printed and cut cabinet art so there is a gap between each piece.
Then, following the manufacturer's instructions (printed on can), spray the cabinet art, several
light coats. Allow each light coat to dry before applying the next.
Allow the cabinet art a full day to dry, or overnight if possible.
The next day you may notice the art has curled, you can place the art between 2 scrap pieces of
MDF, with a heavy object on top, overnight, to straighten them out.
Applying the cabinet art
To apply the cabinet art measure the width of the art, and the width of the panel. Mark where
you want the art on the panel lightly with a sharp pencil.
Peel off the first segment of sticker backing on the corner piece of the art.
Carefully line up the sticky edge to your mark and apply just the edge, straight. Be very careful
as this sticker paper if difficult to remove from the cabinet.
Once the edge of the sticker paper is attached, peel the rest of the sticker backing off
Using a soft cloth as a buffer, carefully buff the sticker onto the cabinet in 1/2" (13mm)
increments, from top to bottom, slowly and evenly.
Then peel the sticker backing off the edge of the next sheet, carefully line up the sticky edge to
your previous sheet and apply just the edge, straight, and buff it on like the last one. Slow and
steady.
Using this process attach all of the remaining cabinet art.
Laminating with clear self-adhesive contact paper
If the cabinet art is less than 17" (432mm) wide we use clear contact paper. Measure and cut
the contact paper so that it is 1" (25mm) wider and 1" (25mm) taller than the applied cabinet art,
this will allow the contact paper to overhang 1/2" (13mm) on all sides.
Peel about 1" (25mm) of the contact paper's backing off and apply the contact paper evenly
1/2" (13mm) over the top edge of the art and take hold of the center of the backing as shown
below.
While slowly pulling down on the backing use a cloth to evenly buff the contact paper onto the
cabinet, in 1/4" (6mm) downward increments, across from one edge to the other. Buff it on
slowly and evenly to avoid trapping air bubbles or making creases.
Once the contact paper is applied buff it on tightly all around with the cloth to ensure a good
bond.
Now the cabinet art is finished.

This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter 10 : The finishing touches
Mounting the power strip
The bottom of the power strip has mounting holes, a hole with thin channels on either side to
accommodate protruding screw heads.
To mark the center of the mounting holes I line a wooden ruler up to the holes, and mark the
center of each hole onto the ruler with a pencil. Then transfer the marks to the cabinet. This
method of measuring is called 'transferrance' and can be very accurate while saving time.
The distance from the left mounting hole to the left end of the ruler represent how much space I
will have between the cabinet's inner wall and the power strip. Transference can help to mount
the strip as close to the wall as you like without having to measure.
The mounting screws are selected according to the size of the screw's head. The screw's head
must be sized so it fits through the center hole but not the channels. The screws are mounted
into the cabinet protruding 1/8" (3mm) and the power strip slides onto them.
Wiring the speakers
The cabinet's speakers each have two lugs, one is positive and one is negative. To connect
them to the cabinet's amplifier simply attach appropriately sized quick-disconnects to 22-gauge
(or larger) wire and attach to the lugs.
For a powerful speaker (like speakers driven with a car amplifier) larger wire (like 16 gauge lamp
wire) should be used, this will help to carry the bass.
Left over 22-gauge hook-up wire with quick-disconnects were used for these low wattage
speakers. The quick-disconnects were enlarged with a flat head screwdriver to fit the speaker's
lugs.
Then the quick-disconnects were crimped tightly onto the lugs with pliers. Optionally, solder
could be used instead of quick-disconnects.
Making the amplifier or "Hacking the computer speakers"
The arcade cabinet must have speakers and an amplifier. For this example I will use an
amplifier from a powered computer speaker and car speakers. I will also add a volume control to
the front of the cabinet for fine tuning.
First, I find a set of powered computer speakers and test them to make sure they work.
Shown below are both sides of the left and right speakers.
They are opened with the appropriate screwdriver. First the left enclosure, revealing a little
speaker, wires, and a board.
Of course the speaker would be too small to mount in an arcade cabinet so it is discarded. The
board has a 1/8" (3.5mm) stereo connector at one end and speaker wires at the other, it could
be used to connect the cabinet's left speaker to the amplifier.
Next we open the right enclosure, revealing the boards to the front buttons and rear connectors,
and a little speaker.
Then, remove the little speaker, what is left will be the cabinet's amplifier. The speaker wires
must be extended to reach the cabinet's right speaker, this could be done with butt connectors
but I will use two sections of a terminal strip so the wires can be easily removed, like a real
amplifier.
To connect the wires to the terminal I cut and strip the ends of the wires, drill two holes in the
side of the enclosure big enough for them to fit through, mount the terminal with super glue and
insert the wires.
Now the amplifier is done. As you can see, the cabinet's right speaker can connect to the
terminal, and the left speaker will connect to "to left speaker" on the back, using the board pulled
from the left enclosure. This makes for an inexpensive means to amplify the cabinet's speakers.
As a mounting solution I decided to cut holes like the ones in the bottom of the power strip so it
could slide onto screws inside the cabinet.
First, I measured the diameter of the shaft and head of a wood screw using a hole gauge. The
center hole of the mount should be slightly larger than the screw head. The channels on either
side should be smaller than the screw head but slightly larger than the screw shaft.
I drilled pilot holes about 1/5th from the bottom and top of the enclosure, on the opposite side of
the terminal. Then measured and marked a rectangle the width of the screw's shaft, and about 1
1/2" (38mm) long, around the pilot hole.
Then drilled the pilot holes with a drill bit larger than the screw head, and cut the channels out
along the lines with a saber saw. (the same could probably be done with a dremmel's cutting
wheel and a drill bit or the router's straight bit)
To mount it in the cabinet I measure the middle of the two center holes and mark the cabinet,
then drill pilot holes and drive the screws, leaving them protruding 1/8" (3mm).
Making the volume control
It is convenient to be able to adjust the volume of the games from the front of the cabinet. We
can do this by placing an audio taper potentiometer between the computer and the amplifier.
Shopping list:
1. 100k Ohm audio taper potentiometer (mono or stereo, depending on your cabinet)
2. terminal strip or barrier strip
3. solder and iron
4. 22 gauge (or similar) wire and wire strippers
5. 4" (100mm) mending plate (or similar)
6. (optional) control knob (that fits the potentiometer)
Note: In this example I will be making a mono (single channel) volume control. Stereo (two
channel) would be the same, only there would be six lugs on the potentiometer instead of three
(three per channel).
The potentiometer appears to be designed to mount into thin material, like sheet metal. The
threads would be too short to properly mount in an arcade cabinet made from 5/8" (16mm) or
3/4" (19mm) thick wood. To make the potentiometer "wood mountable" I will attach it to a
4" (100mm) mending plate, and attach the plate to the cabinet.
The potentiometer mounts into a 5/16" (8mm) hole (according to the package) so I measure and
mark the center of the mending plate and center punch it with a hammer and nail. Then drill it
with a 5/16" (8mm) pilot point drill bit.
Close inspection of the potentiometer also reveals a tiny lug on the left side of the mounting
surface, this lug is obviously there to keep the potentiometer from spinning when the shaft is
turned, and will require another hole to be drilled in the mending plate.
Placing the lug in the hole gauge shows it is slightly smaller than 7/64" (2.7mm). To mark the
spot to drill a 7/64" (2.7mm) hole on the mending plate a drop of white paint was placed on the
lug, and the potentiometer was inserted into the 5/16" (8mm) center hole, this made a white spot
on the mending plate.
Pictured below : the white paint on the potentiometer's mounting lug was transferred to the
mending plate telling us exactly where to drill.
The spot was center punched with a hammer and nail, then drilled with 7/64" (2.7mm) pilot point
bit. The potentiometer was inserted and the nut was tightened. Now we have a "wood
mountable" potentiometer.
Next, I decided to give the potentiometer screw terminals, like the amplifier. This is not
necessary as the audio wires could be soldered, but it is convenient to be able to quickly
connect and disconnect wires.
To add the terminal I first cut and stripped the ends of three short lengths of wire, and added a
paper-thin layer of flux to the three solder lugs.
I soldered a short length of wire to each lug.
Then used super glue to attach a three section terminal strip to the back of the potentiometer
The back of the potentiometer was "roughed up" with sandpaper prior to gluing, to insure a good
bonding surface and remove any packing grease.
and inserted the wires into the terminal.
We now have a wood mountable volume control with terminal connects.
Wiring the computer to the volume control to the amplifier
The computer's sound card uses stereo cable with an 1/8" (3.5mm) stereo connector on both
ends. This is the same cable and connector commonly used on headphones.
As you can see in the picture below, stripping the insulation on the stereo wire reveals four
wires. The red wires are for the right channel and the white wires are for the left channel.
1. Right (+) positive
2. Right (-) ground
3. Left (-) ground
4. Left (+) positive
To connect the computer to the volume control cut a six foot stereo cable in half and strip the
ends as shown above. Plug one of the wires into the computer's sound card and plug the other
into the amplifier's "input" port. Connect the wires to the potentiometer as illustrated in the
picture below.
As you can see both (-) ground wires connect to the left lug, the (+) positive wire from the
amplifier connects to the center lug, and the (+) positive wire from the computer connects to the
right lug.
Another way to explain it is:
"In" from the computer, "out" to the amplifier, and the "ground" wires from the computer and
amplifier.
Stereo is the same, only there are two rows of lugs. The top three are the right channel, and the
bottom three are the left channel.
And another way to explain it:
Mounting the volume control
To mount the volume control to the cabinet simply find a suitable location for a volume knob,
and drill a hole through that is at least 1/8" (3mm) larger than the potentiometer's shaft. With a
counter-sink to accommodate the potentiometer's nut and threads.
The potentiometer pictured required a 5/16" (8mm) hole, with a 1/2" (13.5mm) counter-sink that
was 1/4" (6mm) deep. Without the over sized hole the shaft wouldn't turn freely while adjusting
the volume, without the counter-sink the potentiometer wouldn't mount flush.
Insert the potentiometer and drive screws through the holes in the mending plate.
Place a control knob onto the shaft, the shaft will likely be too long. Measure and mark the
distance between the bottom of the control knob and the cabinet.
Remove the control knob and transfer the measurement to the shaft, adding 1/8" (3mm) of shaft.
(moving the mark 1/8" (3mm) away from the cabinet, so the control knob does not mount flush
against the cabinet)
Trim the shaft with a Dremel's cutting wheel (or similar) and install the knob.
Now the cabinet has a nice front mounted volume control.
