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Lesson Plan Title: Memory Painting Length:1.

5 hours

Performance:
(What will students accomplish as a result of this lesson? This can be presented to students in the form of a story. In this narrative the students take on a role and create a learning product about a specific topic for a
certain audience. (RAFT Role / Audience / Format / Topic)
You can travel back in time, but you can only travel back about a month. We are traveling back to your winter break to paint an event that you
want to share with your peers and instructors.





Concepts:
(List the big ideas students will be introduced to in the lesson. These ideas are universal, timeless and transferrable. Examples of concepts used in art might include: Composition, Patterns, Technique, Rhythm, Paradox,
Influence, Style, Force, Culture, Space/Time/Energy, Line, Law/Rules, Value, Expressions, Emotions, Tradition, Symbol, Movement, Shape, Improvisation, and Observation)
Time, Tradition, Emotion, Memory, Storytelling, connection, tradition, memory





Enduring Understanding (s):
(Statements that show a relationship between two [or more] concepts. They synthesize what students should understandnot just know or doas a result of studying a particular area of art. Moreover, they articulate
what students should revisit over the course of their lifetimes in relationship to art. These ideas are universal, timeless and transferrable.)
Artists use their memory to create art that tells a story.


Standards: (All lessons should address all standards.)
1. Observe and Learn to Comprehend
2. Envision and Critique to Reflect
3. Invent and Discover to Create
4. Relate and Connect to Transfer

Objectives/Outcomes/Learning Targets:
(Objectives describe a learning experience with a condition behavior (measurable) criterion. Aligned to: Blooms-Standards-and, when appropriate, Numeracy, Literacy and Technology. Should be
written as: Objective. Blooms: _____ - Standard: _____. Numeracy, Literacy, and/or Technology)

1. 1.Using class discussion, the student will be able to generate possible ideas for their artwork. (Remembering, Literacy, Numeracy)
2. Using drawing materials, the student will be able to sketch a memory from using line, shape, and color to define a composition. (understanding, Literacy)
3. With acrylic paint, the student will be able to create a painting that tells a story. (Creating, Technology)
4. Recording in sketchbooks, the student will be able to experiment with mixing primary and secondary to produce intermediate colors. (Applying, Technology)
5. Given examples by Lee Smith, Romare Bearden, Allan Rohan Crite, and Marjorie Phillips, the student will be able to interpret the story being told by each artist.
(Evaluating, Literacy)
6. Using their completed paintings, the student will be able to describe the process and story behind their art. (understanding, Literacy)



Differentiation:
(Explain specifically how you have addressed the needs of exceptional students at both end of the skill and cognitive scale. Describe the strategies you will use for students who are already proficient and need growth
beyond what you have planned for the rest of the class, as well as modifications for students with physical and/or cognitive challenges. Students must still meet the objectives.)

Differentiation:
(Multiple means for students to access content and
multiple modes for student to express understanding.)
Access (Resources and/or Process) Expression (Products and/or Performance)

Students may respond to information verbally, visually, and
through movement.
Students may start painting without planning first.

Students may not know how to mix secondary
colors

Students may choose size and types of materials to create with
for their project.
students may create multiple paintings from which they can
choose a final one.
Students may need to take some time to explore color theory
and be shown various color combinations.
Extensions for depth and complexity: Access (Resources and/or Process) Expressiosn (Products and/or Performance)
Students may struggle to communicate their ideas
visually
students may have help in forming single images to
explain their multiple ideas

Literacy:
(List terms [vocabulary] specific to the topic that students will be introduced to in the lesson and describe how literacy is integrated into the lesson.)
Acrylic paint, sketch, storytelling, primary colors, secondary colors, intermediate colors, line, shape, color, composition

-Students will learn new terminology and verbally discuss their meaning
-Students will describe the narrative in their artwork.
-Students will learn how to compose a painting

Materials:
(Must be grade level appropriate. List everything you will need for this lesson, including art supplies and tools. (These are the materials students will use.) List all materials in a bulleted format.)


Acrylic paint
Brushes, foam brushes, bundled sticks
pencils, colored pencils, crayons
Sketch books, drawing pads
paper
Paper cutter
water cups with water
Painting smocks
pallets
paper towels
Examples of artwork




Resources:
(List all visual aids and reference material (books, slides, posters, etc.) Be specific; include title, artist, etc. Make reference to where the material can be found. (These are the resources used by the teacher to
support/develop the lesson.) List all resources in a bulleted format.)
Posters of paintings:
-Parade on Hammond Street, Allan Rohan Crite
-Night Baseball, Marjorie Phillips
-Pittsburg Memories, Romare Bearden
-Dance for the Hunt, Lee N. Smith III
Google Images

Preparation:
(What do you need to prepare for this experience? List steps of preparation in a bulleted format.)
Take time to reflect on my own memories from break so I can begin brainstorming ideas of where to start
Come in early to prepare water cups, paper and get the coloring supplies out for the sketch books
Look at the examples and brainstorm what questions would get the students attention to get them excited for the project.
Think about good questions to ask at the end of the lesson, that would allow the students to share their experience with the rest of the class
and get them talking about their own art/ memories from break.
Have a clean-up strategy.








