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Weekly Choice 18p 040314

Weekly Choice 18p 040314

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Published by Baragrey Dave
Weekly Choice, A Choice Publication, Positive News, Sports and Events, Covering 40 Towns in Northern Michigan including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Lewiston, Mancelona, Mio, Indian River and surrounding area.
Weekly Choice, A Choice Publication, Positive News, Sports and Events, Covering 40 Towns in Northern Michigan including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Lewiston, Mancelona, Mio, Indian River and surrounding area.

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Published by: Baragrey Dave on May 10, 2014
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By Heather DeLong

Alpine Regional Tennis Association Board member Sheila Simpson announced
that Gaylord will be hosting Midwest Youth Team Tennis! Starting May 13th through
May 29th on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 4:30 pm, Team Tennis will be held
at the Gaylord
Community Center
tennis courts. Boys and
girls ages 5 through 12
are encouraged to join!
Thanks to a generous
donation to ARTA from
the Treetops Pepsi
Challenge, the tennis
courts will be painted
for youth size courts,
and trained volunteers
will follow
USTA/Midwest lesson
plans to help students
learn warmup tips,
basic tennis skills and
rules of the game,
including sportsman-
ship. Final team com-
petition will occur on
the last week of train-
ing.
While the normal
cost for the program is
$45, the Gaylord chap-
ter of Kiwanis
International donated
funds to reduce the
cost for the program to
$25 for the first 35 play-
ers to register by April
By Heather DeLong
Pilgrim, the Musical, about a
young man named Christian
embarking on a great journey to
the Celestial City is coming to
Petoskey Middle School this
weekend! “Pilgrim” was written
by Janice Landry and Cathy
Mays. It’s a contemporary musi-
cal based on the classic book,
“Pilgrim’s Progress,” filled with
the ups and downs of life that
will touch the hearts of everyone
who witnesses it.
The musical will be per-
formed by members of Purity
Ring Family Theatre at the
Petoskey Middle School, located
at 801 Northmen Drive. Purity
Ring Family Theatre’s mission is
to help students develop artistic
abilities through theatre arts
that honor God. Shows will
begin Friday, April 4th and go
through Sunday, April 6th.
Friday through Saturday the
show will play at 7:30 pm, and
again on Sunday at 2:30 pm.
Tickets can be purchased for
$5 either at the door or by
emailing
purityringtickets@gmail.com. If
you have any questions about
the show, you can contact Julie
Peurasaari at (231) 330-5650.
For more information
about the Purity Ring Family
Theatre, visit http://puri-
tyringdrama.com.
Spend this weekend in
Petoskey with your family
following Christian’s journey
toward the Celestial City!
To contact Heather
DeLong for any comments,
questions or concerns, send
an email to heather@weekly-
choice.com.
FREE
112 E. Sixth St., PO Box 382, Gaylord, MI 49734 • www.WeeklyChoice.com • (989) 732-8160
Weekly Choice
A Choice Choice Publication
Community Home &
Health Services
continues a long
established tradition of offering
individualized care services in
the home. Shown here is com-
pany president, Bruce Fasel, at
Community Home & Health
Services main office in
Gaylord.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
Positive News,
Sports and
Events
Thursday, April 3, 2014
STORY
PAGE 10

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of year on 2014 All-Area team.
PHOTO BY DAVE BARAGREY
STORY
PAGE 1B
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Covering 40 Towns in Northern Michigan including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Lewiston, Mancelona, Mio, Indian River and surrounding area.
1397 W. Main, GayIord
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By Jessica Boyce
The 2014 Pure Michigan Governor’s
Conference on Tourism took place in
March at the Grand Traverse Resort. The
focus this year was on culinary tourism
and many awards were given to busi-
nesses and individuals in Michigan for
being the best of the best. Ilene Geiss-
Wilson who is the Executive Director of
the Grayling Visitors Bureau was award-
ed the 2014 CVB Star of the Year.
This CVB star is a huge accomplish-
ment for Ilene, who has been working as
Executive Director for 23 years. What
this award means is that Ilene is recog-
nized for her efforts in making the
Grayling Visitors Bureau the absolute
best in Michigan. In reaction to the
award she says, “I was so honored.
Usually it’s the bigger Visitors Bureaus
that receive these awards.” Ilene has also
received the Seven Seals Award present-
ed by the National Committee of the
Employer Support of the Guard and
Reserve. This award is presented for sig-
nificant individual or organizational
achievement, initiative, or support that
promotes and supports the ESGR mis-
sion.
SEE ILENE GEISS-WILSON PAGE 4A
Inside...
& More!
Youth Team Tennis
Coming to Gaylord
Ilene Geiss-Wilson
2014 CVB Star of the Year
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Community
Home &
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Services
20/20 PROJECT
SEE YOUTH TENNIS
PAGE 3A
Pilgrim, the
Musical at the
Petoskey Middle
School this
Weekend
Repairs required at
downtown Gaylord
Museum
The Otsego County Historical Society,
formed in 1963 and serving to protect, pre-
serve and present Otsego County history at
the downtown Gaylord museum, is in need
of assistance through donations and mem-
berships to address repairs at their facility at
320 West Main Street.
“As area residents are well aware,” states
Otsego County Historical Director, Jim
Akans, “this winter has been an especially
harsh one and it has resulted in damage to
the museum roof. We discovered a leak in
February which has temporarily been
addressed, and more extensive repairs will
be needed in the spring.”
Akans adds, “Our museum is funded pri-
marily through our much-valued members,
and we are staffed solely through volunteer
efforts. However, our annual operating
budget of approximately $20,000 leaves us
little reserve to tackle maintenance issues of
this scale. We are hoping that individuals
and businesses in our community will offer
assistance to accomplish the necessary
repairs on the museum building.”
He notes that individuals, businesses and
organizations can help by simply becoming
members of the Otsego County Historical
Society. Individual memberships are $15 per
year, families can join for $20 per year, and
business memberships are $50 per year and
include a company listing in the Society’s
quarterly newsletter.
“Above all,” Akans relates, “memberships
are vital in keeping the mission of preserving
our county’s history continuing through the
efforts of the Otsego County Historical
Society for future generations to appreciate,
learn and interact with our downtown
Gaylord museum.”
To become a Otsego County Historical
Society member, visit the organization’s web-
site at www.otsego.org/ochs and print a
membership form, or contact Jim Akans at
(989) 858-3187 to have a membership form
mailed to you.
Page 2 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
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The upcoming Business Expo will be held at the former Hometown Furniture Building next to Family Fare/Grayling Mini Mall
We will feature samples from local restaurants and door prize giveaways.
Meet hundreds of potential clients at the Grayling Chamber`s largest networking event!
Registration deadline is Friday, April 11, 2014. If you have not already registered, please consider taking advantage
of this chance to let everyone know what you have to offer!
Cost is just $50 for Grayling Chamber members, $100 for non-members.
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20. Late Registration until May 1st will
be $45 per player. The registration fee
includes a team shirt, racquet, and
other youth equipment.
ARTA President, Laura Hansmann
stated, “We are so grateful to both
Treetops and to the Gaylord Kiwanis
organization for their terrific funding
assistance so that more youth will be
able to participate in Youth Tennis.
This life-long sport is a healthy activity
that is loads of fun, can help reduce
child obesity, and improve coordina-
tion skills.”
Volunteer coaches are invited to
attend training on May 7th from 5 to
7 pm at the Gaylord Community
Tennis Courts.
To register, visit www.midwest-
teamtennis.com/homepage. For
more information, call (989) 619-2629
or email gaylordARTA@mail.com.
To contact Heather DeLong
For any comments, questions
or concerns, send an email to
heather@weeklychoice.com
By Deb Hagen-Foley
How many times have you laughed today? Two
times? Ten? The average 40 year old laughs four
times a day. The average five year old laughs more
than 300 times per day. You should laugh more -
for your health. April is National Humor Month, a
great time to bring more laughter into your life.
Is laughter the best medicine? There is consid-
erable evidence that laughter is good for us, for
many reasons. Laughter reduces blood sugar lev-
els and increases glucose tolerance, whether you
have diabetes or not. Laughter reduces pain, by
producing endorphins, which are natural, pain-
killing hormones. Laughter helps us to tolerate
discomfort.
Norman Cousins was seeking a way to cope
with inflammatory arthritis when he decided to
watch Marx Brothers movies to at least distract
him from the pain. In his book, Anatomy of an
Illness as Perceived by the Patient (W.W. Norton,
1979, 2001, 2005) Cousins claimed that ten min-
utes of laughter daily significantly reduced the
pain and inflammation, allowing him to sleep for
two hours without pain.
Laughter improves job performance, particular-
ly if your work requires creativity and the solving
complex problems. Laughter improves the func-
tioning of the heart and brain. Laughter actually
helps your blood vessels function better, by
increasing blood flow. Laughter strengthens the
immune system, by decreasing stress hormones
and increasing the production of T-cells, immune
proteins, and infection-fighting antibodies.
Research conducted by a cardiologist found that
laughter was as beneficial as aerobic activity in a
sample of 20 healthy adults. Michael Miller, M.D.,
believes that the results indicate that laughter may
help maintain a healthy endothelium. The
endothelium regulates blood flood and the ability
of blood to coagulate and clot, as well as secreting
chemicals in response to infection and wounds.
Important in cardiovascular disease, a healthy
functioning endothelium delays or prevents the
development of atherosclerosis, or hardening of
the arteries.
How laughter helps the endothelium is not
entirely clear. Laughter reduces levels of stress
hormones cortisol, epinephrine and dopamine
and increases endorphins, neurotransmitters and
antibodies while improving blood flow to the
heart, leading to greater relaxation, improved
mood and a positive outlook. The effect may be a
result of the exercise of the diaphragm muscles
through laughter. At the least, laughter reduces
mental stress, which damages the endothelium.
Laughter shouldn't be considered a substitute for
aerobic activity in avoiding cardiovascular dis-
ease. The two can work in tandem to improve
heart health.
Laughter also plays an important role in rela-
tionships. Laughter establishes a positive emo-
tional climate and creates an emotional connec-
tion between people through synchronizing, if
only briefly, the brains of those involved. The
power of laughter in intimate relationships is
underestimated - laughing together - not at one
another - keep a relationship together.
To improve your health - and your mood - strive
to laugh 15 minutes each day. You could achieve
this by consciously guffawing for 15 minutes a day
or watching situation comedies alone in your liv-
ing room. However, since laughter is contagious
and improves relationships, try to meet your
laughter quota in the company of others. When
others are laughing, join in! We can all benefit
from more laughter. As you work to laugh more,
help those that are around you to increase their
laughter quota as well!
Today, spend at least 15 minutes laughing. You
will feel happier right away. Make laughter a
daily habit and you will be feeling younger and
even healthier in
no time.
GAYLORD - Tickets are available
now for the Gaylord Alpenfest
Princess Tea. The tea will take place
on Sunday, April 13 at 1:00pm at
Wisconsin Street Hall. Bring your
favorite little girl for an afternoon of
fun, celebrating with the Alpenfest
Queen’s court.
When each little girl walks in they
will receive 3 gifts- one from each of
the Alpenfest Queen’s Court. The
afternoon will proceed with fun foods, a great craft, a little
entertainment, and end with each little girl getting their
photo taken with the queen’s court.
Wisconsin Street Hall will be transformed into an after-
noon fit for royalty. You will not want
to miss out on this terrific event. All lit-
tle girls are encouraged to wear
Alpenfest, princess, or tea party attire.
Tickets are required for this event
and are available at Gaylord Area
Chamber of Commerce 319 West Main
Street. Tickets are limited, so do not
hesitate to stop in and purchase yours
today. Tickets are $25.00 each, which
admits 1 adult and 1 child. Each addi-
tional ticket is $10.00. The 2014 Princess Tea proceeds will go
directly back to Alpenfest to help fund the 50th Anniversary
Celebration.
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 3
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
WEATHER:
Thursday
High 38
Low 28
Friday
High 40
Low 23
Sunday
High 46
Low 25
Monday
High 45
Low 29
Tuesday
High 42
Low 24
Wednesday
High 38
Low 22
Saturday
High 31
Low 14
Snowfall totals
Published Weekly on Thursday.
Afton, Alanson, Alba, Black Lake, Brutus, Burt Lake, Carp Lake,
Cheboygan, Conway, Elmira, Fairview, Frederic, Gaylord, Grayling, Harbor
Point, Harbor Springs, Indian River, Johannesburg, Lakes of the North,
Levering, Lewiston, Lovells, Luzerne, Mackinaw City, Mancelona, Mio,
Oden, Onaway, Pellston, Petoskey, Topinabee, Tower, Vanderbilt, Vienna
Corners, Waters, Wolverine
Deadline Monday Noon.
Place Classified ads on-line at
www.WeeklyChoice.com
20 cents/word, $2 minimum.
Notice to Readers: Typically, most advertising is honest and clear about special offers, however, please be
sure to read the contents thoroughly to avoid misrepresentation. Choice Publications does not warranty
the accuracy or reliability of content and does not accept any liability for injuries or damages caused to the
reader or advertiser that may result from content contained in this publica-
tion. Errors in advertising should be reported immediately. Damage from
errors will not exceed the cost of the advertisement for one issue. Choice
Publication employees and family members and listed advertisers’ employ-
ees and family members are not eligible to win. Choice Publications
reserves the right to publish or refuse ads at their discretion.
IFPA AWARD WINNING PAPER!
Published by:
Choice Publications, Inc.
112 East Sixth Street, PO Box 382, Gaylord, MI 49734-0382
Phone: 989-732-8160 Fax: 888-854-7441
Publisher:
Dave Baragrey 1
Dave1@WeeklyChoice.com
Website Administrator:
Chad Baragrey
Chad@WeeklyChoice.com
Office:
Cathy Baragrey
CB@WeeklyChoice.com
News Editor:
Jim Akans
Jim@WeeklyChoice.com
Writer:
Heather DeLong
Heather@WeeklyChoice.com
989-858-0257
Sports Reporters:
Mike Dunn
Mike@WeeklyChoice.com
989-370-0605
Andy Sneddon
AndySneddon36@yahoo.com
Jeff Baragrey
Jeff@WeeklyChoice.com
Dennis Mansfield
DennisLMansfield@gmail.com
SALES:
Phone: 989-732-8160
In the Petoskey & Cheboygan Area
Charles Jarman
Charles@WeeklyChoice.com
989-370-5361
In the Gaylord Area
Lori Taylor
Lori@WeeklyChoice.com
567-286-0021
In the Cheboygan Area
Terry Becks
Office@WeeklyChoice.com
In the Charlevoix Area
Lisa Sladek
Lisa@CharlevoixCountyNews.com
231-350-8027
Association of Free
Community Papers
2009-10 Amount 2010-11 Amount 2011-12 Amount 2012-13 Amount 2013-14 Amount
Atlanta 3/31/2010 33.1 4/4/2011 56.7 4/2/2012 57.9 4/1/2013 53.5 3/31/2014 59.9
Charlevoix 3/31/2010 74.3 4/4/2011 80.2 4/2/2012 47.4 4/1/2013 90.5 3/31/2014 120.7
East Jordan 3/31/2010 79.2 4/4/2011 98.1 4/2/2012 72.2 4/1/2013 123.8 3/31/2014 148.6
Gaylord 3/31/2010 78.5 4/4/2011 117.2 4/2/2012 99.5 4/1/2013 145.2 3/31/2014 171.9
Mio 3/31/2010 25.6 4/4/2011 56.6 4/2/2012 50.2 4/1/2013 47.7 3/31/2014 66.2
Onaway 3/31/2010 67.3 4/4/2011 61.8 4/2/2012 65.2 4/1/2013 72.1 3/31/2014 118.3
Petoskey 3/31/2010 83.3 4/4/2011 89.3 4/2/2012 73.8 4/1/2013 130.5 3/31/2014 178.4
Local.
Service-
Minded.
Call today for a FREE
Estimate.
Arrow Sanitation
(989) 732-4243
RECORD TEMPERATURES
Month Day Record High Normal High Record Low Normal Low Record Precip. Record Snowfall
April 7 81 °F 48 °F -4 °F 28 °F 0.94 in. 7.5 in.
1991 1982 1954 1974
April 8 74 °F 48 °F -4 °F 28 °F 1.37 in. 3.5 in.
1991 1982 1980 1964
April 9 72 °F 49 °F 5 °F 29 °F 0.59 in. 3.5 in.
1955 1982 1967 1986
April 10 75 °F 49 °F 6 °F 29 °F 1.24 in. 12 in.
1977 2007 2011 1973
April 11 77 °F 50 °F 10 °F 29 °F 0.85 in. 4 in.
1977 1970 2001 1957
April 12 78 °F 50 °F 9 °F 30 °F 1.05 in. 6 in.
1968 1976 1965 2007
April 13 75 °F 51 °F 12 °F 30 °F 1.05 in. 3 in.
1977 1992 1952 1962
Laughter is good for you
B eriC Ward from provo, ut, usa (Laughing) !CC-B-sa-2.0 (http://CreativeCommons.org/LiCenses/B-sa/2.0)",
via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
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A&* #,/ 15 *&+21"0 ,# )a2$%1"/ "3"/6 !a6 1, /"a- 1%" b"+"#&10.
Tickets available for
Alpenfest Princess Tea
Youth Tennis Continued...
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Owner-Financed-Mortgages
Seller-Financed Business Notes
Structured Settlements and Annuities
Our Money Now vs. Your Money Later
For Free Quotes
Call Mon-Fri 9a.m.-9p.m. Eastern
Ofce 989-785-2933

