Code of Practice
for the Application of  
LED Lighting Systems  
Published by: Institution of Engineering and Technology, London, United Kingdom
The Institution of Engineering and Technology is registered as a Charity in England &
Wales (no 211014) and Scotland (no SC038698).
© 2014 The Institution of Engineering and Technology
First published 2014
This publication is copyright under the Berne Convention and the Universal Copyright
Convention. All rights reserved. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of
research or private study, or criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright,
Designs and Patents Act 1988, this publication may be reproduced, stored or
transmitted, in any form or by any means, only with the prior permission in writing
of the publishers, or in the case of reprographic reproduction in accordance with the
terms of licences issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency. Enquiries concerning
reproduction outside those terms should be sent to the publisher at this address:
The Institution of Engineering and Technology
Michael Faraday House
Six Hills Way, Stevenage
Herts, SG1 2AY, United Kingdom
www.theiet.org
While the publisher, author and contributors believe that the information and guidance
given in this work is correct, all parties must rely upon their own skill and judgement
when making use of it. Neither the publisher, nor the author, nor any contributors
assume any liability to anyone for any loss or damage caused by any error or
omission in the work, whether such error or omission is the result of negligence or
any other cause. Any and all such liability is disclaimed.
The moral rights of the author to be identified as author of this work have been
asserted by him in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.
A list of organisations represented on this committee can be obtained on request to
IET standards. This publication does not purport to include all the necessary provisions
of a contract. Users are responsible for its correct application. Compliance with the
contents of this document cannot confer immunity from legal obligations.
It is the constant aim of the IET to improve the quality of our products and services.
We should be grateful if anyone finding an inaccuracy or ambiguity while using this
document would inform the IET standards development team, IETStandardsStaff@
theiet.org, The IET, Six Hills Way, Stevenage SG1 2AY, UK.
ISBN 978-1-84919-719-9 (paperback)
ISBN 978-1-84919-720-5 (e-book)
Typeset in the UK by Phoenix Photosetting, Chatham, Kent
Printed in the UK by Cambrian Printers Ltd.
ii 
Contents 
List of Figures  v  
List of Tables  viii  
Participants in the Technical Committee  ix  
Acknowledgements  x  
Foreword  xi  
Scope and Purpose  xiii  
1  Overview of LED lighting systems  1  
1.1  Introduction to LED lighting systems  1  
1.2  LED lighting systems definitions  1  
1.3  Conventional and LED lighting sources  2  
1.4  Conventional and LED lighting system architectures  2  
1.5  LED lighting products and systems configurations  5  
1.6  Advantages and limitations of LED lighting systems  9  
1.7  Added value  10  
1.8  Application of integrated and discrete LED lighting systems  12  
2  Applications  14  
2.1  Interior lighting applications  14  
2.2  Exterior lighting applications  23  
3  System performance, lifetime and safety considerations  28  
3.1  LED lighting system compatibility, certification and specification  28  
3.2  LED lighting system performance  31  
3.3  LED lighting system lifetime and failure  35  
3.4  LED lighting systems and optical safety  40  
4  Lighting design parameters  44  
4.1  Lighting design principles  44  
4.2  Quantity of light  44  
4.3  Light distribution  47  
4.4  Colour  54  
4.5  Flicker  59  
4.6  Lifetime and maintenance factor  60  
5  Physical installation and thermal management  62  
5.1  Physical installation, location and positioning  62  
5.2  Equipment protection  63  
5.3  Operating, storage and ambient temperature  65  
iii 
 
 
6  Maintenance, inspection and testing  70  
6.1  Lighting system maintenance, inspection and testing  70  
6.2  Electrical maintenance, inspection and testing  71  
6.3  Emergency lighting  72  
6.4  Competence  73  
7  Drivers and wiring  74  
7.1  LEDs and electrical control gear/drivers  74  
7.2  Driver lifetime expectations  78  
7.3  Driver and system efficiency  80  
7.4  Electrical design and installation  82  
7.5  Alternative and emerging approaches to LED power distribution  84  
8  Control systems and interfaces  86  
8.1  Introduction to lighting control systems  86  
8.2  Control of LED lighting systems  88  
8.3  User-input controls  89  
8.4  Environmental-input controls  91  
9  Dimming methods and protocols: Low voltage and mains voltage  100  
9.1  Dimming and LED lighting systems  100  
9.2  Considerations for mains switching and mains dimming of LED lighting  102  
9.3  Methods of mains dimming  104  
9.4  Low-voltage control protocols  107  
9.5  Other lighting control and lighting data transport protocols  116  
10  Retroft of LED lighting systems  120  
10.1  Retrofit solutions and key considerations  120  
10.2  Retrofit criteria checklist  121  
10.3  LED source alternatives to linear tube type lamps  125  
10.4  LED retrofit luminaires  134  
10.5  LED source alternatives to reflector lamps  136  
10.6  LED source alternatives to traditional GLS style ‘light bulbs’  142  
10.7  LED source alternatives for exterior lighting retrofit  144  
Annex A Specification and application considerations, criteria and 
checklists  147  
Annex B Key national/international regulation  163  
Annex C References  175  
Annex D Myth busting factsheet  179  
Annex E Glossary  185  
Index  193  
iv 
List of Figures  
Figure 1.1 LED lighting systems architecture  3  
Figure 1.2 Example LED module schematic  4  
Figure 1.3 LED luminaires with fixed or interchangeable LED light source (image   
courtesy of URBIS and OSRAM)  5  
Figure 1.4 Colour Changing or Variable White LED luminaires (images courtesy   
of Philips and Studio Force)  5  
Figure 1.5 LED module for use in various luminaire types (images courtesy of OSRAM)  6  
Figure 1.6 LED light engines  6  
Figure 1.7 Retrofit LED replacement ‘lamps’ (images courtesy of OSRAM)  6  
Figure 1.8 Rigid LED arrays often used in media screens, signage or facade 
systems (images courtesy of OSRAM)  7  
Figure 1.9 Flexible LED arrays often used in architectural details, media screens,   
signage or furniture systems (images courtesy of OSRAM)  7  
Figure 1.10 OLED arrays and PLED forms (often used in light art, signage, 
display) (images courtesy of OSRAM)  7  
Figure 2.1 Downlighting can give a harsh rendering of facial features (image 
courtesy of BRE)  15  
Figure 2.2 Lighting using LED tubes in a retail warehouse (photo courtesy of BRE)  16  
Figure 2.3 LED task lights (photo courtesy of BRE)  17  
Figure 2.4 Display lighting using LEDs (photo courtesy of BRE)  19  
Figure 2.5 LED floodlights used for accent lighting of architecture (photo courtesy of BRE) 20  
Figure 2.6 LED downlights in a domestic kitchen (additional lighting under 
the cabinets would help to light worktops more effectively, avoiding 
shadowing) (photo courtesy of BRE)  22  
Figure 2.7 LED lighting of residential streets (photo courtesy of ASD Lighting)  24  
Figure 2.8 LED lighting gives good colour rendering in car parks (photo courtesy 
of ASD Lighting)  25  
Figure 3.1 Luminous flux and luminous intensity  32  
Figure 3.2 Development of LED performance (lm/W)  35  
Figure 3.3 Typical lumen depreciation and physical failure curves  36  
Figure 4.1 Sample polar curve and illuminance table for an exemplar LED   
floodlight (image courtesy of BRE)  48  
Figure 4.2 Recommended illuminance ratios from SLL Code [3] (photo courtesy of BRE)  49  
Figure 4.3 Measuring the luminance of ‘scallops’ of light produced by LEDs 
(photo courtesy of BRE)  50  
Figure 4.4 In this retail installation, LED wall washers make the space look 
brighter and more spacious as well as providing extra light on vertical 
displays (photo courtesy of BRE)  51  
Figure 4.5 Obtrusive light from a typical street lighting luminaire (image courtesy of BRE)  52  
Figure 4.6 Vertical cross section through a ceiling mounted luminaire. To limit   
glare, shielding should be provided [3] so that the lamp luminance does 
not exceed the stated value at different angles from the horizontal (image 
courtesy of BRE)  53  
Figure 4.7 Samples lit by lamps of different colour temperatures (photo courtesy of BRE)  55  