Safety:
(Be specific about the safety procedures that need to be addressed with students. List all safety issue in a bulleted format.)
Use of paint that could stain clothing
Sharp objects (Pencils)
-Depending on students- be aware of your neighbors and where your pencil is while making art




Action to motivate/anticipatory set:
(Describe how you will begin the lesson to stimulate students interest. How will you pique their curiosity and make them interested and excited about the lesson? What inquiry questions will you pose? Be specific
about what you will say and do to motivate students and get them thinking and ready to participate. Be aware of the varying range of learning styles/intelligences of your students. Some ideas might include: presenting a
skit, telling a story, posing a series of questions, role-playing, etc. )
You can travel back in time, but you can only travel back about a month. We are traveling back to your winter break to paint an event that you
want to share with others.

What time would you travel back to?
What would you see?
What interesting things did you do?

What is it that makes you happiest? What types of things do you associate with this pass time? Why does it make you so happy?

Ideation/Inquiry:
(Ideation is the creative process of generating, developing, and communicating new ideas, where an idea is understood as a basic element of thought that can be visual, concrete or abstract. List and describe inquiry
questions and processes you will engage students in to help them develop ideas and plans for their artwork.)
Create list and/or concept map of ideas

Inquiry questions:
What do artists make art about?
What kinds of art do artists make? What types of art do you like?

Procedures: (Align with instructional methodologies and approximate times for instruction.)
Give a detailed account (in bulleted form) of how you will present the lesson logically and sequentially (include approximate time for each activity). Include motivation and ideation/inquiry where appropriate.)

Day 1 Instruction (The teacher will... Be specific about what concepts, information, understandings,
etc. will be taught.)

Introductions:
The teacher will introduce him/herself and have others introduce themselves and say one thing
they did over the weekend.

Inquiry:
The teacher will ask:
What types of art do you like? What kinds of art do artists make?
What do artists make art about?
So that the student can... (Be specific about what will be the
intended result of the instruction.)


So that students can get thinking about time, events, and using their
memory.


So that students begin to think about how art is
categorized/organized.


Motivation:
The teacher will explain:
You can travel back in time, but you can only travel back about a month. We
are traveling back to your winter break to paint an event that you want to share
with others.
And ask:
What time would you travel back to?
What would you see?
What interesting things did you do?

The teacher will create a group list and/or concept map on the board of ideas generated by the
students.

The teacher will direct students to create sketches of an event from their memory using line,
shapes, and color to define a composition.

The teacher will introduce the painting by Lee Smith III and will ask:
What do you think is happening in this painting? Why do you think that?
What is the figure in the front looking at?
What time of the year is it? How do you know?

The teacher will introduce the painting by Bearden and will ask:
What colors do you notice in this painting? Be specific (what types of greens, blues, whether
they are light, dark)
What does it look like is happening in this painting? How do you know?

The teacher will introduce the painting by Crite and will ask:
What types of shapes, lines, and colors do you notice in this painting?

The teacher will introduce the painting by Phillips and will ask:
What do you look at first in the painting? Why does your eye go there?
What time of day is it? Why do you think that?
How did the artist paint the people in the stands?






So that students start using their imagination to develop possible
subject matter for their artwork.







So that the students will collect ideas about what to create their
artwork about.

So that the students will plan how they will depict an event through
their artwork.

So that the students will consider the idea of narrative painting.




So that the students can identify colors and how colors can be used
in a painting.



So that the students will identify expressive features and
characteristics of art.

So that the students will consider how composition can help us
understand what artwork is about.












Student reflective/inquiry activity:
(Sample questions and activities [i.e. games, gallery walk, artist statement, interview] intended to promote deeper thinking, reflection and refined understandings precisely related to the grade level expectations. How will
students reflect on their learning? A participatory activity that includes students in finding meaning, inquiring about materials and techniques and reflecting about their experience as it relates to objectives, standards and
grade level expectations of the lesson.)
Discussion Prompt:
My story is
I created it by
I used these colors because
The most important thing I learned was