By Heather DeLong
Getting Kids Outdoors
Northern Michigan is spon-
soring this Saturday’s Maple
Syrup Workshop in Petoskey.
On April 5th from 12 to 1:30
pm, as a continuation of
Getting Kids Outdoors’
Nature-Based Community
Workshops, you and your
kids will have the opportuni-
ty to learn Native American
techniques of making maple
syrup using traditional
Odawa methods.
During the fun-filled after-
noon, you will also get to
sample delicious treats! The
location of the workshop is
north of Harbor Springs. For
a map, visit
www.landtrust.org or
www.gettingkidsoutdoors.org.
Parking will be limited, so
please carpool if you plan to
attend with family or friends.
There is no charge to attend the event!
Getting Kids Outdoors is a communi-
ty-wide initiative to promote local pro-
grams and resources that will help kids
spend more time outdoors. They
believe that every child should have
access, opportunities and encourage-
ment to play outdoors and connect
with nature for their personal growth
and well being.
For any questions about the work-
shop, or to request additional informa-
tion, you can contact Alison Berry at
alison.berry27@gmail.com.
Bring your kids to the Maple Syrup
Workshop this Saturday for a chance to
spend a great day outdoors!
To contact Heather DeLong for any
comments, questions or concerns, send
an email to heather@weeklychoice.com.
The purpose of the Visitors Bureau is to
provide information on things to do; where
to stay, eat, and shop; special places to visit;
and information on rivers, lakes, and trails in
Grayling, Mi. If you want to know anything
about what’s going on in the area, the
Visitors Bureau is the place to look. When
asked why people should be visiting
Grayling, Ilene replied, “It’s so beautiful and
relaxing.” You can visit the Grayling Visitors
Bureau’s website at grayling-mi.com if you
want to check out what Grayling has to offer,
or you can call the office toll free at 800-937-
8837 or 989-348-4945 locally. This website
can even be a great resource for locals won-
dering what is going on in the area or trying
to find something new and exciting for the
family to do.
Some of the other awards presented at the
Governor’s Conference were Culinary Star,
Food and Beverage Star, Star Attraction,
Sales and Marketing Star, and Guest
Relations Star. Northern Michigan was again
recognized for the Sales and Marketing Star
which went to Allen Ballard of Treetops
Resort in Gaylord, and Star Attraction which
was Fort Mackinac on Mackinac Island.
It is a wonderful thing to see Northern
Michigan, and especially Grayling, recog-
nized along with some of the larger
Michigan cities like Ann Arbor and Lansing.
It is a good reminder that Northern Michigan
has a lot to offer, not just in terms of activi-
ties and attractions, but in terms of people
too. Grayling is very lucky to have Ilene and
so is anybody who wants to plan a vacation
or is looking for something to do in Grayling.
Page 4 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
8B/&+$ 6,2/ (&!0 1, 1%" Ma-)" S6/2- W,/(0%,- 1%&0 Sa12/!a6 #,/ a %a+" 1,
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,!0 ,# *a-)" 06/2- -/,!21&,+!9 Courtes photo
Ilene Geiss-Wilson Continued...
Thank you for another great year & voting us the
#1 gold buyer in Northern Michigan (NMBA)
We buy unwanted, broken or scrap gold
We pay the public more than any other
NO Games, NO Gimmicks, NO Altered Scales
Remember, WE PAY MORE
than anyone in Northern Michigan.
Just honest cash value.
dealer in Northern Michigan.
We are not a pawn shop.
and all collector coins.
Alpine Gold &
Silver Exchange
(Your hometown coin shop)
Check with the rest and then come to the best.
Give us a call at 989-448-2400
or stop in and see us at our store in Gaylord.
1363 West Main St. You will be glad you did.
We are located next to Mancino`s and across the street from Ponderosa.

















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RESTAURANT,
RENTAL & CATERING
ANY BREAKIAST, LUNCH OR DINNER
MONDAY - THURSDAY ONLY
990 N. CENTER ST., GAYLORD
989.?32.4010
www.bjscatering.com
1/2 PRICE
BUY ONE, GET ONE
1/2 PRICE
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Choose from any of our delicious appetizers
Sautéed Mussels De Gallo, Mahi Mahi Panko Bites, Italian Nachos, Jumbo Fried Shrimp, Super Pretzels, Boneless Chicken
Wings, Caprese Plates, Potato Wedges with Cajun Cole Slaw
at Alpine Lodge
Any Appetizer
with Coupon
1/2
OFF
Off exit 282, Gaylord
989-732-2431

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lattes and hot chocolates. Good at these locations only.
Not good with any other offer. No copies of this coupon
will be accepted. £xp|res 4/30/¡4. CDD£ ¡06323
Applies to favorite lattes, creme freeze smoothies, tea
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Not good with any other offer. No copies of this coupon
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If It Has a
Small Engine,
I Can Fix it!
George’s Small Engine Repair
3921 Maple Valley Trail, Gaylord · 989-370-9176
George Head Ghead3249@yahoo.com
MAPLE SYRUP WORKSHOP IN
PETOSKEY THIS SATURDAY
Businesses!
Bring extra customers to your store using Coupons in our Clip
and Save Coupon Directory. Prices start as low as $29
C76<)+< D)>- B):)/:-A )< <0- (--34A C071+-
989-732-8160 7: --5)14 !..1+-@(--34AC071+-.+75
National Volunteer Week is April 6 through April 12 and
Mercy Hospice is honoring its hospice volunteers who bring
compassion, support and friendship to those facing a life-
limiting illness.
Hospice and palliative care volunteers bring companion-
ship to people in the final months and weeks of life, respite
to families and caregivers, and support in fundraising and
administrative efforts by hospice care providers. These dedi-
cated volunteers are integral members of the interdiscipli-
nary team of professionals who provide care at the end of
life.
National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization reports
that there are an estimated 400,000 hospice volunteers pro-
viding more than 16 million hours of service to hospice pro-
grams each year.
Mercy Hospice has 20 volunteers who provided over 3,197
hours this year to help care for patients and families in our
nine counties (Crawford, Roscommon, Otsego, Ogemaw,
Oscoda, Montmorency, Gladwin, Claire) service area. Many
people become hospice volunteers after experiencing first-
hand the compassionate care hospice provided to a dying
loved one.
Keitha Lochinski, Volunteer Coordinator, commented ,
“Hospice volunteers play an indispensable role in enabling
Mercy Hospice to offer the best care possible to people in
our community. Volunteers bring compassion, caring and
love to patients and their families who are going through one
of life’s most difficult times,”
“We are grateful to our vol-
unteers during National
Volunteer week and every
week, and pleased that this
celebration of volunteering
allows us to remind everyone
that hospice and palliative
care volunteers are angels
working among us.”
It is federally mandated,
under Medicare, that five
percent of all patient care
hours be provided by trained
volunteers. This regulation
was included in the
Medicare hospice legislation
to maintain the important
role that volunteers play in
hospice philosophy of care.
Hospice began in this coun-
try about 30 years ago as a
largely, volunteer-driven
community movement. To this day volunteers continue to be
at the heart of hospice.
Thank you Mercy Hospice volunteers for all your work,
dedication and willingness to support and serve those in
need.
By Jim Akans
Built to perform, built to last. It is a quali-
ty inherent in the equipment designed and
manufactured for military use. Thanks to
the folks at Pineview Military Surplus in
Frederic, these high quality items are also
available for campers, hunters, hikers, out-
door enthusiasts, and those who simply
enjoy well-crafted, durable goods.
Pineview Military Surplus current owners,
Dan and Christine Klatt, purchased the busi-
ness back in 1997, after it had already been
in operation for about 17 years. The approx-
imately 2,000 square foot facility located in
Frederic on Old U.S. 27 North is an amazing
wonderland for those interested in just
about any type of military surplus item. The
shop even includes a fascinating military
museum, with collections starting from the
Revolutionary War era through the current
conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan
Christine Klatt states, “While the items in
our museum area are not for sale, they are
amazing to see. What we do offer in our
store is all the Government Issue military
surplus items that we can find, some
authentic new items, and even some vintage
items. Our inventory comes from govern-
ment auctions, from people who have retired
from the military, and we also buy new items
from the same manufacturers that supply
the government with equipment.”
Highlights of those offerings included
clothing and outerwear of just about every
type; rain gear, head gear, boots, hats, hel-
mets, even women’s, children’s and infant
clothing.
They also stock camping gear, web gear,
backpacks, carry bags, and chemical protec-
tion suits (a great alternative to scent lock
suits for hunters). Among the souvenir
items in the shop are military insignia and
ribbons, medals, hatpins, patches, decals,
window stickers…the list of items goes on
and on.
The best way to see what is available is to
stop by and take a look! Pineview Military
Surplus is located at 7328 Old US 27 North in
Frederic. Currently, they are open Tuesdays
through Sundays from 9 am to 7 pm. Check
them out on Facebook at Pineview Military
Surplus, or call (989) 348-8300.
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 5
H I D D E N T R E A S U R E S
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
BOYNE ClTY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o 8esa|e
1158 S. M-75,
Boyne City
231-582-5711
www.challengemtn.org
BOYNE FALLS
Peg's 0|oset
3031 Main St., Boyne Falls
231-675-2463
Proceeds benefit the Boyne
Valley Food Pantry
CHARLEvOlX
8ergmaoo 0eoter 8esa|e Shop
8888 Ance Road,
Charlevoix
231-547-9624
www.bergmanncenter.org
CHARLEvOlX
ke||y's Aot|g0es &
F0ro|t0re 8aro
06176 Old US 31 S. ,Charlevoix
231-547-0133
www.dkellyantiques.com
EAST JORDAN
0rossroads 8esa|e Shop
205 Water Street.,
East Jordan
231-536-7606
Open Tuesday thru Saturday
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao
F0ro|t0re & Nore Store
6517 Center St.,
Downtown Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao
9746 Main Street,
Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
FREDERlC
P|oev|ew N|||tary S0rp|0s
7328 Old 27 North,
Frederic
989-348-8300
GAYLORD
A-2-I 8esa|e
1829 Old 27 South,
Gaylord
989-732-9500
Aoge|s at work 8esa|e
1523 S Otsego Ave., Gaylord
989.448.8615
GAYLORD
6oodw||| 8eta|| aod
0ooat|oo 0eoter
1361 Pineview Dr. (near Lowes)
Gaylord
989-705-1747
www.goodwillnmi.org
6reat 8ooms 00a||ty
Pre-0woed F0ro|t0re
148 W. Main St., Gaylord
989-745-5184
www.greatroomsgaylord.com
Veo0s & 8|0e Jeaos
340 West Main St.,
Gaylord
989-731-2600
www.venusandbluejeans.com
Sa|vat|oo Army Fam||y Store
919 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord
989-448-2357
GRAYLlNG
The-8r|ckery.com
Two floors of treasures
107 Ottawa,
Grayling,
One block north of the light
989-348-8999
HARBOR SPRlNGS
hew 8eg|oo|ogs
Thr|It Shop
650 W Conway Rd.,
Harbor Springs
231-348-2980
MANCELONA
Naoce|ooa Food Paotry
& 8esa|e Shop
201 N. Maple St., Mancelona
231-587-9606
MlO
Strawberry Patch
Downtown Mio
989-826-1503
PETOSKEY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o
2429 US31 North, Petoskey
231-348-3195
www.challengemtn.org
6oodw|||
1600 Anderson Rd.,Petoskey
231-348-6947
www.goodwillnmi.org
Hidden Treasures
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To add your business listing E-Mail office@weeklychoice.com
T%a+(0 1, 1%" #,)(0 a1 P&+"3&"4 M&)&1a/6 S2/-)20 &+ F/"!"/&, %&$% .2a)&16, *&)&-
1a/6 $/a!" &1"*0 a/" a3a&)ab)" #,/ a*-"/0, %2+1"/0, %&("/0, ,21!,,/ "+1%20&-
a010, a+! 1%,0" 4%, 0&*-)6 "+',6 4"))-/a#1"!, !2/ab)" $,,!0. photo B dan kLatt.
“Get your gear on”
at Pineview Military Surplus in Frederic
Mercy Hospice Honors Its Volunteers
During National Volunteer Week
In the Rough, Professionally Painted
or Completely Restored
Over 7,000 sq. ft. of Furniture, Antiques & Goodies
06176 Old U.S. 31 South, Charlevoix, MI 49720
E-Mail: donkellyantiques@yahoo.com
FURNITURE BARN
(231) 547-0133 • Cell (231) 881-0353
Web: dkellyantiques.com
CUSTOM & ANTIQUE
FURNITURE

Construction, Inc.
2860 Kassuba Road, Gaylord, MI 49735
Let
Tom Kuch
(formerly from Norandex)
help you find the
best siding, windows, & doors
for your home.
•Simonton Vinyl
Replacement Windows
•Certainteed Roofing
•Norandex Vinyl Siding
Call Tom at J-N-J Construction to get
your free estimate for professional
installation of quality products for
your home or business.
989-370-5738
FREE
ESTIMATES
NORTHERN MICHIGAN
L-< A7=: ?)<-: :=6
Due to extremely cold weath-
er conditions causing some
water service freeze ups cities
all over the area are request-
ing that all water customers
continuously run their water
until further notice. Service
leads to individual customers
may be more vulnerable. To
help prevent freezing of
underground service lines,
customers should continu-
ously run a stream of water
about the width of a pencil
from a single faucet. Please
note, warmer weather may
not immediately mean that
the risk of freezing is over.
Although dependent upon
weather conditions, the run
water order is anticipated to
last several weeks.
PETOSKEY
C4):3 H1;<7:1+)4 L1*:):A
The Clark Historical Library,
Molson Art Collection of
Children's Book Illustration
Fifty-two original works of
art created as book illustra-
tions from the Clark
Historical Library’s Molson
Art Collection at Central
Michigan University will be
on display at the Crooked
Tree Arts Center in Petoskey
through April 5. Francis
Molson, a retired CMU
English professor and former
chair of the English depart-
ment, and his wife Mary Lois
Molson, a former second
grade teacher, have donated
over 50 pieces of original art-
work which they have col-
lected over several years.
Gallery hours are as follows:
Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday we open at 10am
Saturday 10am - 4pm Closed
on Sunday
GAYLORD
L)<-;< 16 +):,1747/A
Educational breakfast hosted
by OCCOA April 3, 9-11am at
University Center. Learn the
latest in cardiology. Guest
speakers Tanya James and
Terry Whitmore from
McLaren. Suggested dona-
tion of $5. Make reservations
with Michelle at 989-748-
4068.
PETOSKEY
"14/:15
Pilgrim is presented by The
Purity Ring Family Theater, a
group of students from all
over northern Michigan,
reaching from Mackinaw
City to Gaylord and
Charlevoix to Cheboygan
who meet in Petoskey for
Practice. The performances
will be held at the Petoskey
Middle School’s auditorium
on Friday, April 4 and 5 at
7:30pm and Sunday, April 6
at 2:30. $5 tickets are avail-
able at the door. Pilgrim is a
full-length, two-act
"Broadway style" musical set
in contemporary times. This
production is an adaptation
of John Bunyan's classic
work, Pilgrim's Progress,
written in the 1600s. Using
Bunyan's allegories, the play
conveys biblical themes of
faith, repentance, friendship,
hardship, temptation, death
and eternity. The script is by
theatre professionals Janice
Landry and Cathy Mays.
Music is by Bob Kauflin,
Mark Altrogge and others.
The story follows a boy
named Christian, portrayed
by local student, Andrew
Benzing, who finds encour-
agement and temptation on
a spiritual journey. Along the
way, Christian, who walks
with the "unseen" King,
played by Martin Fuss, meets
unsavory as well as encour-
aging characters, such as
Pliable, Faithful, Goodwill,
Flatterer, Atheist and the
always present and evil
Apollyon. With moving
music, dance, humor, and
drama Pilgrim is a relevant
look at faith and the real
world.
CHARLEVOIX
M=;-=5 <:-);=:-;
Opening Reception will be
on April 5th from 6-8pm.
This is a show no one will
want to miss. Art Treasures
from Four Museums and One
Art Gallery will be featured.
Albion College Museum,
Dennos Museum Center,
Kalamazoo Institute of Art,
Muskegon Museum of Art,
and Joseph's World will be
featured in this exciting
exhibit. Amongst the artists
featured will be Bailey,
Frankenthaler, Kollwitz and
Warhol. Many noted artists
work will be on display. SAVE
the date and join us for this
first time ever exhibit. Check
out our website at
www.charlevoixcircle.org or
call 231.547.3554 for addi-
tional information.
Also: Announcing the 2014
Annual Fine Art Juried
Photography Exhibition to be
on display at the Charlevoix
Circle of Arts in downtown
Charlevoix this Summer,
June 19 - July 27. The theme
is "Michigan: Places, Spaces,
People and Things". Artists
should submit images that
show what is special to them
as they look about our
"pleasant peninsula". For
more information, please
find the complete Call for
Artists and the required entry
form: www.charlevoixcircle.
org/events--exhibits.html
ROSCOMMON
#-, G:--6 8-:.7:5)6+-
KCPA presents Red Green
“How to Do Everything (from
the man who should know)”
Saturday, April 5th at 7pm at
Kirtland Center for the
Performing Arts (on the
Kirtland Community College
Roscommon Campus) - After
a successful run of 139 shows
throughout Canada and the
USA on his “Wit and Wisdom
Tour”, Red Green is back in
theatres across North
America in 2014 with a brand
new show – How To Do
Everything – from the man
that should know! Red Green,
Canada’s foremost handy-
man, who became famous
for such things as duct tape,
Possum Lodge, and his own
unique style of humor and
wisdom now shares his
thoughts on “How to do
everything”. After establish-
ing himself in fifteen seasons
of his enormously popular
TV show as one of the world’s
handiest men, he now shows
there is no limit to his spe-
cialized knowledge and
advice. Purchase tickets by
calling 989-275-6777 or
online at www.kirtlandcen-
ter.com.
GRAYLING
C)6 ,:1>-
Families Against Cancer will
hold a can/bottle and bake
sell drive at Family Fare
Market, Saturday, April 5th
from 9am to 3pm. They will
be sorted for you. All monies
will go to Relay for life.
Contact Wayne A. Nelson at
989-348-2985
MACKINAW CITY
H)?3 51/:)<176
Straits area Audubon Society
invites the public on
Saturday, April 5 at 10 am to a
free event to witness the
hawk migration in Mackinaw
City. Co-sponsored by
Mackinaw Straits Hawk
Watch, Steve Baker will lead
this introduction to migrat-
ing raptors, with the chance
of watching them circle over-
head in large kettles. Meet at
the Mackinaw City
Recreation Center on Central
Avenue near the school and
ball field, marked by the
Hawk Watch sign. Dress
exceedingly warmly and
bring a lawn chair and binoc-
ulars. The alternate weather
date is Sunday, April 6.
Page 6 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Dowker’s
Meat Market & Deli
“See Les for the Best”
Dowker’s
Old Fashion Ham......
$
2.99lb.
Dearborn whole or half
Classic Ham............
$
3.79lb.
Dearborn whole or half
Spiral ham..............
$
4.25lb.
Dowker’s Smoked
Polish Sausage ........
$
4.79lb.
City Chicken
Made with veal and pork..
$
12.99lb.
13 varieties
Of Pierogies ...
$
4.99per 12 oz. pkg.
Lamb butters .........
$
2.89each.
Leg of lamb,
Red beet horse radish.
Old 27 South, Gaylord, MI 49735
989-732-7575
Order Now for Easter
Owners:
Les and Flo Dowker
Dowker’s homemade kiszka
Closed until
April 7th for
Spring Break
hûUK'.¥ûN· '/I IJ /¥ Iû S |¥ *\|'//¥/'I|KC/K9
CHEBOYGAN USED BOOKS
336 N.MAIN ST.,CHEBOYGAN, MI 49721
GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS SALE
Savo on Evorytning in Stook¹
GRAYLING
E);<-: B);3-< H-48
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April 7th – 16th at the
Crawford County
Community Christian Help
Center (300 Huron St.,
Grayling) - Easter basket
items will be available for
ages 1 through 10 during
office hours (Hours: Mon,
Wed & Fri from 11am—3pm.
Donations of Easter basket
grass, candy and small toys
will be accepted in advance
of above dates. Call 989-348-
6046 for details.
GRAYLING
D1)*-<-; E);<-: E//;-
<:)>)/)6B)
Enjoying the Holidays with
Diabetes Easter Eggs-trava-
ganza Monday, April 7th
from 6-7pm at the Days Inn
of Grayling – provided by
Mercy Hospital Grayling’s
Diabetes Education Program
& Dietitian Services. Guest
Speakers: Dr. Nuthakki, a
Pharmacist from Mercy
Hospital and Cardiac Rehab.
Join us as we provide tasty &
healthy side dish options for
Easter. Door prizes. Diabetes
education materials will be
available. RSVP at 989-348-
0455.
PETOSKEY
(14,41.- :-.=/-;
Petoskey Regional Audubon
Society (PRAS) April 8 pro-
gram Features Mark Vaniman
Presentation on Wildlife
Refuges in Michigan, with
emphasis on Seney National
Wildlife Refuge. The program
is at 7 p.m. at Independence
Village of Petoskey, located at
965 Hagar Drive. The pro-
gram is free, family friendly
and open to the public.
GAYLORD
B=;16-;; ).<-: H7=:;
Please join us on Wednesday,
April 9th for Business after
Hours sponsored and hosted
by Alpine Tavern & Eatery.
Come have a cocktail, enjoy
wonderful food provided by
Alpine Tavern, learn more
about the business and min-
gle with fellow community
members from 5pm - 7pm.
GRAYLING
G:1-. $=887:< G:7=8
Starting April 9th on
Wednesdays at Hospice of
Helping Hands (322 W.
Houghton Ave., West Branch)
- The group will meet for five
consecutive weeks and asks
for a commitment to attend
each group meeting. This
ensures the greatest benefit
and support to each individ-
ual of the group. There is no
fee to attend the group,
which is open to the commu-
nity. Registration is required.
For more information, or to
register, call 800-992-6592 or
989-345-4700.
GAYLORD
E,-4?-1;; G):,-6
C4=* M76<04A M--<16/
Wednesday, April 9th, 10am -
Noon at Otsego County
Sportsplex. Anyone
Interested in gardening in
the Gaylord Area is welcome
to join the members of the
Edelweiss Garden Club at
this monthly meeting. Social
Hour begins at 10am with the
business meeting and pro-
gram following at 10:30. (989)
732-5792
ROSCOMMON
K1:<4)6, $--316/
7516)<176; .7: 2014
!=<;<)6,16/ A4=56=;
The Kirtland Community
College Alumni Committee is
seeking nominations for the
“Outstanding Alumnus of the
Year” to be honored at our
2014 Commencement
Ceremony on May 2nd.
Selection criteria include
additional education beyond
the Kirtland experience, pro-
fessional accomplishments
and involvement in commu-
nity. Nominees must have
graduated from Kirtland in
2004 or before with a certifi-
cate of completion or associ-
ate degree. Complete infor-
mation is online at www.kirt-
land.edu/outstanding-alum-
nus - nomi nat i ons. ht ml .
Deadline for written nomi-
nations is Friday, April 11.
PETOSKEY
LEA L=6+0-76
Join a large group of business
and community leaders who
are all interested in the eco-
nomic vitality of our region at
the 2014 NLEA Annual
Luncheon, Friday, April 11.
The luncheon is from
11:30am to 1:30pm at the
Student and Community
Resource Center of North
Central Michigan College in
Petoskey. This year's event
will include knowledgeable
guest speakers, inspiring
awards and recognition of
outstanding projects and
people throughout the NLEA
region. Reservations are now
being accepted for individual
seats at $20 each and
reserved tables of eight for
$200. Event sponsors are
North Central Michigan
College and DTE Energy
Foundation.
GAYLORD
G77, M7:616/ G)A47:,
Please join us on Friday, April
11th for Good Morning
Gaylord sponsored by the
Gaylord Area Council for the
Arts and hosted by Wisconsin
Street Hall. Come enjoy a
wonderful breakfast buffet
from 8am - 9am, get a chance
to make any announcements
you wish to share, and learn
more about the Gaylord Area
Council for the Arts.
Admission $10 for members,
$15 for not yet members
MACKINAW CITY
L=6+0 ?1<0 E);<-:
*=66A
Lunch with the Easter Bunny
for all kids, is set for Saturday,
April 12th from 11am – 1pm
at The Church of the Straits.
There will be a “Cake Walk”
again this year. It has been in
the past, the highlight of the
lunch! If you could bake a
good cake, cupcakes, or
fancy cookies we could use
the donations.
GAYLORD
#=55)/- $)4-
At First United Methodist
Church Friday, April 11 from
9am-5pm and Saturday, April
12 from 9am - noon. Clothing
and a variety of household
items will be available at 50
cents and $1. Fill one bag on
Saturday for $1 (a few items
more $). All proceeds support
many local missions such as
Otsego County Food Pantry,
Salvation Army and New Life
Pregnancy Resource Center
and others throughout the
world.
GAYLORD
F1;0 .:A
The Northland Sportsmen’s
Club, 1542 Old Alba Rd (cor-
ner of West Otsego Lake
Drive and Old Alba Road) is
holding a number of Friday
night fish fries for the benefit
of the Shotgun Range House
Building Fund. Dates are
Friday April 11. Serving is
from 5 to 7pm. Cost is $10 per
plate.
GRAYLING
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Friday, April 11th from
8:30am to 4:30pm at Grayling
City Hall (1020 City Blvd,
Grayling) – sponsored by
Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center. The course is
an 8 hour classroom refresh-
er for motorists aged 50 and
older. There are no test
requirements. The course
will provide a review of driv-
ing skills and techniques, as
well as strategies and tips to
help everyone adjust to nor-
mal age-related physical
changes. Participants will get
a certificate and many auto
insurance companies give a
discount for completing the
course. Fee is $15/members
and $20 non-members. To
register call 989-348-7123.
GRAYLING
A6<19=- A88:)1;)4 )<
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Saturday, April 12th from
12–5pm at The Brickery (107
Ottawa, Grayling, MI) - Bring
$5 in cash or $5 in non-per-
ishable food and get one to
two items appraised. All pro-
ceeds go to The Crawford
County Christian Help
Center. For more informa-
tion, call 989-348-8999.
GRAYLING
#-/1;<-: .7: G:)A416/
L1<<4- L-)/=-
Thru April 12th - Registration
forms are available below,
and at Xpress copy and
Sylvester’s Sports Shop. You
may also mail in your regis-
tration forms to PO Box 130,
Grayling MI 49738. No
Registrations accepted after
April 12th. Please understand
a deadline must be enforced
so that we may gather coach-
es and draft players. Please
help us spread the word to
sign up before April 12th.
ROSCOMMON
F:-,,A F=;176 D
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$07?
Saturday, April 12th at 8pm
with Family Fun Fest from 6-
8pm at Kirtland Center for
the Performing Arts - Ever
find yourself awed by a magi-
cian and unable to answer
the proverbial question,
“How’d he do that?” Well,
you’ll be even more curious
when you’ve experienced the
magic of Freddy Fusion! A
favorite headliner on
Disney’s Cruise Ships, Freddy
is not just your average pres-
tidigitator! He is a scientist,
inventor, performer, author
and educator as well who
brings science to life in the
weirdest ways! Plan to come
early and experience the
close-up magic of sleight-of-
hand master Jamie Andress
of Mackinaw Island. Enjoy
food, music and more fun at
the Freddy Fusion Family
Fun Festival from 6-8 p.m.
FAMILY FOUR PACK JUST
$68. SAVE $40! Minimum
four ticket purchase.
Additional tickets $27.
Section C only. Purchase tick-
ets at 989-275-6777
EAST JORDAN
D7?6<7?6 78-6 07=;-
The Chamber is presently
working on the 2nd Annual
Downtown Open House -
Date this year will be
Saturday, April 12, 1PM -
3PM. This open house will
feature the vacant spaces
available in the first two
blocks of Main Street that are
for sale or rent. Building
owners or retailers are asked
to be on site to give tours and
answer questions.
LAKES OF THE NORTH
"16<-:-;< & "=:;-; "):<A
A Fund Raiser for Relay for
Life hosted by the Lakes of
the North Busy Bees team.
Saturday, April 12, 11am to
2pm. $2 per person at Lakes
of the North Clubhouse, 6330
Pineview, Mancelona. No
children under 12 please.
Grab your girlfriends and
join us! Sample recipes and
get crafty with inspiration
from the popular Pinterest
website. Plus there will be a
silent auction of new and
gently used purses (some
with surprises) and acces-
sories. Also Chinese auc-
tions, chair massages and
door prizes. All proceeds go
to our local Relay for Life!
Volunteer Incentives: We’re
looking for prepared
Pinterest recipes. If you
would like to bring a dish to
the event, we’ve got a great
incentive program to thank
you. Please contact Cindy
Pointe no later than
Thursday, April 10th at:
PinterestAndPursesParty@ho
tmail.com
MANCELONA
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The annual MEF Spaghetti
Dinner and Auction is Friday,
April 11 at Mancelona High
School. Donations for the
auction are greatly appreciat-
ed. Call 231-587-9764 for
information.
GRAYLING
C)6,A D76)<176;
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The Grayling Eagles Club is
looking for donations of
candy for the Children’s
Easter Egg Hunt to be held
for children ages 10 & under
on Saturday, April 12th from
9-11am. It must be individu-
ally wrapped and small
pieces to go inside of plastics
eggs. There will be a box at
the club to leave your dona-
tions in. Questions, call 989-
348-5287.
GAYLORD
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D166-:
Saturday, April 12, 6PM - 8PM
at Wisconsin Street Hall, 610
S. Wisconsin Ave. Dinner
Menu: Mess Sergeant's
Chicken Dinner and all the
fixins. Presentation of VFW
Scholarships. Adults: $12,
Children 10 and under: $6
GRAYLING
#-/1;<-: !8-6 .7:
G:)A416/ L1<<4- L-)/=-
Registration forms are avail-
able below, and at Xpress
copy and Sylvester’s Sports
Shop. You may also mail in
your registration forms to PO
Box 130, Grayling MI 49738.
No Registrations accepted
after April 12th.
PETOSKEY
C014,:-6E; H-)4<0 F)1:
The fair, which provides an
educational environment
where parents can learn how
to keep their children healthy
and safe, will take place from
9am to 2pm on Saturday,
April 12, at the Petoskey
Middle School located at 801
Northmen Drive, off of
Mitchell St.
GAYLORD
":16+-;; %-)
Tickets are available now for
the Gaylord Alpenfest
Princess Tea. The tea will take
place on Sunday, April 13 at
1:00pm at Wisconsin Street
Hall. Bring your favorite little
girl for an afternoon of fun,
celebrating with the
Alpenfest Queen’s court.
Tickets are required for this
event and are available at
Gaylord Area Chamber of
Commerce 319 West Main
Street. Tickets are limited, so
do not hesitate to stop in and
purchase yours today. Tickets
are $25 each, which admits 1
adult and 1 child. Each addi-
tional ticket is $10.
MACKINAW CITY
F1-4, <:18 <7 <0- 5776
8):< 2
Tuesday, April 15: Field Trip
to the Moon, Part II: Total
Lunar Eclipse at the Dark Sky
Viewing Area, 12:30 a.m. to 4
a.m. (yes, you read that time
right!). This year's Total
Eclipse of the Full Moon will
be visible overnight from
Monday to Tuesday begin-
ning around 12:30 a.m. at the
Headlands. “Our field trip
tonight will include the sto-
ries of ages regarding
eclipses, with rare and won-
derful views through binocu-
lars and telescopes,” said
Adams. This event is ideal for
those interested in photogra-
phy and is free and open to
the public; reservations are
not required.
GRAYLING
F:-- 16+75- <)@ ;-:>1+-
Northern Michigan Free Tax
Service offers free tax prepa-
ration and electronic filing
for individuals with income
up to $60,000. We prepare
and file federal, state and city
taxes. We receive our training
and certification through the
IRS Volunteer Income. Tax
Assistance VITA program.
Call 989-889-1141 to sched-
ule an appointment. We are
located at 305 Lawndale.
PETOSKEY
%)@ 0-48 .7: ;-617:;
Tax preparation for seniors is
available at the Petoskey
Friendship Center. Trained
AARP volunteers are able to
help low and middle income
seniors (aged 60 and over)
prepare their federal and
state tax returns. They can
also help with filing for state
heating and property tax
credits. The Tax-Aide pro-
gram is able to file your
return electronically, allow-
ing you to receive your
refund much faster. Direct
deposit of your refund can
also be arranged. Call the
Petoskey Center to make an
appointment: (231) 347-3211
or (888) 347-0369. An intake
form can be picked up at the
Friendship Center at 1322
Anderson Rd. This form must
be filled out completely in
advance of the appointment.
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 7
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
www.davekring.cem
1861 US31 N. Petoskey
231-347-2585
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Ctseço Christi±n School
/ll-School
Cpen House
Thursd±y, /pril 21
ó.30 p.m. - 8.00 p.m.
"Iecruiug~Croniug~ðelieriug~SucceeJiug"
Ctsego Christian School
ls now enrolling for the 20|1-20|5 school
year for three-year-old preschool through
8th grade students.
Iamilies can check out our website
at nnn.ocs¡c/lorJ.or¡, call the school at
[?8?] Z32-8333 or stop by the school here
in Gaylord, located at |3ZZ M-32 East.











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Stop by and let Shelly dress up your nails, from hand to toe.
OrigiNAILS
by Shelly
Now in our new location, inside
Caribbean Tan
(across from the fairgrounds entrance)
200 Fairview St., Gaylord
989-732-7100
Creative Nail Designs,
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Several leading technology providers
will join together to participate in the
first-ever Gaylord Regional Technology
Workshop in Otsego County on Friday,
April 11th. This free educational event,
produced in cooperation with Connect
Michigan and the University Center
Gaylord, will provide expert insight into
networking and technology topics for
local business leaders.
CenturyLink, Charter, COMLINK,
Frontier Communications, Lynx
Network Group, SPI Innovations, TSS,
Airiston, Gaslight Media and University
Center Metropolitan Area Network will
all participate in the workshop, which
will take place at University Center in
Gaylord from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
The event will feature panel discussions
with technology experts, keynote
speakers and breakout sessions that
explore how technology trends are
changing the landscape of business
communications.
“Technology can be intimidating,
especially for small business owners
who need to focus on running their
businesses and not be distracted by
confusion about networks and servic-
es,” said Tom Stephenson, Community
Technology Advisor for Connect
Michigan. “We are pleased that so
many providers of technology solutions
are joining this event to help demystify
topics like the cloud so that businesses
can better understand the ways tech-
nology can benefit their businesses.”
The benefits of this workshop will
address a broad range of topics relevant
to businesses, including:
How much bandwidth do you need
to accommodate your business needs?
What is a disaster recovery plan and
why does your business need one?
Should you move some or all of your
data and voice services to the cloud?
This event is free and open to all
local businesses. Business owners that
want to attend must register by April
4th by contacting Connect Michigan
Champion - Kristy Kelley at kristy.kel-
ley732@gmail.com
By a nearly 7 to 1 margin, Great Lakes
Energy members approved bylaws
changes that replace voting at-large for
directors with electing directors by dis-
trict.
A total of 5,996 votes in favor of cre-
ating director election districts and 858
opposed were received by the March 20
voting deadline. GLE members received
mail-in ballots with their February
issue of Michigan Country Lines maga-
zine.
“The change will allow our large 26-
county service area to be more equally
and locally represented by the nine
members who serve on the board,”
explains board chairman Richard
Walsworth. “Most of the electric coop-
eratives in the United States have direc-
tor election districts.”
As a consumer-owned electric coop-
erative, Great Lakes Energy is governed
by a board of directors elected by coop-
erative members. By the end of the
2016 election, there will be one director
residing in each of the nine newly-cre-
ated districts.
GLE members will elect a director
from their district once every three
years.
The first district election will be held
this year. Three board positions, each
for three years, will need to be filled.
The terms of directors Richard (Ric)
Evans of Ellsworth, Dale Farrier of
Kalkaska and Larry Monshor of Gaylord
expire this year. They reside in District
3 (Evans), District 4 (Monshor) and
District 5 (Farrier).
Counties by district are:
District 3 - Antrim
District 4 - Otsego, Montmorency,
Oscoda and Crawford
District 5 - Grand Traverse, Kalkaska,
Manistee, Missaukee and Wexford
GLE members in each of the three
districts will elect one candidate from
within their district to fill the three
positions on the board. Mail-in ballots
will be sent with the July/August 2014
issue of Michigan Country Lines.
More information on election
changes appears in the April issues of
Michigan Country Lines and the
PowerTalk bill insert or on gtlakes.com.
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Page 8 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
Technology providers join
forces to offer free education
about business services
Great Lakes Energy district
elections overwhelmingly
approved
Gaylord Ford-Lincoln
1928 S. Otsego Ave.
Gaylord
2005 FORD F-150
SUPERCREW 4WD
8cyl – auto – Blue – cloth
199,800 miles
Stk# 6824B
T
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2007 FORD F-150
SUPERCREW 4WD
8cyl – auto – Green – cloth
75,600 miles
Stk# 6956A $
18,960
2008 FORD F-150
SUPERCREW 4WD
8cyl – auto – Tan – cloth – 65,000 miles
Stk# 6966A
$
21,759
2011 FORD F-150
SUPERCREW 4WD
EcoBoost - auto – Silver – cloth
47,400 miles
Stk#6962A $
25,672
2008 DODGE RAM
QUADCAB 4WD
8cyl – auto – Blue – cloth – 69,900 miles
Stk# P5351
$
17,426
2009 DODGE RAM
REG CAB 4WD
8cyl – auto – Blue – cloth
112,600 miles
Stk# P5349
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10,959
www.gaylordfordlincoln.com
(989) 732-6737 •
1-800-732-6710
If you’re one of the millennials, the
generation that began in the early
1980s, you are still in the early stages of
your career. Retirement must seem like
a long way off yet, it’s never too soon to
start planning for it. At the same time,
though, you may also have shorter-term
goals. Can you make progress toward
your near-term and long-term objec-
tives at the same time?
Yes, you can but you’ll need to match
your short and long-term goals with the
appropriate savings and investment
vehicles.
For example, one of your most impor-
tant short-term goals may be purchas-
ing a house, so you’ll need to accumu-
late a certain amount of money by a cer-
tain time perhaps in three to five years.
Therefore, you won’t want to risk your
down payment on an investment whose
price will fluctuate and whose value
may be down just when you need the
money. Consequently, you may want to
look for a shorter-term investment
whose objective is preservation of prin-
cipal. Typically, with these types of vehi-
cles, the shorter the term, the lower the
interest rate but since your goal is basi-
cally to have a certain amount of money
available at a certain time, you might be
less interested in what return you’ll get
on this particular investment, as
opposed to the return you might hope
for from other, longer-term vehicles.
In fact, while you are saving for your
down payment on your home, or for
other short-term goals, you also need to
be thinking long
term that is, you
need to save as
much as you can
for your eventual
retirement.
Since you are
still in the early
stages of your
working life, you
have an enormous
asset going for
you: time. By start-
ing to save for
retirement now,
you have more
time to save than
you would if you
waited another
decade or so. Plus,
since you have so
many years to go
until you retire,
you can afford to
put a reasonable
percentage of your
investment dollars
into growth-ori-
ented instru-
ments, such as stocks or stock-based
investments. They may carry more risk,
including the risk of losing principal,
but they also offer greater reward poten-
tial than, say, fixed-income vehicles
such as bonds. And holding growth
investments for the long term can help
you look beyond short-term volatility.
You can start a long-term investment
program by investing in your 401(k) or
other retirement plan offered by your
employer. These plans usually offer a
variety of investment options, including
several growth-oriented accounts. Plus,
any earnings are typically tax-deferred,
which means your money could grow
faster than if it were placed in an invest-
ment on which you paid taxes every
year. So try to take full advantage of your
employer’s plan — at a minimum, con-
tribute enough to earn a match, if one is
offered. Then, every time your salary
goes up, boost your contributions.
With discipline and perseverance,
you can move toward both your distant
and imminent goals. And that’s the long
and the short of it.
Tune in Tuesday mornings to Eagle
101.5 FM at 8:30 am to hear Phil
Hofweber discuss the weekly Financial
Focus Topic. Phil Hofweber is a Financial
Advisor with Edward Jones Investments
located in Downtown Gaylord. He can be
reached at (989) 731-1851, or e-mail him
at phil.hofweber@edwardjones.com.
Edward Jones, its financial advisors and
employees do not provide tax or legal
advice. You should consult with a quali-
fied tax or legal professional for advice
on your specific situation. This article
was written by Edward Jones for use by
your local Edward Jones Financial
Advisor.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Leaving a 401(k) with a previous employer could mean
leaving it alone with no one to watch over it.
At Edward Jones, we can explain options for your 401(k)
and help you select the one that’s best for you. If you’d
like to roll it over to an Edward Jones Individual Retire-
ment Account (IRA), we can help you do it without
paying taxes or penalties. And you can feel confident
that someone is looking out for you and your 401(k).
To find out why it makes sense to talk with Edward
Jones about your 401(k) options, call or visit your
local financial advisor today.
If You Aren’t at Your Last Job,
Why Is Your 401(k)?
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MILLENNIALS MUST PLAN FOR
SHORT- AND LONG-TERM
GOALS
FINANCIAL FOCUS
Philip Hofweber, Financial Advisor with Edward Jones
GAYLORD, (989) 731-1851
Dear Editor,
During National Volunteer Appreciation Week, April 6-12,
the Women’s Resource Center of Northern Michigan
(WRCNM) pays tribute to the dedicated and generous indi-
viduals that volunteer with our organization.
It is with sincere gratitude that we celebrate WRCNM vol-
unteers during Volunteer Appreciation Week and every sin-
gle day. They provide invaluable help to our organization,
making it possible for us to continue to provide vital pro-
grams and services to individuals and families in Antrim,
Charlevoix, Emmet, Cheboygan and Otsego counties.
Last year, community members provided more than 5,386
volunteer hours to the WRCNM. They performed important
tasks and activities such as providing information and sup-
port to those who call our 24-hour crisis line; assisting cus-
tomers at our Gold Mine Resale Shops; helping prepare
direct mail pieces; performing maintenance at our facilities;
creating craft projects with the children of domestic abuse
survivors at our Safe Home; or serving on our Board of
Directors and Violence Prevention Team.
WRCNM volunteers are an inspiration to our staff, as well
as those who seek and need our services. They help accom-
plish a wide variety of tasks with dedication and generosity.
We would certainly not operate in the same manner with-
out their donation of time, talent and energy.
Please know that the contributions of WRCNM volunteers
make a significant and positive difference in northern
Michigan communities!
Sincerely,
Jamie Winters, Safe Home Coordinator
Letters and opinions may be submitted by
email to Office@WeeklyChoice.com
Letters to the Editor
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LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 9
Dear Editor,
The children and teens of today are our hope for tomorrow. It’s important for us as parents, caring adults and commu-
nity members to help set young people on the path for a healthy future and support them as they work to create positive
change. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and this year’s campaign is focused on youth. Individuals and commu-
nities are encouraged to support healthy sexual development to help prevent sexual violence.
Young people face many challenges during adolescence. Stereotypes and negative messages in the media don’t make
this process any easier. By learning and talking about healthy adolescent sexuality adults are able to support the teens in
their lives; to be a resource to teens as they learn and grow.
How can we support teens during this time of change and discovery? Young people need age-appropriate information
about healthy sexuality and relationships from trusted adults. The first step is to start an open and honest dialogue. Ask
questions and, most importantly, listen. We can all play a role in modeling healthy behaviors, promoting positive skills,
and creating safe environments. It’s important to empower the voices of youth and challenge negative, unhealthy mes-
sages.
It’s okay not to have all the answers. It’s more important to welcome questions and learn together. To create a vision for
a future without sexual violence, every voice can play a role in a healthier, safer tomorrow for all.
You can use your voice to start the conversation. You can support the voices of young people, and together we can
amplify our voices for a healthy future.
Sincerely,
Chris Krajewski, Domestic Abuse Program Director, Women’s Resource Center of Northern Michigan, Inc.
w w w . t a y l o r ma d e r e n o v a t i o n s . c o m
989-619-3941
Brian Taylor, Owner E-Mail: brian@taylormaderenovations. com
Call Now to Schedule Spring Painting or Renovations
i n t e r i o r & e x t e r i o r p a i n t i n g , r e n o v a t i o n s , c o n s t r u c t i o n
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AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.
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SURPRISING
WAYS TO
BOOST YOUR
HEALTH -
THROUGH YOUR
MARRIAGE
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Drs. Oz
and
Roizen
The Kirtland Community College
Alumni Committee is seeking nomina-
tions for the “2014 Outstanding
Alumnus of the Year.” The deadline
for the submissions is April 11, 2014.
Selection criteria include additional
education beyond the Kirtland experi-
ence, professional accomplishments,
involvement in community activities,
leadership and post-degree involve-
ment with Kirtland or in the field of
education. The nominee must have
graduated from Kirtland in 2004 or
before, with a certificate of completion
or associate degree.
The alumnus selected will be recog-
nized and speak briefly at the college’s
upcoming 2014 commencement cere-
mony Friday, May 2. The name of the
person honored will also be added to a
plaque that hangs in the
Administration Center on the college’s
main campus near Roscommon.
Nominations should consist of the
name of the nominee and information
addressing the selection criteria to
support the nomination. Candidates
may nominate themselves or someone
else. Former nominees who have not
been selected previously are welcome
to have their names resubmitted for
consideration.
Deadline for written nominations is
Friday, April 11, and should be
addressed to Kirtland Community
College, Attention Jo Ann
Gave/Student Services, 10775 N. St.
Helen Road, Roscommon, Mich.
48653. Or, e-mail nominations to Gave
at joann.gave@kirtland.edu.
Annually, more than 3,000 students
attend a variety of occupational,
skilled trades, two-year and transfer
degree programs at Kirtland’s loca-
tions near Roscommon, Kirtland-
Gaylord, Kirtland-West Branch and in
Tawas. Kirtland also offers a wide
range of online courses and degrees,
all of which can be completed from
home.
To learn more about Kirtland’s vet-
eran-friendly services, programs,
advising, testing, financial aid and
other services available to students,
contact Michelle Devine, Admissions
Coordinator, at 989-275-5000 exten-
sion 284 or visit www.kirtland.edu.
Child sexual abuse impacts 1 in 4
girls and 1 in 6 boys in the U.S., which
is why the National Sexual Violence
Resource Center is encouraging indi-
viduals and communities to learn
more about it in an effort to help pre-
vent it from occurring.
A local collaborative campaign to
help prevent child sexual abuse was
initiated in 2013 by the Child Abuse
Council of Charlevoix and Emmet
Counties; Great Start Collaborative of
Emmet, Charlevoix and Northern
Antrim Counties; and the Women’s
Resource Center of Northern
Michigan, Inc., with the goal of getting
information and resources into the
hands of parents and educators to
provide a better understanding of the
issue; enabling them to become part
of the solution in preventing this per-
vasive crime.
Through this prevention project,
free informational materials have
been offered to elementary schools in
Charlevoix and Emmet counties to
share with staff and parents of stu-
dents in kindergarten through 3rd
grade. Schools participating in the
project include Alanson, Boyne City,
Boyne Falls, Harbor Light, Pellston, St.
Francs Xavier and Central, Lincoln
and Sheridan schools in Petoskey. The
cost of materials was funded by the
partner agencies, as well as a $2,000
grant from the Char-Em United Way
Emerging Needs Fund. During the
two year campaign support was also
provided by Charlevoix-Emmet
Intermediate School District and the
Health Department of Northwest
Michigan’s Early Childhood Behavioral
Health Initiative.
“We decided to get this important
information out to parents through
local schools that were willing to par-
ticipate in the program,” said Stacey
Walsh-Hoobler, Clinical Director and
Therapist with the Women’s Resource
Center. “The information and
resources are intended to help them
understand their role in supporting
healthy childhood development and
how to talk with their children about a
subject that can be difficult.”
Part of the prevention effort also
includes an Early Childhood
Networking Night for caregivers and
parents held at the Char-Em ISD
Taylor School for Exceptional Learners
in Petoskey from 6:00-7:30 p.m., on
Wednesday, April 9. Event topics
include child sexual abuse prevention
and the role of mandated reporters
presented by Dar Charlebois, commu-
nity prevention educator with the
Women’s Resource Center of Northern
Michigan and Dana Stempky who will
provide details on the Michigan Child
Protection Law. The Early Childhood
Networking Night is free of charge and
includes dinner and child care. To
register, parents and caregivers may
call Susan Chowen of Great Start to
Quality Northwest Resource Center at
(231) 582-8070 or visit greatstart-
forkids.com.
Elementary schools in Charlevoix
and Emmet counties that have yet to
order the free prevention materials
may inquire about availability by con-
tacting Maggie Kromm, Executive
Director of the Child Abuse Council of
Charlevoix and Emmet Counties at
231-753-8511 or by emailing child-
abusecouncil@gmail.com.
Information on healthy childhood sex-
ual development and tips for talking
to your child on this subject can also
be found on the National Sexual
Violence Resource Center website at
nsvrc.org.
Kirtland Community College
seeks nominations for
Outstanding Alumnus
Area agencies team up to prevent
child sexual abuse
Visit Dennis
at Carriage CIippery
(across from Family Video)
for a great haircut or shave.
Open Wednesday – Friday 9am – 5pm, Saturday 9am – Noon
Walk-ins are welcome or call 989-732-5094 for an appt.
Get Your Hair Cut by
a Master Barber
MIO FAMILY
DENTISTRY
James S. Mangutz, D.D.S.
107 E. 8th Street, Mio, MI 48647
(989) 826-6262
Fax (989) 826-1405
jmangutz@gmail.com
FamIIy Per
CremarIon Cenrer
2835 Dickerson Rd.,
Gaylord, MI 49¯35
2010 M-119
Petoskey, MI 499¯0
989-732-9501 • Toll Free 877-407-4446
familypetcremationcenters.com
Where your pet is treated with respect and dignity.
P.O. Box 1064 · Gaylord, MI 49734
David
Cell (989) 217-1712
Dan
(989) 448-1942
(989) 732-8050
DIPZINSKI
PAINTING & WALLPAPERING
Joseph A. Messenger Owner/Manager
www.gaylordfuneralhome.com
989-732-2230
850 North Center Avenue • P.O. Box 249, Gaylord, Michigan 49734
Gaylord Community
Funeral Home
& Cremation Service
Letters to the Editor
Letters and opinions may be submitted by
email to Office@WeeklyChoice.com
Page 10 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
By Jim Akans
For over 23 years, Northern
Management Services has been help-
ing people to continue to live as inde-
pendently as possible, regardless of
their age or disability. Effective at the
beginning of this year, the company
began operating under a new name;
Community Home & Health Services,
continuing a long established tradi-
tion of offering individualized care
services in the home utilizing the
experience and expertise of a staff that
has grown to over 170 employees. The
company serves over 100 daily clients
in a ten county area, including the
recently added Grand Traverse area.
“As Northern Management Service,”
states Bruce Fasel, company presi-
dent, “we have struggled with a name
that did not fully describe the services
we offer. Community Home & Health
Services is a much clearer reflection of
what we do. We do not focus on a par-
ticular age group or disability…our
focus is on people in need of care in
the home all along life’s path. We tai-
lor our services to meet the specific
clients needs.”
The services offered by the team at
Community Home & Health Services
cover a wide range of client needs.
They include assisting people with
daily living needs, such as meal prepa-
ration, personal care, transportation
for shopping or medical appoint-
ments, socialization, and more.
“We are here to help our clients
enjoy life,” Fasel observes, “and to
continue to live as close as possible to
the way they have all of their lives.
He adds, “Everyone who works here
cares deeply about the people we
serve. We enjoy and are excited about
what we do… helping people live as
independently as possible. We provide
people with an option to nursing
home care, where their needs are met,
they feel safe and secure, and it is also
more cost effective for them.”
When Northern Management
Services was established by Bruce
Fasel and Robert Passmore on
February 1,1991, the founders had
already accumulated approximately
fifteen years of experience working
with individuals requiring varying lev-
els of living assistance. Beginning in
the early 1970’s they worked with
organizations such as the Alpine
Center and other community health
groups. Fasel recalls it was an emo-
tionally rewarding experience that cre-
ated the foundation for the caring,
understanding approach that has
become the hallmark of the wide array
of comprehensive in-home services
Community Home & Health Services
provides today.
Fasel states. “We are available twen-
ty-four hours a day, seven days a week,
every day of the year. Our team
receives extensive and ongoing train-
ing. We have certified CPR and first-
aid instructors on staff and utilize our
many years of caregiver knowledge to
provide a training program that
reflects our experience in the field. We
now also offer private duty nursing for
those requiring in-home nursing serv-
ices.”
A subsidiary of Community Home &
Health Services called Access
Unlimited, offers consultation for peo-
ple in making their home more com-
fortable and user-friendly through
universal design, which adapts living
spaces to a barrier-free lifestyle. The
company also works in affiliation with
Telephone Support Systems in offer-
ing an innovative Personal Emergency
Response System (PERS). The system
offers the user the choice of a pendant
or wrist style alert device, which when
activated in the event of an emergency
notifies a local operator on duty 24/7.
Working with the Kiwanis Club of
Gaylord, Community Home & Health
Services was instrumental in sponsor-
ing the formation of the Aktion Club, a
community service team comprised of
members living with various disabili-
ties. In their first year the Club
received two Service Club Awards;
placing 1st in the State of Michigan
and 3rd in the nation for their exten-
sive contributions to the community,
and recently received the Spirit Award
from the Volunteer Center of Otsego
County. Among the many activities
the Aktion Club has participated in
include being Salvation Army bell
ringers, regularly hosting Community
Meals, and involvement in the Adopt-
a-Road program for a section of
Murner Road in Gaylord.
Jen Marcenaro, Northern
Management Services Coordinator,
states, “The Aktion Club offers a way
for these individuals to give back to
the community, and it raises their
confidence and independence. Their
contributions also help those in the
community learn about those who are
disabled, and to discover how truly
amazing these people really are.”
The team at Community Home &
Health Services share a common goal
of helping individuals in northern
Lower Michigan continue to live a
comfortable lifestyle in the setting of
their choice for as long as possible.
After over 23 years of service in this
highly specialized field, Community
Home & Health Services truly under-
stands their client’s individual needs
in providing personalized, profession-
al in-home support.
For more information, visit
www.northernmanagement.org or call
(989) 732-6374.
Community Home &
Health Services…
offering “services for people along life’s path”
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April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 11
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Choosing a locally owned store gen-
erates almost four times as much eco-
nomic benefit for the surrounding
region as shopping at a chain, a new
study has concluded. The analysis also
found that eating at a local restaurant
produces more than twice the local
economic impact of dining at a chain
restaurant.
The research firm Civic Economics
analyzed data from fifteen independent
retailers and seven independent restau-
rants, all located in Salt Lake City, and
compared their impact on the local
economy with four chain retail stores
(Barnes & Noble, Home Depot, Office
Max, and Target) and three national
restaurant chains (Darden, McDonald’s,
and P.F. Chang’s).
The study found that the local retail-
ers return an average of 52 percent of
their revenue to the local economy,
compared with just 14 percent for the
chain retailers. Similarly, the local
restaurants re-circulate an average of
79 percent of their revenue locally,
compared to 30 percent for the chain
eateries.
What accounts for the difference?
Independent businesses spend much
more on local labor. They also procure
more goods for resale locally and rely
much more heavily on local providers
for services like accounting and print-
ing. This means that much of the
money a customer spends at a local
store or restaurant is re-spent within
the local economy, supporting other
businesses and jobs.
ALPINE GOLD & SILVER EXCHANGE
1363 West Main, (next to Mancino`s) Gaylord

Open Mon-Fri 9am – 6pm
Sat. 9am – 2pm
CLOSED SUNDAYS
Buy – Sell
Appraise
Highest Paying Coin &
Scrap Gold Dealer in
Northern Michigan.
Largest Engagement Ring Selection!
311 West Main, Downtown Gaylord
www.hogansjewelers.com
989.732.4444

Ask about our
Senior Discount
Family
Comfort Systems
989-732-8099
219 East Main
Gaylord, MI 49735
989-732-6271 PHONE
WWW.MAINOAK.COM
BRIAN M. HOYNER, DDS
Main
ak
Family Dentistry
PLC
O
UP NORTH ELECTRONICS
658 EDELWEISS VILLAGE PKWY., GAYLORD, MI 49735
Between Walmart and Lowes in the Walmart Plaza
Jeff Morey,
Manager
upnorthelectronics@hotmail.com
PH. 989.732.6731
If you or your business are interested in sponsoring your favorite
non-profit organization, call our office at 989-732-8160 or e-mail us at Office@WeeklyChoice.com.
We have a number of Non-Profit Groups who are waiting for a sponsor to be a
part of the 20/20 Project. Cost to sponsor a
Non-Profit Group is just $25 a month.
'> ".<C C.>521<.7 '05::7
321 N. ;:-/7, G)@479,, MI 49735 A 989-732-5801
G6@2 :97692 .>:
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(989) 731-1338 E J15 J-..-9:, 2860 K)::<*) ",., G)@479,, MI 49735
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God ga!e $o $or teeth..."e help $o keep them.
33 0ea*+ "& Pe,'+#e0 a, 204 S,a,e S,., Pe,'+#e0
231-347-8980
G)A47:, A:-) C7=6+14 .7: <0- A:<;
GACA 2014 E>-6<;
March 5th-May 3rd
Juried
Photography Exhibit
"076-: 989-732-3242 C ???./)A47:,):<;.7:/
Call for Entr$ forms for member e#hibits and jried sho"s
are a!ailable at the Arts Center, 125 E. Main Street, Ga$lord
#AL$ & #AND A"E
$ (%" &EHICLE
'($% B- ($DA- ($ EE%
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989.390.0485
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J-#-J C76:;9<+;176, I6+.
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(989) 731-1338
J15 J-..-9:, 2860 K)::<*) "7),, G)@479,, MI 49735
$876;7:-, *A $-617:; H-4816/ $-617:; (989) 448-8323
Carla L Parke RN, O#ner
Senior Helping Senior
%
...a #a$ !o gi"e and !o recei"e
%
989-448-8323
###. eni orhel pi ngeni or. com/nor!hernmi chi gan
Micha$"%
1535 Oal Lake Road
Ga$lo!d, MI 49735
Phone 989-939-8919
Fa# 989.939.8511
gm@micha$"e.com
""".micha$"e.com
Whatever it takes!
200 #. C7<9; A=-6<-, #<1;- 2
!7:; ..1+- B7? 1154,
G)@479,, M1+01/)6 49734
%5:92: 989.448.8828
F.B: 989.448.8829
0?<><@25>0.0:8
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220 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord • (989) 732-5444
!<;-/7 C7=6<A
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The only way to end poverty is to build community
Underneath everything we are, underneath everything we do, we are all people.
Connected, Interdependent, United.
And when we reach out a hand to one, we influence the condition of all.
That's what it means to LIVE UNITED.
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Page 12 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
513 Charles Brink Rd. · Gaylord
Rev. Karen Huddelson
Aaron Hotelling, Director of Music
Ecumenical Worship
Sunday Service and
Sunday School
10 a.m. (nursery provided)
NEW PHONE NUMBER 989-732-7447 • GaylordFPC.org
Joy Fellowship
Assembly of God
8600 S. Straits Hwy.
Located between Indian River and Wolverine.
Sunday - Coffee Hour 9 AM
Service - 10 AM including services for children
Wednesday - 6 PM
231-525-8510 Pastor Bob Moody
B6/72 B.=21 %<2.05694
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Friendship Church
415 North Ohio, Gaylord · 989-732-3621
Pastor Steve Datema
A Christian Reformed Ministry
Enjoy the music and message every Sunday morning
at 10:00am. Sunday School at 11:15am
Our Mission: ¨A Spirit filled family of God united in our fear and love of Christ and
committed to the truth of the Bible. A praying church that equips its members to care,
serve and reach out to others with the saving grace of Jesus Christ.'
FREEDOM WORSHIP CENTER
Full Gospel • Non Denominational Church
826-8315
Need Prayer or Ride to Church...Give us a call
• Sunday School - Adults/Kids 9:30 am
• Sunday Worship 10:30 am
• Wednesday Back to Basics Bible Study 2 pm
611 Mt. Tom Rd. (M-33)
Mio, Michigan
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PERSPECTIVE
Scott
Brown
Just a guy, in the piney woods of
East Texas, who listens to what
Father God has to say and writes
it down in a "binder" called
Reflections of a Son.
Sales Manager for Crick Tool
Thank you- 1. A phrase used to express gratitude for a service rendered or kindness offered.
Early last week my wife, Lori, had the opportunity to say “Thank you” to me for something I
had done earlier that day. Now, if you know her at all, you know that Lori is a very thankful per-
son, so the phrase “Thank you” is common to my ears, as well as to the ears of my children. Later
that evening, just before we jumped into the abyss of unconsciousness, a thought danced across
my thoughts and I asked Lori to ponder it with me.
“Have you ever heard Father say Thank you?” She and I both had the same answer of no, but
continued to contemplate, as we drifted off.
The next morning, as is custom around the breakfast table, Lori asked Conner and Brailey how
they slept and if they had any dreams. She also likes to share, with them, what we’ve been talking
about, and the subject of “Thank you” rose to the surface. Below is an account of that conversa-
tion.
From Lori’s journal-
I asked the kids what a "pure heart" looks like: (They were discussing Ps. 86:11b)
Brailey said, "Cleanness, no meanness, to follow God's instructions, nobody mean can enter
His presence."
Conner said, "All kindness, it would be pretty, it would be peaceful."
Then I asked the kids if they've ever heard God say "Thank you", to them.
Conner said no, so I encouraged him to listen.
When I asked Brailey she said, "YES, when I get mad and go into the closet, I talk to God about
my emotions and how I feel. When I finish, He says, "Thank you". I think He is thanking me for
telling Him how I feel.”
I told her I’ve never heard God say "Thank you" to me before, but then I haven't tried to listen
for those words.
Her response to that was, “He tells you "Thank you" all the time, but you’re too busy doing to
hear Him. She went on to say, very confidently & assertively, “He talks to all of us, especially when
we're studying the Bible, we just have to "listen". Her eyes were bright, peaceful & full of life, as
she was speaking....there was a definite change in them, as she spoke.
I'm blown away!
At the end of the day, it is not about how much we have done, but instead how we’ve drawn
near to Father.
My friends, our Father is full of "Thanks" and He wants to share that with us, His Sons!
How can we give away that which we have not received?
Listen for Father to say “Thank you”, this week! Receive it and give it away, if He tells you to.
Shhh.... listen..... "Thank you"......
Please take one minute, right now, don't say a word and just listen.
Live FREE!!!
Scott
Thoughts on...If you have not received thanks then
how can you give it??
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Daily Word
THURSDAY: 2 Samuel 22:47-51 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 47 “The Lord lives, and blessed be my
rock; And exalted be God, the rock of my salvation, 48 The God who executes vengeance for me, And
brings down peoples under me, 49 Who also brings me out from my enemies; You even lift me above
those who rise up against me; You rescue me from the violent man. 50 “Therefore I will give thanks to
You, O Lord, among the nations, And I will sing praises to Your name. 51 “He is a tower of deliver-
ance to His king, And shows lovingkindness to His anointed, To David and his descendants forever.”
FRIDAY: 1 Chronicles 16:34 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 34 O give thanks to the Lord, for He is
good; For His lovingkindness is everlasting.
SATURDAY: Ezra 3:11 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 11 They sang, praising and giving thanks to
the Lord, saying, “For He is good, for His lovingkindness is upon Israel forever.” And all the people
shouted with a great shout when they praised the Lord because the foundation of the house of the
Lord was laid.
SUNDAY: Jonah 2:9 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 9 But I will sacrifice to You With the voice of
thanksgiving. That which I have vowed I will pay. Salvation is from the Lord.”
MONDAY: Luke 17:13-19 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 13 and they raised their voices, saying,
“Jesus, Master, have mercy on us!” 14 When He saw them, He said to them, “Go and show your-
selves to the priests.” And as they were going, they were cleansed. 15 Now one of them, when he saw
that he had been healed, turned back, glorifying God with a loud voice, 16 and he fell on his face at
His feet, giving thanks to Him. And he was a Samaritan. 17 Then Jesus answered and said, “Were
there not ten cleansed? But the nine—where are they? 18 Was no one found who returned to give
glory to God, except this foreigner?” 19 And He said to him, “Stand up and go; your faith has made
you well.”
TUESDAY: Romans 1:20-22 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 20 For since the creation of the world His
invisible attributes, His eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly seen, being understood
through what has been made, so that they are without excuse. 21 For even though they knew God,
they did not honor Him as God or give thanks, but they became futile in their speculations, and their
foolish heart was darkened. 22 Professing to be wise, they became fools,
WEDNESDAY: Ephesians 5:3-6 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 3 But immorality or any impurity or
greed must not even be named among you, as is proper among saints; 4 and there must be no filthi-
ness and silly talk, or coarse jesting, which are not fitting, but rather giving of thanks. 5 For this you
know with certainty, that no immoral or impure person or covetous man, who is an idolater, has an
inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and God. 6 Let no one deceive you with empty words, for
because of these things the wrath of God comes upon the sons of disobedience.
All kids are terrific and here at North Ohio Elementary we are acknowledging kids for good
character. The Kiwanis club of Otsego County is helping us with this endeavor. Students who
exhibit good behavior by following our school rules will be recognized by staff for doing so.
One student per class will be selected to receive a “Terrific Kid” award, button, and pencil. The
student names will be announced on our morning announcements. They will also have their
picture taken to hang on our “Terrific Kid” bulletin board. This is an excellent opportunity for
staff, students, parents and the community to connect on a social/emotional level because
good character is just as important as good grades!
The Kitchen Painters: The Power of Passion will
be on display March 28th through April 26th in
the Atrium Gallery at the Crooked Tree Arts
Center. The Kitchen Painters, a group of passion-
ate art enthusiasts, started out as a small collec-
tive of people who love to paint in the company
of like-minded individuals. Their goal was to
gather weekly to share ideas and inspirations, and
to encourage each other.
Since their inception in 1981, the Kitchen
Painters have set up shop in homes of fellow
painters, the onetime Michigan Bakery Building,
at North Central Michigan College, until they
found a permanent home at the Crooked Tree
Arts Center in 1981. Now, 33 years later, the artists
still meet every Monday from 1-3 pm at CTAC.
The once small group has grown to include
not only retirees who are pursuing their favorite
hobby, but also young adults who squeeze in art
between school and work. The common thread
connecting all Kitchen Painters is their passion
for art and painting. Members share their knowl-
edge and discoveries so that as a whole the group
benefits from the experiences of each other.
In the exhibition The Power of Passion, you
will discover the visual strength and original
beauty of the works by these twenty-one artists,
many of whom are award winning. Each artist has
a moving personal story, and a differing back-
ground which makes for a diverse showcase of work.
This exhibition will surprise and challenge art
gallery goers, forcing examination of the conventional defini-
tion of the word "artist," and showing that good art is good
art regardless of the maker's résumé.
The 2014 Visual Arts Series is supported in part by the
Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and Edward
Jones Investments of Petoskey and Harbor.
Regional history group announces new awards recognizing
area achievers in historical preservation, promotion.
Throughout Northwest Michigan, individuals, volunteers
and organizations are protecting and preserving this region’s
rich history in ways not often recognized by the public. But
without these caretakers of our past, many stories that have
defined this area of Michigan would be lost to the passage of
time and memory.
To recognize these extraordinary efforts in protecting, pre-
serving and sharing our history, the Essence of Emmet – a
local collaborative of organizations and individuals sharing
an interest in our history – has announced it will begin an
awards program.
To be eligible for the awards, the recipient(s) must be indi-
viduals and organizations dedicated to the preservation,
presentation and promotion of the history and culture of
Emmet County. (Individuals serving on the Essence of
Emmet group are not eligible.) Work or programs must have
taken place in the last 18 months within Emmet County,
though the nominated party does not need to be a resident
of Emmet County.
“The Essence of Emmet group has been discovering a real-
ly vast network of people, organizations and groups in our
communities who are doing fascinating, important work pre-
serving the stories from the past,” said Phil Porter, Director
of Mackinac State Historic Parks and an Essence of Emmet
member. “We felt this would be a terrific way to support and
encourage these efforts and shine a light on the people doing
this really great work.”
The public is invited and encouraged to nominate individ-
uals and organizations for these awards, which have several
categories: Lifetime achievement award; distinguished vol-
unteer award; distinguished professional award; Publications
(articles, books, newsletters and print media, websites);
restoration and preservation projects; special programs; and
exhibits. No more than one award per category will be
awarded each year.
Nominations will be reviewed by the Essence of Emmet
Awards Committee. Winners will be announced during the
annual fall twice-yearly program hosted by the Essence of
Emmet group. Nominations are due by Sept. 1.
To nominate, please complete and submit the nomination
form that can be found online, at
www.emmetcounty.org/historical/ If you have questions
about the awards or the process, please contact Phil Porter at
(231) 436-4100.
The Essence of Emmet group works to promote this
region's rich history. Members of the Essence of Emmet
include the Emmet County Historical Commission, Great
Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association, Harbor Springs Area
Historical Society, Headlands International Dark Sky Park,
Inland Water Route Historical Society, Little Traverse Bay
Bands of Odawa Indians, Little Traverse Historical Society,
Mackinac State Historic Parks, Mackinaw Area Historical
Society and Pellston Historical Society. For information
about the group, contact Beth Anne Eckerle, Emmet County
Director of Communications, at (231) 348-1704 or becker-
le@emmetcounty.org
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 13
READ
Recreation, Entertainment, Arts, Dining
Kitchen Painters: The Power of
Passion
Essence of
Emmet history awards
H"&!& G"&$"/ a+! Ba/ba/a Ha+a%a+, CTAC K&1%"+ Pa&+1"/0
Field trip
to the
moon
Protecting the night sky means protecting natural habi-
tat, and at no time is that more important than during the
migration season of the saw-whet owl, an entirely noctur-
nal creature that relies on plumage for camouflage during
the day and deep darkness for mating, migration and pre-
dation at night.
Professional birder Ed Pike conducts research regarding
saw-whets at the Headlands International Dark Sky Park
each year, and this April 4 and 5 the public is invited to
witness his research, though space is limited and reserva-
tions are required for this free event.
The time is 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Guests should meet at the
Guest House; more details will be provided by calling for
reservations at (231) 348-1713.
At the start of the evening, Pike sets up mist nests and an
owl calling station along one of the trails near the
Headlands Guest House. He targets saw-whet owls, but
there is the possibility of boreal and long-eared owls as
well.
The first net check will be about 30 minutes after sunset
(around 8:10 pm), and any captured owls will be meas-
ured, aged, sexed, banded, photographed and released.
Pike will demonstrate techniques that biologists use to
learn more about these nocturnal hunters and describe the
findings he has amassed over his 20 years of banding 2,000
owls of eight species.
In between casting nets and researching the catch,
guests are led through a tour of the night sky and the bird-
related constellations by Headlands Program Director,
Mary Stewart Adams.
"This is one of our most popular programs of the year
and really allows us to demonstrate more fully why pro-
tecting natural darkness matters so much," said Adams.
"Because we are dealing with sensitive natural habitat, we
can only allow a certain number of attendees.”
The Moon will be at waxing crescent phase on April 4
and 5, so it will create a picturesque scene to the west
without casting too much light into the landscape.
"The crescent Moon will be beautiful in the region of
Taurus the Bull, just past Pleiades, whose story is related to
the sisters that transformed themselves into birds in order
to carry nectar to the infant Zeus," said Adams. "It's the
stories and opportunities like these that really allow us to
connect to our environment and to the cultural history of
humanity in ways that are educational, informative,
restorative and entertaining, for the whole family."
NOTE: Because we are dealing with a sensitive nighttime
habitat, space will be limited and reservations are
required. To make reservations, call (231) 348-1713.
CompIctc D] & Mcdia Scrviccs for
Your Most lmportant fvcnts
www.schccrcntcrtainmcnt.com
Chris Schccr
(989) 217-8090
info"schccrcntcrtainmcnt.com
º Wcddìng/Rcccµlìons
º Bìrlhday Parlìcs
º VHS lo DVD Convcrsìon
º Danccs
º Slìdcshows
º and morc
Terrific Kids from North Ohio Elementary
Front row: Sophia Kniss; Kaven Cole; North Ohio Sock Monkey; Bethany
Dreffs; Ian Vollmer
Middle row: Will Smith; Daneiel Beverly; Olivia Adamek; Zell Chiles; Keegan Sajdak; Brent Mankowski;
Ethan Edwards
Back row: Kiwanian, Mrs. Kellner; Joshua Allmacher; Paige Crapser; Izicck Sharpe;
Kelsyn Lundell; Alexis Kozlowski; Kiwanian, Mr. Weston
TERRIFIC KIDS
Safety and support of the survivor is vitally
important immediately following sexual
assault, according to Mary Hotchkiss, a ther-
apist with the Women’s Resource Center of
Northern Michigan (WRCNM). “The local
hospitals call us when there is a sexual
assault and a trained staff member is avail-
able 24-hours a day to go directly to the hos-
pital to provide support to the survivor, sur-
vivor’s family and to hospital personnel,”
Hotchkiss explained.
In Michigan, the legal term for sexual
assault or rape is Criminal Sexual Conduct
(CSC). It is defined as any form of unwanted
sexual contact obtained without consent
and/or obtained through the use of force,
threat of force, intimidation or coercion.
Sexual assault survivors have the choice to
undergo a forensic exam during which
trained hospital personnel gather important
evidence, including DNA, to establish that a
crime has occurred. The collection of this
evidence is helpful if the survivor chooses to
pursue legal action against the perpetrator.
Michigan State Police provides the
WRCNM forensic exam kits at no charge.
Hotchkiss works with local hospitals to
restock their supply on a monthly basis. The
forensic exams are also provided to survivors
free of charge using funds available from a
state grant.
As part of the exam, the survivor’s clothing
is often taken as evidence. Hotchkiss
explains that the Women’s Resource Center
also provides a survivor clothing kit which
includes a shirt, pants, underclothes, tooth-
brush, toothpaste, mouthwash, comb and
deodorant, supplied by the Assistance
League of Southeastern Michigan.
“We appreciate that the hospitals work
together with us at the Women’s Resource
Center because that continuity of care is so
important when assisting survivors,” said
Hotchkiss. After the survivor
leaves the hospital, the
WRCNM continues to pro-
vide ongoing services that
include free and confidential
counseling, legal advocacy
(court support) and support
groups.
The WRCNM services the
five counties of Antrim,
Charlevoix, Cheboygan,
Emmet and Otsego counties
and during the past fiscal
year provided supportive
services to 290 sexual assault
survivors, 84 of whom were
under 18 years of age.
For more information
about the WRCNM’s free and
confidential services, call
their 24-hour crisis and
information line at (231)
347-0082 or (800) 275-1995
for long distance callers.
Page 14 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
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Designed from the wheels up to deliver maxi-
mum drop-top enjoyment, the all-new Ford
Mustang convertible is a fantastic way to escape
the daily grind of life and hit the open road. With
its distinct style and a completely redesigned top
system, drivers can enjoy the shining sun or
sparkling stars quicker with all of the perform-
ance and character expected of Mustang.
“Convertible tops and iconic sports cars like
Mustang have always been a great pairing,” said
Dave Pericak, Mustang chief engineer. “This is
the best convertible we’ve ever built with a one-
of-a-kind design that is instantly recognizable as
Mustang and an outstanding all-around driving
experience.”
Creating the new Mustang convertible
involved far more than just slicing the top off the
fastback. The two cars were designed and engi-
neered from the ground up, incorporating an
array of visually subtle, but important, changes to
make sure each stood on its own while meeting
increased standards of quality, performance and
refinement.
“From the start, we committed to giving
Mustang convertible a unique look from the fast-
back with the clean, cohesive design it deserved
,” said Joel Piaskowski, exterior design director.
“From the raised and straightened muscle line on
the rear haunches to the recontoured trunklid,
the new Mustang convertible has a more linear
quality whether the top is up or down, giving the
car its own distinct presence on the road.”
For the first time on Mustang, every convert-
ible roof gets a full fabric outer layer for the roof
plus a full inner headliner to enclose the five-bow
structure. Sandwiched in between these layers is
a full 10-millimeter thick insulation pad that
makes the convertible nearly as quiet inside with
the top up as the fastback.
“A great deal of effort went into details such as
the shape of the rear quarter windows so that
they could drop completely out of sight when the
top is down,” said Piaskowski. “The top system
was carefully refined to prevent unsightly folds or
‘ears’ at the rear corners of the roof when it’s up.”
Lowering the roof is easier than ever. A new
center-mounted single latch offers quick one-
handed operation right from the driver’s seat.
The new electromechanical drive system raises
or lowers the roof in half the time required previ-
ously with just a press of a button on the center
console. The electric drive system is also much
quieter than the previous electro-hydraulic
design.
“When you’re sitting in the driveway or at a
traffic light and you decide you want to enjoy
some sunshine, you shouldn’t have to wait
around for the top to lower,” said Pericak. “Our
team worked to engineer a retractable roof that
gets out of the way or closes up quickly and qui-
etly.”
The combination of a more compact mecha-
nism and lower beltline for the new Mustang
means the Z-fold roof is flatter and tucked fur-
ther out of the way than before. The highest point
of the folded stack is now 6.7 inches lower than
the outgoing Mustang, contributing to the sleek-
er and more sophisticated looking profile and
better rear visibility for the driver.
A well-engineered top and dramatically
upgraded cabin are just part of making a great
convertible sports car. Like the fastback, Mustang
convertible features significantly increased use of
high-strength and ultra-high-strength steels
throughout the body structure.
Torsional stiffness of the convertible body has
been increased by 13 percent to produce a more
stable platform to better take advantage of the
new fully independent suspension. The result is
more refined ride quality over any road surface
and significantly improved handling when
pressed into the curves.
Mustang convertible inspires drivers to put the
top down and hit the road, so having usable
cargo space is a big plus. The more compact roof
and flat load floor enabled by the new suspen-
sion boost trunk volume by 19 percent to a class-
leading 11.4 cubic feet, big enough to swallow
two large golf bags, even with the available pre-
mium audio subwoofer. The lower liftover height
also makes it easier load up the trunk.
For 50 years, Mustang has combined sports-
car performance with the ability to bring some
friends along for the ride, and the new convert-
ible makes this even easier. The wider rear of the
new Mustang and the new top design contribute
to more shoulder and hip room for rear-seat pas-
sengers.
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Your ONf-STOP GARDfN SHOP!
231-238-41S1
4104 S. Straits Hwy., lndian Rivcr
www.northstargardcns.com
Líke us on íucebook vvv.íucebook.com/northsturgurdens
-1rees & Shrubs
-Annuuís & lerenníuís
-Herbs & Vegetubíes
-Muích, Soíí & lertííízers
-lutío lurníture
-\uter Curdeníng Suppííes
-Curden 1ooís, lottery
& Metuí Art
Wc offcr fuII
lANDSCAPf DfSlGN & CONSTRUCTlON
-Nev íuvns
-Lurge trees over 25'
-lutíos & vuíkvuys
-\uter íeutures
-Cutdoor Lívíng Rooms
& lírepíts
-Hígh quuííty píunt
muteríuí
~o-aeos, 9oc

Women’s Resource Center and hospitals
assist survivors of sexual assault
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Thursday, April 3
10am Crafting
10am Pokeno
11am Golden Toners Exercise
12pm Lunch - Baked Chicken, Boiled
Potatoes, Stewed Tomatoes, Melon Mix
1pm Penny Bingo
5pm Dinner - Baked Spaghetti, Italian
Blend Vegetables, Brussels Sprouts,
Breadstick, Plums
5:30pm Karaoke
5:30pm Pictionary Practice
Friday, April 4
10am Card Golf
10am Mercy Rehab Exercise Group
12pm Lunch - Breaded Cod,
Cole Slaw, Peas, Watermelon
1pm Pantry Bingo
1pm Pool-9 Ball
Monday, April 7
10am Quilting
12pm Lunch - Stufed Florentine
Shells, Carrots, Broccoli, Orange Slices
12:30pm Beginning Clogging
1pm Bridge
1:30pm Clogging
2:30-4pm Computer Club
5pm Dinner - Pork Chops, Boiled
Redskins, Sugar Snap Peas,
Cinnamon Applesauce
Tuesday, April 8
10am Bible Study
10am Zumba Gold
11am Walking Group – Ramada
11:30-6pm Foot Clinic-Appt Req’d
12pm Lunch - Beef Burrito, Lettuce,
Tomato, Spinach, Pineapple
1pm Euchre
1-3pm CCC Class @ City Hall
4-5pm Blood Pressure/Sugar Checks
5pm Dinner - Liver & Onions,
Cabbage w/ Fried Bacon, Carrots,
Fresh Orange
Wednesday, April 9
9:30-10:30am Commodities @St Mary’s
10am Line Dancing
12pm Lunch - Chicken Cordon Bleu,
Mashed Potatoes w/ Gravy, Mixed
Vegetables, Fruit Cocktail
1pm Pool-Ball in Hand
1pm Mahjong
1pm Wii Bowling
2:30pm Unlucky 7’s
5pm Dinner - Chicken Stir-Fry, Rice,
Asparagus, Pineapple, Apple
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T H I S PA G E S P O N S O R E D B Y T H E F O L L O WI N G A R E A B U S I N E S S E S
829 S I-75 Business Loop,
Grayling
Benefits of Advance Care Planning
Join us for this Breakfast Presentation
Tuesday, April 15th at 9am
Western Omelet, Hash Browns, Fruit, Juice, Coffee.
Kathy Beltz, ANP
Glazed Ham
Au Gratin Potatoes
Green Bean Casserole
Pineapple Fruit Mix
Carrot Cake
Serving Dinner 4pm - 6pm
Suggested Donation for 60+ $3.00
Under 60 Cost is $4.50
No Reservations Required!
AnnMarie Rowland In Concert
Thursday, May 8th at 6pm
AnnMarie Rowland has been playing guitar and singing for years.
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 15
(Gaylord) Aspen Ridge Retirement
Village will be hosting a volunteer apprecia-
tion party on Friday, April 11th at 3:30 p.m.
All current and past Aspen Ridge volunteers
are invited to the celebration, along with
anyone who may be interested in learning
more about our volunteer
opportunities.
Aspen Ridge residents and
staff would also like to con-
gratulate Dale Mattmiller for
being selected as our
Volunteer of the Year! Dale
has been a dedicated volun-
teer at Aspen Ridge for sev-
eral years. He attends the
weekly men’s group, and serves as the
group’s leader as needed. Dale is the friend-
ly face that helps guests register for com-
munity events at Aspen Ridge, and he has
assisted with the Dog Days of Summer
Dog Show, Blessing of the Bicycles, Tea
with Tots, and the annual antique car
show. A friend to many residents, Dale
is kind, generous, and truly believes in
giving back to his community.
If you would like to attend the cele-
bration or learn more about volunteer
opportunities, please contact Christy
Payne, Life Enrichment Coordinator, at
(989) 705-2500. Aspen Ridge Retirement
Village is located at 1261 Village Parkway in
Gaylord.
Aspen Ridge Retirement Village
honors volunteers
Petoskey – Community mental health programs in the
State have had 54% of State General Fund/General Purpose
money cut effective April 1st. The agencies were notified of
this reduction in a March 24 communication from the State
Department of Community Health. Specific allocation
communications were
received by local CMH
Directors on March 26.
State funding is the only
resource for persons with-
out any form of government
health care or insurance.
The 54% reduction was pur-
suant to appropriation
adjustments in P.A. 107,
related to the Healthy
Michigan program, and P.A.
34, the recent supplemental
appropriation approved by
the state legislature in mid-
March. “The assumption is
that most of our clients will
qualify for Medicaid or
Healthy Michigan,” says Ed LaFramboise of Alpena, Director
of Northeast Michigan Community Mental Health, “but we
know that many won’t.”
Eligibility requirements could be the problem. “Persons
with Medicare aren’t able to apply, and that’s a problem,”
says Greg Paffhouse of Traverse City, CEO of Northern Lakes
Community Mental Health. “Many persons with serious
and persistent mental illness, who absolutely require servic-
es, are Medicare-only clients, which means that State GF
must be expended for their services, as Medicare does not
cover everything we do.”
Hundreds of letters have been sent across the north noti-
fying existing clients of the reduction. “It’s a painful thing to
do,” says Kaczynski. “Access to services will be limited to
this group.”
Most funding received by community mental health
agencies is Medicaid, according to Alexis Kaczynski,
Director of North Country Community Mental Health,
headquartered in Petoskey. “Last year, 82% of our funding
was from Medicaid”, Kaczynski said. “Twelve percent was
from State sources, but losing half of that is a catastrophe.
There are a lot of demands on this resource.”
B-de, C-,+ ,' C'%%-&",0
Me&,a$ Hea$,!
In its May 2014 “Your Safer-Surgery
Survival Guide,” Consumer Reports maga-
zine, selected Mercy Hospital Grayling as
one of the safest hospitals in northern
Michigan and one of the top 15 hospitals in
the state.
“We have made major investments to
improve the quality and safety of healthcare
we provide our patients,” said Stephanie
Riemer-Matuzak, CEO at Mercy Hospital
Grayling. “We are continuously working to
provide patients with greater comfort, pri-
vacy, and safety, while giving our skilled
doctors and nurses more personalized
patient interactions.”
The well-known product testing organi-
zation uses information from Medicare and
Medicaid Services to grade U.S. hospitals
on their performance. Mercy Hospital
Grayling, owned by non-profit CHE Trinity
Health, received high scores for avoiding
deaths, appropriate pain control, commu-
nication with patients, help from hospital
staff, and appropriate use of medical infor-
mation and scans. The study found that
patients have a 34 percent better chance of
surviving a serious complication in the top-
rated hospitals than they do in lower-rated
institutions.
“The differences between high-scoring
hospitals and low-scoring ones can be a
matter of life and death,” Dr. John Santa,
medical director of Consumer Reports
Health, said in a prepared release. He said
the differences come in hospitals’ efforts to
eliminate mistakes, “from making sure staff
communicate clearly with patients about
medications, which can help prevent drug
errors, to doing all they can to prevent any
hospital-acquired infections.”
“Patient safety is a major part of our hos-
pital's quality program,” said Jennifer
Fuhrman, Director of Quality and Risk
Management at Mercy Hospital Grayling.
“While one study cannot tell us everything
about hospital safety, ratings like these give
patients more of the valuable information
they need to make choices about where to
go for care. Our patients are community
members, friends, and even family, and it’s
important that they know they are in good
hands when they choose Mercy Hospital
Grayling for their care,” she added.
For the full article and hospital Ratings,
subscribers can visit
ConsumerReports.org/hospitalratings.
Learn more about Mercy Hospital Grayling
and its services by calling (989) 348-5461 or
visiting MercyHealthGrayling.com.
Health & Wellness
Page 16 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
ä-:'|ª
SERVICES

BEAUTY SALON
0he||o's Sa|oo & 0ay Spa
126 Main St.
East Jordan
231-536-7764
0arr|age 0||ppery
308 South Otsego
Gaylord
989-732-5094
0r|g|hA|LS by She||ey
200 Fairview St.
Gaylord
989-732-7100
COUNSELlNG
0ygoet 0o0ose||og
Downtown Gaylord
989-731-1018
www.cygnetfamilycounseling.com
DENTlST
N|o Fam||y 0eot|stry
107 East 8th St.
Mio
989-826-626
Na|o 0ak Fam||y 0eot|stry
219 East Main St.
Gaylord
989-732-6271
www.mainoak.com
FlTNESS FAClLlTY
0tsego 0o0oty Sportsp|ex
1250 Gornick Ave., Gaylord
989-731-3546
www.ocsportsplex.com
0tsego 0o0oty 0omm0o|ty 0eoter
315 S. Center, Gaylord
989-732-6521
www.otsegocountyparksrec.com
Powerho0se 6ym
1044 W. Main, Gaylord
989-732-0744
www.gaylordsgym.com
ha0t||0s F|toess & 6S 20
£xpress worko0t
1140 Gornick Ave.
Gaylord
989-732-5820
www.gs20expressworkout.com
HOME HEALTH CARE
hea|th 0ept. oI hw N|ch|gao
220 W. Garfield, Charlevoix
231-547-6092
www.nwhealth.org
horthero Naoagemeot Serv|ces
657 Chestnut Ct..Gaylord
989-732-6374
www.northernmanagement.org
HOSPlTAL
Nercy hosp|ta|
1100 Michigan Ave.,
Grayling
989-348-5461
www.mercygrayling.com
0har|evo|x Area hosp|ta|
14700 Lake Shore Dr
Charlevoix
231-547-8630
www.cah.org
0tsego Nemor|a| hosp|ta|
825 North Center
Gaylord
989-731-2100
www.MyOMH.org
MASSAGE THERAPY
The hat0ra||st
1029 Gornick Ave.,
Gaylord
989-705-1451
Se|I hea| Nassagel
8ody workl£oergy Ned|c|oe
Cathy Brink NCMP/AMTA,
Reiki Master/Teacher
1029 Gornick Ave.,
Alpine Suite #103
989-619-6282
MONUMENTS
Aoger Noo0meots
7535 US 131, Mancelona
231-587-8433
NUTRlTlON &
SUPPLEMENTS
6eoera| h0tr|t|oo 0eoters
1417 W. Main St.,
Pineridge Square
Gaylord, MI 49735-1755
989-731-6363
Fo0r Star h0tr|t|oo
604 W. Main, Gaylord
989-448-8618
www.fourstarnutrition.net
PHARMACY
0eotra| 0r0g Store
301 Bridge St. Charlevoix
231-547-242
www.central-drug.com
PHYSlCAL THERAPY
Jordao Va||ey
8ehab|||tat|oo 0eoter
100 Main St # 9, East Jordan
231-536-1451
8oyoe 8ehab|||tat|oo 0eoter
197 State St, Boyne City
231-582-6365
SENlOR ASSlSTANCE
0tsego 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
120 Grandview Blvd.,Gaylord
989-732-1122
www.otsegocountycoa.org
0rawIord 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
308 Lawndale St.,
Grayling
989-348-8342
www.crawfordcoa.org
Seo|ors he|p|og Seo|ors
221 E. Felshaw St.,
Gaylord
989-448-8323
www.seniorshelpingseniors.com/
northernmichigan
0har|evo|x 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
218 West Garfield St.
Charlevoix
231-237-0103
www.charlevoixcounty.org/coa.asp
WALK-lN CLlNlC
0Nh Ned|ca| 6ro0p -
8oyoe Va||ey
2572 North US 131
Elmira
989-731-7700
www.MyOMH.org
l: :JJ j:ª. .ªs.ª-ss
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Classes Available!
Visit
www.gaylordsgym.com
(989) 732-0744
GAYLORD FAMILY FITNESS CENTER
M-32 WEST
BEANERS
PG
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IC
K
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R
S
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N
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A
D
I-
7
5
I-
7
5
#
! Large Free Weight Room
! 2 Racquetball/Wallyball Courts
! Special Student, Senior
and Military Rates
! Trainers on Staff
! Racquetball Leagues
! 8 Different Aerobics Classes
! HEX Tanning Booths
FEATURING
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 5am - 8pm; Sat. & Sun. 8am - 2pm
1044 W. Main St.
Gaylord
Now offering spinning class
Limited number of bikes
so call 989.732.0744 and reserve your spot today.
Spinning will be on Tuesday and Thursdays at 5:30 Member & Non-member
$5.00/class or you can purchase a 10 visit punch
card and make it $4.00/class!
www.gaylordsgym.com



M-32 WEST
BEANERS
PG
D
IC
K
E
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S
O
N
R
O
A
D
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7
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#






















Specializing in
6+747/@ M)::)/- &
G-91);91+ & D-5-6;1) M)::)/-
FOUR STAR NUTRITION
604 W Main St., Gaylord 989-448-8618
ARE YOU GETTING THE
NUTRITION YOU NEED?
CHECK OUT OUR PERFORMANCE NUTRITION
For active people and athletes.
· Good source of PROTEIN · Sustained Energy
· Muscle Growth · Hydration · Muscle Recovery
www.24hourcompetitor.com
Mercy Hospital Grayling
earns high rating by Consumer Reports
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 17
P0SlTl\E |EwS & SP0RTS
E\ERY wEEK FR0V All 0\ER
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T H I S PA G E S P O N S O R E D B Y T H E F O L L O WI N G A R E A B U S I N E S S E S

1001 Mankowski RD. · I75 EXIT 282
GAYLORD · 989.732.5991
WWW.FEENY.COM
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Jim Wernig
Chevrolet
APS Mini
Warehouse
112 East Sixth St.
GayIord.
989-732-5892
9B9-732-223D
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www.c»-Loab=oiea»Lio:e.co:
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900 Hayes Rd., Gaylord, MI 49735 • Phone: (989) 732-6200
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Page 18 • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014

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