Figure 4.8 International Commission on Illumination (CIE) chromaticity diagram 
(copyright Havells Sylvania)  56  
Figure 4.9 Part of the CIE chromaticity diagram  57  
Figure 4.10 A medical task light with excellent colour rendering (note the 
additional red LEDs to give extra light at the red end of the spectrum)  58  
Figure 4.11 Example depreciation of light output with time for an LED installation  61  
Figure 5.1 Bathtub and shower zones requiring specific IP ratings  64  
Figure 5.2 Efficient thermal management configurations of an LED PCB  67  
Figure 5.3 Luminaires can be provided with passive or active heat sinks (image 
courtesy of BRE)  67  
Figure 5.4 Section through a typical high-powered LED package  68  
Figure 7.1 Examples of electronic control gear/drivers (image courtesy of 
Havells Sylvania)  74  
Figure 7.2 Example of a fixture that connects to a constant-current driver (image 
courtesy of Havells Sylvania)  75  
Figure 7.3 Example of constant-voltage LED tape (image courtesy of Havells Sylvania)  76  
Figure 7.4 LED inrush current profile  78  
Figure 7.5 Example profile of transient voltage spikes  79  
Figure 7.6 Schematic for series connection  82  
Figure 7.7 Schematic for parallel connection  82  
Figure 7.8 Example HFAC inductive coupler (image courtesy of Havells Sylvania)  85  
Figure 8.1 Conceptual control system schematic  87  
Figure 8.2 Energy savings from the application of lighting controls for a typical 
office space Source: Organic Response Pty, Australia  87  
Figure 8.3 LED lighting colour-mix combinations (image courtesy of Havells Sylvania)  88  
Figure 8.4 An example of optical mixing  89  
Figure 8.5 Examples of user interfaces (photographs courtesy of Mode Lighting   
(UK) Ltd. Used with permission)  89  
Figure 8.6 Examples of low-voltage bus cables  90  
Figure 8.7 Examples of scene-setting control plates (images courtesy of Mode 
Lighting (UK) Ltd and Havells Sylvania)  90  
Figure 8.8 Example of a photocell detector (image courtesy of Havells Sylvania)  92  
Figure 8.9 Example of light loss due to aging and dirt accumulation  93  
Figure 8.10 Light-level commissioning schematic  93  
Figure 8.11 Example of a PIR sensor (image courtesy of Havells Sylvania)  95  
Figure 8.12 Typical sensor coverage and segments  95  
Figure 8.13 Example of PIR sensor coverage configuration  96  
Figure 8.14 Examples of microwave sensors (images courtesy of Havells Sylvania)  96  
Figure 8.15 Schematics for microwave sensor coverage and sensitivity  97  
Figure 8.16 Example of a ‘smart’ fixture with integrated sensor (image courtesy 
of Havells Sylvania and Organic Response)  98  
Figure 8.17 Example of presence detection  99  
Figure 8.18 Example of absence detection  99  
Figure 9.1 Example dimming curve  101  
Figure 9.2 Measured light versus perceived light  102  
Figure 9.3 Mains-switching diagram  102  
Figure 9.4 Leading-edge dimming profile  104  
Figure 9.5 LED repetitive peak current profile  105  
Figure 9.6 Trailing-edge dimming profile  106  
Figure 9.7 Control-transmitted-over-mains dimming profile Source: LEDOTRON  106  
Figure 9.8 Example 1–10 V analogue controller  108  
Figure 9.9 Example 1–10 V analogue control system  108  
iv 
Figure 9.10 Example 1–10V analogue control system test with a multimeter and 
light output levels  109  
Figure 9.11 Network topologies  109  
Figure 9.12 A DSI signal profile  110  
Figure 9.13 DSI signal profile and light levels  110  
Figure 9.14 Warning: Do not connect Switch-DIM to DALI or DSI signal  113  
Figure 9.15 Example DMX control devices  114  
Figure 9.16 Example DMX cable  114  
Figure 9.17 Example DMX network topology  114  
Figure 9.18 PWM signal profiles  115  
Figure 9.19 Example IR communications device (photograph courtesy of Organic 
Response)  117  
Figure 9.20 Example Ethernet connectors  117  
Figure 9.21 Example Ethernet network link  118  
Figure 9.22 Example gateway device connection between low-voltage control 
protocols (baud rate is the data speed: the number of binary bits of 
information transmitted per second)  119  
Figure 10.1 Example LED retrofit cost savings calculation  121  
Figure 10.2 Lumen output versus ambient temperature  124  
Figure 10.3 T5, T8 and T12 lamps (images courtesy of OSRAM)  125  
Figure 10.4 Example fluorescent luminaire containing CCG  126  
Figure 10.5 Example ECG for fluorescent lamp luminaire (image courtesy of OSRAM)  126  
Figure 10.6 Double-end power tubular LED source  128  
Figure 10.7 Single-end power tubular LED source   128  
Figure 10.8 LED tubes with (a) clear tube and (b) diffuse optics  129  
Figure 10.9 Efficient optical distribution with minimal losses from LED tube  130  
Figure 10.10 LED tube does not suffer from upward light losses like conventional lamps  130  
Figure 10.11 Energy labelling to determine the performance of the LED product  131  
Figure 10.12 First generation LED retrofit safety issues  132  
Figure 10.13 Example integrated LED luminaire solution for retrofit and 
replacement of conventional T5/T8 linear fluorescent luminaire  135  
Figure 10.14 Example integrated LED luminaire solution for retrofit and 
replacement of conventional 2D fluorescent lamp luminaire (image courtesy 
of Zeta LED Technology)  135  
Figure 10.15 Example integrated LED retrofit module solution, designed by 
the product manufacturer for retrofit and replacement of conventional 
discharge lamp solution  135  
Figure 10.16 Example LED retrofit reflector lamp schematics  137  
Figure 10.17 LED lamp replacement products (from left: MR-16 Gu5.3 base 12 V   
lamp replacement; MR-16 12 V lamp replacement with deeper body; GU10 
base 230 V lamp replacement)  139  
Figure 10.18 Examples of the size and form factor of LED retrofit sources (these   
can be larger than the lamps they replace, meaning that some might 
protrude further from certain luminaires or not fit at all, which is especially 
true with mains voltage solutions such as the GU10 base that contains the 
LED driver within the base section)  139  
Figure 10.19 LED retrofit and transformer compatibility issues  140  
Figure 10.20 A selection of LED retrofit solutions intended to replicate the GLS lamp  143  
vii 

 
List of Tables 
Table 3.1 IEC Standards for LED lighting products (the Technical Report on reliability 
of LED products is currently being developed)  30  
Table 4.1 Performance requirements for motorised traffic on routes of medium to high 
driving speeds [6]  46  
Table 4.2 Performance requirements for conflict areas and subsidiary roads [6]  46  
Table 4.3 Minimum illuminances for emergency lighting, from BS EN 1838:2013 [35]  47  
Table 5.1 Common ingress protection ratings  63  
Table 5.2 Common mechanical impact protection (IK) ratings  65  
Table 9.1 DALI network length and minimum cable conductor cross-sectional area  112  
Table 9.2 Summary of wiring for low-voltage control protocols (‘baud rate’ is the 
number of binary digits transmitted per second)  116  
Table 10.1 Nominal and actual lengths for T5, T8 and T12 lamps  126  
Table 10.2 Example of LED tube thermal range data  134  
Table 10.3 Comparison of LED retrofit lamps (reproduced from the Swiss Agency for 
Efficient Energy Use LED products test, it illustrates the power consumption, 
efficacy light quality and distribution characteristics of several LED lamps against 
a conventional incandescent lamp)  144  
Table .1 B SSttaannddaarrddss r reellaatteedd t too L LEEDD l liigghhttiinngg  163 
Table .2 B Standards related to LED lighting  171  
viii 
Participants in the Technical Committee  
The  IET  wishes  to  acknowledge  the  support  received  from  representatives  of  the  following 
organisations in the development of this Code of Practice. 
Committee members:
Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS)  
Certsure LLP  
Electrical Contractors’ Association (ECA)  
Electrical Contractors’ Association of Scotland (SELECT)  
Highway Electrical Association (HEA)  
Independent testing services:  
LUX-TSI Ltd 
Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) 
Institution of Lighting Professionals (ILP) 
Lighting Industry Association (LIA) 
National Association of Professional Inspectors and Testers (NAPIT) 
UK-China Eco-cities and Green Building Group/UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) 
Corresponding members:
British Electrotechnical and Allied Manufacturers’ Association (BEAMA)  
Department for Communities & Local Government (DCLG)  
Electronics, Sensors and Photonics Knowledge Transfer Network (ESP KTN)  
Professional Lighting and Sound Association (PLASA)  
Public Health England (PHE)  
ix 
Acknowledgements
The IET would like to thank the following parties for their contributions to this document: 
Lead technical authors:
Kevin J. Grant IALD CEng MILP MIET MSLL (Light Alliance)  
Paul Littlefair MA PhD CEng MCIBSE MSLL and Cosmin Ticleanu BSc PgD PhD MSLL 
(Building Research Establishment, BRE)  
Sam Woodward (Havells Sylvania Europe Ltd)  
Additional contributors:
Lawrence Barling (Lighting Industry Association, LIA)  
Frank Bertie MIET (NAPIT)  
Ian Cathcart (Zega/Sunfor Lighting)  
Michael Collinge MIET (NAPIT)  
Matthew Darville (Certsure LLP)  
Malcolm Duncan IEng MIET (SELECT)  
Tony Howells BEng (Department of Business, Innovation & Skills, BIS)  
Peter Hunt BSc Hons FIAM (Lighting Industry Association, LIA)  
Gareth Jones BSc PhD AMSLL (LUX-TSI Ltd)  
Owen Kell BSc (Intelligent & Green Systems Ltd)  
Nigel Monaghan MSLL (ASD Lighting PLC)  
John O’Hagan, BSc PhD CSci CPhys CRadP MInstP MIPEM MSRP FLIA (Public Health 
England)  
Ben Papé Eur Ing FHKIE FIET FIMMM (UK-China Eco-Cities Group)  
Gareth  Pritchard  BTech  (Hons)  CEng  FILP  MIET  Tech(IOSH),  (Highway  Electrical 
Association HEA)  
Mike Simpson BSc (Hons) CEng FIET FCIBSE FSLL FILP (Philips Lighting)  
Cameron Steel CEng FIET MCIBSE MInstRE (BK Design Associates)  
Peter Y. Wong BSc LLB LLM CEng FIET FCIBSE FHKIE (Yook Tong Electric Co Ltd)  
Bill Wright MA CEng FIET (Electrical Contractors’ Association)  
Examples of commercially available products suitable for application of the document 
are provided in the text and have been provided courtesy of various companies. This 
information  is  given  for  the  convenience  of  users  of  this  document  and  does  not 
constitute an endorsement by the IET.  

 
 
 
Foreword from the Society of Light and Lighting (SLL)  
The rapid development of LED technology and its applications has started to transform 
the  way  people  use  light  and  apply  lighting  in  and  around  their  buildings.  Although 
the Society has been updating its lighting recommendations in the Code for Lighting 
and  our  various  building  sector  lighting  guides  to  incorporate  advice  on  using  LEDs, 
there has been a need for one overall comprehensive guide to LED technology and its 
application. 
The Society welcomes this Code of Practice as a way of promoting understanding of 
LED technology and how it can be used to enhance the way buildings and the wider 
environment can be lit well while using less energy and reducing maintenance costs. 
Dr Kevin Kelly CEng FSLL FCIBSE – President, Society of Light and Lighting
Paul Ruffles BSc CEng FSLL FCIBSE – Chair, Society of Light and Lighting Technical
and Publications Committee
October 2013
xi 
xii  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Scope and purpose
The aims of this Code of Practice are to: 
●   provide confidence to specifiers, installers, maintainers and end-users as a minimum 
standard for light-emitting diode (LED) lighting systems installation; 
●   provide useful guidance on the selection, application and suitability of LED lighting 
systems to installers, maintainers, operators and systems managers. 
The scope of this document covers: 
●   interior and exterior applications of LED lighting systems in compliance with relevant 
standards and regulations; 
●   LED  performance,  lifetime  and  safety  considerations,  lighting  design  principles, 
physical and thermal considerations, drivers and wiring, controls and dimming, and 
retrofit. 
Note  that  this  Code  of  Practice  does  not  cover  lighting  design  in  detail,  specialist  lighting 
applications or organic LED (OLED) lighting systems specifically, although some elements of 
this document do apply to OLED applications. 
xiii 

Index  

abruptfailurevalue(AFV) 3.3.2.2
absencedetection 8.4.2
absolutephotometry 3.2.4
AC(alternatingcurrent)systems 1.4.4
accentlighting 2.1.4,4.3.4
accessforinstallationand
maintenance 5.1.1
advertisingsigns 2.2.7.1
AFV(abruptfailurevalue) 3.3.2.2
alternatingcurrent(AC)systems 1.4.4
ambienttemperature 5.3.1,5.3.3.2,
7.2.3.2
LEDtubesrange Table10.2
ambienttemperaturedataset(Ta) 5.3.1
amenitylighting 2.1.4,2.2.6
analoguecontrolsystems 9.4.2,
AnnexA.3.7
architecturallighting 2.2.6
arealighting 2.2.4,Table4.3
ArtNetprotocol 9.5.3
artworklighting AnnexD,2.1.3.2
astronomicaltimecontrol 8.3.4

BACnetprotocol 9.5.1
ballast:seedrivers
beamangleandluminous
intensity 4.3.1.2
benefitsofLEDlighting 1.6–1.7
binning:seecolourbins
bluelighthazard(BLH) 3.4.1.5
‘bottom-endbounce’effect 9.3.2.2
brightness:seelightlevels;light
output
BritishStandards TableB.2
buildingcontrolrequirements AnnexB.5
BuildingRegulations,PartL:
Conservationoffueland
power AnnexB.4
cables 7.4.1
checklist AnnexA.3.5
directcurrent(DC)wiring 7.4.1,7.4.3
low-voltagecontrol Table9.2
alongsidemainscables 9.4.1.2
analoguesystems 9.4.2
checklist 8.3.2,AnnexA.3.6
DALI 9.4.4.3,Table9.1
DigitalSerialInterface(DSI) 9.4.3
DMX 9.4.5.3
CAN-busprotocol 9.5.1
candelas(cd) 3.2.3
CarbonTrust,EnhancedCapital
Allowance(ECA), 1.7.5
CCT(correlatedcolour
temperature) 4.4.1
CDM(Construction(Designand
Management))
Regulations2007 AnnexB.9
ceilingmountedlighting 2.1.1.1
see alsodownlights
ceilingreflectance 4.3.3.1
CEmarking 3.1.3,AnnexB.1
CFV(combinedfailurevalue) 3.3.2.2
chandeliers 2.1.5.2
checklists AnnexA
chillercabinets 2.1.3.2
chromaticitycoordinatevalues
(CCV) 4.4.2.1
circuitboarddesignand
materials 5.3.2.2
circuitwatts 7.3.1
cleaningofluminaires 6.1.1
colourappearance 2.1.5.1,4.4.1
testing 6.1.2
variationin 4.4.2.1
colourbins 4.4.2.2
colourchangingLEDs 1.5,4.4.2.3,
4.4.4.1,8.2.2
colourconsistency 4.4.2
colourgamut 4.4.3.4
colourmixing 2.2.6.2,4.4.2.3,
8.2.2
ColourQualityScale(CIE) 4.4.3.3
colourrendering 4.4.3
colourgamut 4.4.3.4
colourqualityofsaturated
colours 4.4.3.3
exteriorlighting 4.4.3.2
reflectorlampretrofit 10.5.4
roadlighting 2.2.3.2,4.4.3.2
tasklighting 2.1.2.1
testing 6.1.2
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
193

colourrenderingindex(CRI) 4.4.3.1
minimumrequirement AnnexB.2
retrofitLEDtubes 10.3.4.3
colourtemperatures AnnexD,2.1.5.1,
4.4.1
reflectorlampretrofit 10.5.4
retrofitLEDtubes 10.3.4.4
colourtuneableLEDs 4.4.4.2
colourvaryingLEDs 4.4.4
combinedfailurevalue(CFV) 3.3.2.2
compatibilityofcomponents1.6.4,1.8.2
controlsystems 9.5.5
driversanddimmers 7.1.3,9.3.6
replacementsandupgrades 7.3.6
see alsoretrofitofLEDlighting
systems
competentpersonsscheme 6.4,
AnnexB.5
compliancetesting 3.1.3.2
computerdisplayscreens 2.1.1.1,
4.3.6.3
concealedLEDlightsources 2.1.3.2
constant-currentdrivers 7.1.4,7.4.2
constantlightoutput 8.4.1.4
constant-voltagedrivers 7.1.5,7.4.2
Construction(Designand
Management)(CDM)
Regulations2007 AnnexB.9
contrast  2.1.3.1,4.3.3.2
controlgear:seeelectroniccontrol
gear(ECG)
controls   Section8
analoguesystems 9.4.2
benefits 8.1.3
checklist AnnexA.3.6
compatibilityofcomponents 9.3.6,
10.5.5.4
digitalsystems 9.4.3–9.4.6
foremergencytesting 6.3.3
functionsof 8.1.1
infrared(IR) 9.5.2
LEDretrofit 10.2.5
reflectors 10.5.5.4
tubes 10.3.6.2
lightoutput 8.2.1
low-voltagewiringfor 7.4.1,8.3.2,
9.4.1.2,9.4.4.3,
AnnexA.3.6
protocols 9.4
analoguesystems 9.4.2
checklists AnnexA.3.7
DigitalAddressableLighting
Interface(DALI) 9.4.4
DigitalSerialInterface(DSI) 9.4.3
DMX 9.4.5
gatewaydevices 9.5.5
otherprotocols 9.5.1
pulsewidthmodulation
(PWM) 9.4.6
scene-setting 8.3.3
userinterfaces 8.3
wall-mounted 8.3.2
see alsodimming
conventionalcontrolgear(CCG) 10.3.1
conventionallightingsources 1.3,1.4.2
correlatedcolourtemperature
(CCT) 4.4.1
CRI:seecolourrenderingindex
(CRI)
criticaltemperature 5.3.3.1
cycletime(sensors) 8.4.2.3

damplocations 5.2.2.2
datasheets 3.2.7
daylightharvesting 8.3.4,8.4.1.5,
10.2.5
daylightsensing 8.4.1
day-litinteriors 4.4.1
DCpowernetworks 7.5.2
decorativefittings 2.1.5.2
definitions AnnexE,1.2
desklighting 2.1.1.1,4.3.2
dies:seeLEDchips
diffuserLEDtubes 10.3.3.4,10.3.4.2
diffusingLEDpanels 2.1.1.2,4.3.6.3
digitalcontrolprotocols 9.4.3–9.4.6,
AnnexA.3.7
DigitalAddressableLighting
Interface(DALI) 9.4.4,
Table9.1
DigitalSerialInterface(DSI) 9.4.3
DMX 9.4.5
pulsewidthmodulation(PWM) 9.4.6
dimming Section9
benefits 9.1.1
checklist AnnexA.3.7
control-transmitted-over-mains 9.3.5
daylightharvesting 8.4.1.5
dimmingcurve 9.1.1
dimmingrangeand
performance 9.1.2
drivercompatibility 7.1.3,9.2.4,9.3.4
andflicker 4.5.2,9.3.6
humanperception 9.1.1,9.1.2
LEDretrofit 10.2.5
reflectors 10.5.4,10.5.5.5
tubes 10.3.6.2
loadconsiderations 9.2.3
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
194

dimming–continued
low-voltagecontrolprotocols 9.4
mainsdimming 9.2,9.3,AnnexA.3.7
andmaintenancefactor 4.6,8.4.1.4
photocelldetectors 8.4
directcurrent(DC)power
networks 7.5.2
directcurrent(DC)wiring 7.4.1,7.4.3
directcurrentsystems 1.4.4
directionallighting 4.3.1.3
disabilityglare 4.3.6.2
dischargelightingsources:see
fluorescent/tubetypelamps
discomfortglare 4.3.6.3
displaycases 2.1.3.2
displaylighting 2.1.3,4.4.3.4
displayscreens 2.1.1.1,4.3.6.3
DMXprotocol 9.4.5,AnnexA.3.7
documentation 1.8.1,1.8.2.1,1.8.2.2
domesticlighting 2.1.5
downlights 2.1.5.2,4.3.1.2
drivecurrentandfailure 3.3.2.5
drivers 7.1.2
checklist AnnexA.3.5
colourvariationcontrol 4.4.4.3
connectiontoLED 7.4
constant-current 7.1.4
constant-voltage 7.1.5
dimmercompatibility 7.1.3,9.2.4,
9.3.4
drivecurrentandfailure 3.3.2.5
drivecurrentandlightoutput 7.2.3.1
efficiency 7.3.1
externaldriverretrofit 10.3.6.4
ingressprotection(IP) 7.2.3.3
inrushcurrent 7.1.8.2
internaldriverretrofit 10.3.6
lifetime 1.8.2.1,7.2
mainssupply 7.1.6,7.4.1
operatingtemperature 7.2.3.2
powerfactor 7.3.2,7.3.3
powerfactorcorrection(PFC) 7.3.4
protectivedevices 7.1.8
remoteoperation 5.1.3,7.4
runningcurrentandratings 7.1.8.1
testcurrent 7.1.7
thermalconsiderations 7.2.3
voltageoptimisation 7.3.6
drop-out 9.3.6
dwelltime(sensors) 8.4.2.3

efficacy   3.2.5
advancesin  3.2.8
claimed  AnnexD
minimumrequirement AnnexB.4,
AnnexB.10
v.efficiency 3.2.6
electricaldesign 7.4
electricalinspectionandtesting 6.2.1
electricalinstallation 1.6.4
electricalmaintenance 6.2
electricalprotection 7.1.8
electricalsafety
ingressprotection(IP) 5.2.2
labelling  7.4.4
retrofitLEDtubes 10.3.5.2
standards TableB.2
electricalwastedisposal 6.1.3
electrolyticcapacitors 7.2.1
electromagneticcompatibility Annex
B.7,TableB.2
electroniccontrolgear(ECG) 10.3.1
see alsodrivers
emergencylighting 4.2.4,6.3,
Table4.3
emergencytesting 6.3.2
energyefficiency 1.7.4,3.2.2,3.2.4,
7.3.1,AnnexB.2
see alsoenergysavings
energy-efficiencyindex(EEI) AnnexB.2
energylabelling 10.3.4.4,AnnexB.3,
AnnexB.12
EnergyPerformanceofBuildings
Directive AnnexB.4
energysavings  1.7.2
benefitsofcontrols 8.1.3
LEDretrofit 10.1.3,10.2.1,Table10.3
EnergySavingTrust(EST) AnnexB.12
enhancedcapitalallowance
(ECA) 1.7.5,AnnexB.10
environmental-inputcontrols 8.4
environmentalstandards TableB.2
escaperoutelighting Table4.3
ethernet-basedprotocols 9.5.3
EuropeanDirectives AnnexB.2
ArtificialOpticalRadiation AnnexB.6
electromagnetic
compatibility AnnexB.7
EnergyPerformanceof
Buildings AnnexB.4
WasteElectricalandElectronic
Equipment(WEEE) Annex
B.8.4
Europeanstandards TableB.1,
TableB.2
exteriorlighting  2.2.1
colourrendering 4.4.3.2
LEDretrofit 10.7,AnnexA.3.8
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
195

H  
exteriorlighting–continued
lightpollution 4.3.5
lightpollution/spill 2.2.5.1,2.2.6.1,
4.3.5
recommendedilluminance 4.2.3
see alsopedestrianpaths/areas;
roadlighting

fadetime 8.3.3.3
failureofLEDlightingsystems 3.3
drivecurrentandfailure 3.3.2.5
lightoutputandfailure 3.3.2.2
temperatureandfailure 3.3.2.4
see alsolifetime
faultfinding 6.1.3
flexibleLEDarrays 1.5
flicker 3.4.1.2,4.5,9.3.6
ACLEDs 1.4.4,4.5.2
floodlighting
accentlighting 2.1.4.1
architecturalandamenity
lighting 2.2.6.1
beamangleandluminous
intensity 4.3.1.2
sportslighting 2.2.5
fluorescent/tubetypelamps 1.3.3
LEDreplacementsfor 10.3,Annex
A.3.8
nominalandactuallengthsTable10.1
thermalrange Table10.2
types 10.3.3
footpathlighting:seepedestrian
paths/areas
fuses 7.1.8.1

gatewaydevices 9.5.5
GeneralLightingService(GLS)
lamps 1.3.2
efficiency 10.6.1
LEDreplacements 10.6,
AnnexA.3.8
glare 4.3.6
disabilityglare 4.3.6.2
discomfortglare 4.3.6.3
reflectedglare 4.3.6.4
sportslighting 2.2.5.1
streetlighting 4.3.6.5
glossary AnnexE
GLSlamps:seeGeneralLighting
Service(GLS)lamps
GreenPublicProcurement
(GPP) AnnexB.11
GU10-base(mainsvoltage)
LEDretrofit 10.5.6
Haitz’slaw 3.2.8
halogenlampsv.LEDs AnnexD
healthandsafety AnnexB.6
Construction(Designand
Management)(CDM)
Regulations2007 AnnexB.9
high-risktasklighting Table4.3
highwayworking 6.4
safetylabelling 10.3.5.3
workingatheight 5.1.2
see alsoelectricalsafety;optical
safety
heatdissipation 5.3.2
heatgeneration 3.3.2.4,5.3.1
DCv.ACLEDs 1.4.4
drivingcurrentandlight
output 7.2.3.1
productclaims AnnexD
see alsooperatingtemperature
heatsinks 5.3.2.3
DCv.ACLEDs 1.4.4
LEDlightingsystems 1.4.3
highfrequencyalternatingcurrent
(HFAC)circuits 7.5.3
high-risktaskarealighting Table4.3
high-temperaturelocations 5.3.1
HighwayElectricalRegistration
Scheme(HERS) 5.1.2,6.4
highwaylighting:seeroadlighting
hospitallighting 4.4.3.1

IEC(InternationalElectrotechnical
Commission)
standards 3.1.3.1,3.1.3.2,
3.3.3.3,Table3.1,TableB.2
IES(IlluminatingEngineeringSociety
ofNorthAmerica)standards
3.1.3.2,3.3.3.2,3.3.3.3
IKratings(mechanicalimpact
protection) 5.2.3,Table5.2
illuminance 4.2.1
lightingleveltesting 6.1.2
testing 6.1.2,6.2.2
see alsomaintainedilluminance
illuminatedsigns 2.1.4.2,2.2.7
IlluminatingEngineeringSocietyof
NorthAmerica:seeIES
(IlluminatingEngineering
SocietyofNorthAmerica)
standards
incandescentlightingsources:see
GeneralLightingService
(GLS)lamps
indirectlighting 2.1.4.2,4.3.3.3
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
196

inductivecoupling 7.3.1,7.5.3
infrared(IR)communications 9.5.2
infrared(IR)radiationeffects 3.4.1.3
ingressprotection(IP) 5.2.2
drivers 7.2.3.3
IPratings 5.2.2.1,
Table5.1
wet/dampareasorlocations 5.2.2.2
inrushcurrent 7.1.8.2,9.2.3.1
inspection
checklist AnnexA.3.4
competentpersons 6.4
electrical 6.2.1
installation 1.6.4,5.1
ambienttemperature 5.3.3.3
checklist AnnexA.3.3
competentpersons 6.4
dimensionalfit 5.1.3
locationandaccess 5.1.1,5.1.2
integratedLEDluminaires 1.8
interchangeableLEDlightsources 1.5
interchangeableLEDmodules 1.5
interiorlighting 2.1,4.2.2
InternationalElectrotechnical
Commission:seeIEC
(InternationalElectrotechnical
Commission)standards
internationalregulations AnnexB
InternetProtocol(IP) 9.5.3
IP(ingressprotection):seeingress
protection(IP)
IR(infrared):seeinfrared(IR)
J
junctiontemperature 5.3.3.2

KNXprotocol 9.5.1

lamppowerfactor:seepowerfactor
(PF)
lampsurvivalfactor 3.3.1,AnnexB.2
leading-edgedimming 9.3.2
LEDchips 1.4.3,3.3.3.3
junctiontemperature 5.3.3.2
lifetime 3.3.2.3
lumendepreciation 3.3.3.3
variationincolour
appearance 4.4.2.1,4.4.2.2
LEDlightengines 1.2,1.5,1.8.2.2
LEDlightingsystems
addedvalue 1.7
advantagesandlimitations 1.6
builtfromdiscretecomponents 1.8.2
definitions 1.2
integrated 1.8.1
systemsarchitecture 1.4
v.conventionallighting
sources 1.3–1.4
see alsomanufacturedproducts;
systemperformance;system
specification
LEDmodules 1.2
LEDpackage 1.2,1.8.1
LEDs(light-emittingdiodes) 1.2
LENI(LightingEnergyNumeric
Indicator) 7.3.5,AnnexB.4
lifetime 1.6.2,1.7.3,3.3
andambienttemperature 5.3.3.2
assessment 3.3.3
conventionallightingsources 1.4.2
drivers 7.2
andfailure 3.3.1–3.3.2
maintenancefactor 4.6
manufacturedproducts 1.8.2.1
minimumrequirement AnnexB.2
andoperatingtemperature 3.3.2.4,
5.3.2.1,5.3.3.1
testingandmeasurement 3.3.3.2,
3.3.3.3
warranties AnnexD
lightdistribution 4.3
beamangleandluminous
intensity 4.3.1.2
directionallighting 4.3.1.3
exteriorlightingretrofit 10.7.4.2
measuring 4.3.1
retrofitLEDtubes 10.3.4.2
roomsurfaces 4.3.3
specified 3.2.9
uniformitylevels 4.3.2,4.3.3.2
light-emittingdiodes(LEDs) 1.2
lightingcomfort 2.1.1.1,8.1.3
lightingdesign Section4
accentlighting 4.3.4
checklist AnnexA.3.1
emergencylighting 4.2.4
exteriorlighting 4.2.3
interiorlighting 4.2.2
lightdistribution 4.3
standards TableB.2
LightingEnergyNumeric
Indicator(LENI) 7.3.5,
AnnexB.4
LightingLiaisonGroup(LLG) 3.1.3.3
lightingscenes 8.3.3
lightlevels
daylightharvesting 8.3.4,8.4.1.5,
10.2.5
maintainedlevel 8.4.1.4
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
197

lightlevels–continued
see alsoilluminance;maintenance
factors
lightoutput 3.2.2
control 8.2.1
DCv.ACLEDs 1.4.4
lumendepreciation 3.3.1,4.6,8.4.1.4
luminousfluxandluminous
intensity 3.2.3
variationsin 1.4.4
v.wattage AnnexD
see alsodimming
lightoutputratio(LOR) AnnexD,3.2.4
lightpollution/spill 2.2.5.1,2.2.6.1,4.3.5
lightsensors 8.4.1,AnnexA.3.6
lineartubetypelamps:seefluorescent/
tubetypelamps
LLG(LightingLiaisonGroup) 3.1.3.3
LOR(lightoutputratio) AnnexD,3.2.4
low-voltagecontrolprotocols 9.4
low-voltagewiring:seecables,
low-voltagecontrol
lumendepreciation 3.3.1,4.6,8.4.1.4
see alsomaintenancefactors
lumens(lm) 3.2.3
luminairelumensperwatt 3.2.9
luminaires
body 1.4.3
cleaning 6.1.1
constant-current 7.4.2
constant-voltage 7.4.2
definition 1.2
efficacy 3.2.5–3.2.6,3.2.8
efficiency AnnexD,3.2.4
electricalinspectionandtesting 6.2.1
fan-integrated 5.3.2.3
heatsinks 5.3.2.3
integrated 1.8.1
interiorlighting 2.1.1.2
LEDreplacements 10.4,AnnexA.3.8
lifetime 3.3.2.3,3.3.3,5.3.3.2
lightdistribution 3.2.2,3.2.3
lightingleveltesting 6.1.2,6.2.2
lightoutputratio(LOR) 3.2.4
manufacturedproducts 1.5
non-directional 4.3.1.3
performancerequirements 3.1.3.3
productspecification 3.1.3.3
tasklighting 2.1.2.1
luminousflux 3.2.3
luminousintensity 3.2.3
Lxvalues 3.3.2.2

MacAdamellipses 4.4.2.2
mainsdimming 9.2,9.3,AnnexA.3.7
mainsswitching 9.2
mains-voltageLEDs 9.2.1
maintainedilluminance 1.6.3,4.2.1
automaticdimmingcontrols 4.6,
8.4.1.4
emergencylighting 4.2.4
exteriorlighting 4.2.3
interiorlighting 4.2.2
see alsomaintenancefactors
maintenance AnnexD,6.1–6.4
checklist AnnexA.3.4
cleaningofluminaires 6.1.1
competentpersons 6.4
electricalinspectionandtesting 6.2.1
emergencylighting 6.3
LEDretrofit 10.2
lightingleveltesting 6.1.2
reactive 6.1.3
see alsoreplacementLED
components
maintenancefactors 4.6,8.4.1.4,
AnnexB.2
manualcontrol 8.3.1
manufacturedproducts 1.5
availability 3.1.3.3
CEmarking 1.8.1,3.1.3
colourconstancy/stability 4.4.2
compatibilitywithspecification 3.1.2
datasheets 3.2.7
dimmingrange 9.1.2
documentation 1.8.1,1.8.2.1,1.8.2.2
labelling 3.2.7
lifetimeassessment 3.3.3.4
lifetimeclaims 1.8.2.1
opticalsafety 3.4.2.2
selection 3.1.4,AnnexA.3.2
specificationcriteria AnnexA.2
warranties AnnexD,1.7.5
maximumloadconsiderations 9.2.3
MCBs(miniaturecircuit
breakers) 7.1.8.1
mechanicalimpactprotection
(IKratings) 5.2.3,Table5.2
medianusefullife(Lx)
parameter 3.3.2.2
mesopicvision 2.2.3.2
microwavesensors 8.4.2.5
miniaturecircuitbreakers
(MCBs) 7.1.8.1
minimumloadconsiderations 9.2.2
museumlighting AnnexD,2.1.3.2

naturallight:seedaylight
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
198

nighttimevision 2.2.3.2
noise(audible) 9.3.2.3,9.3.6

obtrusivelight:seelightpollution/spill
occupancydetection 8.4.2
officelighting
colourchangingLEDs 4.4.4.1
deskilluminance 4.3.2
LEDdiffusingpanels 4.3.6.3
recommendedaverage
illuminances 4.2.2
OLEDs(organiclight-emitting
diodes) 1.5,1.3.4
operatinglife:seelifetime
operatingtemperature 5.3.1,5.3.2.3,
7.2.3.2
criticaltemperature 5.3.3.1
LEDretrofit 10.2.4
LEDtubesrange Table10.2
andlifetime 3.3.2.4,5.3.2.1,5.3.3.1
opticalradiationexposure AnnexB.6
opticalsafety 3.4
LEDlightingproducts 3.4.2
opticalradiationexposure AnnexB.6
photo-biologicalsafety
requirements 3.4.1
precautionarymeasures 3.4.4
recommendations 3.4.5
riskgroups 3.4.3
opticalsystems
conventionallightingsources 1.4.2
LEDlightingsystems 1.4.3
organiclight-emittingdiodes
(OLEDs) 1.5,1.3.4
outdoorlighting:seeexteriorlighting
outdoorworkareas 2.2.2,4.2.3

packagedsystems 1.2,1.8.1
parasiticload 7.3.5
passiveheatsinks 5.3.2.3
passiveinfrared(PIR)sensors 8.4.2.4
PCBs(printedcircuitboards) 5.3.2.2
PDs(photocelldetectors) 8.4.1
pedestrianpaths/areas 2.2.3.1,4.2.3,
4.4.3.2
performancestandards TableB.2
perimeterlighting 4.3.3.4
periodicelectricalinspectionand
testing 6.2.1
PF(powerfactor) 7.3.2–7.3.3,
AnnexB.2
PFC(powerfactorcorrection) 7.3.4
phase-choppeddimming 9.3.1
photo-biologicalsafety 3.4.1,TableB.2
photocelldetectors(PDs) 8.4.1
photometrictesting 3.2.4
photopicvision 2.2.3.2
pin-basedsockets 10.3.1,10.5.6.1
PIR(passiveinfrared)sensors 8.4.2.4
polymerlight-emittingdiodes
(PLEDs) 1.5,1.3.4
‘popcorn’effect 9.3.6
powerconsumption 3.2.2,3.2.5,7.3.1
see alsoenergyefficiency
powerfactor(PF) 7.3.2–7.3.3,
AnnexB.2
powerfactorcorrection(PFC) 7.3.4
powersupply 7.4.1
DCpowernetworks 7.5.2
highfrequencyalternatingcurrent
(HFAC)circuits 7.5.3
powerfactor 7.3.2–7.3.3
quality 7.2.2
see alsodrivers
presencedetection 8.4.2
printedcircuitboards(PCBs) 5.3.2.2
products:seemanufacturedproducts
protocols:seecontrols,protocols
publicprocurement AnnexB.11
pulsewidthmodulation(PWM) 9.4.6
Q  Noentries

RDM(remotedevice
management) 9.4.5.5
redundantcomponents 6.1.3
reflectance,surface 4.3.3.1
reflectedglare 4.3.6.4
reflectorlamps
beamangleandluminous
intensity 4.3.1.2
efficiency 10.6.1
LEDreplacements 10.5,10.7.4.2,
AnnexA.3.8
regulations AnnexB
relativephotometrictesting 3.2.4
remotecontrolhandsets 9.5.2
remotedevicemanagement(RDM)
9.4.5.5
remotedrivers 5.1.3
repetitivepeakcurrent 9.3.2.3
replacementLEDcomponents 3.1.3.3,
4.6,6.1.3
colourappearance 4.4.1
compatibility 1.8.2.3,7.3.6
retrofitofLEDlighting
systems Section10,AnnexD
alternativesforexteriorlighting   10.7
LEDengineretrofit 10.7.3
LEDretrofitlamps 10.7.4
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
199

retrofitofLEDlightingsystems–
continued
alternativesforreflectorlamps 10.5
alternativestoGLSstyle‘light
bulbs’ 10.6
alternativestolineartubetype
lamps 10.3
differenttypesofLEDretrofit
tubes 10.3.3
internalorexternaldrivers 10.3.6
mock-upandsitetrials 10.3.4.5
opticalperformance
considerations 10.3.4
safetyconsiderations 10.3.5
checklists 10.2,AnnexA.3.8
criteriaforreplacement
controlsystemstobe
replaced 10.2.5
lightingsystemstobe
replaced 10.2.3
physicalsettingoflighting
systemstobereplaced 10.2.4
siteandoperationalcriteria 10.2.2
equivalence AnnexD
replacementluminaires 10.4
safetylabelling 10.3.5.3
rigidLEDarrays 1.5
roadlighting 2.2.3
colourrendering 4.4.3.2
curfew 4.3.5
glare 4.3.6.5
LEDretrofit 10.7.2
lightpollution 4.3.5
maintenancefactors 4.6
recommendedilluminance 4.2.3,
Table4.1,Table4.2
safeworking 5.1.2
uniformitylevels 4.3.2
roomsurfaces 4.3.3
directlighting 4.3.3.2
indirectlighting 4.3.3.3
recommendedilluminance 4.3.3.1
reflectances 4.3.3.1
RS232protocol 9.5.1
RS485protocol 9.5.1

safety:seeelectricalsafety;healthand
safety;opticalsafety
scene-settingcontrols 8.3.3
securitylighting 2.2.4
self-certification 6.4,AnnexB.5
seriesconnection 7.4.2
shelflighting 2.1.3.2
signage 2.1.4.2,2.2.7
skyglow 4.3.5
‘smart’fixtures 8.4.2.6
solid-statelightingsources 1.3.4
specularreflection 4.3.6.4
sportslighting 2.2.5
spotlights 2.1.5.2,4.3.1.2,4.3.1.3
see alsoreflectorlamps
standards 3.1.3.3,AnnexB.13,
TableB.1
step-downtransformers 2.1.5.2,
10.5.5.4
storagetemperature 5.3.1,5.3.3.3,
Table10.2
streetlighting:seeroadlighting
stroboscopiceffects 3.4.1.2
surfacereflectances 4.3.3.1
SwitchDIM 9.4.4.5
systemarchitectures
conventionallightingsources 1.4.2
LEDlightingsystems 1.4.3
systemperformance 3.2
checklist AnnexA.3.2
datasheets 3.2.7
efficacy 3.2.5–3.2.6,3.2.8
electricalpowerandlight
output 3.2.2
highefficiencyv.highefficacy 3.2.6
luminaireefficiency 3.2.4
luminousfluxandluminous
intensity 3.2.3
andoperatingtemperature 5.3.1
systemspecification 3.1,3.2.7,3.2.9

tasklighting 2.1.1.1,2.1.2,Table4.3
taxincentives 1.7.5
temperature:seeambienttemperature;
operatingtemperature
terminology AnnexE
testcurrent 7.1.7
testing
checklist AnnexA.3.4
colourappearanceand
rendering 6.1.2
electrical 6.2
emergencylighting 6.3.2,6.3.3
lightinglevels 6.1.2,6.2.2
photometric 3.2.4
thermaleffects 5.3.1
thermalmanagement 5.3.2.1
checklist AnnexA.3.3
LEDretrofit
exteriorlighting 10.7.3.2
reflectors 10.5.5.2
see alsoheatdissipation
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
200

timedcontrols 8.3.4
trafficsigns 2.2.7.1
trailing-edgedimming 9.3.3
transformers 2.1.5.2,10.5.5.4
transientvoltages 7.1.8.2,7.2.1,7.2.2,
9.3.2.3
triacdimming:seeleading-edge
dimming
tubularLEDs 2.1.1.2
LEDretrofit 10.3,AnnexA.3.8
nominalandactuallengthsTable10.1
thermalrange Table10.2
types 10.3.3
tungstenhalogenlampsv.
LEDs AnnexD

ultravioletradiation(UV) AnnexD,
3.4.1.4
unifiedglarerating(UGR) 4.3.6.3
upgradingLEDsystems 7.3.6
uplighters 4.3.3.3
usercontrols 8.3

variablewhiteLEDluminaires 1.5
voltagesurgesandspikes 7.1.8.2,
7.2.1,7.2.2,9.3.2.3

walkways:seepedestrianpaths/areas
wallreflectance 4.3.3.1
wall-washing 2.1.4.2,4.3.3.4
warranties AnnexD,1.7.5
wasteelectricalandelectronic
equipment(WEEE) 6.1.3,
AnnexB.8
waterproofenclosures:seeingress
protection(IP)
wattage AnnexD,3.2.2,7.3.1
wet/dampareasorlocations 5.2.2.2
wirelesscommunicationmethods 9.5.4
wiring:seecables
X, Y Noentries
Z
Zhagaprotocolproducts 1.5,1.8.2.2
©TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
201

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful