SAU School of Education Lesson Plan Template

Rational Functions: Graphing Translations of Inverse Variations

Name: Amanda Mandell Time Allotted: 1 hour
Grade Level: 11-12 Subject(s): Algebra 2
Materials Required:
 Guided notes
 Classroom set of white boards
 Classroom set of markers
 2 Poster boards
 Sticky notes
 Pencils
 Classroom set of Highlighters

Michigan Content Expectations:
CCS: F-IF-4 - For a function that models a relationship between two quantities, interpret key features of
graphs and tables in terms of the quantities, and sketch graphs showing key features given a verbal
description of the relationship.
CCS: F-IF-7d - Graph rational functions, identifying zeroes and asymptotes when suitable factorizations
are available, and showing end behavior.

Objectives:
1. The learner will sketch the relationships of rational functions using the variable “a” to
communicate if the function is growing or shrinking. The learner will show they are proficient in
determining the relationship by writing the relationship on their white boards correctly 4 out of 6
times when I show them functions at the end of class.
2. The learner will sketch the relationships of rational functions using the variable “h” to identify the
horizontal asymptote of the function and communicate if the function is shifting to the right or the
left. The learner will show me they are proficient in determining the relationship by writing the
relationship on their white boards correctly 4 out of 6 times when I show them functions at the
end of class.
3. The learner will sketch the relationships of rational functions using the variable “k” to identify the
vertical asymptote of the function and communicate if the function is shifting to the up or down.
The learner will show me they are proficient in determining the relationship by writing the
relationship on their white boards correctly 4 out of 6 times when I show them functions at the
end of class.


Assessment:
Formative:
 Informal:
 Sticky notes: Begin lesson with a real world inverse variation problem using the parent
function learned in the previous lesson. I will adjust the stipulations of the problem,
creating a translation function of the parent function. Students will place sticky notes on a
poster board chart, making an inference as to how the new function will be different than
the parent function, taught in the previous lesson. This will take place at the beginning of
the lesson and will create discussion about the several hypotheses that have been formed.
 White boards: During the lesson, I will check for understanding by having the students
answer individual questions on personal whiteboards.
SAU School of Education Lesson Plan Template
 Once the students are able to answer correctly on their whiteboards 4 out of 6
times on each objective, I will move on to an interim assessment.
 If students do not exhibit proficiency on an objective by answering correctly 4
out of 6 times on their whiteboards, we will focus longer on the particular
objective and work in pairs to determine areas of confusion. Working in pairs
will allow me to observe which students are struggling and in what ways as they
communicate with their partner. Then, I can do individual intervention over areas
of confusion.
Interim:
 Formal
 Quiz: At the end of the lesson, I will give the students a quiz over the objectives of this
lesson. It will be in the same format as the unit summative assessment.
 Students show proficiency if they can answer 80% of the questions correctly.
They will show mastery of the objectives if they can answer 100% of the
questions correctly.
 The data from this assessment will be data of student learning and perceptions
because there will be a questions inquiring about the students’ confidence on the
material and suggestions for instruction.
 If over half of the students do not show proficiency on this quiz, that will inform
me that the objectives need more attention before the students can be assessed
summatively. Therefore, I will make adjustments to my instruction and focus on
the objectives for another lesson. At the end of that lesson, I will administer
another interim assessment to gauge student learning before the summative
assessment.
Summative:
 Formal:
o End of Unit Test: Once students have shown proficiency over the objectives throughout
the lessons in this unit, I will administer a summative assessment divided by the
objectives from each lesson.


Instructional Procedure: 52 minutes
1. Anticipatory Set: (5 minutes)
a. Narrate a real-world inverse variation example that uses the parent function of inverse
variation. Solve it together as a class using learned information from previous lesson.
b. Change the stipulations of the problem in order to create a translation of the function.
c. Ask students to list how this function is different than the parent function in partners.
d. Individually, the students will be given 30 seconds to write their prediction of how the
graph of the new function will be different than the graph of the parent function on a
sticky note.
e. I will instruct the class to place their sticky note on the poster board labeled “predictions”
once they have completed writing it.
f. I will read the predictions aloud and organize them in rows by similarities.
g. Inform the students that we will come back to our predictions at the end of class and we
will answer the new problem with the information that we practice in class.