Extending the stereo potentiometer's shaft
The mono potentiometer I tested had a shaft that was long enough for wood mounting. The
stereo potentiometer I later tested had a shaft only long enough to mount in sheet metal (like a
coin door). To make the stereo potentiometer "wood mountable" I extended the shaft using 1/4"
diameter aluminum rod.
I chucked the rod into a vise leaving about an inch (25mm) overhanging, then cut the
overhanging portion. This will be the new extension.
After I chucked the extension into the vise upright, and cut a notch into it (like the
potentiometer's shaft). This will give the JB Weld more surface area to bond to.
I gathered JB Weld, tape, a mixing stick (in this case a popcicle stick), the potentiometer, and
the extension.
Mixed the JB Weld according tot he manufacturer's instrcutions, and applied a bit to the top of
the potentiometer's shaft.
Then put the extension on top, with the notch down, and taped it so it would dry straight. Then
let it dry for 24 hours and sanded it smooth.
Mounting the computer inside the cabinet
It is convenient to have the computer mounted inside the cabinet so it does not move when the
machine is tipped (carried or transported). Mounting options depend upon the type of computer case. In
this example the computer case has a "one piece" removable cover, which is very common on older
computers (as opposed to removable side panels). so I will mount it with angle brackets.
First, I place the computer inside the cabinet leaving room in the back for the wires and in the front for
the opening of the CD drive (in the event software will later be added). Then place the angle brackets
on center with the case, flush against the wood, and mark the holes with a pencil in both the case and
the wood.
If the case is beveled (round on top) hold the bracket flush against the wood, this will line the bracket
flush against the high spot on the case and will leave a gap between the bracket and the low spot on
the case, mark the hole directly under and later use washers to fill the gap between the case and
bracket.
Next, I removed the cover and made a jig from scrap wood as shown below to accommodate the lip
inside the cover, otherwise the cover could not be pressed flush against wood for drilling. Then drilled
holes large enough for the bolts.
After, I secured the brackets to the case with nuts and bolts. Now the computer can mount securely in
the cabinet with short wood screws.
One method of mounting a computer with removable side panels is to attach one of the side panels to
the inside of the cabinet, then simply attach the case onto the panel. The panel's screws hold the case
firmly and can be easily removed to take out the case.
In this example the left side panel is attached to the inside of the cabinet with several wood screws
The computer case can attach to the panel
and is held in place by thumb screws that can be accessed when the coin door is opened.
Optional : Using a car audio amplifier in an arcade cabinet
A car audio amplifier can push powerful speakers better than a 'hacked PC speaker amplifier'. The car
audio amplifier is a 12 volt device just like the computer's devices. It can be connected to a computer's
molex connector like so:
12 volt (yellow) to amplifier's +12 terminal
5 volt (red) to amplifier's REM terminal
ground (black) to amplifier's GND
Shown below is the computer's molex connector, note the different color scheme between 4-pin (large)
and 3-pin (small). Sometimes the 3-pin connector has a yellow wire, this wire does not carry a charge (it
is a speed sensor)
Shown below, the car amplifier is mounted to the cabinet with wood screws and powered through the
computer's 4-pin molex connector.
The computer's sound card connects to the amplifier's LOW inputs via a '1/8" (3.5mm) stereo to RCA'
adapter.
When using a car amplifier you must be careful it does not draw too much power, otherwise you could
damage the computer. A safe bet would be a car amplifier rated at less than 100 watts total. A more
powerful car amplifier could be connected to a separate power supply, like a switchable AT computer
power supply.

This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter 11 : The computer
At the heart of your arcade cabinet is the computer which runs the MAME emulator and your
favorite arcade games.
What computer to choose?
Different versions of the MAME emulator have different computer requirements. Each newer
version supporting more games but requiring more processor power.
An older version of MAME, like version .36, could run at full speed on a low end computer, like a
200mhz Pentium running DOS. This configuration would cost very little and support as many as
2,000 games (depending on your control panel layout) from 1980 to 1998. This configuration
should only be considered if you are very familiar with DOS.
A mid-level version of MAME, like .53, could run at full speed on a mid-level computer, like a
500mhz Pentium 2. This configuration would not cost much and would support as many as
3,000 games (depending on your control panel layout) from 1980 to 1999. This configuration is
the best average as it is does not cost much and is fast enough to run Windows98 and
MAME32, which makes for an easy set up. This is the setup that will be illustrated in this tutorial.
A newer version of MAME, like version .95 and beyond, could run at full speed on a new
computer, like a 2GHZ Pentium 4. This configuration would have a substantial cost but run as
many as 5,500 games (depending on your control panel layout) from 1980 to 2003. This
configuration should only be considered if cost is not a consideration and you want to have as
many of the newest games possible.
The specs of the computer used in this tutorial are as follows:
Pentium 2 500mhz
256 MB RAM
10 GB hard drive
nVidia GeForce 4 mx440 with TV out (any "TV out" card should do, but I recommend nVidia)
CD-ROM drive (any will do)
Windows 98SE
MAME32 .53
Note : "Celeron" and "AMD K6-2" processors are roughly the equivalent of Pentium 2, so a
similar configuration to the above would be a "Celeron 600 MHZ processor" or "AMD K6-2 500
MHZ processor".
Note : said prices are in USD
The computer configuration above minus the nVidia card could be found at most computer
shops for much less than $50. Call around locally and see what you can find, if all else fails
there's always eBay.
Once you have the computer you'll need a "TV out" solution. In this tutorial I'll be using a nVidia
video card with TV out, alternately you could try a different video card that has "TV out" or a
scan converter.
Note: Video cards come in AGP and PCI, it's important to note weather or not your computer
has an AGP port. Be sure to find out from the seller or the computer's manual if it has AGP or
only PCI and order your video card accordingly.
Extending the ATX power switch
The standard ATX computer comes with a power button that is a momentary switch, similar to
the pushbuttons on your arcade cabinet's control panel. It is convenient to extend this power
button so it can be accessed from the front of the arcade cabinet, otherwise we would have to
go behind the cabinet to access the computer's power button.
The cabinet in this tutorial features a simple extended power button for the television, which did
not require the television to be opened, mounted in the arcade cabinet's monitor bezel (see
chapter 5) and will have a power button for the computer mounted in the arcade cabinet's coin
door area. The procedure for powering the arcade machine on or off will be to push the
computer's power button and then the television's power button, both conveniently mounted in
front.
To begin, unplug your computer, remove the screws securing the case, and open it up. You will
see that the power button's wires lead to the motherboard.
Note: Always unplug the computer before opening it. Also, before touching the computer's
components it is a good idea to "ground yourself" by touching the computer's metal case, this is
done because the computer's components are sensitive to static electricity.
This computer's power button is a momentary switch that has two wires leading to two pins on
the computer's motherboard, when the power button is pushed the two pins on the motherboard
are bridged (touching) and the computer is told to power on (or off).
The pins are two out of a block of pins on the motherboard, called the front panel connector.
The front panel connector consists of two rows of pins, usually totaling about a dozen.
Pictured below is a side view of an open computer. It is an HP brand computer with a 500mhz
Celeron processor (similar to Pentium II), mini ATX motherboard, and mini ATX power supply.
This is a good example of what you might find at your local computer shop inexpensively. Good
for this project yet probably too dated for a home computer. A computer like this can run DOS or
Windows98 and an early version of MAME (up to .61).
Like most ATX motherboards, the front panel connector is on the bottom right.
Unlike standard ATX computers, this HP's front panel wires are in a single large connector
block, instead of the more common 2 pin connector blocks. Pictured below is the front panel
wires and connector block, unplugged from the motherboard's front panel connector pins.
Two of these wires connect the power pins on the front panel connector to the power button on
the front of the computer case. We will discover which pins, then split and extend the
corresponding wires. The end result will be a power button for the computer on the arcade
cabinet and the computer case power button will still work.
Now, make sure the computer is plugged in and if there is a power switch near the computer's
power plug that it is switched on .
If there is a switch the "-" means "on" and the "o" means "off", a simple way to remember that is
"o for off".
To discover which of the two pins are the power pins, we can use a screwdriver to bridge one
pin to another until the computer powers on.
Pictured below : Using a screwdriver, two pins at a time are bridged until the computer powers
on.
Make a note of the two pins that powered on the computer and the corresponding wires. It is
these wires that will be cut and stripped on both ends, as shown below. (see chapter 8 for an
example of stripping wires)
As you can see below there are now four stripped wires: two leading to the power button on the
computer case, and two leading to the connector block.
To extend these wires I will use 22-gauge hook-up wire (as used in wiring the control panel),
butt connectors, and a crimping tool.
Next, take a five foot length of hook-up wire and strip one end. Placing the stripped end up to
one of the stripped power wires leading to the computer's power button.
Twist the stripped portions together and slide them into one end of a butt connector.
Then crimp the butt connector with the crimping tool, this easily connects the wires without the
need for solder.
Do this for both wires leading to the computer's power button. So each wire is now extended.
Slide the other end of the butt connector over the wires leading to the connector block, crimp
them, and plug the connector block back into the motherboard.
Route the long wires out of an opening in the back of the computer.
To avoid accidentally unplugging the the connector block I tied the wires around a metal part
inside the computer. This makes it "tug resistant"
Now the ATX power switch is extended five feet. Touching the stripped ends of the hook-up
wires should power on the computer, and the power button on the computer case should still
work. Test them before proceeding.
The extended wires will connect to a microswitch and pushbutton on the arcade cabinet. We will
now be able to power the computer from outside of the cabinet.
Sorting the ROMs for use in the cabinet with Sortinfo
It is a good idea to sort the ROMs before adding them to the cabinet. Sorting the ROMs insures that
only the games compatible with the cabinet's control panel are available. For example : a Neo Geo
layout of 1 stick and 4 buttons per player (2 players) can handle most ROMs but not those which
require a trackball, spinner, or games with more than 4 buttons. It also allows us to remove any of the
following types of games : "adult" (as they are innapropriate for children) "mahjongg / quiz" (as they are
in Japanese and can't be read by everyone) "fighter" (as some people may feel they are innapropriate
for children) and "clones" (as scrolling through a menu of many of the same titled games can be
annoying)
The program used in this example to accomplish these things is Sortinfo (click to download)
The first step is to place the complete MAME ROM set onto the home computer's hard drive (not the
arcade cabinet's hard drive). In this example I used MAME .53 set and copied it to a directory on my
hard drive c:\games\MAME53
Next extract the contents of the file Sortinfo.zip to the MAME directory. It will extract the file Sortinfo.exe
and it's text file. If you are unable to see the "exe" at the end of Sortinfo you may have "hide file
extensions" turned on in Windows, you can turn off this feature by doing the following : double click "my
computer", click Tools > Folder options > View and uncheck "Hide file extensions for known file types"
then click OK
Then grab the most recent version of catver.ini and place it in the MAME folder. Catver.ini will tell the
Sortinfo program what category each ROM is, this will allow us to delete types of ROMs.
Lastly, grab this file and extract it's contents to the MAME directory. It contains a batch file telling
MAME to create a game list for Sortinfo.
Now that we have MAME and it's ROMs along with Sortinfo and Catver in the MAME directory we can
sort the ROMs to use on the cabinet. Follow the steps below.
1. Create the folder c:\sortroms on your hard drive. (to create a folder on your hard drive double click
my computer, then click C:, then right click within the windows but not on an icon, a menu will open up,
highlight new then click folder, name the folder sortroms)
2. Create the game list by double clicking
"gamelist-84.bat" if you are using MAME.exe version prior to .84
"gamelist+84.bat" if you are using MAME.exe .84 and beyond
"gamelist32-84.bat" if you are using MAME32.exe version prior to .84
"gamelist32+84.bat" if you are using MAME32.exe .84 and beyond
This will create a large text file called "gamelist.txt"
2. Double click Sortinfo.exe, this will launch the Sortinfo program.
3. press CTRL+L (hold control, press L)
4. point towards "gamelist.txt"
5. click the "input" tab
6. click "control" rectangle, ROMs are now sorted by controller
7. click the first game, it should now be visibly selected
8. hold the shift key on the keyboard down, and press down arrow key until you come up to the control
you have on your control panel (I held it down past "dial" "doublejoy4way" "doublejoy8way" and stopped
at "joy4way", because I feel an 8way joystick can handle the 4-way games)
9. Now all the control types you don't have should be highlighted, like double4way, trackball, paddle,
etc. confirm that you don't want those selected using the scrollbar to the right, then press the Delete key
on the keyboard, they will be deleted. Scroll down the list and do this for all the control types you don't
have.
For me, I left only joy8way and joy4way joystick games, because I have only a pair of 8-way joysticks
on my control panel.
10. click the buttons rectangle now all games are sorted by the number of required
buttons, using the same method delete the games that have more buttons than your control panel. for
example if you have 4 buttons delete all 5,6,7,8, and 9 button games.
tricky: if you have 3 buttons leave all 4-button games, why? because many "4 button games" are
literally "3 button games" that don't use the 4th button, for example : many Neo Geo games including
Metal Slug.
This *could possibly* cause a problem with true "4 button" games on a "3 button control panel" but the
4th button is usually something dispensable, like grenade, as opposed to something indispensable, like
shoot and jump.
11. *optional* click the players rectangle and delete games requiring more players than
your control panel has.
12. *optional* click "game" tab , click "clone of" and scroll down until the
sheep icons are visible on the left, you can highlight and delete all the games with the sheep icon
as they are clones (like duplicates). Many people find it tedious to scroll through long game lists on
a cabinet and deleting clones is one way to shorten the list.
*tricky* Pac-Man, the #1 arcade game in America, is a clone of puck-man, the ad wizards at Midway
envisioned naughty kids with black markers making swear words out of their marquees, so they
changed the name for American release. So leave the clone game "Pac-Man" or your friends will
wonder where it went.
13. To sort by content press CTRL+F (hold control while pressing F) and open "catver.ini"
Catver.ini categorizes the games in Sortinfo, this is useful for removing "mahjong" and "quiz" (if you
can't read Japanese) "adult" (if you don't want nudity on your cab) and whatever else types of games
you feel inappropriate for your setting.
click on the "category" rectangle on the far right, now games are organized by
category. Using shift, the down arrow, and delete key, delete any unwanted types of games from the list.
13. Now you should only have the games you like in the list, give it a double check and when you are
ready press CTRL+T, this is to make a "copy the ROMs on this list" batch file.
Double click the ROMs directory
name the file !copy.bat
or whatever you like, the exclamation point puts the file at the top of the alphabetized directory
then enter the template:
copy %a.zip c:\sortroms
and click OK
14. Minimize Sortinfo and go to MAME's "roms" directory on the hard drive, double click !copy.bat, it
should copy all the ROMs from the list to c:\sortroms
It can take several minutes to copy all the ROM files
15. now all the ROMs for your cabinet are in c:\sortroms, but Sortinfo does not copy the bios ROMs
required by many games. To copy the bios ROMs extract the contents of this zip file into MAME's
"roms" directory. Then go to MAME's "roms" directory and double click !copybroms.bat. It will copy all
the BIOS ROMs to c:\sortroms.

This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter 12 : The computer part 2
Installing Windows 98SE
For this example I will show how to install Windows 98SE. It is a great operating system for computers
similar to Pentium 2 or above, requiring less resources than Windows 2K/XP and easier to work with
than DOS.
You will need the "Windows 98SE retail CD" which can be had for about $10 (USD)
The first step is to access the computer's bios, this is done when the computer is first turned on and
going through it's startup routine. For this computer the 'delete' key is pressed to access the bios.
The key to access the bios varies by computer but is generally delete, F1, F2, or F12. If a logo comes
up when you turn on your computer ESC or TAB may remove it so you can see the text, if the text goes
too fast you can press the pause/break key to pause it.
While in the bios we must verify that the hard drive and cd-rom are recognized, and that the computer
is set to try booting from the CD before the hard drive. This is done so the computer can boot from the
Windows 98SE CD. In this example I go to the "advanced" page and select "IDE configuration".
It reveals that the hard drive is present as "IDE primary master" and that the CD-rom drive is present
as "IDE primary slave"
Your bios may look different but should have the same options, try looking on every page for them.
Pressing 'esc' backs out of that page and returns to the first, where I select "boot"
Then "boot device priority"
On this page I set:
First boot device : Floppy
Second boot device : CDROM
Third boot device : Hard drive (sometimes known as "HDD-0")
This tells the computer to fist try booting from the floppy disk, then the CD, then the hard drive.
Note: although a floppy drive is present in this computer it is not required.
Pressing 'esc' backs out of that page and returns to the first, where I select "exit" and "exit saving
changes"
Once the bios setup screen is exited, the computer will reboot, quickly insert the Windows 98SE retail
CD into the computer's CD-rom drive. Once the computer boots from the Windows 98SE CD select:
"boot from CD-rom"
"start computer with CD-rom support"
The CD-rom driver will load and display the CD-rom's drive letter, in most cases it will be "D:"
If the computer has more than one hard drive the CD-rom drive may have a different letter.
Now we will use some DOS commands to set up Windows. Don't let it's dark appearance spook you, I
will take you step by step through it's cryptic commands until Windows is installed :)
Once the computer is done booting we are at the DOS prompt, specifically the "A prompt", which looks
like this:
A:###BOT_TEXT###gt;
In this tutorial I will color the prompts blue and the typed commands black to avoid confusion.
Now type :
A:###BOT_TEXT###gt;c: (and press enter)
If the Windows CD recognizes the hard drive the prompt will change to C:###BOT_TEXT###gt;
If the Windows CD does not recognize the hard drive you will get the error message "invalid drive
specification", if you get that error message click here, otherwise continue.
If you are able to get to the C prompt the Windows CD recognizes the hard drive, but assuming it is a
used hard drive we will erase it install Windows 98SE onto a clean drive. To do this type:
C:###BOT_TEXT###gt;d: and press 'enter'
(If the computer has more than one hard drive the CD-rom drive may have a different letter, enter it
instead of D)
This will change the prompt to D, the CD drive, then type:
D:###BOT_TEXT###gt;cd win98 and press 'enter'
This will change the prompt to the CD folder 'Win98', type:
D:\WIN98>format c: /q /s
This tells the Windows CD to erase the hard drive and make it bootable, quickly (if possible)
Press 'y' and 'enter' for any prompts, and for volume label enter "hard drive"
Now that the hard drive is bootable it is convenient to have the Windows 98SE installation files on it,
instead of in the CD. This will speed up the Windows installation considerably. To do this we will make
a folder for the installation files on the hard drive and copy the files into it.
Type:
D:\WIN98>md c:\win98 (and press enter)
This tells the CD to make a folder on the hard drive called "Win98".
Then type:
D:\WIN98>copy *.* c:\win98 (and press enter)
This tells the CD to copy all the contents it's folder "win98" to the hard drive's folder "win98".
Once all the files are copied, remove the Windows 98 CD from the CD-rom drive and restart the
computer.
Now the computer boots from the hard drive which is blank, except for the Windows 98SE installation
files. So we will begin the installation of Windows 98SE, to do this type:
C:###BOT_TEXT###gt;cd win98 and press enter
This will change the prompt to the folder 'Win98', then type:
C:\WIN98>setup and press 'enter'
This will launch the Windows 98SE installation. First it will scan the hard drive.
Then setup will begin. Although the mouse cursor is visible the mouse may not be usable, as it's driver
is not loaded. To navigate through the setup we will use the keyboard.
Press 'enter' to select "continue" at the first screen.
Press 'enter' to select "next" at the "Select directory" screen
At the "Setup options" screen we will select "compact" to do this:
hold 'alt' and press 'c' to change the selection from "typical" to "compact", then press 'tab' twice to
highlight the "next" button and press 'enter'
Press 'enter' again at the "windows components" screen.
This brings us to the "Identification" screen. Here you can press 'tab' to get to the "computer name"
field and give a clever name to the computer, then 'tab' to the "next" button and press 'enter' to
continue.
Use 'tab' and the arrows keys if you need to change the default location
Press 'enter' at the "Startup disk" screen
At the "insert disk" window, press the 'right arrow' to go from "OK" to "cancel" and press 'enter'
Press 'enter' at the "start copying files" screen.
Eventually setup will restart the computer, and relaunch.
When setup continues it will prompt for "name" and "company", use 'tab' and 'enter' to navigate this
screen.
Then the "license agreement", use 'tab' and 'space bar' to navigate this screen.
Then the "Windows product key" screen. Use 'tab' to get to the leftmost field and enter the CD-key that
came with your Windows 98SE retail disk. While entering the key you do not need to press 'space bar'
or 'tab'.
After entering the key use 'tab' to highlight "next" and press 'enter'.
Eventually you will see the "date/time properties" screen. Use 'tab' and 'arrow keys' to adjust these, the
'tab' to highlight "OK" and press 'enter'
When finished setup will restart the computer
Setting up Windows
If asked for a user name and password a windows start, leave the password blank and click OK
Uncheck the box on the bottom left of the "welcome window" and click 'close'
Click 'start' 'settings' 'control panel'
To remove the password prompt at startup double click 'network' - if you were not asked for a
password at startup you can skip this step.
From 'network' change the "primary network logon" drop-down menu to "windows logon" then restart
VCACHE
Windows 98 will use most of the computer's RAM as "disk cache" to speed up the loading of programs
from the hard drive. This is not good for our arcade computer because we want MAME32 to be able to
have as much RAM as possible - so we must limit the amount of RAM Windows uses for disk cache.
To do this press 'start' 'run' type c:\windows\system.ini and click 'OK'
This will open the "system.ini" file. Scroll down the file until you see [vcache]
Change the line to read :
[vcache]
minfilecache=2048
maxfilecache=2048
This will allocate 2 MB of RAM to disk cache. This is good if you have up to 32 MB RAM or want to
minimize the amount of RAM used by Windows. Otherwise refer to the following:
(Changing this line also allows Windows 98 to stably use more than 512 MB RAM)
After changing the line click X to close the window and select 'yes' to save the file
Installing the device drivers
Click 'start' 'settings' 'control panel'
Double click 'system'
Click 'device manager' tab
This brings us to "the device manager". The device manager lists all the devices in the computer.
If Windows does not recognize a device, the device will have a yellow mark next to it's name. It will
need it's corresponding device driver to be installed for it to work.
If there are no yellow marks (as pictured above) you can proceed to the next step. If there are yellow
marks (as pictured below) you must identify the device(s) and locate the necessary driver(s).
You can use a program called "PC Wizard" to help identify devices. Removing the device and looking
at it can often reveal it's identity too, the board or the chips may be labeled.
For example : here is a video card that needs to be identified - upon inspection you can see that it is a
"DTV 1100" made by "Diamond multimedia". These are words that can be used to search for the
drivers.
Here is another example - This soundcard is clearly marked "Sound Blaster" model "CT4670"
To download a device driver go to the manufacturer's website or search for it at driverguide. If
searching at the manufacturer's website and driverguide yields no results, try searching for just what is
written on the chips on driverguide and google.

This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Using FDISK
If the c: drive was not recognized by the Windows CD we must prepare it with a program called FDISK.
To access it type:
A:###BOT_TEXT###gt;fdisk (and press enter)
This will start the fdisk program. On the first two screens you may be prompted with a Y, simply press
'enter' for both.
Now we are at the fdisk main screen, which has four options:
1. Create DOS partition or logical DOS drive
2. Set active partition
3. Delete partition or logical DOS drive
4. Display partition information
Press '4' and then 'enter' to display the partitions on the drive. In this example the hard drive was
previously set up with an NTFS partition for use with Windows 2K/XP. Windows 98 cannot recognize
NTFS partitions as it uses FAT32, therefore the NTFS partition must be deleted. If there is not an NTFS
partition you can skip to "Creating a new partition"
Deleting an NTFS partition
Press 'esc' to return to the main screen.
Press '3' and 'enter'. This brings us to the "Delete DOS partition or logical DOS drive" screen. To delete
the NTFS partition, select '4' and press 'enter'
This brings us to the "Delete non-DOS partition" screen. Here I press '1' and 'enter' to delete the NTFS
partition. If that partition had a label I would have had to type it in to proceed. Then I press 'y' to confirm
it's deletion and 'enter'. After I press 'esc' to return to the main screen.
Creating a new partition
Back at the main screen I press '1' and 'enter'
This brings us to the "Create DOS partition or logical DOS drive" screen
I press '1' and press 'enter' to create a new partition. When prompted press 'y' and once it is finished
press 'esc' to exit fdisk.
You will have to restart the computer and boot again from the Windows 98SE CD.
Once the computer boots from the Windows 98SE CD select:
"boot from CD-rom"
"start computer with CD-rom support"
The CD-rom driver will load and display the CD-rom's drive letter, in most cases it will be "D:"
(If you have more than one hard drive your CD-rom drive may have a different letter.)
Once the computer is done booting we are at the DOS prompt, specifically the "A prompt", which looks
like this:
A:###BOT_TEXT###gt;
In this tutorial I will color the prompts blue and the typed commands black to avoid confusion.
Now type:
A:###BOT_TEXT###gt;d: and press 'enter'
(If you have more than one hard drive your CD-rom drive may have a different letter, enter it instead of
D)
This will change the prompt to D, the CD drive, then type:
D:###BOT_TEXT###gt;cd win98 and press 'enter'
This will change the prompt to the CD folder 'Win98', type:
D:\WIN98>format c: /s
This tells the Windows CD to erase the hard drive and make it bootable
Press 'y' and 'enter' for any prompts, and for volume label enter "hard drive"
Now that the hard drive is bootable it is convenient to have the Windows 98SE installation files on it,
instead of in the CD. This will speed up the Windows installation considerably. To do this we will make
a folder for the installation files on the hard drive and copy the files into it.
Type:
D:\WIN98>md c:\win98 (and press enter)
This tells the CD to make a folder on the hard drive called "Win98".
Then type:
D:\WIN98>copy *.* c:\win98 (and press enter)
This tells the CD to copy all the contents it's folder "win98" to the hard drive's folder "win98".
Once all the files are copied, remove the Windows 98 CD from the CD-rom drive and restart the
computer.
Now the computer boots from the hard drive which is blank, except for the Windows 98SE installation
files. So we will begin the installation of Windows 98SE, to do this type:
C:###BOT_TEXT###gt;cd win98 and press enter
This will change the prompt to the folder 'Win98', then type:
C:\WIN98>setup and press enter
This will launch the Windows 98SE installation. First it will scan the hard drive.
Then setup will begin. Although the mouse cursor is visible the mouse may not be usable, as it's driver
is not loaded. To navigate through the setup we will use the keyboard.
Press 'enter' to continue at the first screen.
Press 'enter' for next at the "Select directory" screen
At the "Setup options" screen we will select "compact" as we do not want all of the typical desktop
components installed on the arcade machine, to do this:
hold 'alt' and press 'c' to change the selection from "typical" to "compact", then press 'tab' twice to
highlight the "next" button and press 'enter'
Press 'enter' to continue at the "windows components" page.
This brings us to the "Identification" screen. Here you can press 'tab' to get to the "computer name" field
and give a clever name to the computer, then 'tab' back to the "next" button and press 'enter' to
continue.
Use 'tab' and the arrows keys if you need to change the default location
Press 'enter' at the "Startup disk" screen
At the "insert disk" window, press the 'right arrow' to go from "OK" to "cancel" and press 'enter'
Press 'enter' at the "start copying files" screen.
Eventually setup will restart the computer, and relaunch.
When setup continues it will prompt for "name" and "company", use 'tab' and 'enter' to navigate this
screen.
Then the "license agreement", use 'tab' and 'space bar' to navigate this screen.
Then the "Windows product key" screen. Use 'tab' to get to the leftmost field and enter the CD-key that
came with your Windows 98SE retail disk. While entering the key you do not need to press 'space bar'
or 'tab'.
After entering the key use 'tab' to highlight "next" and press 'enter'.
Eventually you will see the "date/time properties" screen. Use 'tab' and 'arrow keys' to adjust these, the
'tab' to highlight "OK" and press 'enter'
When finished setup will restart the computer
Setting up Windows
If asked for a user name and password a windows start, leave the password blank and click OK
Uncheck the box on the bottom left of the "welcome window" and click 'close'
Click 'start' 'settings' 'control panel'
To remove the password prompt at startup double click 'network' - if you were not asked for a password
at startup you can skip this step.
From 'network' change the "primary network logon" drop-down menu to "windows logon" then restart
VCACHE
Windows 98 will use most of the computer's RAM as "disk cache" to speed up the loading of programs
from the hard drive. This is not good for our arcade computer because we want MAME32 to be able to
have as much RAM as possible - so we must limit the amount of RAM Windows uses for disk cache.
To do this press 'start' 'run' type c:\windows\system.ini and click 'OK'
This will open the "system.ini" file. Scroll down the file until you see [vcache]
Change the line to read :
[vcache]
minfilecache=2048
maxfilecache=2048
This will allocate 2 MB of RAM to disk cache. This is good if you have up to 32 MB RAM. If you have
more RAM refer to the following
(Changing this line also allows Windows 98 to stably use more than 512 MB RAM)
After changing the line click X to close the window and select 'yes' to save the file
Installing the device drivers
Click 'start' 'settings' 'control panel'
Double click 'system'
Click 'device manager' tab
This brings us to "the device manager". The device manager lists all the devices in the computer.
If Windows does not recognize a device, the device will have a yellow mark next to it's name. It will
need it's corresponding device driver to be installed for it to work.
If there are no yellow marks (as pictured above) you can proceed to the next step. If there are yellow
marks (as pictured below) you must identify the device(s) and locate the necessary driver(s).
You can use a program called "PC Wizard" to help identify devices. Removing the device and looking
at it can often reveal it's identity too, the board or the chips may be labeled.
For example : here is a video card that needs to be identified - upon inspection you can see that it is a
"DTV 1100" made by "Diamond multimedia". These are words that can be used to search for the
drivers.
Here is another example - This soundcard is clearly marked "Sound Blaster" model "CT4670"
To download a device driver go to the manufacturer's website or search for it at driverguide. If
searching at the manufacturer's website and driverguide yields no results, try searching for just what is
written on the chips on driverguide and google.

This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Chapter 13 : The computer part 3
Installing MAME32
Once the device drivers are installed we can get the computer set up for arcade use. Right click the
desktop and from the menu select 'properties'.
On the 'background' tab change the wallpaper to 'none'.
On the 'appearance' tab, change the desktop color to black. This will make the desktop more discreet.
On the 'settings' tab, change the colors to '16 bit' and the resolution to '800x600 pixels' then click OK.
When prompted, select 'apply the new color settings without restarting' and click OK.
After, you can delete the extra icons from the desktop.
Then, double click 'my computer' and C drive.
Within the C drive, right click in the white area between the icons, from the menu select 'new' and
'folder'.
This will create a new folder, name the folder 'mame'.
Click the 'up' button to return to 'My computer'. Insert the CD you made containing MAME and it's files.
Double click the CD icon to display it's contents.
To make sure all files and their extensions are visible click 'view' 'folder options'.
Within folder options on the 'general tab' select 'classic style'.
On the 'view tab' select 'show all files' and uncheck 'hide file extensions for known file types', then click
OK.
Back at the CD drive, select 'edit' and 'select all', this will highlight all files on the CD.
Then click 'edit' and 'copy'.
Click the 'up' button and double click the C drive. Find the MAME folder and right click it, from the menu
select 'paste'. This will copy the contents of the CD to the MAME folder.
Do this for all the CDs containing MAME32, the roms, and the snapshots. Make sure to include hiscore.
dat, (optionally) cheat.dat and (optionally) history.dat
Double click the MAME folder to display it's contents. Inside find the file 'mame32.exe'. This is the file
that starts the emulator.
Right click mame32.exe and select 'create shortcut' from the menu.
The shortcut will appear at the bottom of the folder. Right click it and select 'copy' from the menu.
Press the 'up' button to return to the root of the hard drive, then double click 'windows' 'start menu'
'programs' and 'startup'. This brings us to the 'startup folder'. Anything placed in this folder will start
automatically with Windows. Right click within the folder and select 'paste' from the menu.
This will place the 'shortcut to mame32.exe' in the 'startup folder' which will make mame32 start with
windows.
However it does not start at maximum size by default. To make it start maximized, right click the
shortcut and select 'properties' from the menu.
Change the run menu to 'maximized' and click 'OK'. Now mame32 will launch at windows startup,
maximized.
The finishing touches
To make windows more cabinet friendly we will make some adjustments, the first will be to set the
taskbar so it is not visible when Mame32 is running. To do this right click it and select 'properties' from
the menu.
On 'taskbar options', uncheck 'always on top' and click OK.
The next finishing touch will be to remove the startup and shutdown logos, to do this locate 'msdos.sys'
on the hard drive, right click it and select 'properties' from the menu.
From properties, uncheck 'hidden' and 'read only', then click OK.
Right click 'msdos.sys' again and select 'open with'.
Choose 'notepad' and click OK.
Once msdos.sys is open, add the line 'logo=0' under [options], then close and save it.
After, go to the 'windows' folder on the hard drive, find the files 'logos.sys' and 'logow.sys' and delete
them. Now windows will not show the startup and shutdown logos.
While in the windows folder, find and delete the folder called 'media'. This will remove the startup and
shutdown sounds.

With the startup logo gone, windows will now display the contents of the autoexec.bat and the words
'starting windows' at startup. To change it to display 'starting arcade' (or whatever you choose) click
start, run, and type 'edit c:\autoexec.bat'
In the autoexec.bat, add the lines shown below, then close and save it. You can change 'starting
arcade' to whatever you like. If you have installed a program that added a line in the autoexec.bat,
simply add the lines shown below under that line.
Optimizing Windows 98se
To make windows faster and free up some resources we will make some adjustments. First go to the
'control panel' and choose 'add/remove programs'.
From the 'windows setup' tab, uncheck all components and click OK.
Next, go to 'system' in the control panel.
From the 'performance' tab click the 'file system' button.
On the 'hard disk' tab, change the 'typical role...' to 'network server'.
From the 'cd-rom' tab change 'supplemental...' to 'small' and 'optimize...' to 'single speed..' and click OK.
Next, click start, run, type 'msconfig' and click OK.
From the 'startup' tab, uncheck everything except for 'shortcut to mame32.exe' and click OK.

With these settings Windows 98se will use less than 15 MB of RAM, that leaves the rest for the
emulator and game. Shown below is the system monitor displaying the free resources. The top graph is
'CPU usage', the bottom is 'free RAM'. The calculator was used to convert bytes to megabytes then
minus the free RAM from the actual RAM, which was 64 MB. As you can see only 14.45 MB of RAM is
used by the operating system.
Setting up mame32
Restart the computer. Mame32 will automatically launch and scan for available roms.
Once it's finished scanning, click the 'available' folder. This displays only the roms that are available.
Right click the 'available' folder and choose 'custom filters'.
Using filters you can remove items from the game list.
I've chosen to hide clones, unavailable, and non-working. Now only the games that are original and
working are displayed.
Click the icon under the word 'file' to hide the folders.
Now the computer is finished! You can configure mame32's options and put the computer inside the
arcade cabinet. Make sure to disable scanlines.
You can also customise which fields are displayed in the game list, to do this right click any field and
choose 'customize fields' from the menu.
Shown below, I have chosen for the game list to display the game name, the number of times it has
been played, the year it was made, and the manufacturer's name.
MAME32 works excellent in an arcade cabinet - the game list can be navigated with the joystick, 'enter'
launches a game from the menu, and 'esc' exits the game returning to the menu. The options are very
easy to configure and the menu is user friendly. The software is solid and uses very little resources -
MAME32 version .36 only uses 10 MB RAM. Coupled with Windows 98 that uses only 15 MB RAM
(after optimizing) there is allot of RAM left for the game.

This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
History.dat will display the game's history in the menu, shown below (top) is mame32 with history.dat and (bottom) mame32
without history.dat
Appendix 2 : How to build a keyboard hack or The poor man's keyboard encoder
Note: all said prices are in USD
Forward : The keyboard hack is an 'old school' device, conceived back when keyboard
encoders were $150. The average arcade builder had no alternative to making one. These days
a keyboard encoder can be bought from GroovyGameGear for $19.95 +$6.50 shipping (for the
version that requires soldering) and $34.95+$6.50 shipping (for the solderless version).
Real keyboard encoders are better than keyboard hacks, as they are perfectly accurate and
have no potential issues. Keyboard hacks, however, have potential issues : "ghosting" a key
that wasn't physically pushed is activated, and "blocking" a key that is physically pushed does
not activate. Although I have never experienced these problems with any of my keyboard hacks,
and suspect they are related to the old AT keyboards, they have been widely documented.
If that wasn't enough to dissuade you, keyboard hacks require small scale soldering skills and at
least 3 hours of time to make. Therefore, if time is money, you may as well just buy a keyboard
encoder. I once did the math and drew the conclusion that after the cost of parts, I was only
saving $8 per hour by building a keyboard hack instead of buying a keyboard encoder.
Below is a comparison of cost and time required for each option. Prices include shipping to USA.
$51 = I-PAC 2 (no soldering required)
$42 = KeyWiz Max (no soldering required)
$27+1 hour = KeyWiz Eco (finished)
$14 (or less) +3 hours = Keyboard hack (finished)
The pros of a keyboard hack are low cost, ease of use, and the satisfaction of creation.
Low cost - especially if you already have some of the parts in your shop from previous projects.
Ease of use - the keyboard hack never needs to be programmed, it is as simple as connecting 2
wires.
Satisfaction of creation - many people would rather build than buy whenever possible, these
people are often referred to as 'do-it-yourselfers' and are usually happy to spend 3 hours to save
$20.
That said, we press on and create our own keyboard encoder!
Materials list
30-watt soldering iron
Rosin-core solder
Flux
22-gauge hook up wire
Wire stripper/crimping tool
Super glue
Project enclosure and (3) 12-position barrier strips
$4 PS/2 keyboard
Disassembling the keyboard
Flip the keyboard over and remove the screws, you will see a large mylar film leading up to a
small encoder board, remove the board.
The picture below shows the top of the encoder board, note the LEDs and the capacitor.
The picture below shows the bottom of the encoder board, note the 'teeth'. When two of these
are bridged a key is produced.
Preparing the wires
Count the number of teeth on the encoder board, this is the number of wires we need to
prepare, the number of screw terminals we need from the barrier strips, and the number of holes
we need to drill in the enclosure. I will refer to this number as 28 for the remainder of this
chapter.
Cut 28 lengths of wire, about the height of the enclosure +2". Strip away the insulation from
about 1/2" on the top and 1/4" on the bottom.
Preparing the enclosure
You'll notice the enclosure has concave 'feet' on the bottom, we will be using the enclosure
upside-down, so I remove the feet with sandpaper.
You'll also notice the barrier strips have 12 screw terminals each, to make the total 28 I cut 2 off
each end of the third barrier strip.
After, I attached the barrier strips to the enclosure with super glue.
Then, using 'step drilling' (starting with a very small bit, then progressively larger bits) I drill a
hole in the seam for the PS/2 cable.
And drilled 3/32" holes in the top, one next to every screw terminal.
Soldering the encoder board
Plug in your soldering iron and set up a work light, while the iron is heating use a cotton swab to
apply a paper thin coat of flux to the encoder's teeth and the 1/4" stripped portion of the wires.
Then begin to solder the 1/4" end of the wires to the the encoder's teeth, one wire per tooth.
Accuracy on this step is crucial, make sure each wire is centered along the tooth, and that no
solder bridges two teeth together.
*note* Some keyboard encoders have a powder coating on the teeth, if you are unable to solder
to the teeth try lightly sanding them with a high grit sandpaper. I have encountered this from Dell
keyboards.
After soldering each wire, give it a little tug to be sure it is firmly attached, remembering to clean
your soldering iron's tip every once in a while. I simply rolled the tip against a tight ball of moist
paper towel.
When finished visually inspect each solder point, with a magnifying glass. Make absolutely sure
that no teeth have been accidentally bridged.
Assembling the keyboard hack
Now we push the wires through the holes in the enclosure, starting at the top.
I used a small pair of needle-nosed pliers to pull the wires through, while taking care not to
stress the solder joints.
Once all the wires were through, I added a nylon wire tie tightly to the PS/2 cable, inside the
enclosure. It is too large to fit through the PS/2 hole therefore will protect the board from getting
pulled, in the event the wire is yanked.
Then I screwed the covers on, placing the plastic cover on the inside and the metal cover on the
outside.
Now insert the 1/2" stripped portion of the wires into the inner screw terminals, and tighten the
inner terminal screws. It is imperative that the screw comes down on the stripped wire and not
the insulation.
To deal with the extra length, I curled the wire around backwards before inserting the 1/2"
stripped end into the inner terminal.
The finishing touches
Now that the keyboard hack is assembled put a number next to every screw terminal using a
silver marker, as shown below.
And every work of art must be signed, yes?
Now the keyboard hack is finished :)
Mapping the keyboard hack
Print out this table and place a check mark under the 'used' column for every button on your
control panel's layout, as shown below.
Then download this file, it contains 'keyhook.exe', the program we will use to identify which
terminal combinations produce what keys.
Plug the keyboard hack into your computer, and launch the program keyhook.exe.
With a 12" length of wire, stripped at both ends, begin to bridge the the terminals in order.
Touching #1 to #2, #1 to #3, #1 to #4 and so on.
Keyhook will identify the key being pressed.
Find all the keys you have checked off on the printed table, make a note of what terminals
produced the key on that line in the 'notes' column, as shown below.
Note: some key combinations may shut down your computer, make a note of these
combinations so you can avoid them in the event you need to make a second pass.
Note: The table has 6 buttons for player's one and two (Street Fighter), but only 4 buttons for
player's three and four (Dungeons and Dragons). As far as I know, there are no games in
MAME that have four players with more than 4 buttons each. Therefore you would not need
"player three buttons 5 and 6", or "player four buttons 5 and 6".
When you have found and documented all the combinations needed to produce your checked
keys, be sure to verify them all before continuing to the next step.
If you don't find some of your checked keys on the first pass, make a second pass, and a third if
necessary. If after the third pass you still don't find some of your checked keys, do not despair
and throw away your keyboard hack, assign the missing key to an unused key and make a note
of it. This is because all of MAME's keys can be manually assigned.
In example: If you have found all of your checked keys except for "Player 1 button 2" (Left Alt)
you can assign it to an unused key (Z) and later configure MAME to use "Z" as "Player 1 button
2"
A mounting solution
For a mounting solution I chose brackets and 1/2" screws.
To secure the brackets to the keyboard hack I held the bracket in place, and slowly drilled a
shallow pilot hole in the center of each bracket hole.
Then slowly drove the screws in.
This will make mounting the keyboard hack inside the cabinet very easy.
Wiring the control panel
To connect the keyboard hack to the control panel we need to review the anatomy of the
microswitch.
Above is an enlarged picture of a microswitch, it has 3 posts :
NC (normally closed) is not used
NO (normally open) will use one of the two terminals as noted on your printed table.
COM (common) will use the other of the two terminals as noted on your printed table.
If you like, you can clip off the NC posts with a wire cutter
Now, set up the control panel next to the keyboard hack. To wire the keyboard hack to the
control panel cut (2) 30" lengths of wire for each button and (8) 30" lengths of wire for each
stick, then strip 1/2" of insulation from each end of each wire.
After, you can either crimp a .187 quick-connect to one end of each wire, and attach them to the
buttons and sticks, or simply solder them in place.
Then, using your printed table as reference, connect the wires on the control panel to the
keyboard hack.
When finished, plug the control panel into your computer, launch keyhook.exe, and verify that
each button press and stick direction produces a key.
If all is well, fire up MAME and test out your creation. I played "Alien Syndrome" because the
characters move in all 8 directions, it worked perfectly.
This tutorial and its entire contents copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
MAME keymap for keyhook.exe, only to be used with keyhook.exe, if not using keyhook.
exe click here
Function Key Used? Notes
Enter game from menu Enter
Exit game to menu Esc
Operator's menu Tab
Save snapshot for menu F12
Player one up Grey Up
Player one down Grey Down
Player one left Grey Left
Player one right Grey Right
Player one button 1 Left Ctrl
Player one button 2 Left Alt
Player one button 3 Space
Player one button 4 Left Shift
Player one button 5 Z
Player one button 6 X
Player one start 1 (one)
Player one coin 5 (five)
Player two up R
Player two down F
Player two left D
Player two right G
Player two button 1 A
Player two button 2 S
Player two button 3 Q
Player two button 4 W
Player two button 5 to be assigned
Player two button 6 to be assigned
Player two start 2 (two)
Player two coin 6 (six)
Player three up I
Player three down K
Player three left J
Player three right L
Player three button 1 Right Ctrl
Player three button 2 Right Shift
Player three button 3 Enter
Player three button 4 to be assigned
Player three start 3
Player three coin 7
Player four up Up
Player four down Down
Player four left Left
Player four right Right
Player four button 1 INS
Player four button 2 Del
Player four button 3 Grey Enter
Player four button 4 to be assigned
Player four start 4
Player four coin 8
MAME keymap, not to be used with keyhook.exe, if using keyhook.exe click here
Function Key Used? Notes
Enter game from menu Enter
Exit game to menu Esc
Operator's menu Tab
Save snapshot for menu F12
Player one up Up arrow
Player one down Down arrow
Player one left Left arrow
Player one right Right arrow
Player one button 1 Left Ctrl
Player one button 2 Left Alt
Player one button 3 Space
Player one button 4 Left Shift
Player one button 5 Z
Player one button 6 X
Player one start 1 (one)
Player one coin 5 (five)
Player two up R
Player two down F
Player two left D
Player two right G
Player two button 1 A
Player two button 2 S
Player two button 3 Q
Player two button 4 W
Player two button 5 to be assigned
Player two button 6 to be assigned
Player two start 2 (two)
Player two coin 6 (six)
Player three up I
Player three down K
Player three left J
Player three right L
Player three button 1 Right Ctrl
Player three button 2 Right Shift
Player three button 3 Enter
Player three button 4 to be assigned
Player three start 3
Player three coin 7
Player four up Numpad 8
Player four down Numpad 2
Player four left Numpad 4
Player four right Numpad 6
Player four button 1 Numpad 0
Player four button 2 Numpad . (period)
Player four button 3 Numpad Enter
Player four button 4 to be assigned
Player four start 4
Player four coin 8
Appendix 3 : Printable MAME keymap
Here is a printable MAME keymap that you can use for reference when wiring your
control panel, planning out your keys, or programming your keyboard encoder.
Print out the table, check the 'used' box if you will be using the key on that line, and fill in
the 'notes' section with the the mapped key (when assigning your own buttons in MAME)
or the chosen keyboard emulator terminal (when programming your keyboard encoder).
Note: The table below has 6 buttons for player's one and two (Street Fighter), but only 4
buttons for player's three and four (Dungeons and Dragons). This is because, as far as I
know, there are no games in MAME that have four players with more than 4 buttons
each. Therefore you would not need player three buttons 5 and 6, or player four buttons
5 and 6.

Click here for a printer friendly table.
Function Key Used? Notes
Enter game from menu Enter
Exit game to menu Esc
Operator's menu* Tab
Save snapshot for menu** F12
Player one up Up arrow
Player one down Down arrow
Player one left Left arrow
Player one right Right arrow
Player one button 1 Left Ctrl
Player one button 2 Left Alt
Player one button 3 Space
Player one button 4 Left Shift
Player one button 5 Z
Player one button 6 X
Player one start 1 (one)
Player one coin 5 (five)
Player two up R
Player two down F
Player two left D
Player two right G
Player two button 1 A
Player two button 2 S
Player two button 3 Q
Player two button 4 W
Player two button 5 to be assigned***
Player two button 6 to be assigned***
Player two start 2 (two)
Player two coin 6 (six)
Player three up I
Player three down K
Player three left J
Player three right L
Player three button 1 Right Ctrl
Player three button 2 Right Shift
Player three button 3 Enter
Player three button 4 to be assigned***
Player three start 3
Player three coin 7
Player four up Numpad 8
Player four down Numpad 2
Player four left Numpad 4
Player four right Numpad 6
Player four button 1 Numpad 0
Player four button 2 Numpad . (period)
Player four button 3 Numpad Enter
Player four button 4 to be assigned***
Player four start 4
Player four coin 8
*The TAB key is for the operator only, it can be used to assign keys to MAME. Make
adjustments in the game, like how many lives Doug has on Dig-Dug, and at what score
do you earn an extra ship on Galaga. You can also enable cheats from this menu, which
is great for small children. Because this button has advanced features you do NOT want
it where players will find it, or bump it on accident. A good place to put this button would
be on the roof of the cabinet, or recessed behind the cabinet, where only the operator
would find it. Real arcade machines often had their power switches on the roof of the
cabinet, recessed, where players would never see it.
**The F12 key takes a screenshot for the MAME32 emulator. The MAME32 emulator has
a nice GUI with a picture for every game, these pictures make browsing through the
games pleasant and are referred to as 'snapshots'. Often there will be a few missing
snapshots from a person's game menu and it can be very annoying and disrupt the flow
while browsing through the available games. Using the F12 key, while in a game that has
no snapshot will add a snapshot for the menu. Therefore, the F12 key, like the TAB key,
should be installed where only the operator would find it.
***To be assigned means that MAME does not have a default key assigned for this
function, you will have to manually assign it into MAME using the TAB menu. It is very
easy, simply map the button in question on the control panel to an unused character.
Then, in the TAB menu, select "Input ( general )", scroll down, select the function in
question from the menu, and change "n/a" to the mapped character by pressing the
ENTER button, and then the button in question on your control panel.
This tutorial and its entire contents copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Appendix 5 : Mini cabinets
Forward : Mini cabinets are a special surprise for your child, a portable arcade to bring to your
friend's house, or the arcade you can play while sitting at the couch.
Mini cabinet's history
In 1982 Intrepid Marketing Inc released the first child sized arcade machine called Moppet
Video. It was just under 4 feet tall, contained a 19" monitor and had single player controls.
Shown below is the original flyer.
The measurements are as follows :
Height 47" Width 17" Depth 26"
The pictures below show the cabinet's front in detail and the side by side size comparison to an
upright cabinet.
Chris from MiniMAME.com was the first of the arcade builders to make a mini cabinet, his site
has downloadable plans that measure 40" tall, 15" wide, and contain a 13" screen.
Mini cabinet's features
A mini arcade cabinet can be played by children standing up or adults sitting down. They can be
built quickly and cheaply compared to a full sized arcade cabinet as they only require a single
sheet of 4'X8' material. They have the potential to be light and portable (perhaps if one was built
from 5/8" plywood) and are a great "starter project" for the arcade building enthusiast who has
never built anything before (to become familiar with building before attempting a full sized cab)
Mini cabinet design theory
In my opinion, an ideal mini cabinet would be 48" tall, that is the width of a sheet of 4'X8'
material. With this cabinet height a single sheet of material yields the entire cabinet. Because
the cabinet will be used to play authentic arcade games the screen should not be smaller than
19", I think when arcade games are displayed at smaller than original sizes it becomes difficult
to see and feels less authentic. The cabinet should be child proof : since the cabinet is intended
for children the speakers should be covered to protect their paper cones from little fingers and
the screen should be covered by acrylic. The TAB button should exist on any children's cabinet :
this can be used within MAME to change the difficulty of a game to easy and even enable
cheats (you wouldn't want your child to get frustrated while playing)
I built a mini Tempest by scaling the Tempest plans from MassiveMAME. I scaled the height
down to 48" and based the width on the television (television width +2"). It contains a 19"
television. To protect the speakers I mounted the center channel in the cabinet floor and the
other speakers behind the marquee. The television acrylic also protects the marquee.
Shown below is the marquee, which is behind the television acrylic. The stereo speakers, which
are out of sight behind the marquee, and power button in the middle. The small speakers will
play at low volume simply to create stereo imaging while most of the sound will come from the
large speaker mounted in the cabinet floor.
Shown below is the control panel, a scaled version of the Neo Geo layout.
Shown below left is the floor mounted center channel speaker. It is a 2-way speaker consisting
of a 6" woofer and 2" tweeter. Shown below right is the speaker's back panel and audio
connection. If the speaker did not have a back panel it would not produce good low frequencies.
Also shown right is the button for TAB menu. This picture was taken before the components
were added.
To scale a cabinet plan into a mini
The formula for scaling the cabinet plan into a mini is:
48 / height = percent
original measurement X percent = mini measurement
48" being the desired height, divided by the original height of the cabinet, equals the percent by
which we will multiply all measurements.
Cabinet plans can be downloaded from MassiveMAME and JakoBud.com

For example I will convert the Tempest plan. Shown below is the original.
Note the cabinet plan has a height of 69 1/4", which in decimal is 69.25", to scale the cabinet
down to 48" I use this equation on a calculator:
48 / 69.25 = 0.693 (see pic below)
move the decimal point two spaces right and you've got the percent
69.3% will be the percent used to multiply all the measurements.
ie: 69.25" (original height) X 69.3% = 47.99", round to 48" (new height of cabinet plan for mini)
The Tempest plan contains the following measurements (column 1) that I multiply by 69.3%
(column 2) then convert from decimal to fractional (column 3)
Original Mini decimal Mini fractional
(rounded to nearest 16th)
36 24.94 24 15/16th
15.50 10.74 10 3/4
36.75 25.46 25 7/16th
30.75 21.30 21 5/16th
69.25 47.99 47 15/16th
6 4.15 4 1/8th
8.50 5.89 5 7/8th
32.50 22.52 22 1/2
30 20.79 20 3/4
15.25 10.56 10 9/16th
7.75 5.37 5 3/8th
6.25 4.33 4 5/16th
20.25 14.03 14
8 5.54 5 9/16th
8.75 6.06 6 1/16th
32.25 22.34 22 5/16th
28.75 19.92 19 15/16th
27.50 19.05 19 1/16th
The cabinet plan you choose will likely contain fractional measurements, to input the
measurements in to the calculator the fractions must be converted to decimal. Common
fractions to decimal are 1/4=.25 , 1/2=.50 ,and 3/4=.75. The plans from MassiveMAME are all
rounded to the nearest quarter. For fraction to decimal conversion other than quarters see this
table. This table is also used for converting the new mini measurement from decimal to fraction
as the tape measure is fractional.
1/16th .0625
1/8th .1250
3/16th .1875
1/4th .2500
5/16th .3125
3/8th .3750
7/16th .4375
1/2 .5000
9/16th .5625
5/8th .6250
11/16th .6875
3/4 .7500
13/16th .8125
7/8th .8750
15/16th .9375
And here is the mini Tempest plan, note that the width and depth can be scaled around the
television (TV width +2" and TV depth +2")
Can you dig it?
This tutorial and its entire contents copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Appendix 6 : Building the computer
Forward : This chapter details the assembling of a computer from parts. It can be a handy
reference if you have to add or remove a part from the computer you intend to use in your arcade
cabinet or can be used as a primer if you ever wondered what is "inside the box".
In the picture below are the parts I will use to build a computer. This will be a Pentium 4
computer yet will resemble most other computers as old as Pentium 1. Though your computer
may look slightly different it will likely contain the same type of parts.
Note: these pieces are static sensitive, static can build up in your body from walking on a carpet
or similar. Be sure to touch the metal of the chassis (or whatever is nearby) to ground yourself
before handling them.
The parts:
1 ATX power supply (PSU) (this supplies DC power to the computer)
2 Floppy disk drive* (for reading/writing of 3.5" floppy disks)
3 CD/DVD drive (optical drive) (for reading/writing of CD/DVD disks)
4 Hard drive (HDD) (this is where all the data on the computer is stored)
5 CPU cooler (processor cooling fan) (this cools the hot CPU)
6 RAM (memory) ("random access memory" the system uses to operate)
7 CPU (processor) ("central processing unit", the computer's "engine")
8 IDE cable (40-pin hard drive and CD drive cable, to connect the drives to the mainboard)
9 Floppy drive cable* (34-pin floppy cable, to connect the floppy drive to the mainboard)
10 Expansion cards (because most cabs need TV out, pictured is a video card with TV out)
11 Mainboard (motherboard) (main system board)
12 ATX chassis (case)
*optional parts, not required for a working computer
a : ATX power supply tester : This is not a part of the computer but what I feel is an essential
tool, as important as the screwdriver. In my years building and repairing computers I have
learned the hard way that PSU failure can cause anomalies that would appear as if another
device or the software was malfunctioning. PSU failure is common and I recommend that every
PSU be tested before building the computer, and again if the computer acts strange.
The mainboard's integrated peripherals (onboard expansion cards)
Many mainboard's come with almost everything you need built right in. You only need expansion
cards if an essential part is missing or if a part is inadequate (for example, if the onboard video
did not have "TV out", you would have to add a video card that did)
1. PS2 mouse port (note it is color coded green) (for connecting a PS2 mouse)
2. PS2 keyboard port (note it is color coded purple) (for connecting a PS2 keyboard)
3. printer port (for connecting a printer)
4. 9-pin serial port (for connecting 9-pin serial devices)
5. USB ports (for connecting USB devices)
6. LAN port (for networking, or DSL internet connection)
7. Audio (onboard sound) (note the green port, that is what you plug the speaker line into)
If any of these devices were not built into the mainboard they would be added in the form of an
expansion card.
Building the computer
The first step to building the computer is to install the CPU and it's cooler to the mainboard, this
is done by first lifting the mainboard's CPU socket latch.
Then locate the "keys" on the CPU and the socket, see in the picture below as the CPU is flipped
it reveals a pin missing in the the top right corner, also the socket is missing a pin hole in the top
right corner, this is used to align the CPU. This is referred to as "keyed" and ensures the CPU is
installed correctly.
After locating the keys carefully insert the CPU into the socket taking great care not to bend any
of the tiny pins. Once inserted close the socket latch.
Then locate the RAM chips and the RAM sockets on the mainboard. Notice they are keyed as
well, they can only be inserted one way.
Open the RAM retention latches on the mainboard and insert the RAM into the socket by
applying equal pressure on either side of the top, press the RAM to ensure it is fully inserted then
close the RAM retention latches.
Next apply a paper thin, even coat of thermal grease to the top of the CPU. This thermally
conductive grease will fill the tiny void between the CPU and it's cooler and will ensure maximum
cooling. First apply enough thermal grease to coat the CPU then use a razor to evenly distribute
it.
Then install the CPU cooler following the manufacturer's instructions and plug it's power cable
into the motherboard's CPU fan power header (as illustrated in the mainboard's manual)
Identifying the screws
There are 3 different types of screws used to build the computer:
1. "Fine screws", #4-40 x 3/16" machine screws, for attaching floppy and CD drives.
2. "Coarse screws", #6-32 x 3/16" machine screws, for attaching the hard drive and case cover.
3. "Standoff screws" #6-32 to M3 jackscrew, these go under the mainboard into the case.
Fine and coarse screws are turned with a #2 Phillips head screwdriver and standoff screws are
turned with a 5mm socket.
Attach the power supply to the case using four coarse screws, and (optionally) attach the IO
plate that came with the mainboard to the case (these either pop in or are secured by two fine
screws)
Next, compare the screw holes in the mainboard to the screw holes in the case, put a standoff
screw in each of the case's corresponding holes (it is not a bad idea to place a drop of superglue
on the bottom threads of the standoff screws before inserting them into the case)
Place the mainboard in the case on the standoff screws, aline the mainboard's screw holes on
center with the standoff's screw holes. Then use fine screws to secure the mainboard.
Plug the power supply into the mainboard, note the plug and header are keyed. Pictured is a
Pentium 4 mainboard and compatible power supply that has two power plugs, most other
systems have only one power plug. Refer to your mainboard's manual for details.
Setting the jumpers
Shown below are the back of the hard drive and CD drive.
1. IDE plug, this is where the IDE cable plugs in to connect the drive to the mainboard.
2. Jumper block, this is where the jumper is set.
3. Power plug, this is where the power is plugged in.
Shown below is a closeup of the jumper block (1) and the jumper block diagram (2) of the hard
drive. This is also found on the CD drive.
The jumpers tell the mainboard which devices are first and second on an IDE cable. Each IDE
cable can accommodate two devices. The mainboard can accommodate two IDE cables.
The (single or primary) hard drive should be jumpered as "master" and plugged into the
mainboard's primary IDE port. The CD drive (or secondary hard drive) can be "slave" on the
same cable as the primary hard drive or "master" on it's own IDE cable that is plugged into the
mainboard's secondary IDE port.
For systems with one hard drive and one CD drive simply jumper both devices as "master" and
later give each device it's own IDE cable. The hard drive's IDE cable will plug into the
mainboard's primary IDE port and the CD drive's IDE cable will plug into the mainboard's
secondary IDE port.
After the jumpers are set on the hard drive and CD drive, insert the devices into the case. Shown
below is a standard case, the devices simply slide in. The CD drive (1) slides in from the front as
does the floppy drive (2). The hard drive (3) slides in from the back.
Line the front of the CD and floppy drive up with the front of the case.
Then secure the CD and floppy drives with fine screws, and hard drive with coarse screws.
Some cases use drive rails as shown below. Once the rails are attached the devices slide in and
lock.
Shown below is the case's front panel wires. These connect from the case's power button, reset
button, hard drive activity light, power light, and speaker to the mainboard.
Plug the case's front panel wires into the mainboard as illustrated in the mainboard's manual.
Optionally, for audio CD playback, plug the 4-pin CD-ROM audio cable from the CD drive to the
sound card / onboard sound. (as illustrated in the CD drive manual)
Next, locate the molex power plugs. Shown below (left) is the large plug for the hard drive and
CD drive, also shown (right) is the smaller plug used only for the floppy drive. Both plugs are
keyed. Insert a molex plug into each device.
Then locate the IDE cables. Shown below (left) is the 40-pin IDE cable for the hard drive and CD
drive, also shown (right) is the smaller 34-pin IDE cable used only for the floppy drive. Both
cables are keyed.
You'll notice the 40-pin cable can accommodate two devices, since we've jumpered the hard
drive and CD drive both as "master" they will each get their own IDE cable.
Plug one end of each IDE cable into the mainboard, and the opposite end of each IDE cable to a
device. The hard drive's IDE cable should be plugged into the mainboard's primary IDE port. The
CD drive's IDE cable should be plugged into the mainboard's secondary IDE port. The
mainboard will only have one floppy IDE port.
Lastly, insert any expansion cards into their corresponding slots as illustrated in the expansion
card's manual.
Now the computer is built!
If available use the power supply tester before giving power to the mainboard.
Always plug any computer into a good surge protector.
Plug the computer in and power it on with the case's front power button, if it does not power on
look at the back of the power supply and check for a switch (1), if there is a switch make sure it is
set to "-" and not "O" ("O" should be thought of as "off") Also check that the voltage selector
switch (2) is correct, it should be set to 115v for USA/Canada and 230v for European countries.
If in doubt try both, it won't hurt anything.
Once the computer is powered on quickly verify that the CPU cooler's fan is spinning, if it is not
unplug the computer immediately and correct the problem. Modern CPUs will overheat and die in
less than one minute if not properly cooled.
If the lights on the front of the case do not work, try unplugging the corresponding front panel
wire and plugging it back in upside-down.
If there is a floppy drive make sure it's light doesn't stay on constantly, it's light should flash at
startup then turn off. If the floppy drive's light stays on constantly unplug the computer, unplug
the floppy drive's IDE cable and plug it back in upside down.
Once you've verified the fans, floppy, and lights are working close the case and secure it with
coarse screws.
From then on always make sure the case is closed when the computer is powered on and
always make sure the computer is unplugged when the case is open.
If all is well the computer should power up and display video to the monitor, following your
mainboard's manual set up the bios and then install an operating system.
This tutorial and it's entire contents are copyright 2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Appendix 7 : Inches / Millimeter converter
Forward : As seen in the image below, the majority of the world uses metric. While the United States, Liberia,
and Burma continue to use standard. The converter will help you to localize cabinet plan measurements.
To convert measurements from millimeters into inches and vice versa simply fill in the field below with the
measurement you have, click on the button below to convert. The converted number will appear in the text box
under the opposite heading. The number outputted is precise and has not been rounded.
Millimeters Inches


The cabinet plan you choose will likely contain fractional measurements, to input the measurements into the
calculator the fractions must be converted to decimal. Common fractions to decimal are 1/4=.25 , 1/2=.50 ,and
3/4=.75. The plans from MassiveMAME are all rounded to the nearest quarter. For fraction to decimal
conversion other than quarters see these tables. These tables are also used for converting a measurement from
decimal to fraction as the USA tape measure is fractional.
This table contains the most common fractions.
1/16th .0625
1/8th .1250
3/16th .1875
1/4th .2500
5/16th .3125
3/8th .3750
7/16th .4375
1/2 .5000
9/16th .5625
5/8th .6250
11/16th .6875
3/4 .7500
13/16th .8125
7/8th .8750
15/16th .9375
This table contains all of them and their metric equivilent
fraction decimal mm fraction decimal mm fraction decimal mm
1/64 0.0156 0.3969 1 1/64 1.0156 25.7969 2 1/64 2.0156 51.1969
1/32 0.0313 0.7938 1 1/32 1.0313 26.1938 2 1/32 2.0313 51.5938
3/64 0.0469 1.1906 1 3/64 1.0469 26.5906 2 3/64 2.0469 51.9906
1/16 0.0625 1.5875 1 1/16 1.0625 26.9875 2 1/16 2.0625 52.3875
5/64 0.0781 1.9844 1 5/64 1.0781 27.3844 2 5/64 2.0781 52.7844
3/32 0.0938 2.3813 1 3/32 1.0938 27.7813 2 3/32 2.0938 53.1813
7/64 0.1094 2.7781 1 7/64 1.1094 28.1781 2 7/64 2.1094 53.5781
1/8 0.1250 3.1750 1 1/8 1.1250 28.5750 2 1/8 2.1250 53.9750
9/64 0.1406 3.5719 1 9/64 1.1406 28.9719 2 9/64 2.1406 54.3719
5/32 0.1563 3.9688 1 5/32 1.1563 29.3688 2 5/32 2.1563 54.7688
11/64 0.1719 4.3656 1 11/64 1.1719 29.7656 2 11/64 2.1719 55.1656
3/16 0.1875 4.7625 1 3/16 1.1875 30.1625 2 3/16 2.1875 55.5625
13/64 0.2031 5.1594 1 13/64 1.2031 30.5594 2 13/64 2.2031 55.9594
7/32 0.2188 5.5563 1 7/32 1.2188 30.9563 2 7/32 2.2188 56.3563
15/64 0.2344 5.9531 1 15/64 1.2344 31.3531 2 15/64 2.2344 56.7531
1/4 0.2500 6.3500 1 1/4 1.2500 31.7500 2 1/4 2.2500 57.1500
17/64 0.2656 6.7469 1 17/64 1.2656 32.1469 2 17/64 2.2656 57.5469
9/32 0.2813 7.1438 1 9/32 1.2813 32.5438 2 9/32 2.2813 57.9438
19/64 0.2969 7.5406 1 19/64 1.2969 32.9406 2 19/64 2.2969 58.3406
5/16 0.3125 7.9375 1 5/16 1.3125 33.3375 2 5/16 2.3125 58.7375
21/64 0.3281 8.3344 1 21/64 1.3281 33.7344 2 21/64 2.3281 59.1344
11/32 0.3438 8.7313 1 11/32 1.3438 34.1313 2 11/32 2.3438 59.5313
23/64 0.3594 9.1281 1 23/64 1.3594 34.5281 2 23/64 2.3594 59.9281
3/8 0.3750 9.5250 1 3/8 1.3750 34.9250 2 3/8 2.3750 60.3250
25/64 0.3906 9.9219 1 25/64 1.3906 35.3219 2 25/64 2.3906 60.7219
13/32 0.4063 10.3188 1 13/32 1.4063 35.7188 2 13/32 2.4063 61.1188
27/64 0.4219 10.7156 1 27/64 1.4219 36.1156 2 27/64 2.4219 61.5156
7/16 0.4375 11.1125 1 7/16 1.4375 36.5125 2 7/16 2.4375 61.9125
29/64 0.4531 11.5094 1 29/64 1.4531 36.9094 2 29/64 2.4531 62.3094
15/32 0.4688 11.9063 1 15/32 1.4688 37.3063 2 15/32 2.4688 62.7063
31/64 0.4844 12.3031 1 31/64 1.4844 37.7031 2 31/64 2.4844 63.1031
1/2 0.5000 12.7000 1 1/2 1.5000 38.1000 2 1/2 2.5000 63.5000
33/64 0.5156 13.0969 1 33/64 1.5156 38.4969 2 33/64 2.5156 63.8969
17/32 0.5313 13.4938 1 17/32 1.5313 38.8938 2 17/32 2.5313 64.2938
35/64 0.5469 13.8906 1 35/64 1.5469 39.2906 2 35/64 2.5469 64.6906
9/16 0.5625 14.2875 1 9/16 1.5625 39.6875 2 9/16 2.5625 65.0875
37/64 0.5781 14.6844 1 37/64 1.5781 40.0844 2 37/64 2.5781 65.4844
19/32 0.5938 15.0813 1 19/32 1.5938 40.4813 2 19/32 2.5938 65.8813
39/64 0.6094 15.4781 1 39/64 1.6094 40.8781 2 39/64 2.6094 66.2781
5/8 0.6250 15.8750 1 5/8 1.6250 41.2750 2 5/8 2.6250 66.6750
41/64 0.6406 16.2719 1 41/64 1.6406 41.6719 2 41/64 2.6406 67.0719
21/32 0.6563 16.6688 1 21/32 1.6563 42.0688 2 21/32 2.6563 67.4688
43/64 0.6719 17.0656 1 43/64 1.6719 42.4656 2 43/64 2.6719 67.8656
11/16 0.6875 17.4625 1 11/16 1.6875 42.8625 2 11/16 2.6875 68.2625
45/64 0.7031 17.8594 1 45/64 1.7031 43.2594 2 45/64 2.7031 68.6594
23/32 0.7188 18.2563 1 23/32 1.7188 43.6563 2 23/32 2.7188 69.0563
47/64 0.7344 18.6531 1 47/64 1.7344 44.0531 2 47/64 2.7344 69.4531
3/4 0.7500 19.0500 1 3/4 1.7500 44.4500 2 3/4 2.7500 69.8500
49/64 0.7656 19.4469 1 49/64 1.7656 44.8469 2 49/64 2.7656 70.2469
25/32 0.7813 19.8438 1 25/32 1.7813 45.2438 2 25/32 2.7813 70.6438
51/64 0.7969 20.2406 1 51/64 1.7969 45.6406 2 51/64 2.7969 71.0406
13/16 0.8125 20.6375 1 13/16 1.8125 46.0375 2 13/16 2.8125 71.4375
53/64 0.8281 21.0344 1 53/64 1.8281 46.4344 2 53/64 2.8281 71.8344
27/32 0.8438 21.4313 1 27/32 1.8438 46.8313 2 27/32 2.8438 72.2313
55/64 0.8594 21.8281 1 55/64 1.8594 47.2281 2 55/64 2.8594 72.6281
7/8 0.8750 22.2250 1 7/8 1.8750 47.6250 2 7/8 2.8750 73.0250
57/64 0.8906 22.6219 1 57/64 1.8906 48.0219 2 57/64 2.8906 73.4219
29/32 0.9063 23.0188 1 29/32 1.9063 48.4188 2 29/32 2.9063 73.8188
59/64 0.9219 23.4156 1 59/64 1.9219 48.8156 2 59/64 2.9219 74.2156
15/16 0.9375 23.8125 1 15/16 1.9375 49.2125 2 15/16 2.9375 74.6125
61/64 0.9531 24.2094 1 61/64 1.9531 49.6094 2 61/64 2.9531 75.0094
31/32 0.9688 24.6063 1 31/32 1.9688 50.0063 2 31/32 2.9688 75.4063
63/64 0.9844 25.0031 1 63/64 1.9844 50.4031 2 63/64 2.9844 75.8031
1 1.0000 25.4000 2 2.0000 50.8000 3 3.0000 76.2000
2004 SpyStyle llc
spystyle@yahoo.com
Convert To Inches Convert To Millimeters