2. State Purpose and Objective of Lesson: (2 minutes)
a. State the following objectives while using the function from the anticipatory set as a
reference to the “new” variables.
SAU School of Education Lesson Plan Template
b. Identify the relationship of the variable “a” in an inverse variation translation by
sketching the graph of the function.
c. Identify the relationship of the variable “h” in an inverse variation translation by
sketching the graph of the function.
d. Identify the relationship of the variable “k” in an inverse variation translation by
sketching the graph of the function.
e. These three variables help us to graph the function so that we can pictorially see the
relationship of the two values.
f. Overall, this lesson gives us a deeper look into inverse variation functions/relationships
that were covered in the last lesson.
g. It also lays the foundation for us to be able to understand and graph more difficult
rational functions in future lessons.

3. Instruction: (Allotted Time: 30 minutes)
a. Direct Interactive Instruction:
i. TTW model objectives through guided notes.
ii. TSW take notes in the manner that works best for their understanding.
iii. TSW participate in discussion of material, raising their hand during instruction
with any questions or comments.
iv. TTW monitor guided practice by observing student work and conversations
during practice time.

b. Modeling: 5 minutes per objective (15 minutes)
i. After anticipatory set, begin by taking notes as a class using highlighters to color
code.
ii. Review Parent function for inverse variation:

, where .
iii. Specify that the inverse function belongs to the Reciprocal function family which
can also be called the rational function family.
iv. Review previous translations that have been learned
v. Show the equation of a translation of that parent function is

vi. Demonstrate the roles of each of the following variables:
1.  Stretches graph;  shrinks, compresses graph;

 2
nd
and 4
th
quadrant;

 1
st
and 3
rd
quadrant
a. Model examples
b. Guided practice with whiteboards/comparison matrix/body
graphing.
2.  Shifts left;  shifts right;  vertical asymptote.
(Specify that  h is negative!)
a. Model examples
b. Guided practice with whiteboards/comparison matrix/body
graphing.
3.  shifts up; shifts down;  horizontal asymptote
a. Model examples
b. Guided practice with whiteboards/comparison matrix/body
graphing.
vii. Revisit the definition of asymptote: Imaginary lines that the graph approaches
but never touches
viii. Show the asymptotes of the parent function are the x-axis and y-axis;
, so in the parent functions
SAU School of Education Lesson Plan Template
ix. Identify the values on a couple example functions.
x. Sketch the asymptotes by determining the values.
xi. Describe the properties of the transformed function.
xii. Utilize the graphing calculator by entering the parent function and the example
transformation function
xiii. Think-aloud about the similarities and differences between the two graphs with
the class.
xiv. Sketch these two graphs on the board and show the correlation of similarities and
differences.
xv. Have students begin by always sketching the asymptotes first!

c. Guided Practice: 5 minutes per objective (15 minutes)
This set of guided practice will occur after introducing each of the 3 variables from the 3
objectives. That is, this set will occur 3 times, once after introducing a, then after h, and
then after k.
i. After introducing the variable, as a class we will go over a practice problem that
involves identifying the variable, making predictions, sketching the graph of the
function, and discussing the changes in the translated function.
ii. Then, I will put up a new translated function and ask students to work with a
partner to identify, predict, sketch, and discuss as done previously as I observe
their conversations. They will use a whiteboard to write down their findings.
iii. I will give an additional 30 seconds for the pairs to come up with one question
they might have based on that practice problem.
iv. Then students will raise their whiteboards and I will scan their answers, assessing
their understanding.
v. I will then do the same problem on the board and they will follow along looking
at their answers.
vi. Then I will ask 2 groups to share a question they had.
vii. As a class we will discuss the questions.
viii. Then I will give them 6 separate functions and they will individually answer
them one at a time, as I reveal them, on their white boards.
ix. After sketching the function on their whiteboard, they will use a comparison
matrix (strategy #1 in profile) to identify similarities and difference between the
parent function and the new translation function. (Appendix A).
x. After guided practice is completed after each objective, I will break students into
groups who each have a function. I will use a kinesthetic activity (strategy #13
in profile) where the students will be asked to use their bodies to give a
representation of the translation function. (For example: using arms as branches
of the graph, laying on the ground to form the curve, etc.)

d. Independent Practice: 12 minutes
i. Students with have time to complete the interim assessment to check for their
understanding. If they are unable to complete it all in class they may complete it
for homework.

4. Differentiated Consideration (Adjust instruction and assessments, tools, resources or activities
for students who):
 Finish quickly: Student may work on a supplemental activity from “Extra Fun!” bin
pertaining to objectives.
 Struggle to complete activity/assessments: Student will be given extra time to finish after
school, at home, or next class period.
SAU School of Education Lesson Plan Template
 Show proficiency early: Students can assist peers with questions as well as begin working on
more complex uses of the material.
 Still not proficient near end of lesson: Student may meet with me after school for
supplemental instruction until they reach proficiency. They will be able to continue working
on current objectives until they reach proficiency before moving onto new objectives.
 Needs different modes of learning or learn through a different multiple intelligence strategies:
Create open lines of communication in order to be informed of the students instructional
needs and adapt accordingly.

5. Closure: 3 minutes
a. As students wrap up their interim assessments, take inventory of how many students still
need more time.
b. Ask students that are finished to turn their assessments in on their way out.
c. Ask students that are not finished to put their assessment away to finish at home.
d. Revisit the predictions from the beginning of class.
e. Ask the class to write down on sticky notes how they think the function has changed now
and stick it to the poster labeled “differences”
f. Graph the new function on that poster board.
g. If time permits, discuss changes compared to predictions.
h. If time runs out, discuss the changes as the anticipatory set of the next lesson.

6. References:
a. Bellman, A. Bragg, S., Randall, C., Handlin, W., & Kennedy, D. (2004). Prentice hall
mathematics: Algebra 2. Needham, MA: Pearson.

7. Explanation of Identified Instructional Strategies:
Comparison Matrix
 I decided to use the comparison matrix in this lesson because it is a good way for students to
identify the relationship of the translation function to the parent function by detecting similarities
and differences while looking at the two graphs side-by-side.
 Since will be comparing the two graphs, I considered doing a Venn diagram or a t-chart, but I
think the comparison matrix is the best option because it allows room to sketch the graphs and
compare them next to each other.
 This would be the most effective strategy because it serves the purpose of identifying the
relationship of the functions and it gives the students another source of reference since the
whiteboard activity will not provide them with a permanent source of notes.
 Con- If we wanted to compare more than two graphs in a row it could become messy and hard to
understand. However, with only two graphs to compare, the comparison matrix could be useful to
reference.

Kinesthetic Activity
 I incorporated kinesthetic activity in order to include different learning styles into the instruction.
 Kinesthetic activities help to create a mental image of the knowledge for the students which assist
in retention of the knowledge.
 Con- This activity has the potential to get out of hand since students have free range to move and
communicate with their groups. Therefore, it is important to establish guidelines and remind
students of those guidelines for group work before they begin working on the activity.

SAU School of Education Lesson Plan Template
Teacher Reflection (Proof your lesson and revisit it before you teach it. Make sure you can answer
the following questions… you do not need to physically respond to these questions, just think about
them and check yourself):
 Do I have measurable objectives derived directly from the state expectations?
 Do I have ways for students to create tangible proof or evidence that they accomplished EACH
objective? What will I do for the students that didn’t? What will I do for the students that did?
 Do I embed in my direct instruction and guided practice as many possible multiple intelligences
to reach as many types of learners as possible?
 Do I have ways to scale-up or scale-back my content, resources, etc. for students functioning on
all levels?



SAU School of Education Lesson Plan Template
Appendix A


Comparison Matrix
Function
Items to be compared
Similarities/Differences
Parent Function
Graph
Translation Function
Graph
1.
Similarities:
Differences:
2.
Similarities:
Differences:
3.
Similarities:
Differences: