Running head: COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

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College Students and the Consumption of News
Mackenzie Hilmer, Dylan Milkent, Brian Zeller, John O’Dea and Michael Rovansek
Loras College











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Table of Contents
Chapter 1………..Abstract………. p. 3-4

Chapter 2………. Introduction………. p. 5-6

Chapter 3……….. Literature Review………. p. 7-27

Chapter 4……….. Methods………. p. 28-32

Chapter 5……….. Analysis………. p. 33-85

Chapter 6……….. Summary………. p. 86-92

Chapter 7……….. Limitations………. p.93-95

Chapter 8……….. Recommendations………. p. 96-97

Chapter 9……….. Conclusion………. p. 98-102

Chapter 10………. References………. p. 103-109

Chapter 11………. Appendices………. p. 110-189



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Ch. 1
Abstract












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Five college students conducted a research study for a communication research course at
a small, private, Catholic, liberal arts institution, located in the Midwest. The researcher’s
studied how college students obtain their news; hypothesizing college students obtain their news
through Twitter. While researching the history of various news consumption outlets such as:
newspapers/magazines, television, Facebook, and Twitter, the researchers had concluded the
evolution of news consumption outlets are continually going to change. After distributing a
questionnaire to a stratified random sample, the researchers analyzed the responses and did not
find support for the hypothesis. The researchers concluded television is the news outlet college
students use to obtain news.















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Ch. 2
Introduction












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A group of 5 researchers conducted a study on how college students obtain their news.
The researchers believed this study merited research because as potential professionals in the
public relations field, it would possibly be one’s job to reach as many audiences as possible. It is
essential to public relations professionals to effectively inform the targeted audience on their
client’s services, products, service efforts, and overall goals. The public relations professional
can utilize the information found from the researchers’ data to help aid in targeting their
audience in an effective way. The more the public relations professional can narrow down the
specific platform, the better service they are doing for their clients and the more successful they
can be.
Furthermore, the research on how college students receive their news also merits research
because technology is constantly changing. Since different media platforms are changing it is
important to understand how generations are obtaining news. People use technology often and in
various forms to make their lives easier and more efficient. Since technology is continuously
upgraded and built to be better, it is important to be aware of which media platforms people are
using. With the results of this study, the researchers have a better understanding of where
college students are obtaining their news.
In recent history, the expansion of the Internet has become increasingly popular in the
world, especially with younger members of society. College students have grown up with the
Internet, as opposed to older generations who did not have access to the Internet. The
researchers believe this study will provide a better understanding as to what platform college
students currently are utilizing to obtain the most news.


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Ch. 3
Literature Review












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Newspapers and Magazines
According to Oxford (2001), a newspaper is defined as, a printed publication, usually
issued daily or weekly, consisting of folded unstapled sheets and containing news, feature
articles, advertisements, and correspondence (p. 1153). According to Oxford (2001), a magazine
is defined as, a periodical publication containing articles and illustrations, typically covering a
particular subject or area of interest (p. 1026). The magazine and newspaper have shown to be
an important part of how individuals consume news and the following is the history, decline, and
improvements of these two outlets
The history of the newspaper began in Rome, according to Endres (2003), The Acta
Diurna Populi Romani (Daily Acts of The Roman People) was a script account of news of the
empire, launched in 59 BC by Julius Caesar as official publication of his government (p. 2.1).
This was the first real news source for individuals of that time period and its contents included
much of the same information presented in newspapers today. Endres’s (2003), states, Act
Diurna Populi Romani provided the details of government business-decrees, proclamations, and
resolution, news of rich and famous, catastrophe stories (fires and executions) and the weather
(p. 2.1). Furthermore, Act Diurna Populi Romani was able to gain readership and publicity
throughout Rome according to Endres (2003), who states, it had substantial readership (for
ancient Rome) because it was posted in many of the popular places of the day, including the
bathhouses (p 2.1). Although this may not be how individuals envision the paper today, it served
as the forefront for things to come.
Act Diurna Populi Romani, foreshadowed many other platforms to emerge in America
because for example according to Biagi (2011), in the 17th century, North America produced its
first newspaper (p. 52). In 1690, after colonies were settled, Harris created Publick Occurrences.
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According to Biagi (2011), Publick Occurrences which was published in Boston on September
25, 1690 often is identified as America’s First Newspaper (p. 54). Furthermore, Biagai (2011),
states, the nation’s first consecutively issued newspaper was The Boston News-Letter which
appeared in 1704 (p. 54). These print outlets were important because according to Biagi (2011),
From 1690 until the introduction of radio in 1920, newspapers were the only mass news
medium available, attempting to deliver news and information as soon as it happened.
Until 1920, newspapers were the only way for large numbers of people to get the news
simultaneously (p. 53).
In 19th century America, newspapers and magazines were beginning to become more
frequent because of technology. According to Biagi (2011), technological advances of the 19th
century, such as cheaper newsprint, mechanized printing, and the telegraph meant newspapers
could reach a wider audience faster than before (p. 55). As history took its course, different
viewpoints began to emerge through print. This was facilitated through technological
advancements that made it easier to create the print mediums. The newspaper and magazine
became a way for people to spread a message whether its readers liked or disliked it. According
to Biagi (2011), who states, two strong social movements, Emancipation and Women’s Suffrage
brought new voices to the American Press (p. 56). According to Biagi (2011), this Alternative
press movement signaled the beginning of a significant American journalist tradition.
Newspapers became an outlet for the voice of social protest, a tradition that continues today (p.
56).
A direct result and perfect example of print media giving voice to the people was the
creation of The Liberator. It was created to voice white men fighting slavery and was issued in
1831, and according to Biagi (2011), in 1831, Garrison began publishing The Liberator, a weekly
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abolitionist paper in Boston (p. 56). As a result of creating the Liberator Garrison was met with
problems from the public (Biagi, 2011, p. 56). Biagi (2011) states, as a white man fighting
slavery and advocating women’s rights Garrison was attacked by a mob in 1855 but survived
when the Boston mayor jailed him for his own protection. Garrison continued to publish the
Liberator for 30 years (p. 56).
This demonstrates how much people relied on papers in the past to voice their opinions,
and call occurrences to public attention that concerned them, without regard of punishment.
Instances like this gave rise to yellow journalism in the 20th century (Biagi, 2011, p. 56). Biagi
(2011), states, yellow journalism is news that emphasizes crime, sex and violence; also called
jazz journalism and tabloid journalism (p. 56).
Although the newspaper and magazine still exist today, their readership among
individuals is decreasing. Print, such as newspapers and magazines, are being met with many
competing news outlets such as the Internet and television as well as social media (Plambeck,
2010, p. 1). The print news is losing its significance in a technologically driven world. Although
this is the case, the interpretation can be made that technology has progressed and so have the
platforms for which news is discovered, leaving print a thing of the past, (Plambeck, 2010 p. 1).
Newspaper circulation has been in decline for many years, but the drop accelerated in
2007 and even more rapidly through the recession (Plambeck, 2010, p. 1). According to
Plambeck (2010) While the Internet is widely cited for the decrease, the lower circulation figures
have resulted in part from a conscious decision by publishers to focus on the most loyal and
profitable readers, often raising prices and limiting discounts (p. 5). This provides a grim
outlook toward the future of providing news coverage through print. Plambeck (2010), states, the
reality facing many American newspaper publishers continues to look stark (p. 1).
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Because newspapers and magazines are declining, some may ask what newspaper and
magazine companies are doing to combat this? In many instances, newspapers and magazines
have gone digital to increase viewership or in other words have digitized (Kirchoff, 2010, p. 12).
According to Kirchoff (2010), as print circulation declines, online readership has surged (p. 12).
Kirchoff (2010), also states, newspapers are attracting online readers from well beyond their
local communities, including other cities and countries (p. 12). From the research provided by
Plambeck and Kirchoff, it is clear online readership is the future of the newspaper. Providing
newspapers and magazines online has helped ignite the viewership and has given new life to the
digitized print form of news. According to Kirchoff (2010), this new wave of online viewership
is represented by the demand the people have set. Consumer demand and technology are
changing the way news is read and offered (p. 12).
Recently, Generation Y has gotten away from print media and has switched to other
outlets. For example, a survey conducted by The Newspaper Association of America, Vahlberg
(2010), concluded, online readership does not make up for the loss in print readership. The
young people surveyed reported spending an average of two minutes reading newspapers or
magazines online in 2009 (p. 3). According to Vahlberg (2003), ownership of mobile media by
young people skyrocketed, with cell phone ownership rising from 39 percent to 66 percent of 8-
to 18-yearolds in the last five years. Ownership of MP3 players grew from 18 percent to 76
percent, while ownership of laptop computers rose from 12 percent to 29 percent (p. 4). This
demonstrates that younger people are not reading the newspaper, which in return is affecting
readership. Vahlber (2010), continued, not only has the average amount of time spent with
newspapers and magazines declined, but the proportion of teens reading either outlets has
declined as well (p. 4). Vahleberg (2010) states, The statistics showed from 42 percent in 1999
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to 34 percent in 2004, to 23 percent in 2009 for newspapers; From 55 percent in 1999 to 47
percent in 2004 to 35 percent in 2009 for magazines (p. 4). Furthermore, this shows print
readership is being lost to other forms of electronic news. For instance in the 20th century,
laptops did not exist and print was the common outlet used. Today with technological
advancements online news has gained much more readership than print because of its accessible
nature.
Major News Television Stations
CNN was the first television news network to enter into the new genre of news. Cable
News Network (CNN) was the first ever 24/7 all news service (Erickson, n.d.). It was created by
Ted Turner as a part of Turner Broadcasting System (TBS) (Erickson, n.d.). The first ever
broadcast was on June 1
st
, 1980 (Erickson, n.d.). CNN developed devoted fan base by offering
news all day every day, something that no other television station did at the time (Erickson, n.d.).
It covered all news events, no matter the size, topic, or location (Erickson, n.d.). Two events that
solidified the credibility of the news station were the coverage of the Challenger space shuttle
disaster of 1986 and the ―in-country‖ telecasts it provided its viewers with in 1991 (Erickson,
n.d.). In 1996 CNN, along with the rest of the Turner Broadcasting System, was purchased by
entertainment conglomerate Time Warner Inc (Erickson, n.d.).

Fox followed CNN into the news genre of television. Fox News Channel started its
coverage of news and political commentary in 1996 (Ray, n.d.). Rupert Murdoch’s News
Corporation division of the Fox Entertainment Group was in charge of the news channel (Ray,
n.d.). It started after Murdoch’s failed attempt at purchasing CNN. (Ray, n.d.) The initial hurdle
for the fledgling cable network was to obtain ―carriage‖ (distribution) on the numerous local and
regional cable systems (Ray, n.d.). It was routine for cable companies to pay networks such as
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HBO or MTV for the right to broadcast their content, but Murdoch reversed the equation, paying
cable providers to carry Fox News (Ray, n.d.). As a result, when the network first aired on
October 7, 1996, it was viewable in more than 17 million homes (Ray, n.d.).
Breakdown of Types of Television News
News on television can be divided into three categories; Local television news, network
television news, and cable network news (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013). Local
television news consists of channels that cover the news specifically of a given city and
surrounding area (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013). Out of the three, most watch
cable television news(Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013). While the largest portion
of Americans watch local and network TV news at home, those who tune into cable news do so
for an average of twenty-five minutes a day (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013). That
is more than twice as much time as local and network TV viewers spend getting news on those
platforms (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013).Even heavy viewers of local TV news
and network news spend more time watching cable news than they do watching these respective
platforms (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013).
The heaviest local news viewers spend, on average, 11 more minutes watching cable
news than local news (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013). The heaviest network
news viewers spend about one more minute watching cable news than they do network news
(Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013).Across all three platforms, there is a very large
gap between the heaviest news consumers and everyone else (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, &
Enda, 2013). The top third of network news viewers in terms of time spent, for example, average
almost 32 minutes a day watching network news (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013).
The next third spends about one-sixth as much time, or five minutes, watching network news
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(Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013).Fully 90% of network news viewers watch local
news and 82% of local news viewers tune in to network news (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, &
Enda, 2013). The result is that more than half (58%) of U.S. adults watch both network and local
news (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013).
Television Consumption by Generation
Pew Research longitudinal surveys find that Gen Xers (33-47 years old) and Millennials
(18-31 years old), who spent less time than older people following the news at the outset of their
adulthood, have so far shown little indication that that they will become heavier news consumers
as they age (Kohut, 2013).

Television news viewership is much lower among younger age with no sign of it
increasing as Xers and Millennials age (Kohut, 2013). However, unlike newspapers, there is little
indication that this TV news viewership declines with age (Kohut, 2013). Xers and Millenials
seem to not be as interested in news as older generations, not only for the television platform, but
as a whole (Kohut, 2013).
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The percentage of Silents (67-84) and Boomers (48-66) who turn to TV for news has not
declined since the mid-1990s, since the survey group began (Kohut, 2013). In fact, as Boomers
have aged, a growing percentage have turned to TV for news (Kohut, 2013). Strikingly, many
fewer Silents and Boomers get news from radio than they did in the mid-1990s(Kohut, 2013).
This may be because technology such as social media and the Internet do not appeal to the older
generations as it does to the younger members of society (Kohut, 2013).
In another study, In 2010 Americans spent more time (70 minutes daily) consuming news
than ever before (Americans Spending, 2010). Despite unhappiness over the demise of the
American TV news audience, television is still the most used news source (Americans Spending,
2010). The immobility and linearity of this medium, rather than what it disseminates, may have
weakened its competitive edge. Yet, when mobile and interactive platform use of established TV
news sources like CNN or network news are considered, traction among the 18–29 age group
becomes evident (Americans Spending, 2010). Perhaps most striking, they find what they need
rather than wait for it to be served.
Local Television News
In local television, newscasts in recent years have placed an even greater emphasis on
traffic, weather and sports, reduced the number of edited package stories on the air and shortened
the lengths of stories, trends that may reflect the economic strains affecting the industry (Pew,
2013). The already considerable amount of time devoted to sports, weather and traffic on local
newscasts rose even higher among the stations studied in the Pew Research Center’s latest State
of the News media report (Pew, 2013). Airtime on those subjects increased from 32% 2005 to
40% in 2012 (Pew, 2013). The biggest increase came in the airtime devoted to sports, to 12%
from 7% (Pew, 2013). The traffic and weather components of the newscast increased by a
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smaller percentage (to 29% from 25%), but four in ten of the newscasts examined in the study
led with a weather story (Pew, 2013).
The topics people seek out the most on local TV news — weather and breaking news
(and to a lesser extent, traffic) — are ripe for replacement by any number of Web- and mobile-
based outlets (Pew, 2013). While many stations ramped up their digital news offerings in the past
year, they are late to the digital game (Pew, 2013).

Facebook
According to Zeevi (2013), Facebook is the largest social network in the world today,
where 1 out of every 7 people on earth is on Facebook (p. 1). Reading this statement makes one
wonder how did this new phenomenon of Facebook come about and who started it? Zuckerburg,
a Harvard dropout, is running a company at 27, used by over half a billion people in the world
and is worth at least $17.5 billion (Marszal, 2011). In 1984, Zuckerburg was born in White
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Plains, New York (Marszal, 2011). Eighteen years later, Zuckerburg graduated from Phillips
Exert Academy, a private school in New Hampshire (Marszal, 2011). Zuckerberg joined
Harvard University later that fall in 2002 after graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy
(Marszal, 2011). In 2003, the introduction of a web program called Facemash, was introduced to
Harvard students which enabled the students to contrast images of same-gender students and rate
the attractiveness of each person (Zeevi, 2013). Zuckerberg illegally hacked into the Harvard
database in order to access the students profile pictures to create the site (Zeevi, 2013). As the
days went on and the site grew more popular, the students soon begun to become outraged by the
creation of the site and demanded the page be shut down (Zeevi, 2013). Luckily, Zuckerberg
was not expelled due to his behavior; however, it was discussed in great detail among Harvard’s
administration (Marszal, 2011). People were surprisingly not knowledgeable of the fact
Zuckerberg, along with other acquaintances including: C. Winklevoss, T. Winklevoss, and
Narendra, were working on another site called HarvardConnection.com (Zeevi, 2013). It seems
as if the Harvard Connection site became overlooked by the new web page of TheFacebook
because the researchers could not find any additional information on Harvard Connection.
In February of 2004, Zuckerberg started TheFacebook.com (Marszal, 2011). Within 24
hours of TheFacebook being created, 1,200 Harvard students had signed up, and after one month,
over half of the undergraduate student population had a profile (Phillips, 2007). Due to the
success Zuckerberg experienced through the creation of TheFacebook, Zuckerberg dropped out
of Harvard and moved to Palo Alto the summer of what was supposed to be Zuckerberg’s junior
year in college (Marszal, 2011). The original website was initially supposed to be limited to
Harvard students only; however, the site quickly expanded to many colleges in the Boston area,
other Ivy League schools, and then eventually about every University in North America (Zeevi,
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2013). In August of 2005, TheFacebook’s name was changed to simply Facebook (Phillips,
2007). However, high schools in the United States began to sign up in September 2005, which
eventually led to the social media site spreading worldwide, reaching many United Kingdom
universities (Phillips, 2007).
Phillips (2007) continues, as of September 2006, the network was extended beyond
educational institutions to anyone with a registered email address (para. 4). When Facebook was
created it was free to join and still is today (Phillips, 2007). Facebook makes a profit through
advertising revenue and stock (Phillips, 2007). Other companies such as Yahoo and Google, are
among companies whom have expressed an interest in purchasing Facebook for a rumored
amount of around $2 billion (Phillips, 2007). However, Zuckerberg has so far refused to sell to
any corporation (Phillips, 2007).
Every year, Time Magazine chooses a person to be awarded the magazine’s person of the
year (Marszal, 2011). In 2012, Zuckerberg proudly won the award for his creativity in founding
an incredible social networking site (Marszal, 2011). After the award became public, the
Hollywood movie The Social Network was released which documented Zuckerberg's time at
Harvard and the early days of Facebook (Marszal, 2011). In 2011, Facebook recorded half a
billion users went on the social media site in a single day (Marszal, 2011). In just a single year,
in 2012, Facebook was projected to reach 1 billion users (Marszal, 2011). Indeed, the estimation
of at least 1 billion users by the end of 2012 was proven to be true; according to the Associated
Press (2012) a final number of 1.01 billion Facebook users were recorded as of September 2012
(para. 4).
The increase in the use of Facebook through college students has skyrocketed since the
launch of the social media site in 2005 (World Geographic Regions, 2013). A late 2012 survey
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by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project shows that young adults are
more likely than others to use major social media (Brenner, & Duggan, 2012). Specifically,
when discussing Facebook, Brenner, and Duggan (2012), stated, 67% of adults ranging from the
ages 18-29 use Facebook (p. 2). This statistic supports the discussion of how popular Facebook
is with college students. Facebook was originally intended to rate attractiveness among Harvard
students (Zeevi, 2013); however, over the years of the sites development it has become a place
to connect with family, friends and acquaintances. For example, according to Google Trends
(n.d.), in October and December of 2012, Facebook had reached its highest peak of interest and
has slowly started to decline, yet still fluctuating (Interest over time). However, over the years,
Facebook has become a popular platform for news consumption (Ward-Barnes, 2009). If one
were to go onto a Facebook account, the homepage for the user’s site is called a news feed. It is
constantly and automatically updated with everything friends are doing on the site (Ward-
Barnes, 2009). Through all of the mediated interactivity among friends, an opportunity is
presented for the site owners to monitor and exploit this information (Ward-Barnes, 2009).
A specific example of how Facebook had broadened its purpose was by implementing the
Washington Post Social Reader (The Washington Post, n.d). Social Reader is a Facebook
application which offers a new way to read news from The Washington Post and more of the
Web's best news sources (The Washington Post, n.d). Once one is using the app, the stories one
reads will be instantly shared with their friends, and in return their friends' reads will be shared
with one, creating a socially powered newswire of intriguing articles (The Washington Post, n.d).
The app was launched at the f8 Facebook conference in September 2011 (The Washington Post,
n.d). If the numbers are any indication, Facebook users have embraced the Social Reader, which
currently have almost five million users (The Washington Post, n.d). Social Reader surpassed
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3.5 million users within two months of launching, and 83% of those readers were under 35 years
old (The Washington Post, n.d). Facebook is a pathway to news, but not as large as the
researchers had suggested (Christian, Mitchell, & Rosenstiel, 2012). The study suggested
Facebook news users get more news from friends and family and do see it as news but probably
would have gotten their news someplace else if Facebook did not; The population whom use
these networks for news is still relatively small (Christian, Mitchell, & Rosenstiel, 2012, para.
6). Major news websites in the U.S. now get, on average, 9% of their traffic from Facebook
(Mitchell, Olmstead, & Sasseen). However, these social media news consumers have not given
up other methods of getting news, such as going directly to websites, using apps or through
search (Christian, Mitchell, & Rosenstiel, 2012). In other words, Christian, Mitchell, and
Rosenstiel (2012), sum up the fact that social media outlets, such as Facebook, are additional
paths to news, not replacements for more traditional ones.
Twitter
According to B. Wasike (2013, January 1), Twitter now has influenced the entire social
media advertising and news market. One hundred- forty character advertising and informing of
audience members is critical. Wasike (2013) gives three main reasons as to why Twitter is so
useful and effective with advertising and delivering news; Twitter has uniqueness and suitability
for audience interaction, Twitter’s prowess as an adept news breaking tool, and dwindling news
readership (p. 7).
Twitter does have a uniqueness, Glass and Dorsey noticed that from the inception of the
software. Twitter allows for software designers to be able to have a constant and steady stream of
communication with readers at a rate of their own convenience. The reader does not get
overloaded with information, but rather is told smaller pieces of information in convenient
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portions of 140 characters at a time. This makes all consumption and information getting of
news simpler than ever.
Twitter has prowess as an excellent news breaking tool as well, according to Wasike
(2013). It is a quick delivery system that allows for news to be circulated to a mass audience at
any given time they check their phones. Twitter is able to deliver quick and concise small
messages to users over a platform that the user can individually custom to their own liking
according to Wasike (2013). This has had a widespread effect on the social media and news
information market. According to C. Smith (2013, October 7) Twitter has a reported 250 million
daily users (p. 4).
Opinions of News Consumers
The way in which news consumers are obtaining their news have been shifting away
from print and cable to Internet sources and social media. There are several reasons for this
change in consumer’s methods of obtaining their news. One of the major reasons is that there
are certain media outlets that are not matching consumer needs. In particular, this need is for
immediate news (Edna & Mitchell, 2013). When obtaining news from friends and family, the
most common way is of word of mouth (Edna & Mitchell, 2013). Once the original news is
heard, many of those consuming the news want to find out more about the particular news story.
For United States adults, 35% of adults follow up their news ―very often‖ through social media
sites or media, and 42% ―somewhat often‖ follow up their news by social media sites and email
(Edna & Mitchell, 2013). Only 27% sought out more news by word of mouth very often and
37% very often (Edna & Mitchell). The factor that must be taken away from this study was that
the news was being sought out. Adults in the United States that were not concerned for finding
more information about the story was 23% (Edna & Mitchell, 2013). This indicates that news
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consumers are willing to go online to seek out news.
The data collected by Edna and Mitchell is consistent to other studies of how often
people are discovering the news through the Internet. With the introduction of the use of
Internet, other sources of media have been in decline (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). During the 2008
Presidential election, Gaskins and Jerit studied the media outlets preferred to determine news of
the candidates. This was an important study because this was news that consumers would be
willing to go out and find what was most important to the race. Research showed that
newspapers were in decline of use when the Internet was introduced (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). To
see if this phenomenon was based on the fact that offline newspapers were being replaced by
their online equal, questions were applied to see what the popular Internet sources were. The
newspaper sites were not those that were most popular (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). Sources such as
search engines Yahoo and Google and news websites like cnn.com and msn.com were more
popular (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). Overall, the newspaper fell behind in the categories of
convenience, variety, and vote (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). The vote category represented which
outlet seemed to be the most helpful when it came for outlets that voter could post their ballot.
The Internet was optimal preference for the categories, followed by television, radio, and
newspaper (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). These categories fit what the overlaying usefulness of each
news outlet. The strongest beneift for the Internet over other media outlets is because The
Internet is easily accessible and has the ability to be updated quickly (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012).
Newspapers were not the only news outlet that showed decline with the introduction of
the Internet. Television and radio also proved to be in decline since the introduction of the
Internet (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012, p. 199). This supports the study made by Edna and Mitchell
study. There are advantages that the Internet has over the media outlets that make it more
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preferable to United States consumers (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). The options of having choice and
control over one’s media outlet were important factors (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012, p. 199). The
ability to choose their outlet and what the consumer would like to specifically read is a key
component over the other media outlets (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). The multiple outlets that are
available has given consumers the ability to control their media. With the digital natives
becoming of a mature age, the social media outlets are important for future research. This is
because it gives news producers information of how they need to reach their consumers.
Social Media Popularity
With social media being introduced into the news market, it is important to know the
demographics that are popular with a specific social media site. This is because if there is news
that is specifically being sent out to a particular group of people, one would need to know where
to go. An example of this would be a Republican biased independent news outlet. Pew
Research Center (2013) researched the news consumption about Facebook compared to other
social networks such as: YouTube, Twitter, Google Plus, and LinkedIn in comparison with the
United States population of adults. The study was based off of the percentage of United States
adults covering the demographics of gender, age, income, amount of education the individual
had gone through, ethnicity, and political affiliation (Pew, 2013). In regards to the most popular
in gender, LinkedIn had the largest difference in use (Pew, 2013). LinkedIn would have a
difference with its users of 67% male and 33% female (Pew, 2013). In comparison, Facebook
had 42% male users and 58% female users (Pew, 2013).
The age demographic was resourceful because it gives data on specific age groups.
These groups were: 18-29, 30-49, 50-64, and 65+ (Pew, 2013). Facebook users of the age
demographic 30-49 use it the most to get their news via social media (Pew, 2013). YouTube
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

24


users of 18-29 use this social media the most with 39% of users (Pew, 2013). For the Twitter,
the age group of 18-29 used it the most to get their news (Pew, 2013). Google Plus demographic
that used it the most for news was 30-49 with 37%, and LinkedIn highest use in a demographic
was 30-49 with 50% (Pew, 2013).
Holcomb, Gottfriend, and Mitchell did research on determining how loyal consumers
stick with their social media news outlet (2013). It is rather rare that users switch (Holcomb,
Gottfriend, & Mitchell, 2013). Those who get news from just one site, 65% of United States
adults limit their search to their one site (Holcomb, Gottfriend, &Mitchell, 2013). For those who
use two sites, 26% of adults choose to find more (Holcomb, Gottfriend, & Mitchell, 2013). And
finally, 9% of news consumers on social media use three or more sites (Holcomb, Gottfriend, &
Mitchell, 2013).
The Decline of Newspapers
Newspapers have been tremendously impacted by the transition to media outlets on the
Internet. With the enhancement of digital technology such as smart phones and tablets,
information is essentially instant. It is no long necessary to wait for news. Apps such as
Flipboard give users the ability to fully customize their news by pulling from multiple news
sources from just one app (Cramer, 2013). An example, such as Flipboard, demonstrates how
news consumers are transitioning to a new way of obtaining news (Cramer, 2013). This instant
gratification takes an effect on newspaper organizations and their employees (Cramer, 2013).
The career path of journalists has been impacted in a negative way. Cramer (2013) states the
transition for journalists:
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25


In the past reporters could start in small markets, pay their dues, move up in the world,
and settle into a career with a legacy news organization, but they now face massive
layoffs and the elimination of hundreds of those legacy news organizations because of the
pressures of today’s news environment (p. 21).
This can be a deterrent for future journalists. The journalism field is not a thriving one.
The changing news environment from print to online media has been a result of the many
advantages that online sources have. One of the key factors of why print media has taken a hit is
that there is endless space for digital print. News organizations are not limited to a certain
number of words or page space. Stories can be printed throughout the day without waiting to see
which stories can fit on the news print (Althaus & Tewksbury, 2001). When traditional news
organizations move from print to digital, they print what their normal fare would be, and add
other stories and features (Althaus & Tewksbury, 2001). Using the Internet lets the news
consumers obtain the news much for quickly (Althaus & Tewksbury, 2001). By obtaining their
news more quickly, this leads into another advantage that the Internet has. This is that
consumers seek control over their news.
The Internet, in theory, allows people searching for news to be able to quickly find their
news and navigate to what they see. People that have a desire to control their external
environment are drawn to the Internet because this type of media allows for greater control than
other media outlets (Althaus & Tewkbury, 2001). However, despite this fact, there has been no
study that been done that assess the importance of how control over the media outlet has a
predictor of how news will be consumed (Althaus & Tewkbury, 2001). This being said,
consumers also have a desire for more control over their ability to obtain the news.
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

26


The added news outlets have led to greater competition for the newspaper (Diddi &
LaRose, 2006). There are just so many different outlets that the newspaper has to compete with.
According to Diddi and LaRose (2006),
. The extremely varied media environment that now confronts the news consumer might be
thought to stimulate active selection of news sources more than ever, simply by virtue of
presenting so many new choices, most of which are accessible at all times of the day and
night (p. 194).
With the large amount of options for news outlets that are available, humans innately
want to give themselves something where they do not have to select (Diddi & LaRose, 2006).
The consumer will lapse into a habitual pattern of media consumption in order to conserve
mental resources instead of having to perform an active selection process (Diddi & LaRose,
2006). Because this generation of college students are the first to be so heavily dependent on
the Internet, this media outlet has simply become one of habit (Diddi & LaRose, 2006). These
reasons combined have helped in the demise of the Newspaper.
The struggles of the legacy newspaper organizations have brought forth two issues. They
can either adapt or collapse. For many of the major organizations, they have chosen to adapt to
the new trend of social media. Sources such as The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times
have turned to twitter in order to maintain popularity (Cramer, 2013). According to Cramer
(2013), The New York Times has sent out over 100,000 tweets and has nearly 8 million followers
following their twitter handle @nytimes (p. 24). For The New York Times and many other
newspapers, getting the news to their consumers is what keeps them driven. The content is the
most important factor, and if the journalist is able to put out a message that readers cannot
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

27


ignore, the newspaper will carry on (Cramer, 2013). According to Cramer (2013), big budgets
and the best writers are still going to keep the industry alive in the social web era (p. 24). It has
become the future journalist’s responsibility to carry on the newspaper industry.




















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28













Ch. 4
Method










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A group of 5 undergraduate students, enrolled in a communication research course, were
given the task to conduct a research project. The groups were determined by each person in the
course indicating, on a piece of paper, 1 person they did want to work with and 1 person they did
not want to work with on the project throughout the course of the semester. This information
was given to the course’s instructor, who selected the groups based on the answers given.
Once the groups were determined among the entire class, the researchers started
brainstorming possible research topics which would merit useful research. After much
discussion of other possible topics and comparing topics among the other groups in the course to
ensure there was not similar topics being chosen, the researchers agreed to study which media
outlet college students use to obtain their news most frequently. Following the decision of the
topic which merits research, the hypothesis and research question was developed (see
introduction). The researchers then researched where and when the consumption of news first
started, how the consumption of news has changed over the years.
The researchers utilized the stratified random sampling method by printing a copy of the
Fall 2013 course schedule (see appendix A) of a small, Catholic, private, college in the mid-west.
The strata are defined as: first-year, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Four different colored
highlighter pens were used to highlight the courses which enrolled the participants in the stratum.
The identified courses likely to enroll the targeted audience were identified in the course
schedule. All of the research groups collectively choose courses assumed to enroll members of
each stratum. For example, the high school to college transition course enrolls only first year
students; hence it was chosen. Once all the identified classes were highlighted for each stratum,
every course identified for the study was given a number in consecutive order beginning with
#001-#046. This process was repeated until each identified course stratum was assigned a
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

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number. A number chart, listed with four digit numbers, provided by Adler and Clark (2003),
was used to help aid in the random selection process (see appendix B). One of the researchers
closed their eyes and placed their finger on a number listed within the chart. Whichever number
the researcher landed on was used and split in half. An example is if the number selected was
4321 it was split as 43-21. The researchers looked at the class course schedule to see which class
was labeled the number chosen, 43. If that specified class was listed, the researchers used it, if
not; the next number, 21 was used. However, if neither number was listed, the researchers went
back to the number chart and selected a different number to use.
Once at least three to four different courses were selected for each stratum, the
researchers compared the selected courses with the other research groups to make sure there was
not overlap in the courses selected. By using the random sampling method, the researchers were
able to determine which classes they were going to visit to distribute their questionnaire which
aided in determining the answer to the research question. Each group member decided which
classes they visited based on the classes that best fit their schedule. Every researcher within the
group sent an E-mail to the professors who instructed the classes selected by the stratified
random sampling process (see appendix C). The E-mail asked for the instructor’s permission to
have the researcher visit their class on the day and time the schedule indicated, to have their
students complete the questionnaire.
As a group, the researchers created a 20 question questionnaire (see appendix D). One of
the researchers went to Copy Works in Dubuque, IA and ordered approximately 175 copies of
the questionnaire, as well as a cover letter, assuring the participants if they agree to complete the
questionnaire, their name will rename anonymous throughout the course of the study (see
appendix E). As long as the professor returned an E-mail back to the researcher and agreed to
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allow the researcher to use their class time to distribute the questionnaire, the researcher then
visited the class and distributed the questionnaire to the participants.
After the questionnaires were completed, the researchers numbered each one starting with
#1 and ending in #148. Before analyzing the data in SPSS, the database program the researchers
used to analyze the results of the study, the researchers identified the variables in the
questionnaire based on the level of measurement as: nominal, ordinal, interval, or ratio. A code
book was created based on the questions asked in the questionnaire (see appendix F). An
example of a code is if the question asked what one’s gender was, the code for the specific
question was gender. The code word selected for all 20 questions was then inserted into SPSS.
Every possible answer to the questions was given a number starting with 1 and ending in 29 at
the most. An example is if the question asked what one’s gender was and the two options were
male or female; male was labeled 1 and female was labeled 2. This process was completed for
all 20 questions.
Each researcher took a stack of questionnaires and recorded the codes as the headings to
each question and the corresponding answers to each question into a Microsoft Excel
spreadsheet. This process took place until all 148 questionnaires were accounted for. Once all
of the answers were recorded into Excel, the researchers E-mailed the designated researcher in
charge of the SPSS database their completed Excel spreadsheet of answers. The researcher
designated to record the data then inserted all responses from the Excel sheet into SPSS to
generate the results (see appendix G). The 5 researchers then analyzed the results for each
question; including cross tabulation data which was run to compare 2 questions to each other to
aid the researchers in determining if the research supported the hypothesis. After the analysis of
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the data was completed the researchers created descriptions of the data found for each question,
explaining what the data indicated (see analysis).





















COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

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Ch. 5
Analysis










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Figure 1












Table 1









The respondents in the questionnaire were separated by gender as seen in figure 1. The
data shows a total of 148 questionnaires were competed. Out of the 148 questionnaires
completed, 77 of the respondents were male and 71 of the respondents were female.
Statistically, 52.03% of the respondents were males and 47.97% were female respondents. The
number of respondents was relatively even and balanced between men and women.

Gender

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 55 41.7 51.4 51.4
2.00 52 39.4 48.6 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missing System 25 18.9

Total 132 100.0

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

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Figure 2

Table 2












Year

Frequen
cy
Percen
t
Valid
Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 29 22.0 27.1 27.1
2.00 30 22.7 28.0 55.1
3.00 16 12.1 15.0 70.1
4.00 32 24.2 29.9 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missin
g
Syste
m
25 18.9

Total 132 100.0

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As seen in figure 2 each stratum was broken into four college academic year levels: first
years, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The data shows out of our 148 participants 33 were first
year students, 36 were sophomore students, 33 were junior students, and 46 were seniors.
Statistically, 22.30% were first years, 24.32% were sophomores, 22.30% were juniors, and
31.06% were seniors. The goal was to have at least 25 respondents in each stratum. According
to the data in figure 2, the goal was achieved.


















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Figure 3










Table 3













Print

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 73 55.3 68.2 68.2
2.00 33 25.0 30.8 99.1
3.00 1 .8 .9 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missing System 25 18.9

Total 132 100.0

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The respondents were asked whether they read newspapers or magazines. The response
choices included yes or no answers. Out of the 148 respondents, 106 responded yes, and 42
responded no, they do not read newspapers or magazines. Statistically, 71.62% replied yes and
28.38% responded no. The data supports most respondents read the newspaper or magazine. One
could argue there is a great deal of news consumption through the newspaper and magazine, and
there may be news consumption coming from different media outlets.

















COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

39


Figure 4














Table 4








Pread

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 4 3.0 3.8 3.8
2.00 15 11.4 14.2 17.9
3.00 56 42.4 52.8 70.8
4.00 31 23.5 29.2 100.0
Total 106 80.3 100.0

Missing System 26 19.7

Total 132 100.0

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

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The respondents were asked how often they read the newspaper and magazine if they
answered yes for question #3. The data in figure 4 shows 7 people responded they read the
newspaper or a magazine five times or more per week. Twenty-one respondents read the
newspaper or a magazine three to four times per week. Figure 4 shows 81 respondents read the
newspaper or a magazine 1-2 times per week; this response choice was the highest response
statistically found among the respondents. Lastly, 38 respondents do not read the newspaper or a
magazine during the week. Statistically, 4.76% of respondents read the newspaper or a
magazine five times a week or more. Newspapers or a magazine was read three to four times a
week by 14.29% of respondents. The highest percentage of respondents, 55.10%, responded
they read the newspaper or a magazine 1-2 times per week. The second highest response was
represented by 25.85% of respondents who do not read the newspaper or a magazine during the
week. From the data shown in figure 4, there is a general interest to read a print form of news at
least once a week. The data shows there is a significant amount of people who do not check for
news through a magazine or newspaper and could possibly use an alternative outlet to find news.









COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

41


Figure 5

Table 5
Int

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 5 3.8 4.7 4.7
2.00 5 3.8 4.7 9.3
3.00 39 29.5 36.4 45.8
4.00 40 30.3 37.4 83.2
5.00 18 13.6 16.8 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missing System 25 18.9

Total 132 100.0



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42


When trying to discover how college students obtain their news it is important to find the
interest level college students have in learning the latest news. The reason this question was
important to include in the researchers’ questionnaire is based on a question the researchers
asked themselves when deciding whether or not it should be included in questionnaire. The
question is as follows: why would the researchers try to discover how college students obtain
news if they are not interested in it? In figure 5, the data shows 134 respondents choose answers
3, 4 and 5 which meant those respondents were the most interested in learning the news;
compared to 14 respondents who indicated they were not as interested in learning the latest news.
Statistically, 9.46% of respondents are not interested in learning the latest news, in
comparison with the 90.54% of respondents who indicated they are interested in learning the
latest news. The data shown in figure 5 indicates over 75% of the respondents indicated they
were in the range of somewhat interested to definitely interested in learning about the latest
news.










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43


Figure 6

Table 6
SMuse

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 105 79.5 98.1 98.1
2.00 2 1.5 1.9 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missing System 25 18.9

Total 132 100.0






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44


The researchers’ hypothesized Twitter, a social media outlet, to be the outlet college
students’ use most often to obtain their news. To discover whether or not the hypothesis was
supported or not supported, the researchers decided it was crucial to ask whether college students
use social media. In figure 6, the data overwhelmingly showed 146 of the respondents use social
media and only 2 respondents do not. Statistically, 98.65% of the respondents indicated yes they
do use social media; whereas 1.35% of the respondents do not use social media. The data
showed respondents are highly involved in using social media.
















COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

45


Figure 7

Table 7

SMtwo

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 3 2.3 2.8 2.8
2.00 27 20.5 25.2 28.0
3.00 75 56.8 70.1 98.1
4.00 2 1.5 1.9 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missing System 25 18.9

Total 132 100.0

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

46


Understanding which social media platforms college students are using today was an
important factor in the researchers’ study. According to the data presented in figure 7, 108
respondents have both a Twitter and a Facebook account. However, 35 respondents only have
Facebook; whereas, 3 respondents only have a Twitter and 2 respondents do not have a Facebook
or Twitter account. Statistically, 2.03% of the respondents only have a Twitter account, whereas
23.65% of the respondents only have a Facebook account. The data suggests Facebook is more
popular than Twitter among the sample of college students used for this particular study.
72.97% of respondents indicated they have both a Twitter and Facebook account and 1.35% of
the respondents do not have a Twitter or a Facebook account. Even though the highest
percentage of respondents indicated they have both a Twitter and a Facebook account, the data
suggests Facebook has more members than Twitter; however, it may not necessarily be the place
college students obtain their news.











COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

47


Figure 8

Table 8
SMmost

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 54 40.9 50.5 50.5
2.00 53 40.2 49.5 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missing System 25 18.9
Total 132 100.0





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48


Social media today is extremely popular for social interaction purposes; however, news
consumption on social media among college students is what interested the researchers. The
data in figure 8 shows extremely close opinions among the respondents who completed the
questionnaire; in regards to whether or not the respondents thought social media is a useful tool
to discovering news. Seventy-five respondents indicated yes, social media is a useful way to
discover news; only 2% more than the 73 respondents who indicated no, social media is not a
useful tool in discovering news. The researchers discovered since there is not a significant gap
in the results of the data shown in figure 8, there must be a different medium college students
prefer to use to obtain their news.














COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

49


Figure 9

Table 9

MPbest

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 44 33.3 43.1 43.1
2.00 12 9.1 11.8 54.9
3.00 23 17.4 22.5 77.5
4.00 3 2.3 2.9 80.4
5.00 20 15.2 19.6 100.0
Total 102 77.3 100.0

Missing System 30 22.7

Total 132 100.0

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50


Discovering which media platform college students use the most to obtain there news is
the primary question to answer in regards to this particular study. Therefore, the researchers
asked the respondents to indicate which media platform they use the most to obtain their news:
television, magazine/newspaper, Facebook, radio, or Twitter. The data in figure 9 shows
television was the most overwhelming response with 64 respondents indicating television was
the outlet the respondents used the most to obtain news. Statistically, 45% of the respondents
indicated television was how they obtained their news. Facebook was the second most
frequently used outlet to obtain news; shown in figure 9, 32 respondents chose the Facebook
option. Interestingly, Facebook has half the respondents that television has. Only 17.48% of
respondents choose Twitter, the third most popular choice respondents chose to obtain their
news.













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51


Figure 10

Table 10
FirstOut

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 16 12.1 15.1 15.1
2.00 16 12.1 15.1 30.2
3.00 74 56.1 69.8 100.0
Total 106 80.3 100.0

Missing System 26 19.7

Total 132 100.0





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52


The data in figure 10 represents where the respondents go on the Internet when the
respondents initially want to obtain news. The options the respondents were given to choose
from included online news outlets (CNN, MSNBC, Fox, Etc.) or social media sites such as
Facebook or Twitter. Overwhelmingly, the data shows 74.83% of respondents go to online news
outlets before they check social media sites. The data does not support the researchers’
hypothesis. The data shows Twitter is potentially an afterthought when it comes to college
students obtaining news.

















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Figure 11

Table 11
NewOften

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 12 9.1 11.3 11.3
2.00 15 11.4 14.2 25.5
3.00 62 47.0 58.5 84.0
4.00 17 12.9 16.0 100.0
Total 106 80.3 100.0

Missing System 26 19.7

Total 132 100.0


This data shown in graph 11 represents how often the respondents check for news every
day. The graph shows that the college students we surveyed either do not check the news at all
or only check it 1-2 times per day. About 58% check the news 1-2 times per day and about 14%
do not check it at all. Lastly, 17.01% of the respondents check the news more than 3 times per
day.
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

54


Figure 12

Table 12
ONsub

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 11 8.3 10.3 10.3
2.00 96 72.7 89.7 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missing System 25 18.9

Total 132 100.0







COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

55


The data in figure 12 displays how many respondents subscribe to an online newspaper.
The data showed that out of the 148 total questionnaires filled out, 23 responded, yes, they do
subscribe to an online newspaper and 125 responded, no, they do not subscribe to an online
newspaper. Statistically, 15.54% responded no, and 84.46% responded yes. This is not
surprising to the data gathered from the previous question asking which media platform do
respondents use the most to find the news. The magazine/newspaper response was only
represented by 12.59% respondents. This data informs the researchers that although 23
respondents responded yes they do subscribe to an online newspaper; only 18 of those
respondents find it is the most used for obtaining news. The data figure 12 supports the
researchers’ hypothesis since online newspapers cannot be the most frequently visited media
platform for news if only 23 respondents have online newspaper subscriptions.











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Figure 13

Table 13

VisitNew

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 71 53.8 66.4 66.4
2.00 36 27.3 33.6 100.0
Total 107 81.1 100.0

Missing System 25 18.9

Total 132 100.0







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The question responsible for the findings of the data in figure 13 was the following:
Do you visit any of the following news sites: CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, Yahoo? Out of the 148
questionnaires, 45 respondents do not visit the listed websites. While 103 responded yes they do
visit the listed websites. Statistically, the data shows 30.41% responded no and 69.59%
responded yes. The data gathered from this question agrees with the previous question of: When
you’re checking for news on the internet which outlet do you go to first. The data shows 110
(74.83%) of respondents revealed online news outlets was the most popular answer.
















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Figure 14


Table 14

MostInc

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 13 9.8 12.7 12.7
2.00 4 3.0 3.9 16.7
3.00 2 1.5 2.0 18.6
4.00 11 8.3 10.8 29.4
5.00 56 42.4 54.9 84.3
6.00 3 2.3 2.9 87.3
7.00 13 9.8 12.7 100.0
Total 102 77.3 100.0

Missing System 30 22.7

Total 132 100.0


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59


The data represented in figure 14 represents the question: where are you most inclined to
find the latest news? The data revealed that 20 (13.99%) responded word of mouth, 7(4.90%)
responded newspaper, 2(1.40%) responded magazine, 17(11.89%) responded T.V., 76(53.15%)
responded Internet, 5 (3.50%) responded online periodicals, and 16 (11.19%) responded social
media sites. This data does not support the researchers’ hypothesis because it concludes that
although a majority of college students may be on the Internet, that does not mean they use social
media to find the latest news.
















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Figure 15

Table 15


Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 70 53.0 66.0 66.0
2.00 36 27.3 34.0 100.0
Total 106 80.3 100.0

Missing System 26 19.7

Total 132 100.0


The data in figure 15 represents the question: when reading your news on Facebook or
Twitter and there is not a link provided are you inclined to follow up on a news site such as:
CNN, MSNBC etc. One-hundred and one respondents 101 (68.71%) answered yes, and 46
(31.29%) answered no. The data suggests providing links increases the likelihood of a social
media reader to follow up.

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Figure 16

Table 16
Click

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 127 85.8 86.4 86.4
2.00 20 13.5 13.6 100.0
Total 147 99.3 100.0

Missing System 1 .7

Total 148 100.0


Figure 16 displays what the respondents insist on doing once they find the information
they are looking for on social media. When reading about the news, 127 respondents click on
links to obtain more information on the news story, which makes up for 85.8% of the
respondents. Twenty of the students said they did not click the link, plus there was 1 error in the
response from the respondent. This provides data that posting the link will help draw hits to the
website of the social media member.


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Figure 17

Table 17
Like

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 66 44.6 44.6 44.6
2.00 82 55.4 55.4 100.0
Total 148 100.0 100.0


Facebook and Twitter are two of the most prominent social media sites. Based on figure
17, the research indicates 145 respondents had Facebook, Twitter, or both. This being said, less
than the majority of people said that they followed or liked some type of news source. 82
respondents (55.4%) said they did not follow the sites, where 66 (44.6%) said they did.




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Figure 18

Table 18
WOM

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 14 9.5 9.7 9.7
2.00 16 10.8 11.0 20.7
3.00 23 15.5 15.9 36.6
4.00 61 41.2 42.1 78.6
5.00 31 20.9 21.4 100.0
Total 145 98.0 100.0

Missing System 3 2.0

Total 148 100.0







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The word of mouth aspect is an important element to consider within this study. When
discovering news first through word of mouth, the researchers wanted to discover where they try
and find more information. This was important for the research questions in trying to distinguish
where college students are getting their news. According to figure 18, if they hear about it from
human interaction, 61 (42.07%) of the respondents said they would go to online newspapers first.
The next closest was going to news stations with 31 (21.38%) respondents going their first.
Statistically, 23 (15.85%) respondents indicated they would go to yahoo, 16 (11.03%) would go
to Twitter, 14 (9.66%) would go to Facebook first, leaving 3 unanswered, and unusable
responses.














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Figure 19

Table 19
Inform

Frequency Percent Valid Percent
Cumulative
Percent
Valid 1.00 107 72.3 72.3 72.3
2.00 33 22.3 22.3 94.6
3.00 8 5.4 5.4 100.0
Total 148 100.0 100.0


Twitter and Facebook have had a major influence around the students. To try and
determine whether the news was an important element, respondents were asked whether or not
Facebook and Twitter makes them more informed about the world around them. Statistically,
107 (72.30%) respondents indicated that it did, 33 (22.30%) of respondents indicated that it
didn’t, and 8 (5.41%) respondents indicated they were not applicable.



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Cross Tabulation Analysis
Figure 20











Table 20






This cross tabulation displayed in figure 20 displays the between males and females. After
analyzing the data it is clear that both a majority of males and females read a newspaper or
magazine 1-2 times a day. The second highest response for both genders indicates the
respondents never read the newspaper or magazine.

Gender * PRead Cross Tabulation
Count

PRead
Total 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00
Gender 1.00 4 18 30 24 76
2.00 3 3 51 14 71
Total 7 21 81 38 147
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Figure 21













Table 21






After analyzing this data in figure 21 it is clear males have a slightly greater interest in
learning the latest news compared to females. Furthermore when it comes to learning the latest
news the respondents in the female section have a median interest in learning the latest news.

Gender * Int Cross Tabulation
Count

Int
Total 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00
Gender 1.00 3 5 21 35 13 77
2.00 2 4 28 21 16 71
Total 5 9 49 56 29 148
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Figure 22


Table 22

Gender * SMuse Cross Tabulation
Count

SMuse
Total 1.00 2.00
Gender 1.00 75 2 77
2.00 71 0 71
Total 146 2 148

In figure 22, the data showed all 71, female, respondents use social media. Out of the 77,
male, respondents, 2 indicated they did not use social media. Therefore, the data in figure 22
shows 100% of the female respondents use social and 98% of the male respondents use social
media.
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Figure 23

Table 23

Gender * SMTtwo Cross Tabulation
Count

SMTtwo
Total 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00
Gender 1.00 1 20 54 2 77
2.00 2 15 54 0 71
Total 3 35 108 2 148

According to figure 23, 100% of the females have either a Facebook or Twitter account;
over half of the female respondents having both accounts. Two male respondents do not have
either account; however, more males have only a Facebook account than females. An equal
amount of 54 respondents among both the male and female groups have both a Facebook and a
Twitter account.
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Figure 24


Table 24

Gender * SMmost Cross Tabulation
Count

SMmost
Total 1.00 2.00
Gender 1.00 41 36 77
2.00 34 37 71
Total 75 73 148



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When asking respondents if social media is the most useful tool for finding out news,
figure 24 shows the female respondents indicated it is not useful. When comparing the female
responses to the male responses, the no’s outweighed the yes’ by 3 respondents. The female
respondents said no; social media is not useful for finding out news with a total of 36 responses;
whereas, 41 responses whereas males responding yes; social media is not useful for finding out
news.

















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Figure 25


Table 25

Gender * ONsub Cross Tabulation
Count

ONsub
Total 1.00 2.00
Gender 1.00 13 64 77
2.00 10 61 71
Total 23 125 148





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The data in figure 25 shows through a cross tabulation analysis that 13 males respondents
subscribe to an online newspaper while 10 female respondents subscribe to an online newspaper
as well. A total of 64 males responded they did not subscribe at all and 61 female respondents
answered they do not subscribe to an online newspaper either.






































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Figure 26

Table 26
Gender * VisitNew Cross Tabulation
Count

VisitNew
Total 1.00 2.00
Gender 1.00 58 19 77
2.00 45 26 71
Total 103 45 148


The data in figure 26 that 58 male respondents answered, yes, they do visit websites from
large news corporations while 19 male respondents do not. Forty-five female respondents replied
they did visit these types of websites as well while 26 female respondents do not.
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Figure 27

Table 27
Gender * MostInc Cross Tabulation
Count

MostInc
Total 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00
Gender 1.00 9 3 1 11 41 1 8 74
2.00 11 4 1 6 35 4 8 69
Total 20 7 2 17 76 5 16 143




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Analysis of the data in figure 27 shows male respondents are most inclined to find the
news through the Internet. Statistically, 41 out of the 74 male respondents indicated the Internet
is the highest inclination to find news. The second highest response choice for male respondents
was television with 11 respondents. The third highest response was through word of mouth.
Furthermore, the fourth highest response was social media. Females closely mirrored the males’
responses as well. The highest for females’ inclination for news was the Internet and the lowest
response was for obtaining news via an online periodical. Overall the three least responses the
respondents chose to obtain their news was a newspaper, magazine and an online periodical.






























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Figure 28

Table 28
Gender * NoLink Cross Tabulation
Count

NoLink
Total 1.00 2.00
Gender 1.00 49 27 76
2.00 52 19 71
Total 101 46 147




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This cross tabulation analysis shown in figure 28 represents 49 males respondents
indicated, yes, they follow a link to a larger website when provided with a link to do so. Twenty-
seven of the respondents indicated that they did not follow the link. Females agreed with the
males answering that 52 respondents follow the link and only 19 respondents do not.
Statistically, the data showed 101 respondents answered yes and 46 answered no.


















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Figure 29











Table 29






After analyzing the data provided in figure 29, it is clear that the senior respondents are
more inclined to follow up with an online news source. The junior respondents are less likely to
follow up with an online news source than the sophomore respondents. Additionally,
sophomores are the second most inclined to follow up. The first year respondents are least likely
to follow up with an online news source after reading news on Facebook or Twitter.

Year * NoLink Cross Tabulation
Count

NoLink
Total 1.00 2.00
Year 1.00 19 14 33
2.00 24 12 36
3.00 23 10 33
4.00 35 10 45
Total 101 46 147
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Figure 30

Table 30

Year * ONsub Cross Tabulation
Count

ONsub
Total 1.00 2.00
Year 1.00 8 25 33
2.00 3 33 36
3.00 5 28 33
4.00 7 39 46
Total 23 125 148

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The data in figure 30 provides the following information about online newspaper
subscriptions divided among first years, sophomores, juniors and seniors. The first year students
have the highest amount of online subscriptions with 8 indicating that, yes, they do and 25
indicating they do not. The seniors are second highest with 7 indicating, yes, they do and 39
respondents indicate they do not. Juniors are the 3
rd
highest with online newspaper subscriptions
with 5 yes and 28 no. Finally, the sophomores are the lowest with online subscriptions with 3 yes
and 33 no.










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Figure 31

Table 31

Year * VisitNew Cross Tabulation
Count

VisitNew
Total 1.00 2.00
Year 1.00 22 11 33
2.00 25 11 36
3.00 21 12 33
4.00 35 11 46
Total 103 45 148



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The data provided in figure 31 shows 22 first years responded yes, they do visit news
sites. However, 11 respondents do not visit news sites. Twenty-five sophomores answered yes
while 11 respondents indicated no. Twenty-one juniors responded yes they do visit news sites,
while 12 responded no. Finally, 35 seniors replied yes, they do visit news sites while only 11
responded no. Statistically, the data resulted in 103 respondents indicating yes, they do visit
news sites and 45 respondents indicated no, they do not.

















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Figure 32

Table 32

Year * MostInc Cross Tabulation
Count

MostInc
Total 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00
Year 1.00 2 3 1 10 12 1 4 33
2.00 6 1 0 3 19 0 5 34
3.00 9 1 0 2 19 1 1 33
4.00 3 2 1 2 26 3 6 43
Total 20 7 2 17 76 5 16 143



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This data in figure 32 shows each stratum is most inclined to find their news through the
usage of the Internet. First years indicated television was the second highest inclination for
obtaining their news. Sophomores indicated that word of mouth was the second highest and the
juniors did as well. The seniors found that social media was the second highest inclination for
obtaining the news. All other categories were very low with responses in each stratum. The
fewest category in total responses was magazines.

















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Ch. 6
Summary










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Intro
A group of 5 researchers conducted a study on how college students obtain their news.
The researchers believed this topic merited research because as potential professionals in the
public relations field, it will be one’s job to reach as many audiences as possible. Furthermore,
the study on how college students obtain their news merits research because technology is
constantly changing and if public relations professionals knew the platform their targeted
audience uses the most, the better service they are doing for their clients and the more successful
they can be.
Literature Review
The history of the newspaper began in Rome; this according to Endres (2003), who
states, The Acta Diurna Populi Romani was a script account of news of the empire, launched in
59 BC by Julius Caesar as official publication of his government (p. 2.1). One could argue Act
Diurna paved the way for many other platforms to emerge. Specificly, in the 17
th
century, North
America produced its first newspaper. In 1690, after colonies were settled, Benjamin Harris
created Publick Occurrences, this according to Biagi (2011), who states, Publick Occurences
which was published in Boston on September 25, 1690 often is identified as America’s First
Newspaper (p. 54). According to Biagi (2011), Technological advances of the 19
th
century such
as cheaper newsprint, mechanized printing, and the telegraph meant newspapers could reach a
wider audience faster than before (p. 55). Furthermore, newspapers and magazines have begun to
see major changes towards viewership. More importantly many newspapers and magazines have
become digitized. For instance many papers have made online versions. For instance, Vahlber
(2010) states, Not only has the average amount of time spent with newspapers and magazines
declined, but the proportion of teens reading either one has, too
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News on television can be divided into three categories; Local television news, network
television news, and cable network news (Olmstead, Jurkowitz, Mitchell, & Enda, 2013). The
topics people seek out the most on local TV news — weather and breaking news (and to a lesser
extent, traffic) — are ripe for replacement by any number of Web- and mobile-based outlets
(Pew, 2013). CNN was the first television news network to enter into the new genre of news on
June 1st, 1980 as the first television station to offer news 24/7 (Erickson, n.d.). Fox was the next
major network to provide this type of television station in 1996 (Erickson, n.d.). Television news
viewership is much lower among younger age with no sign of it increasing as Xers (33-47) and
Millennials (18-31) age (Kohut, 2013). However, unlike newspapers, there is little indication that
this TV news viewership declines with age (Kohut, 2013). Xers and Millenials seem to not be as
interested in news as older generations, not only for the television platform, but as a whole
(Kohut, 2013).
In February of 2004, Zuckerberg started TheFacebook.com (Marszal, 2011). According
to Zeevi (2013), Facebook is the largest social network in the world today, where 1 out of every
7 people on earth is on Facebook (p. 1). In August of 2005, TheFacebook’s name was changed to
simply Facebook (Phillips, 2007). However, high schools in the United States began to sign up in
September 2005, which eventually led to the social media site spreading worldwide, reaching
many United Kingdom universities (Phillips, 2007). The increase in the use of Facebook through
college students has skyrocketed since the launch of the social media site in 2005 (World
Geographic Regions, 2013). A late 2012 survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet &
American Life Project shows that young adults are more likely than others to use major social
media (Brenner, & Duggan, 2012). Specifically, when discussing Facebook, Brenner, and
Duggan (2012), stated, 67% of adults ranging from the ages 18-29 use Facebook (p. 2). This
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89


statistic supports the discussion of how popular Facebook is among college students. Facebook
was originally intended to rate attractiveness among Harvard students (Zeevi, 2013); however,
over the years of the sites development it has become a place to connect with family, friends and
acquaintances.
According to B. Wasike (2013, January 1), Twitter now has influenced the entire social
media advertising and news market. 140 character advertising and informing of audience
members is critical. Wasike (2013) gives three main reasons as to why Twitter is so useful and
effective with advertising and delivering news; Twitter has uniqueness and suitability for
audience interaction, Twitter’s prowess as an adept news breaking tool, and dwindling news
readership (p. 7).
Twitter also has prowess as an excellent news breaking tool as well. It is a quick
delivering system that allows for news to be circulated to a mass audience at any given time they
check their phones. This allows for Twitter to be very effective because now, more than ever
audiences are on their phones and computers. According to C. Smith (2013, October 7) Twitter
has a reported 250 million daily users (p. 4).News has changed drastically in the past few years
and Twitter is a major reason as to why social media has become such a large output for news
and media’s everywhere.
The way in which news consumers are obtaining their news have been shifting away
from print and cable to Internet sources and social media. With the introduction of the use of
Internet, other sources of media have been in decline (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). Once the original
news is heard, many of those consuming the news want to find out more about the particular
news story. Research showed that newspapers were in decline of use when the Internet was
introduced (Gaskins & Jerit, 2012). To see if this phenomenon was based on the fact that offline
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90


newspapers were being replaced by their online equal, questions were applied to see what the
popular Internet sources were.
Television and radio also proved to be in decline since the introduction of the Internet
(Gaskins & Jerit, 2012, p. 199). With the digital natives becoming of a mature age, the social
media outlets are important for future research.
Method
A group of 5 undergraduate students, enrolled in a communication research course, were
given the task to conduct a research project. Once the groups were determined among the entire
class, the researchers started brainstorming possible research topics which would merit useful
research. The researchers agreed to study which media outlet college students use to obtain their
news most frequently. Following the decision of the topic which merits research, the hypothesis
and research question was developed (see introduction).
The researchers then researched where and when the consumption of news first started,
how the consumption of news has changed over the years. The researchers utilized the stratified
random sampling method by printing a copy of the Fall 2013 course schedule (see appendix A)
of a small, Catholic, private, college in the mid-west. The strata are defined as: first-year,
sophomores, juniors, and seniors. All of the research groups collectively choose courses assumed
to enroll members of each stratum. A number chart, listed with four digit numbers, provided by
Adler and Clark (2003), was used to help aid in the random selection process (see appendix B).
Once at least three to four different courses were selected for each stratum, the
researchers compared the selected courses with the other research groups to make sure there was
not overlap in the courses selected. By using the random sampling method, the researchers were
able to determine which classes they were going to visit to distribute their questionnaire which
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91


aided in determining the answer to the research question. Every researcher within the group sent
an E-mail to the professors who instructed the classes selected by the stratified random sampling
process (see appendix C).
As a group, the researchers created a 20 question questionnaire (see appendix D). One of
the researchers ordered approximately 175 copies of the questionnaire, as well as a cover letter,
assuring the participants if they agree to complete the questionnaire, their name will rename
anonymous throughout the course of the study (see appendix E). The researchers then visited the
class and distributed the questionnaire to the participants. After the questionnaires were
completed, the researchers numbered each one starting with #1 and ending in #148. Before
analyzing the data in SPSS, the database program the researchers used to analyze the results of
the study, the researchers identified the variables in the questionnaire based on the level of
measurement as: nominal, ordinal, interval, or ratio. A code book was created based on the
questions asked in the questionnaire (see appendix F). The code word selected for all 20
questions was then inserted into SPSS. Every possible answer to the questions was given a
number starting with 1 and ending in 29 at the most. This process was completed for all 20
questions. Once all of the answers were recorded, the researcher designated to record the data
then inserted all responses into SPSS to generate the results (see appendix G).
The 5 researchers then analyzed the results for each question; including cross tabulation
data which was run to compare 2 questions to each other to aid the researchers in determining if
the research supported the hypothesis. After the analysis of the data was completed the
researchers created descriptions of the data found for each question, explaining what the data
indicated (see analysis).

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Analysis
After analyzing the data collected, the researchers have found that their hypothesis was
not supported. For instance, the researchers found that Twitter was not the most utilized media
platform for retrieving news information. The most utilized media platform was television
according to the researchers analysis. Furthermore, while 98.65% of the respondents did reply
that they use social media, it was not the media platform used most frequently to obtain news.
The researchers found that college students have the highest inclination towards using the
internet to obtain news, but they did not actually gather news from the internet as frequently as
they incline. Television was the main media platform that college students utilized most for
finding their news. Although this was the case, the researchers did notice that social media was
becoming more utilized among the older college students to find news.











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Ch. 7
Limitations









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Following the collection of the data and analyzing the complete questionnaires, the
researchers discovered that there were limitations during the process. The limitations were the
aspects of the research that, if this process was started again, these steps would be completed
differently. The limitations were aspects of research process that narrowed the study. There were
several questions on the questionnaire that limited the data collection.
Question 7:
Which of the two social media sites do you currently have?
a. Twitter
b. Facebook
c. Both
d. I do not use social media
The question was bias towards the hypothesis. The hypothesis was that the researchers
believed that Twitter was the source that college students were using to get their news. However,
this does not give the opportunity to find out if there is a different social media site that the
students were using. As a result, this hinders the study by not discovering if there is a social
media site that is used more than others.
Question 11:
When you’re checking for news on the Internet, what is the first outlet you go to?
a. Twitter
b. Facebook
c. Online news outlets
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95


Option ―C‖ was very vague in terms of content. It does not allow for information on what
the news outlets could be. This broad answer does not help with the research because it is not
known what type of research is the most useful. The question should have given options such as:
television sites (i.e. CNN), newspapers (i.e. New York Times), magazines (Time Magazine).
Question 13:
Do you subscribe to an online newspaper?
a. Yes
b. No
This question does not serve much purpose for the research. Knowing whether someone
has a subscription to online newspaper or not had no angle to the research. If there was a follow
up question of whether they believe this is the best resource or they use this source to be their
news first would have been more useful.
Question 14:
Do you visit any of the following news sites: CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, Yahoo?
a. Yes
b. No
This question did not pertain to our study. This question is seemingly too broad and does
not infer which media college students use the most. The questions answer only provides
whether or not the student visits this website. The researchers believe asking this type of question
in a different way would lead to a better analysis.

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Ch. 8
Recommendations









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97


The researchers have concluded that allowing this study to be replicated would provide a
better analysis as to where college students will be attaining their news from. Furthermore, a
longitudinal study is recommended for the future to find out whether or not future college
students are relying on social media more to find their news. Technology is always evolving as
well, and this brings about new media platforms. As technology advances, conducting a
longitudinal study every 4 years would allow future researchers to identify which platform is
most effective with news delivery to college students. Additionally, this study would focus on
how college students specifically obtain news, and where they end up looking the most.















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Ch. 9
Conclusion










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99


Introduction
A group of 5 researchers conducted a study on how college students obtain their news.
The researchers believed this topic merited research because as potential professionals in the
public relations field, it will be one’s job to reach as many audiences as possible while keeping
up to date with the latest technology to better serve their clients.
Literature Review
The newspaper was the first form of news information delivery. After the newspaper the
radio was established to provide news and entertain the general public. Furthermore in recent
history it was noted social media plays an important part in the consumption of news. More
importantly because of social media newspapers have become digitized. More recently, social
media websites have gained popularity. Websites such as Facebook and Twitter have allowed for
faster media coverage to a widespread audience at the audience’s pace and discretion at a
minimalistic cost. Not only is this convenient for financial purposes but it is also an easier way
for the sharing of information.
Method
A group of 5 undergraduate students, enrolled in a communication research course, were
given the task to conduct a research project. The researchers agreed to study which media outlet
college students use to obtain their news most frequently. Following the decision of the topic
which merits research, the hypothesis and research question was developed (see introduction).
The researchers then researched where and when the consumption of news first started, and how
the consumption of news has changed over the years.
The researchers utilized the stratified random sampling method by printing a copy of the
Fall 2013 course schedule (see appendix A) of a small, Catholic, private, college in the mid-west.
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

100


The strata are defined as: first-year, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. All of the research
groups collectively choose courses assumed to enroll members of each stratum. A number chart,
listed with four digit numbers, provided by Adler and Clark (2003), was used to help aid in the
random selection process (see appendix B).
Three to four different courses were selected for each stratum. By using the random
sampling method, the researchers were able to determine which classes they were going to visit
to distribute their questionnaire which aided in determining the answer to the research question.
Every researcher within the group sent an E-mail to the professors who instructed the classes
selected by the stratified random sampling process (see appendix C).
As a group, the researchers created a 20 question questionnaire (see appendix D). One of
the researchers ordered approximately 175 copies of the questionnaire, as well as a cover letter
(see appendix E). The researchers then visited the determined classes and distributed the
questionnaire to the participants. After the questionnaires were completed, the researchers
identified the variables in the questionnaire based on the level of measurement as: nominal,
ordinal, interval, or ratio. A code book was created based on the questions asked in the
questionnaire (see appendix F). The code word selected for all 20 questions was then inserted
into SPSS. Every possible answer to the questions was given a number starting with 1 and
ending in 29 at the most. This process was completed for all 20 questions. Once all of the
answers were recorded, the researcher designated to record the data then inserted all responses
into SPSS to generate the results (see appendix G).
The 5 researchers then analyzed the results for each question; including cross tabulation
data to aid the researchers in determining if the research supported the hypothesis. After the
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

101


analysis of the data was completed the researchers created descriptions of the data found for each
question, explaining what the data indicated (see analysis).
Analysis
After analyzing the data collected, the researchers have found that their hypothesis was
not supported. For instance, the researchers found that Twitter was not the most utilized media
platform for retrieving news information. The most utilized media platform was television
according to the researchers’ analysis. Furthermore, while 98.65% of the respondents did reply
that they use social media, it was not the media platform used most frequently to obtain news.
The researchers found that college students have the highest inclination towards using the
internet to obtain news, but they did not actually gather news from the internet as frequently as
they incline. Television was the main media platform that college students utilized most for
finding their news. Although this was the case, the researchers did notice that social media was
becoming more utilized among the older college students to find news.
The researchers hypothesized Twitter was the media platform used most among college
students when obtaining their news. After analyzing the data, the researchers’ hypothesis was not
supported. However, this study does merit future study because it is apparent through the data
collected that social media is an up and coming platform for news gathering. While technology
has advanced extremely fast in the past decade, social media is still at a very early stage as
compared to other media platforms such as the television.
Limitations
Multiple questions in the study limited the knowledge which could have been gained due
to the following reasons: on question #8 having a write in answer on the questionnaire did not
aid in the researchers and could have been directed more to the particular study and lead the
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102


researchers in an indirect path. The researchers concluded that questions 7,11,13, and 14 in their
questionnaire were deemed insufficient. These lead the researchers towards insufficient
evidence that did not pertain towards their study. Furthermore, some of the questions were either
improperly phrased and subject to an individual’s personal bias on what they believe is to be
considered news.
Recommendation
The researchers would recommend a longitudinal study every 4 years to combat with the
change in technology. The researchers feel there could be a shift in future student’s news
consumption habits to move more towards social media when obtaining their news. Lastly,
another recommendation is to question how long each social media user has been subscribed to
each site. The researchers believe this would be valuable information as well.












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Ch. 10
References










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Adler, E. M., & Clark, R. (2003). How it’s done: An invitation to social research (2
nd
.).
Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/ Thomson Publishers.
Althaus, S. L. & Tewksbury, D. (2000). Patterns of internet and traditional news media use in
a networked community. Routledge. Retrieved from
http://faculty.las.illinois.edu/salthaus/Publications/althaus_tewksbury_2000_pc.pdf
Biagi, S. (2003). Newspapers expanding delivery. Media/Impact: An introduction to mass
media (6th ed., pp. 54-56). Australia: Wadsworth/Thomson.
Brenner, J., & Duggan, M. (2013, February 14). The demographics of social media users.
2012 Pew Research Center, 2. Retrieved from
http://pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2013/PIP_SocialMediaUsers.pdf
Carlson, N. (2011, April 13). The real history of Twitter. Retrieved from
http://www.businessinsider.com/how-twitter-was-founded-2011-4
Christian, L. Mitchell, A. Rosenstiel, T. (2012). What Facebook and Twitter mean for the
news. The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism-The State of the
News Media 2013, para. 5, 6. Retrieved from http://stateofthemedia.org/2012/mobile-
devices-and-news-consumption-some-good-signs-for-journalism/what-facebook-and-
twitter-mean-for-news
Cramer, M. L. (2013). The death of the media brand: Is your good name worth anything?
Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=f9bf89a8-
d090-4b56-aba2-4b781f8fd087%40sessionmgr13&vid=8&hid=20
Diddi, A. & LaRose, R. (2006). Getting hooked on news: Uses and gratifications and the
formation of news habits among college students in an internet. Journal of Broadcasting
& Electronic Media. 194-197
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Dorsey, J. (2006, March 21). just setting up my twttr [Twitter post]. Retrieved from
https://twitter.com/dorsey/status/20
Enda, J. & Mitchell, A. (2013). Friends and family: Important drivers of news. The Pew
Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism: The State of the News Media
2013 An Annual Report on American Journalism. Retrieved from
http://stateofthemedia.org/2013/special-reports-landing-page/friends-and-family-
important-drivers-of-news/
Endres, K. (2003). Newsletter, Newspapers, and Pamphlets. In Encyclopedia of Life Support
Systems. (Vol. 1, p. 2.1). UK: Oxford.
Erickson, H. (n.d.) Cable News Network (CNN). Retrieved from Encyclopedia Britannica:
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/87632/Cable-News-Network-CNN
Fielbig, M. (2011). The effects of the sputnik launch on computing. Retrieved from Lecture
Notes Online Website, para. 3, 6.
http://www.sinc.sunysb.edu/Stu/mfielbig/cse301/sputnik.html
Figerman, S. (2013, September 12). How much is Twitter worth? Retrieved from
http://mashable.com/2013/09/12/twitter-valuation
Gaskins, B. & Jerit, J. (2012). Internet news: Is it a replacement for traditional media
outlets? The International Journal of Press/Politics. 197-199
Holcomb, J., Gottfried, J., & Mitchell, A. (2013). News use across social media platforms. Pew
Research Journalism Project. Retrieved from
http://www.journalism.org/2013/11/14/news-use-across-social-media-platforms/

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106


Interest over time. (n.d.) Google Trend. Retrieved from
http://www.google.com/trends/explore?q=facebook#q=facebook&cmpt=date
Kirchhoff, M. S. (2010, September). The U.S. Newspaper Industry in Transition (CRS
Report No. R40700). Retrieved from Congressional Research Service website:
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R40700.pdf
Kohut, A. (2013). Pew surveys of audience habits suggest perilous future for news. Poynter,
para 8,11. Retrieved from http://www.poynter.org/latest-news/top-stories/225139/pew-
surveys-of-audience-habits-suggest-perilous-future-for-news
Mac, R. (2013, October 4). Who owns Twitter? A look at J. Dorsey, E. Williams and the
company’s largest shareholders. Retrieved from
http://www.forbes.com/sites/ryanmac/2013/10/04/who-owns-twitter-a-look-at-jack-
dorsey-evan-williams-and-the-companys-largest-shareholders
Marszal, A. (2011, December 2). Timeline: The life of Zuckerberg. The Telegraph. Retrieved
from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/8930485/Timeline-the-life-of-
Zuckerberg.html
Mitchel, A., Olmstead, K., Sasseen, J. (2013). Digital: As mobile grows tapidly, the pressures
on news intensify. The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism-The
State of the News Media 2013, 5. Retrieved from http://stateofthemedia.org/2013/digital-
as-mobile-grows-rapidly-the-pressures-on-news-intensify
N. a. (2013). Profile of the social media news consumer. Pew Research Center. Retrieved
from
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107


Olmstead, L. Jurkowitz, M. Mitchell, A. Enda, J. (2013). How Americans Get TV News at
Home. The Pew Research’s Journalism Project, para 8,9,10,11, 12. Retrieved from
http://www.journalism.org/2013/10/11/how-americans-get-tv-news-at-home

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Who Watches and Why. Pew Research’s Center for the People & the Press, para 5, 10.
Retrieved from
http://www.people-press.org/2010/09/12/americans-spending-more-time-following-the-
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Sports. Pew Research Center, para 3,4,5. Retrieved from
http://www.pewresearch.org/daily-number/local-tv-news-facing-challenges-turns-to-
heavy-diet-of-traffic-weather-and-sports/news
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Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2007/jul/25/media.newmedia
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s&st=Search&_r=0
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Yahoo Finance, para. 4. Retrieved from http://finance.yahoo.com/news/number-active-
users-facebook-over-years-214600186--finance.html
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108


Smith, C. (2013, October 7). How many people use 275 of the top social media, apps and
services? Retrieved from http://expandedramblings.com/index.php/resource-how-many-
people-use-the-top-social-media
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/socialreader
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Newspaper Assocaition of America Foundation.
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the news and interact with audiences via Twitter. Global Media Journal: Canadian
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http://mashable.com/2006/08/25/facebook-profile
Yarow, J. (2013, October 4). Twitter has a surprisingly small number of US users. Retrieved
from http://www.businessinsider.com/twitter-has-a-surprisingly-small-number-of-us-
users-2013-10
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109


Zeevi, D. (2013, February 21). The ultimate history of Facebook. Socialmedia today, para. 1,2.
Retrieved from http://socialmediatoday.com/daniel-zeevi/1251026/ultimate-history-
facebook-infographic




















COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

110













Ch. 11
Appendices










COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

111


Appendix A
Fall 2013 Course Schedule

MAX USED WTLST SYN DEPT CAT SEC TITLE CRED
TIME DAY BLDG ROOM INSTRUCTOR(S)

20 13 2588 L.AAD 105 01 Representational Drawing 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF VISI 115 Romero, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Open to FY, SO or Stu Art Minors

20 15 2587 L.AAD 110 01 2D Design 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW VISI 115 Calvert, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 23 3631 L.AAD 150 01 Art History I 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 212 Calvert, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 6 2589 L.AAD 215 01 Critical Analysis I 1.0
04:00-06:00pm M VISI 111 Myers, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 5 2590 L.AAD 225 01 Critical Analysis II 1.0
04:00-06:00pm M VISI 111 Myers, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

16 14 2591 L.AAD 230 01 Digital Design Fundamentals 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 435 Myers, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 5 2592 L.AAD 315 01 Critical Analysis III 1.0
04:00-06:00pm M VISI 111 Myers, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

20 1 2593 L.AAD 325 01 Critical Analysis IV 1.0
04:00-06:00pm M VISI 111 Myers, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

16 10 2594 L.AAD 340 01 Graphic Design II 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 435 Romero, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

16 10 2595 L.AAD 350 01 Interact Multimedia Projects I 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HOFF 435 Calvert, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 1 3835 L.AAD 395 01 Critical Analysis V 1.0
04:00-06:00pm M VISI 111 Myers, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

32 30 3791 L.ACC 227 01 Managerial Accounting 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF HOFF 311 Lammer, L
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

112


Aug 26 - Dec 12

32 32 3792 L.ACC 227 02 Managerial Accounting 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 340 Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 30 3793 L.ACC 227 03 Managerial Accounting 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 340 Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

32 32 3794 L.ACC 227 04 Managerial Accounting 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 340 Lammer, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 29 3795 L.ACC 227 05 Managerial Accounting 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF ARCE 402 Kerkenbush, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

32 25 2796 L.ACC 331 01 Intermed Financial Acct I 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 311 Lammer, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 20 2797 L.ACC 343 01 Cost Accounting 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HOFF 329 Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 27 2798 L.ACC 455 01 Federal Income Tax I 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HOFF 340 Schleicher, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 25 2799 L.ACC 468 01 Adv Financial Accounting 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF ARCE 402 Kerkenbush, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

10 1 3854 L.ACC 494 01 Accounting Internship 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

10 1 3941 L.ACC 494 02 Accounting Internship 4.0
ARR ARR ARR Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

10 1 4718 L.ACC 494 03 Accounting Internship 1-12
ARR Lammer, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

113


12 4 4036 L.ADM 560 01 Curriculum II 3.0
ARR TBA TBA Staff
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

20 4 4037 L.ADM 611 01 Supervised Field Experience 2.0
ARR TBA TBA Staff
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

12 2 4038 L.ADM 612 01 Reseach Project/Portfolio 2.0
ARR TBA TBA Staff
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

15 10 2571 L.ART 140 01 Intro to Painting 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH VISI B24 Romero, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

3 3 2572 L.ART 240 01 Intermediate Painting I 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH VISI B24 Romero, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

2 2 Y 2573 L.ART 241 01 Intermediate Painting II 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH VISI B24 Romero, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 11 3132 L.ATR 280 01 Athletic Training Clinical I 1.0
11:00-11:50 W AWC 110 Newman, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ATHLETIC TRAINING MAJORS ONLY

25 12 3133 L.ATR 290 01 Eval of Athletic Injuries I 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MF ROHL 127 Newman, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ATHLETIC TRAINING MAJORS ONLY

25 9 3134 L.ATR 380 01 Athletic Training Clinical III 1.0
10:00-10:50 W AWC 110 Kamm,C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 21 3135 L.ATR 480 01 Org & Adm of Ath Training 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH GRAB 206 Newman, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
ATHLETIC TRAINING MAJORS ONLY

25 11 3136 L.ATR 482 01 Athletic Training Clinical V 1.0
08:00-08:50 W AWC 110 Homan,K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

21 19 3230 L.BIO 115 01 Principles of Biology I 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 242 Schnee, F
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

114


Aug 26 - Dec 12
08:00-10:50 TH SCIE 049

21 18 3231 L.BIO 115 02 Principles of Biology I 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 242 Schnee, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12
11:00-01:50pm TH SCIE 049

21 19 3232 L.BIO 115 03 Principles of Biology I 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 070 Cooper, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:00-04:50pm TH SCIE 049

21 16 3233 L.BIO 115 04 Principles of Biology I 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 070 Cooper, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
06:00-09:00pm TH SCIE 049

11 9 3968 L.BIO 115 05 Principles of Biology I 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 242 Schnee, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12
04:00-06:50pm W SCIE 049

11 10 3969 L.BIO 115 06 Principles of Biology I 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 070 Cooper, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
04:00-06:50pm W SCIE 049

20 20 Y 3234 L.BIO 116 01 Principles of Biology II 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 054 Sinha, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
08:00-10:50 T SCIE 054

25 22 3235 L.BIO 240 01 Plant Biology 4.0
10:00-10:50 MWF SCIE 054 Sinha, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
12:30-03:20pm TH SCIE 054

20 20 Y 3236 L.BIO 273 01 Human Genetics-HV 3.0
01:30-02:20pm WF SCIE 049 Schnee, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12
01:30-03:20pm M SCIE 049
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.PHI-317-
01
Clustered with 3237 L.PHI 317 01 Ethics
and Genetics-HV

12 13 Y 3238 L.BIO 279 01 Exp Design/Biostat-AH 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF SCIE 054 Wenny, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:30-04:20pm M SCIE 019
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

12 12 Y 3239 L.BIO 279 02 Exp Design/Biostat-AH 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF SCIE 054 Wenny, D
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

115


Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:30-04:20pm W SCIE 019
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 18 3240 L.BIO 348 01 Immunology 3.0
02:30-03:20pm MWF HENN 070 Cooper, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

30 20 3241 L.BIO 389 01 Junior Seminar 1.0
04:00-04:50pm M SCIE 128 Cooper, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
BIO & BIO RESEARCH MAJORS ONLY

10 3 3243 L.BIO 400 01 Senior Thesis Research 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Schnee, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 0 3244 L.BIO 401 01 Honors Senior Thesis Research 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Schnee, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12

16 15 3245 L.BIO 420 01 Vertebrate Physiology 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF SCIE 128 Davis, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:30-04:20pm T SCIE 134

16 14 Y 3246 L.BIO 420 02 Vertebrate Physiology 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF SCIE 128 Davis, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:30-04:20pm W SCIE 134

16 12 3876 L.BIO 420 03 Vertebrate Physiology 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF SCIE 128 Davis, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
04:30-06:20pm W SCIE 134

25 24 2800 L.BUS 230 01 Prin of Management 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 340 Gambrall, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 23 2801 L.BUS 230 02 Prin of Management 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 340 Gambrall, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 22 3912 L.BUS 230 03 Prin of Management 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 311 Graham, H
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 25 Y 2802 L.BUS 240 01 Principles of Marketing 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 311 Steidinger, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

116



25 26 Y 2803 L.BUS 240 02 Principles of Marketing 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 329 Steidinger, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

30 27 2804 L.BUS 250 01 Business Statistics 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF HOFF 340 Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Cannot Register If Took L.Bus-255
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 18 2805 L.BUS 250 02 Business Statistics 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 312 Graham, H
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Cannot Register If Took L.Bus-255
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 25 Y 2807 L.BUS 317 01 Business Law I 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 329 Schleicher, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 24 Y 2808 L.BUS 317 02 Business Law I 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 329 Schleicher, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

28 22 2809 L.BUS 331 01 Organizational Behavior 3.0
03:30-04:50pm TTH HOFF 340 Collins, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 14 2810 L.BUS 335 01 Human Resource Management 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH Collins, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 23 2811 L.BUS 343 01 Marketing Management 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 312 Marzofka, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 26 Y 2812 L.BUS 344 01 Sales Management 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 312 Marzofka, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 25 Y 2813 L.BUS 349 01 Consumer Behavior 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 311 Steidinger, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 18 2814 L.BUS 350 01 Principles of Finance 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF HOFF 111 Upstrom, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

117


NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 11 2815 L.BUS 350 02 Principles of Finance 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 111 Upstrom, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 22 2816 L.BUS 350 03 Principles of Finance 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 312 Keyes, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 10 2817 L.BUS 353 01 Financial Institutions 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 112 Upstrom, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

20 14 2818 L.BUS 358 01 LIFE Portfolio Application I 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 312 Keyes, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

25 25 Y 2819 L.BUS 379 01 Rise/Fall of Celtic Tiger-AC 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF ARCE 102 Hitchcock, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

0 2 4031 L.BUS 394 01 Business Internship 3.0
ARR Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

0 0 4044 L.BUS 394 02 Business Internship 1-12
ARR Keyes, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 22 2820 L.BUS 433 01 Global Leadership 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 312 Graham, H
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 29 2821 L.BUS 447 01 Marketing Research 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 350 Marzofka, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 27 2822 L.BUS 451 01 Intermed Financial Management 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 312 Upstrom, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
SENIORS ONLY

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

118


5 0 2823 L.BUS 458 01 LIFE Portfolio Application II 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 312 Keyes, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

10 1 3920 L.BUS 494 01 Business Internship 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

1 1 4022 L.BUS 494 02 Business Internship 8.0
ARR Sturm, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

1 1 4033 L.BUS 498 01 Dir Reading: CFA Prep 3.0
ARR Keyes, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required

24 19 3895 L.CHE 111 06 General Chemistry I 4.0
10:00-10:50 MWF SCIE 245 Moser,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-111L

48 40 3896 L.CHE 111 07 General Chemistry I 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF SCIE 242 Binz, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-111L

48 30 3897 L.CHE 111 08 General Chemistry I 4.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HENN 070 Speckhard, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-111L

24 19 3899 L.CHE 111L 01 Gen Chemistry I Lab 0.0
08:00-10:50 T SCIE 245 Maslowsky, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-111

24 21 3900 L.CHE 111L 02 Gen Chemistry I Lab 0.0
12:30-03:20pm T SCIE 245 Maslowsky, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-111

24 12 3901 L.CHE 111L 03 Gen Chemistry I Lab 0.0
01:30-04:20pm W SCIE 245 Binz, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-111

24 24 3902 L.CHE 111L 04 Gen Chemistry I Lab 0.0
08:00-10:50 TH SCIE 245 Speckhard, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

119


MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-111

24 13 3903 L.CHE 111L 05 Gen Chemistry I Lab 0.0
12:30-03:20pm TH SCIE 245 Oostendorp, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-111

15 11 3251 L.CHE 225 01 Quantitative Analysis 4.0
12:30-04:20pm T SCIE 242 Binz, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
12:30-04:20pm TH SCIE 242

24 23 3252 L.CHE 233 01 Organic Chemistry I 4.0
08:00-08:50 MWF SCIE 128 Oostendorp, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
08:00-10:50 T SCIE 142

24 7 3253 L.CHE 233 02 Organic Chemistry I 4.0
08:00-08:50 MWF SCIE 128 Oostendorp, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
12:30-03:20pm T SCIE 142

25 25 Y 3255 L.CHE 262 01 Globl Warming-Fact/Fiction-AH 4.0
08:00-08:50 MWF SCIE 252 Maslowsky, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12
09:00-10:50 TH SCIE 252
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 25 Y 3256 L.CHE 262 02 Globl Warming-Fact/Fiction-HV 4.0
11:00-12:20pm WF SCIE 252 Maslowsky, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12
01:30-03:20pm TH SCIE 252
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.PHI-313-
01
Clustered with 3657 L.PHI 313 01
Environmental Ethics-HV

20 11 3257 L.CHE 335 01 Introductory Biochemistry 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 128 Speckhard, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
08:00-10:50 T SCIE 137

20 14 3258 L.CHE 335 02 Introductory Biochemistry 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 128 Speckhard, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 4 3985 L.CHE 335L 01 Biochemistry Lab 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Speckhard, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-335

20 6 3259 L.CHE 352 01 Quantum Chemistry 4.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF SCIE 252 Moser,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:30-05:20pm W SCIE 208
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

120



20 7 3260 L.CHE 389 01 Junior Seminar 1.0
05:00-06:00pm T SCIE 125 Speckhard, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

20 4 3261 L.CHE 490 01 Senior Thesis 1.0
05:00-06:00pm T SCIE 128 Oostendorp, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Chemistry and Biochemistry Majors

15 2 3262 L.CHE 491 01 Research 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Maslowsky, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 0 3263 L.CHE 491 02 Research 2.0
ARR ARR ARR Binz, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 1 3264 L.CHE 491 03 Research 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Oostendorp, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 0 3265 L.CHE 491 04 Research 4.0
ARR ARR ARR Speckhard, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 1 4040 L.CHE 491 05 Research 1-4
ARR TBA TBA Moser,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 22 2824 L.CIT 110 01 Computing & Info Tech Basics 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF ARCE 402 Hitchcock, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Cannot Register If Took L.Cit-111

30 30 2825 L.CIT 110 02 Computing & Info Tech Basics 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 112 Mauss, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Cannot Register If Took L.Cit-111

25 17 3973 L.CIT 110 04 Computing & Info Tech Basics 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF ARCE 402 Hitchcock, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Cannot Register If Took L.Cit-111

25 25 3428 L.CIT 115 01 Programming & Design Basics 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MTWTHF HENN 470 Thompson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 2826 L.CIT 217 01 Network Management 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 112 Mauss, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 18 3430 L.CIT 225 01 Data Structures & Algorithms 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MTWTHF HENN 070 Litka, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

121



25 20 2828 L.CIT 322 01 Web Publishing I 1.0
06:00-09:00pm W ARCE 402 Hitchcock, W
Aug 28 - Sep 25

25 20 2829 L.CIT 323 01 Web Publishing II 1.0
06:00-09:00pm W ARCE 402 Hitchcock, W
Oct 2 - Oct 30

25 19 2830 L.CIT 324 01 Web Publishing III 1.0
06:00-09:00pm W ARCE 402 Hitchcock, W
Nov 6 - Dec 11

20 8 3432 L.CIT 357 01 Found of Programming Languages 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HENN 360 Thompson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 13 2831 L.CIT 485 01 Systems Engineering 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 112 Mauss, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SENIORS ONLY

27 24 2597 L.COM 131 01 Intro Mass Communication 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 412 Belanger, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

27 24 2598 L.COM 131 02 Intro Mass Communication 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 412 Belanger, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

27 27 3728 L.COM 131 03 Intro Mass Communication 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 329 Belanger, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

13 12 2599 L.COM 158 01 Intro TV Production 3.0
12:30-02:20pm TTH HOFF 211 Schaefer, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

16 15 2600 L.COM 164 01 Digital Imaging 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 435 Pisarik, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 26 2601 L.COM 190 01 Communication Theory 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 411 Sullivan, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 30 2605 L.COM 201 01 Prin of Public Relations 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 412 Harris, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 24 2606 L.COM 202 01 Public Relations Writing 3.0
06:00-09:00pm M HOFF 411 Sisco,B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

20 15 2607 L.COM 225 01 Media Writing 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 411 Kohl, P
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

122


Aug 26 - Dec 12
MAY REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.COM-131

0 4 Y 3823 L.COM 255 OL Interpersonal Communicatn-AI 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Sullivan, M
Oct 21 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
ONLINE COURSE
For Liberal Studies major students only

14 14 2608 L.COM 257 01 Electronic Field Production 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 211 Schaefer, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

20 10 2609 L.COM 259 01 Mock Trials 1.0
03:30-06:30pm F ARCE 202 Merkel,D
Aug 26 - Oct 11

20 9 2610 L.COM 259 21 Mock Trials 1.0
03:30-06:30pm F ARCE 202 Merkel,D
Oct 21 - Dec 12

16 11 2611 L.COM 264 01 Desktop Publishing 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 435 Pisarik, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12
PR Majors Only

25 10 2612 L.COM 280 01 News Analysis 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 412 Pisarik, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Need to Have Taken L.Com-158
MAY REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.COM-158

25 25 Y 2613 L.COM 285 01 World Cinema-AA 3.0
01:30-04:20pm M SCIE 242 Kohl, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12
01:30-03:30pm W SCIE 242
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

14 5 2614 L.COM 293 01 Media Studies Practicum Staff 1.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 211 Schaefer, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
05:00-07:00pm W HOFF 211

22 20 2615 L.COM 330 01 Busn Speaking & Writing 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF HOFF 411 Neuhaus, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

22 17 2616 L.COM 330 02 Busn Speaking & Writing 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HOFF 411 Neuhaus, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

20 21 Y 2617 L.COM 351 01 Adv Public Relations Writing 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 111 Belanger, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

123


20 1 2618 L.COM 359 01 Mock Trials 1.0
03:30-06:30pm F ARCE 202 Merkel,D
Aug 26 - Oct 11

20 1 2619 L.COM 359 21 Mock Trials 1.0
03:30-06:30pm F ARCE 202 Merkel,D
Oct 21 - Dec 12

20 17 2620 L.COM 380 01 Persuasion 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 411 Sullivan, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MAY REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.COM-190

25 25 Y 3830 L.COM 386 01 Conflict Resolution-CI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 411 Neuhaus, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CRJ-276-
01
Clustered with 3829 L.CRJ 276 01
Restorative Justice-CI

25 17 2621 L.COM 390 01 Media Criticism 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 411 Kohl, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12

0 0 4032 L.COM 394 01 Internship 3.0
ARR Schaefer, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
PRIOR APPROVAL OF CHAIRPERSON REQ

14 13 2622 L.COM 395 01 Experimental Video 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF HOFF 211 Myers, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

40 39 2623 L.COM 485 01 Communication Research 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 512 Harris, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
PR & MEDIA STUDIES MAJORS ONLY
SENIORS ONLY

10 1 3780 L.COM 492 01 Journalism Practicum 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Pisarik, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12
PRIOR APPROVAL OF INSTRUCTOR REQ

14 9 2624 L.COM 493 01 Media Studies Practicum Staff 1.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 211 Schaefer, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 26 2894 L.CRJ 120 01 Intro to Criminal Justice 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HENN 350 Tentis, D / Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

124


30 25 2896 L.CRJ 120 02 Intro to Criminal Justice 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HENN 350 Tentis, D / Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 22 2897 L.CRJ 224 01 Criminal Law 3.0
06:00-09:00pm W HENN 070 Corken, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 29 2898 L.CRJ 252 01 Criminology 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 250 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 30 2899 L.CRJ 253 01 Corrections 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HENN 250 Bell, V
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3829 L.CRJ 276 01 Restorative Justice-CI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF HENN 350 Bell, V
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.COM-386-
01
Clustered with 3830 L.COM 386 01 Conflict
Resolution-CI

0 6 Y 3810 L.CRJ 280 OL CJ Ethical Considerations-AV 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Decker, L
Aug 26 - Oct 11
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
ONLINE COURSE
For Liberal Studies major students only

25 23 2900 L.CRJ 320 01 Juvenile Delinq & Justice 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF HENN 250 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 2 3932 L.CRJ 398 01 Empirical Research 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Bell, V
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

30 28 2902 L.CRJ 480 01 Senior Seminar & Portfolio-Pj 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 280 Bell, V
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 2 2903 L.CRJ 490 01 Field Experience 3.0
08:00-08:50 T HENN 445 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS ONLY
FLD INSTRUCTION COORD PERMISSION

10 0 2904 L.CRJ 490 02 Field Experience 4.0
08:00-08:50 T HENN 445 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS ONLY
FLD INSTRUCTION COORD PERMISSION
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

125



10 0 2905 L.CRJ 490 03 Field Experience 5.0
08:00-08:50 T HENN 445 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS ONLY
FLD INSTRUCTION COORD PERMISSION

10 1 2906 L.CRJ 490 04 Field Experience 6.0
08:00-08:50 T HENN 445 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS ONLY
FLD INSTRUCTION COORD PERMISSION

10 0 2907 L.CRJ 490 05 Field Experience 7.0
08:00-08:50 T HENN 445 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS ONLY
FLD INSTRUCTION COORD PERMISSION

10 0 2908 L.CRJ 490 06 Field Experience 8.0
08:00-08:50 T HENN 445 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS ONLY
FLD INSTRUCTION COORD PERMISSION

10 0 2909 L.CRJ 490 07 Field Experience 9.0
08:00-08:50 T HENN 445 Decker, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJORS ONLY
FLD INSTRUCTION COORD PERMISSION

15 15 3648 L.CTL 100 01 Once and Future Church-FI 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH WAHL 143 Wathier, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
CTL STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

15 22 3506 L.CTL 274 01 All for One-IV 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF ARCE 102 Lorenz, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CTL STUDENTS ONLY
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CTL-277-
01
Clustered with 3649 L.CTL 277 01 Belief
and Unbelief-IV

15 22 3649 L.CTL 277 01 Belief and Unbelief-IV 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH WAHL 143 Wathier, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CTL STUDENTS ONLY
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CTL-274-
01
Clustered with 3506 L.CTL 274 01 All for
One-IV

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

126


15 13 3651 L.CTL 490 01 Leadership Sem for Soc Justice 2.0
06:00-08:00pm TH SMYT 102 Wertz, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CTL STUDENTS ONLY

30 26 3507 L.ECO 221 01 Prin of Microeconomics 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 511 Smith, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 20 3508 L.ECO 221 02 Prin of Microeconomics 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 511 Smith, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 25 3509 L.ECO 221 03 Prin of Microeconomics 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 112 Smith, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 27 3510 L.ECO 222 01 Prin of Macroeconomics 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 311 Maskay, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 27 3511 L.ECO 222 02 Prin of Macroeconomics 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HOFF 311 Maskay, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 23 3908 L.ECO 254 01 God Catholicism Capitalism-AV 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 512 O'Connor, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

4 5 3984 L.ECO 295 01 Crime, Econ, and Urban Life 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Finnegan, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 12 3513 L.ECO 321 01 Intermed Microecon Theory 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH KEAN 008 O'Connor, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 9 3514 L.ECO 334 01 International Trade 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 311 Maskay, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 15 3515 L.ECO 351 01 Labor Economics 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 511 O'Connor, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 16 3305 L.EDU 200 01 Foundations of Education 2.0
09:00-09:50 MW WAHL 124 Welsh,H
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-205

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

127


25 18 3306 L.EDU 205 01 Foundations/Special Education 2.0
10:00-10:50 MW WAHL 101 Kruse,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MAY REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-200

20 20 Y 3307 L.EDU 221 01 Learning Envir & Social Intera 2.0
09:00-09:50 MW WAHL 143 Kane, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

20 11 3308 L.EDU 221 02 Learning Envir & Social Intera 2.0
02:30-03:20pm MW WAHL 143 Kane, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 25 Y 3309 L.EDU 230 01 Children & Young Adult Lit-AA 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH WAHL 110 Kruse,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
EDUCATION MAJORS ONLY

15 15 3310 L.EDU 232 01 C/I in PE/Health/Wellness 1.0
04:30-05:20pm W WAHL 109 M. Schreiber
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Declared Elementary Ed Majors Only
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-
233*L.EDU-234

15 15 3311 L.EDU 233 01 C/I in Performing Arts 1.0
02:20-03:20pm W WAHL 109 Klapatauskas, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Declared Elementary Ed Majors Only
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-
232*L.EDU-234

15 15 3312 L.EDU 234 01 C/I in Visual Arts 1.0
03:30-04:20pm W WAHL 109 Lovell, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Declared Elementary Ed Majors Only
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-
232*L.EDU-233

15 5 3313 L.EDU 255 01 Social Studies & Curr & Instr 2.0
12:30-02:20pm T WAHL 145 Monhardt, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-256

15 5 3314 L.EDU 256 01 Science Curriculum & Instr 3.0
12:30-03:20pm TH WAHL 145 Monhardt, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-255

25 25 3315 L.EDU 265 01 Multicultural Education-AC 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH WAHL 109 Welsh,H
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

128


EDUCATION MAJORS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

20 8 3316 L.EDU 321 01 Infant/Toddlers Curriculum 3.0
03:45-06:35pm TH WAHL 110 Kruse,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-323

20 8 3317 L.EDU 323 01 Preprimary Curriculum 3.0
03:45-06:35pm W WAHL 110 Steines David,T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-321

15 16 3318 L.EDU 331 01 Curr/Instr in Lang Arts 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH WAHL 145 Salyer, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-332

15 16 3319 L.EDU 332 01 Beginning Reading 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH WAHL 145 Salyer, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-331

15 15 Y 3320 L.EDU 333 01 Curr/Instr in Math 3.0
03:30-07:30pm M FULT SCH Nugent, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

12 11 Y 3321 L.EDU 334 01 Intermediate Clinical 1.0
08:00-10:50 TTH WAHL 124 Monhardt, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

0 2 4021 L.EDU 334 02 Intermediate Clinical 1.0
ARR Monhardt, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

15 11 3322 L.EDU 337 01 Reading Across the Curriculum 3.0
12:30-01:50pm WF WAHL 145 Salyer, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

20 6 1469 L.EDU 339 01 Differentiated Instr 5-12 2.0
08:00-09:50 M WAHL 145 Scheuerell, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

20 12 3323 L.EDU 340 01 Differentiated Instruction K-6 2.0
12:30-02:20pm M WAHL 143 Shaw, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

129



20 7 3324 L.EDU 343 01 Assess Exceptionality Pre K-12 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH WAHL 109 Kane, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

25 21 3325 L.EDU 348 01 Learning/Behavior Strategies 2 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF WAHL 101 Kruse,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

20 7 3326 L.EDU 350 01 Gen Sec Methods of Tching 3.0
07:45-09:15 WF WAHL 145 Scheuerell, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

20 7 3327 L.EDU 350L 01 Intermed Clinical Exper 5-12 1.0
09:25-10:55 WF WAHL 145 Scheuerell, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

15 9 3328 L.EDU 352 01 Special Sec Methods: English 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH WAHL 110 Welsh,H
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

20 6 3329 L.EDU 355 01 Special S Methods: Soc Studies 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH WAHL 143 Scheuerell, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

20 6 3330 L.EDU 356 01 Spec Meth Spanish K-8 & 5-12 3.0
05:30-08:20pm M WAHL 145 Spielvogel,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

20 19 3331 L.EDU 357 01 Reading in Sec Schools 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH WAHL 101 Welsh,H
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

20 10 3332 L.EDU 361 01 Practicum/Instr Read Problem 3.0
03:30-04:50pm TTH WAHL 101 Lansing, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 21 3335 L.EDU 369 01 Special Education Seminar 2.0
08:00-08:50 F WAHL 110 Kruse,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 1 3336 L.EDU 411 01 Student Tch Elem Music 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Staff
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

30 1 3337 L.EDU 412 01 Student Tch Sec Music 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Staff
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

130


Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

30 2 3338 L.EDU 416 01 Student Tch Elem Physical Educ 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

30 1 3339 L.EDU 417 01 Student Tch Sec Physical Educ 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

30 1 3340 L.EDU 418 01 Student Tch Sec P E & Health 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

30 0 3341 L.EDU 424 01 Stud Tch Early Child Sp Ed 0-5 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-426

30 2 3342 L.EDU 425 01 Student Tch Early Child 0-5 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-426

30 2 3343 L.EDU 426 01 Student Tch Primary K-3 ECE 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-425

30 4 3344 L.EDU 432 01 Student Tch Elem School 10.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

30 2 3345 L.EDU 441 01 Student Tch Inst Strat I K-8 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-442

30 2 3346 L.EDU 442 01 Student Tch El Ed Inst Strat I 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-441

30 0 3347 L.EDU 443 01 Student Tch Inst Strat I 5-12 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

131


ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-444

30 0 3348 L.EDU 444 01 Student Tch Sec W Inst Strat I 5.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.EDU-443

30 7 3349 L.EDU 452 01 Student Tch Secondary School 10.0
ARR ARR ARR Fabricius, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

40 18 3350 L.EDU 490 01 Capstone Seminar/Portfolio-PJ 2.0
04:00-05:30pm M WAHL 101 Welsh,H
Aug 26 - Dec 12

35 17 4030 L.EDU 690 03 Institutes in Education 1-3
ARR
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

22 22 3392 L.EGR 105 01 Intro to Engineering I 3.0
08:00-08:50 M SCIE 118 Merkel, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
08:00-09:20 TTH SCIE 118

24 10 3393 L.EGR 232 01 Engineering Dynamics 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF SCIE 118 Merkel, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

20 20 3394 L.EGR 342 01 Modeling/Control Dynamic Systm 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 125 Thompson, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:00-03:50pm T SCIE 231

20 11 3395 L.EGR 488 01 Engineering Topics/Review 1.0
02:00-02:50pm TH SCIE 118 Merkel, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 10 3396 L.EGR 490 01 Capstone Engineer Design I 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF SCIE 118 Merkel, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

21 20 3045 L.ENG 111 01 Critical Writing-FW 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 111 Neyland, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 20 3046 L.ENG 111 02 Critical Writing-FW 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 112 Neyland, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

132



21 20 3047 L.ENG 111 03 Critical Writing-FW 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 111 Jablonsky, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 21 3048 L.ENG 111 04 Critical Writing-FW 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF HOFF 111 Stone, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 21 Y 3049 L.ENG 111 05 Critical Writing-FW 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 112 Pollock, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 9 3050 L.ENG 222 01 World Lit Renaissance to Modn 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 412 Wilson, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3051 L.ENG 232 01 The Novel-CA 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 511 Wilson, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.HIS-249-
01
Clustered with 3522 L.HIS 249 01 Russian
Civilization-CA

25 25 Y 3052 L.ENG 233 01 Drama-AA 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 512 Merrill, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

15 14 3053 L.ENG 238 01 Poetry Writing 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 347 Pollock, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3054 L.ENG 266 01 Sci Fic Cyborg Communities-AI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF HOFF 312 Neyland, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 24 3055 L.ENG 285 01 Modn Irish Lit & Culture 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF ARCE 202 Auge, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 10 3058 L.ENG 328 01 Am Lit Mod/Contemp Poetry 3.0
06:00-09:00pm W HOFF 111 Neyland, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 20 3059 L.ENG 332 01 Major Author: Hawthorne 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 111 Stone, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

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133


25 19 3060 L.ENG 340 01 Romantic Age 1798-1832 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 411 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 15 3063 L.ENG 380 01 Nature Writing 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 134 Koch, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 10 3064 L.ENG 384 01 Adv Fiction Writing 3.0
06:30-09:30pm M HOFF 212 Jablonsky, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

15 12 3065 L.ENG 391 01 Lang Theory & Tching Writing 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HOFF 134 Koch, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

17 15 3066 L.ENG 468 01 Literary Criticism 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 212 Auge, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

20 10 3067 L.ENG 490 01 Senior Literature Capstone 1.0
03:30-04:30pm T HOFF 212 Merrill, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

25 6 3718 L.ENG 490D 01 Senior Lit Capstone Defense 0.0
ARR ARR ARR Merrill, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Need L.ENG-490

15 4 3068 L.ENG 491 01 Senior Thesis Seminar-PJ 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 134 Jablonsky, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 1 3719 L.ENG 491D 01 Senior Thesis Seminar Defense 0.0
ARR ARR ARR Jablonsky, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Need L.ENG-491

10 0 3977 L.ENG 498 01 Dct Rdg: James Joyce's Ulysses 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Auge, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required

10 4 4043 L.ENG 498 02 Directed Readings 1-3
ARR Jablonsky, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Instructor Signature Required

25 1 3974 L.EXP 000 01 AFFILIATE: England 12.0
ARR Carroll, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
STUDY ABROAD

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134


10 4 4024 L.EXP 294 01 Chicago Or Dubuque Internships 1-11
ARR Finnegan, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12

0 1 4034 L.EXP 294 02 Chicago Or Dubuque Internships 3.0
ARR Finnegan, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 5 3949 L.EXP 370 01 Chicago Ctr Preparation 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Finnegan, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CHICAGO/WASHINGTN CTR STUDNTS ONLY

25 5 3950 L.EXP 372 01 Chicago Ctr Internship 6.0
ARR ARR ARR Finnegan, F
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CHICAGO/WASHINGTN CTR STUDNTS ONLY

25 5 3951 L.EXP 374 01 Chicago Ctr Service Learning 2.0
ARR ARR ARR Mauss, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
CHICAGO/WASHINGTN CTR STUDNTS ONLY

20 18 3926 L.EXP 395 01 Topics: PreDepart/StudyAbroad 1-3
05:00-06:30pm TH WAHL 101 Carroll, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

0 7 3996 L.GRS 105 01 First Year Latin I 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF HOFF 340 Smith, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
For Seminary Students Only

25 16 3516 L.GRS 302 01 Epic Heroes Greece & Rome 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH SCIE 125 Smith, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 25 Y 3517 L.HIS 116 01 Greek Civilization 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 512 Smith, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 17 3518 L.HIS 121 01 U S History to 1877 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 118 Salvaterra, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 18 3519 L.HIS 140 01 Early Modern Europe to 1750 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 212 Lorenz, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

35 28 3520 L.HIS 175 01 Themes in World History 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HENN 350 Kehren, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3521 L.HIS 225 01 Confederates: Virtual/Real-CI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 112 Salvaterra, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

135


MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.SOC-250-
01
Clustered with 3544 L.SOC 250 01 Aryan
Socities-CI

25 25 Y 3522 L.HIS 249 01 Russian Civilization-CA 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF HOFF 311 Zhu, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.ENG-232-
01
Clustered with 3051 L.ENG 232 01 The
Novel-CA

20 15 3523 L.HIS 320 01 Native American Archaeology 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 511 Anderson-Bricker, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

20 10 3524 L.HIS 348 01 Paris in 1920'S and 1930'S 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 212 Lorenz, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 14 3525 L.HIS 365 01 Contemp Urban Portugal 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH ARCE 102 Kehren, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 8 3526 L.HIS 386 01 U S Survey for Teachers 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 340 Anderson-Bricker, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
JUNIORS & SENIORS ONLY

20 8 3527 L.HIS 489 01 Seminar for Majors 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH KEAN 011 Zhu, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
JR & SR HISTORY MAJORS ONLY

20 9 3528 L.HIS 490 01 Research Seminar 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HOFF 512 Anderson-Bricker, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
HISTORY MAJORS ONLY

22 19 3697 L.HON 100 01 Identity and the 'Other'-FI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH ARCE 402 McCarthy-Gilmore, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
ONLY STUDENTS IN HONORS PROGRAM
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 21 3698 L.HON 100 02 The Big Bang Theory-FI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 111 Stone, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
ONLY STUDENTS IN HONORS PROGRAM
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

136


22 23 3748 L.HON 220 01 Democracy/Globl Diversity-MD 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 111 Salvaterra, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY STUDENTS IN HONORS PROGRAM
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 3756 L.HON 220 02 Democracy/Globl Diversity-MD 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HENN 280 Shadle, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY STUDENTS IN HONORS PROGRAM
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 34 4006 L.HON 250 01 Honors Research Seminar 1.0
11:00-12:00pm W ARCE 102 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 3 4007 L.HON 250 02 Honors Research Seminar 0.0
11:00-12:00pm W ARCE 102 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 1 4008 L.HON 250 03 Honors Research Seminar 1.0
02:30-03:30pm M ARCE 102 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 0 4009 L.HON 250 04 Honors Research Seminar 0.0
02:30-03:30pm M ARCE 102 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

4 4041 L.HON 250 05 Honors Research Seminar 1.0
ARR VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 17 3266 L.HON 273 01 Issues Environmental Bio-HA 4.0
09:00-09:50 MWF SCIE 134 Davis, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
08:00-10:00 T SCIE 134
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
ONLY STUDENTS IN HONORS PROGRAM
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.HON-275-
01
Clustered with 3044 L.HON 275 01 Writing
Midwest Landscape-HA

18 17 3044 L.HON 275 01 Writing Midwest Landscape-HA 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF SMYT 102 Koch, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
ONLY STUDENTS IN HONORS PROGRAM
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.HON-273-
01
Clustered with 3266 L.HON 273 01 Issues
Environmental Bio-HA

25 3 4010 L.HON 350 01 Honors Research Seminar 1.0
11:00-12:00pm W ARCE 102 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

137



25 0 4011 L.HON 350 02 Honors Research Seminar 0.0
11:00-12:00pm W ARCE 102 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 14 4012 L.HON 350 03 Honors Research Seminar 1.0
02:30-03:30pm M ARCE 102 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 4 4013 L.HON 350 04 Honors Research Seminar 0.0
02:30-03:30pm M ARCE 102 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

2 4042 L.HON 350 05 Honors Research Seminar 1.0
ARR VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 5 3784 L.HON 488 01 Abstract and Defense 1.0
ARR VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY STUDENTS IN HONORS PROGRAM

20 13 3751 L.HON 490 01 Honors Service Learning-PJ 3.0
06:30-09:30pm W SMYT 102 Darr,C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY STUDENTS IN HONORS PROGRAM
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

20 10 3529 L.INS 489 01 Senior Seminar 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HOFF 212 Kehren, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

22 22 2832 L.LIB 100 01 In Black and White-FI 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 312 Keyes, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 2910 L.LIB 100 02 Criminal Minds-FI 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH ARCE 102 Bell, V
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 3397 L.LIB 100 04 Computers in Movies-FI 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HENN 250 Litka, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 21 3621 L.LIB 100 05 Weird Beliefs-FI 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HENN 470 Bechen, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

138


22 20 3693 L.LIB 100 06 Schooled-FI 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 480 Anderson, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 18 3694 L.LIB 100 07 (Dis)Ability in the Cinema-FI 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH WAHL 101 Kane, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 20 3695 L.LIB 100 08 Food: Feast or Famine?-FI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 329 VanLaningham, E
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 19 3696 L.LIB 100 09 Dance Around the World-FI 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HOFF 340 Kerkenbush, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 3799 L.LIB 100 10 The '-isms'-FI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 512 Smith, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 21 3827 L.LIB 100 11 The Power of Nature-FI 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HENN 350 Grinde, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 21 3878 L.LIB 100 12 Modern Music Festival-FI 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HENN 450 Cavanagh, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 3881 L.LIB 100 13 One Ring to Rule Them All-FI 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH ARCE 402 Swanson,J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 3882 L.LIB 100 14 Man Up, Be A Lady-FI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 412 Merrill, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 3883 L.LIB 100 15 Controversy in Music-FI 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 360 Crook,S
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

139


Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 3884 L.LIB 100 16 Science vs. Religion-FI 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HENN 180 Thompson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 21 3885 L.LIB 100 17 The War on Terrorism-FI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF WAHL 109 Scheuerell, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 21 3891 L.LIB 100 18 Molecules Changed History-FI 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HENN 070 Moser,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 21 3036 L.LIB 105 01 College Writing-FW 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 212 Witthoeft, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 21 3037 L.LIB 105 02 College Writing-FW 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 212 Witthoeft, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 16 3038 L.LIB 105 03 College Writing-FW 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HENN 360 Klapatauskas, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 21 3039 L.LIB 105 04 College Writing-FW 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF ARCE 402 Hall, H
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 19 3040 L.LIB 105 05 College Writing-FW 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 212 Merrill, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 21 3041 L.LIB 105 06 College Writing-FW 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 329 Auge, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

21 21 3788 L.LIB 105 07 College Writing-FW 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HOFF 111 Pollock, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

140



20 12 3991 L.LIB 105 08 College Writing-FW 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF ARCE 102 Hall, H
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 19 2574 L.LIB 110 01 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF HOFF 136 Goodman, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 18 2575 L.LIB 110 02 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HOFF 136 Goodman, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 17 2576 L.LIB 110 03 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 136 Goodman, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 19 2577 L.LIB 110 04 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HOFF 427 Sullivan, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 17 2578 L.LIB 110 05 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HOFF 427 Neuhaus, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 18 2579 L.LIB 110 06 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 136 Merkel,D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 19 Y 2582 L.LIB 110 09 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HOFF 136 Sisco,B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 17 2583 L.LIB 110 10 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 427 Donald, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 19 2585 L.LIB 110 11 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 136 Sisco,B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 16 3838 L.LIB 110 12 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 427 Donald, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

141


19 16 3909 L.LIB 110 13 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
06:00-09:00pm T ARCE 402 Hanson, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

19 17 3988 L.LIB 110 14 Public Spking & Group Comm-FS 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HOFF 427 Pisarik, P
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 25 Y 3655 L.LIB 130 01 Empowered Catholic Women-MC 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF KEAN 008 Osheim, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 25 3663 L.LIB 130 02 Hope Heart Humanity-MC 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW KEAN 009 Joensen, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 22 3874 L.LIB 130 03 Empowered Catholic Women-MC 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF ARCE 102 Osheim, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 25 Y 3654 L.LIB 135 01 Priests Ministers Rabbis-MC 3.0
02:30-03:20pm MWF WAHL 101 Waldmeir, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 26 Y 3660 L.LIB 135 02 Catholicism and Taoism-MC 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH WAHL 110 Lammer-Heindel, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 19 2833 L.LIB 220 01 Democracy/Global Diversity-MD 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 311 Collins, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 3042 L.LIB 220 02 Democracy/Global Diversity-MD 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 512 Wilson, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 Y 3043 L.LIB 220 03 Democracy/Global Diversity-MD 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 512 Wilson, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 22 Y 3531 L.LIB 220 05 Democracy/Global Diversity-MD 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF HOFF 212 Darr,B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

142


22 22 Y 3661 L.LIB 220 07 Democracy/Global Diversity-MD 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH SMYT 102 Lammer-Heindel, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

22 23 3846 L.LIB 220 08 Democracy/Global Diversity-MD 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HOFF 411 Zhu, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

20 20 Y 2911 L.LIB 305 01 Portfolio-PJ 1.0
03:00-04:20pm T HENN 480 Fett, N
Aug 26 - Oct 11
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

20 7 3650 L.LIB 305 02 Portfolio-PJ 1.0
06:00-08:00pm TH ARCE 102 Wathier, D
Oct 21 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
CTL STUDENTS ONLY
Contact Office of the Registrar to
register

20 20 Y 2912 L.LIB 305 21 Portfolio-PJ 1.0
03:00-04:20pm T HENN 480 Cavanagh, B
Oct 21 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
Contact Office of the Registrar to
register

20 13 4026 L.LIB 305 22 Portfolio-PJ 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Adams, R
Oct 21 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
Online Course
Contact Office of the Registrar to
register

30 35 3398 L.MAT 091 01 Intermediate Algebra 4.0
11:00-11:50 TWTHF WAHL 101 Klapatauskas, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
FIRST YEAR ONLY

30 34 3399 L.MAT 091 02 Intermediate Algebra 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MTWF HENN 370 Klapatauskas, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
FIRST YEAR ONLY

25 27 3401 L.MAT 113 01 College Algebra-FM 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF WAHL 109 Keller, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 30 3402 L.MAT 113 02 College Algebra-FM 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF WAHL 109 Keller, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

143


27 27 Y 3403 L.MAT 115 01 Statistics-FM 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MTWF KEAN 008 Crook,S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

27 23 3404 L.MAT 115 02 Statistics-FM 4.0
02:30-03:35pm MWF HENN 250 Heidenreich, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

27 22 3405 L.MAT 117 01 Pre-Calculus-FM 4.0
11:00-11:50 TWTHF HENN 250 Willis, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

27 27 3406 L.MAT 117 02 Pre-Calculus-FM 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MTWF KEAN 009 Heidenreich, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 16 3407 L.MAT 124 01 Finite Mathematics-FM 4.0
08:00-08:50 MTWF HENN 280 Willis, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

30 30 3409 L.MAT 150 01 Calc of One Variable I-FM 4.0
11:00-11:50 TWTHF SCIE 128 Meyer, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
NO CREDIT IF L.MAT-170 TAKEN

30 25 3408 L.MAT 150 02 Calc of One Variable I-FM 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MTWF SCIE 134 Meyer, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
NO CREDIT IF L.MAT-170 TAKEN

25 14 3410 L.MAT 160 01 Calc of One Variable II 4.0
11:00-11:50 TWTHF HENN 270 Heidenreich, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NO CREDIT IF L.MAT-170 TAKEN

25 7 3411 L.MAT 170 01 Accelerated Calc of One Var-FM 4.0
11:00-11:50 TWTHF HENN 070 Rissler, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
NO CREDIT IF L.MAT-150/160 TAKEN

25 18 3412 L.MAT 250 01 Linear Algebra 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HENN 350 Willis, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 15 3413 L.MAT 260 01 Analytic Geom/Calc III 4.0
08:00-08:50 MTWF HENN 180 Kohlhaas, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

144


0 16 3986 L.MAT 260 02 Analytic Geom/Calc III 4.0
07:15-08:05 MTWF ARR ARR Heidenreich, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Course taught at Senior High School.

20 8 3414 L.MAT 380 01 Modern Geometry 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HENN 070 Kohlhaas, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

14 4 3415 L.MAT 390 01 Seminar 1.0
02:30-03:20pm F HENN 350 Rissler, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MAY REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.MAT-250

14 4 3416 L.MAT 391 01 Guided Research 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW HENN 270 Meyer, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 9 3417 L.MAT 460 01 Real Analysis 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HENN 070 Crook,S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MAY REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.MAT-250

20 19 3980 L.MBA 510 01 Managerial Effectiveness 3.0
05:30-09:30pm M WAHL 143 Gambrall, D
Sep 9 - Oct 21
Course meets Sept 9, 16, 23, 30; Oct 7,
14, 21

20 19 3981 L.MBA 515 01 Ethical & Social Resp Bus 3.0
05:30-09:30pm M WAHL 143 Ciapalo, R
Oct 28 - Dec 9
Course meets Oct 28; Nov 4, 11, 18, 25;
Dec 2, 9

15 11 2626 L.MUS 101 01 Music Theory I 3.0
11:00-11:50 TWTHF WAHL 110 Carroll, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 9 2627 L.MUS 110 01 Applied Voice 1.0
ARR VISI 137 Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 3 2628 L.MUS 110 02 Applied Voice 2.0
ARR VISI 137 Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

12 12 2629 L.MUS 110 03 Applied Voice 1.0
ARR VISI 138 Swanson,J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

9 7 2630 L.MUS 110 04 Applied Voice 2.0
ARR VISI 138 Swanson,J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

145


10 8 2631 L.MUS 110 05 Applied Voice 1.0
ARR VISI 137 Kotowich, B / Weber, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 2 4020 L.MUS 110 06 Applied Voice 2.0
ARR TBA TBA Kotowich, B / Weber, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

9 7 2632 L.MUS 121 01 Applied Piano 1.0
ARR VISI 134 Carroll, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

3 1 2633 L.MUS 121 02 Applied Piano 2.0
ARR VISI 134 Carroll, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 14 2634 L.MUS 121 03 Applied Piano 1.0
ARR VISI 134 Carroll, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

3 2 2635 L.MUS 122 01 Applied Organ 1.0
ARR VISI 134 Carroll, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

3 0 2636 L.MUS 122 02 Applied Organ 2.0
ARR VISI 134 Carroll, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

3 0 2637 L.MUS 123 01 Applied Harpsichord 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Carroll, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 4 2638 L.MUS 131 01 Applied Violin 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Luke,W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 0 2639 L.MUS 132 01 Applied Viola 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Luke,W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 0 2640 L.MUS 133 01 Applied Cello 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Luke,W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 0 2641 L.MUS 134 01 Applied String Bass 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Luke,W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

24 11 2642 L.MUS 135 01 Applied Guitar 1.0
ARR VISI 135 McConnell,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 5 2643 L.MUS 141 01 Applied Flute 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Omarzu, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

146


5 1 2644 L.MUS 142 01 Applied Oboe 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Omarzu,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 5 2645 L.MUS 143 01 Applied Clarinet 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Omarzu,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

1 1 3975 L.MUS 144 01 Applied Saxophone 1.0
ARR Staff
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 2 2647 L.MUS 145 01 Applied Bassoon 1.0
ARR VISI 135 Omarzu,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 1 2648 L.MUS 151 01 Applied Trumpet 1.0
ARR VISI 130 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 0 2649 L.MUS 152 01 Applied French Horn 1.0
ARR VISI 130 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 1 2650 L.MUS 153 01 Applied Trombone 1.0
ARR VISI 130 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 3 2651 L.MUS 154 01 Applied Baritone 1.0
ARR VISI 130 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

5 1 2652 L.MUS 155 01 Applied Tuba 1.0
ARR VISI 130 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 3 3976 L.MUS 160 01 Applied Percussion 1.0
ARR Iwasaki, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 4 2653 L.MUS 174 01 String Techniques 1.0
09:00-09:50 F VISI 226 Luke,W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

60 39 2654 L.MUS 181 01 Wind Ensemble 1.0
07:00-08:50pm TTH VISI 226 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

60 4 3633 L.MUS 181 02 Wind Ensemble 0.0
ARR TBA TBA Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

24 10 2655 L.MUS 182 01 Jazz Ensemble 1.0
06:00-06:50pm TTH VISI 226 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

147


24 1 3634 L.MUS 182 02 Jazz Ensemble 0.0
06:00-06:50pm TTH VISI 226 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

90 72 2656 L.MUS 183 01 Loras Concert Choir 1.0
03:30-04:50pm TTH FLDH GYM Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

90 16 3639 L.MUS 183 02 Loras Concert Choir 0.0
ARR Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

20 15 2658 L.MUS 184 01 Chamber Singers 1.0
04:30-05:50pm MW FLDH GYM Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
REQUIRES AUDITION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.MUS-183

20 2 3640 L.MUS 184 02 Chamber Singers 0.0
ARR Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.MUS-183

16 4 4056 L.MUS 184 03 Chamber Singers 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

40 7 2659 L.MUS 185 01 Bella Voce 1.0
03:30-04:20pm MW FLDH GYM Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

40 6 3641 L.MUS 185 02 Bella Voce 0.0
ARR Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 3 2660 L.MUS 186 01 Con Brio 1.0
05:00-05:50pm TTH FLDH GYM Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 1 3642 L.MUS 186 02 Con Brio 0.0
ARR Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

12 7 2661 L.MUS 203 01 Music Theory III 3.0
08:00-08:50 MTWTHF VISI 135 Carroll, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 5 2662 L.MUS 215 01 Music Hist/Literature I 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF VISI 226 Swanson,J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 7 3821 L.MUS 230 01 Basic Conducting 2.0
01:30-02:20pm MW VISI 236 Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

148


25 25 2663 L.MUS 321 01 History of Sacred Music-AA 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH VISI 236 Kotowich, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

10 3 2665 L.MUS 337 01 Secondary Music Methods 3.0
ARR VISI 226 Pohland, G
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 4 2666 L.MUS 395 01 Vocal Pedagogy 2.0
ARR VISI 236 Swanson,J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

12 10 3812 L.NEU 145 01 Introductory Neuroscience 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF SCIE 134 Jarcho,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:30-04:20pm F SCIE 014

20 7 3818 L.NEU 281 01 Traumatic Brain Injuries 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH SCIE 125 Bagley,S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 1 3853 L.NEU 490 01 Senior Seminar 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Jarcho,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

16 15 3138 L.PHE 072 01 Racquet Sports 1.0
10:00-10:50 MW GRAB CT3 Tebon, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3139 L.PHE 074 01 Team Sports I 1.0
11:00-11:50 TTH GRAB CT1 Tebon, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 23 3141 L.PHE 121 01 Personal/Comm Health Educ 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF ROHL 127 Connor, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 21 3142 L.PHE 135 01 Sports Officiating 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH ROHL 127 Tebon, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY FIRST YEARS & SOPHOMORES

27 21 3145 L.PHE 150 01 Introduction to Kinesiology 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF GRAB 206 Glover, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY FIRST YEARS & SOPHOMORES

27 21 3146 L.PHE 150 02 Introduction to Kinesiology 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF ROHL 143 Kult, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ONLY FIRST YEARS & SOPHOMORES

25 4 3147 L.PHE 205 01 Teaching Elementary PE Skills 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HENN 170 Connor, W / Garrett, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

149



25 7 3152 L.PHE 341 01 Meas & Eval in Phys Ed 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH GRAB 206 Connor, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 8 3153 L.PHE 465 01 Sec Physical Educ Methods 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH GRAB 104 Connor, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

15 2 3154 L.PHE 493 01 Practicum In PE & Coaching 3.0
06:00-06:50pm T GRAB 206 Tebon, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
PE MAJOR OR COACHING MINOR ONLY
JUNIORS & SENIORS ONLY

15 1 3837 L.PHE 493 02 Practicum In PE & Coaching 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Kult, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
PE MAJOR OR COACHING MINOR ONLY
JUNIORS & SENIORS ONLY

24 18 3659 L.PHI 101 01 Critical Reasoning-Prin & Appl 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HENN 280 Lammer-Heindel, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

20 16 3662 L.PHI 220 01 Ancient Philosophy 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH KEAN 009 Joensen, W
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3657 L.PHI 313 01 Environmental Ethics-HV 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH KEAN 011 Ciapalo, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.CHE-262-
02
Clustered with 3256 L.CHE 262 02 Globl
Warming-Fact/Fiction-HV

20 20 Y 3237 L.PHI 317 01 Ethics and Genetics-HV 3.0
06:00-09:00pm T HENN 250 Idziak, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.BIO-273-
01
Clustered with 3236 L.BIO 273 01 Human
Genetics-HV

25 25 Y 3419 L.PHY 210 01 Elements Physics I 4.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF SCIE 128 Meyer, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.PHY-290

25 25 3420 L.PHY 210 02 Elements Physics I 4.0
02:30-03:50pm MW SCIE 128 R. Williams
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

150


MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.PHY-290

20 15 3421 L.PHY 223 01 Physics Scientist/Engineers I 5.0
12:30-01:20pm MTWF SCIE 125 Thompson, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MUST REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.PHY-290

18 18 3422 L.PHY 290 01 Intro Physics Lab I 0.0
08:00-10:50 TH SCIE 122 Thompson, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 16 3423 L.PHY 290 02 Intro Physics Lab I 0.0
12:30-03:20pm TH SCIE 122 Rissler, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 13 3424 L.PHY 290 03 Intro Physics Lab I 0.0
06:00-08:50pm W SCIE 122 Stierman, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 17 3425 L.PHY 290 04 Intro Physics Lab I 0.0
12:30-03:20pm T SCIE 122 Rissler, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 18 3532 L.POL 101 01 Issues in American Politics 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF KEAN 009 Cochran, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 25 3533 L.POL 101 02 Issues in American Politics 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF KEAN 009 Cochran, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 20 3534 L.POL 131 01 Found Western Political Thgt 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HOFF 329 Budzisz, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 11 3535 L.POL 202 01 Congress & Presidency 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HOFF 512 Budzisz, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 22 Y 3536 L.POL 351 01 Comp Environmental Politic-AC 3.0
11:00-12:20pm TTH HOFF 311 Darr,B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 12 3537 L.POL 395 01 East Asian Politics 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF WAHL 143 Darr,B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 26 2915 L.PSY 101 01 Introductory Psychology 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HENN 180 Bagley,S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 27 2914 L.PSY 101 02 Introductory Psychology 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 270 Bagley,S
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

151


30 28 2913 L.PSY 101 03 Introductory Psychology 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HENN 280 Hopper, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 28 2916 L.PSY 121 01 Developmental Psych 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HENN 350 Johnson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 28 2917 L.PSY 121 02 Developmental Psych 3.0
03:30-04:50pm TTH HENN 250 Reicks, J.
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 30 2918 L.PSY 121 03 Developmental Psych 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HENN 350 Grinde, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 18 3972 L.PSY 121 04 Developmental Psych 3.0
06:00-09:00pm T HENN 180 Homb,J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 22 2919 L.PSY 211 01 Res Methods & Statistics I 4.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HENN 360 Omarzu, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:30-04:20pm W HENN 360

25 25 2920 L.PSY 221 01 Abnormal Psychology 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HENN 180 Dunn, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 26 2921 L.PSY 221 02 Abnormal Psychology 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HENN 180 Dunn, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 25 Y 3776 L.PSY 252 01 Positive Psychology-AI 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HENN 270 Hopper, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

20 17 2923 L.PSY 265 01 Psychology As A Profession 1.0
11:00-11:50 W HENN 180 Johnson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 2924 L.PSY 267 01 Psychology and the Arts-AA 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HENN 270 Omarzu, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

12 12 Y 2925 L.PSY 285 01 Drugs & Human Behavior-AH 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH SCIE 128 Jarcho,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
07:30-09:20 TH SCIE 014
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

152


12 12 Y 2926 L.PSY 285 02 Drugs & Human Behavior-AH 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH SCIE 128 Jarcho,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:00-03:50pm TH SCIE 014
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

12 12 Y 3916 L.PSY 285 03 Drugs & Human Behavior-AH 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH SCIE 128 Jarcho,M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
02:00-03:50pm T SCIE 014
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 20 2927 L.PSY 295 01 Cross-Cultural Psychology 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH ARCE 402 Grinde, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12

020 20 Y 3773 L.PSY 333 01 Motivation & Emotion 3.0
02:00-03:20pm TTH HENN 250 Omarzu, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12

15 11 2929 L.PSY 351 01 Adv Research Methods 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Omarzu, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

10 3 2930 L.PSY 390 01 Psych Peer Assistantship 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Hopper, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

10 1 2931 L.PSY 394 01 Internship 1.0
ARR ARR ARR Johnson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 1 2932 L.PSY 394 02 Internship 2.0
ARR ARR ARR Johnson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

10 2 3840 L.PSY 394 03 Internship 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Johnson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 2934 L.PSY 490 01 Senior Seminar & Portfolio-PJ 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HENN 280 Johnson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
OPEN TO PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS ONLY

15 13 2935 L.PSY 527 01 Human Development 3.0
04:00-06:30pm ARR HENN 070 Johnson, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
ONLINE CLASS

15 15 2936 L.PSY 605 01 Research & Program Evaluation 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Hopper, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

153


GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
ONLINE COURSE

12 11 3924 L.PSY 625 01 Psychopathology 3.0
06:00-09:00pm TH HENN 180 Nemmers, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
Open to Masters in Psych Program

12 10 3789 L.PSY 647 01 Helping Relationships 3.0
04:00-06:30pm M HENN 180 Dunn, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
Open to Masters in Psych Program

15 4 2938 L.PSY 660 01 Individ Mental Measurement 3.0
06:00-09:00pm T HENN 070 Hopper, C
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

8 2 2939 L.PSY 694 01 Practicum 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Dalsing, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
NEED 12 GR PSY CREDS PRIOR TO REG

12 7 3925 L.PSY 695 01 Graduate Proseminar 3.0
06:00-09:00pm W HENN 180 Bonert,J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
Open to Masters in Psych Program

10 0 2940 L.PSY 696 01 Supvsed Clinical Internship I 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Dalsing, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
NEED 12 GR PSY CREDS PRIOR TO REG

8 0 3625 L.PSY 698 01 Supvsed Clinical Internship II 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Dalsing, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

8 0 3626 L.PSY 699 01 Supvsed Clinical Internshp III 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Dalsing, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

30 16 3656 L.REL 112 01 Intro Theology & Rel Studies 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF KEAN 008 Osheim, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 26 3538 L.REL 113 01 Intro to Bible 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH WAHL 101 Lorenz, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

154


30 21 3646 L.REL 231 01 Catholic Social Teachings 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW WAHL 145 Shadle, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3652 L.REL 251 01 Does Land Belong to Israel-AC 3.0
02:00-03:30pm TTH ARCE 402 Waldmeir, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 25 Y 3647 L.REL 272 01 Christian Sexual Morality-AV 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HENN 450 Shadle, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 23 3644 L.REL 320 01 Sacraments:Catholic ID/Comm-AI 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW ARCE 402 Pitt, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

20 13 3739 L.REL 391 01 The Catholic Heritage 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH SMYT 102 Idziak, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Open to Catholic Studies Minors

15 1 3757 L.REL 491 01 Thesis Writing 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Waldmeir, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SENIORS ONLY
RELIGIOUS STUDIES MAJORS ONLY

10 2 3758 L.REL 493 01 Practicum Parish Ministry 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Waldmeir, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SENIORS ONLY
RELIGIOUS STUDIES MAJORS ONLY

15 6 3653 L.REL 643 01 World Religions 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Waldmeir, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

10 0 3760 L.REL 680 01 Thesis 6.0
ARR ARR ARR Waldmeir, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
WRITTEN APPROVAL DIR OF CAPSTONE

10 0 3759 L.REL 683 01 Practicum Project 6.0
ARR ARR ARR Waldmeir, J
Aug 26 - Dec 12
GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY
WRITTEN APPROVAL DIR OF CAPSTONE

10 0 3979 L.REL 683 02 Practicum Project 6.0
ARR ARR ARR Osheim, A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

155


GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

30 20 2941 L.SCW 130 01 Intro Social Welfare 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 470 Cavanagh, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 30 2942 L.SCW 130 02 Intro Social Welfare 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HENN 480 Bechen, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 18 2943 L.SCW 231 01 Human Behav & Soc Environmt 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HENN 480 Fett, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 6 2945 L.SCW 346 01 Social Work Practice I 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HENN 480 Cavanagh, B
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SOCIAL WORK MAJORS ONLY

25 7 2946 L.SCW 347 01 Social Work Practice II 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HENN 450 Bechen, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 20 2947 L.SCW 348 01 Social Work Practice III 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF HENN 180 Fett, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 16 2948 L.SCW 395 01 Career Options in SW Field 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF HENN 180 Fett, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 0 2949 L.SCW 446 01 Field Instruction 4.5
08:00-09:50 F HENN 445 Fett, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SOCIAL WORK MAJORS ONLY

25 0 2950 L.SCW 447 01 Field Instruction 4.5
08:00-09:50 F HENN 445 Fett, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SOCIAL WORK MAJORS ONLY

25 1 2951 L.SCW 448 01 Field Instruction 9.0
08:00-09:50 F HENN 445 Fett, N
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SOCIAL WORK MAJORS ONLY

0 0 3966 C.SCW 381 01 Adv Issues in Social Work Prac 3.0
ARR Clarke Instructor
Aug 26 - Dec 12

29 31 3155 L.SMG 150 01 Intro Sport Management 3.0
08:00-08:50 MWF ROHL 143 Garrett, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Non-Senior Standing Only

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

156


25 28 Y 3156 L.SMG 240 01 Sport and Society 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH ROHL 143 Marx,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3157 L.SMG 270 01 Ethics in Sports-AV 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH KEAN 011 Ciapalo, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

15 4 3159 L.SMG 294 01 Level-2 Internship Sport Mgmt 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Garrett, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
MINIMUM GPA OF 2.0 REQUIRED

25 19 3160 L.SMG 345 01 Adm Athletic & Rec Facilities 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HENN 270 Marx,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 19 3161 L.SMG 450 01 Finance & Fund Raising 3.0
02:30-03:50pm MW ROHL 143 Marx,A
Aug 26 - Dec 12
JUNIORS & SENIORS ONLY

25 19 3162 L.SMG 468 01 Sport Marketing/Promotions 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH ROHL 143 Garrett, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
JUNIORS & SENIORS ONLY

10 1 3163 L.SMG 492 01 Lev 3 Field Experience Spt Mgt 9.0
ARR ARR ARR Garrett, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SENIORS ONLY
MINIMUM GPA OF 2.0 REQUIRED
SPORT MGMT MAJORS ONLY

10 1 3164 L.SMG 492 02 Lev 3 Field Experience Spt Mgt 12.0
ARR ARR ARR Garrett, M
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SENIORS ONLY
MINIMUM GPA OF 2.0 REQUIRED
SPORT MGMT MAJORS ONLY

30 26 3539 L.SOC 115 01 Intro to Sociology 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF HOFF 511 Garoutte, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Has Not Taken L.SOC-101

30 24 3540 L.SOC 115 02 Intro to Sociology 3.0
02:30-03:20pm MWF HOFF 511 Garoutte, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
Has Not Taken L.SOC-101

30 30 3541 L.SOC 115 03 Intro to Sociology 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH HENN 470 Parks, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

157


Has Not Taken L.SOC-101

30 28 3542 L.SOC 216 01 Social Problems 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HENN 250 Parks, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 21 3543 L.SOC 240 01 Gender & Society 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH HENN 180 Anderson, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 25 Y 3544 L.SOC 250 01 Aryan Socities-CI 3.0
11:00-12:20pm WF HOFF 112 Garoutte, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION
MAY REGISTER FOR COREQUISITE: L.HIS-225-01
Clustered with 3521 L.HIS 225 01
Confederates: Virtual/Real-CI

25 25 Y 3545 L.SOC 254 01 Race & Ethnicity-AC 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH HOFF 111 Anderson, R
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO CROSS-REGISTRATION

25 24 3546 L.SOC 333 01 Statistical Analysis 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF HOFF 111 Parks, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 13 3547 L.SOC 336 01 Classical Sociological Theory 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH ROHL 143 Garoutte, L
Aug 26 - Dec 12

0 1 4395 L.SOC 498 01 Directed Readings 1-3
ARR Garoutte, L
Oct 21 - Dec 12

18 11 3069 L.SPA 110 01 Beginning Spanish I 4.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF WAHL 101 Jeffries, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 15 3070 L.SPA 210 01 Intermediate Spanish I 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF WAHL 110 McCarthy-Gilmore, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 18 Y 3071 L.SPA 210 02 Intermediate Spanish I 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF WAHL 110 McCarthy-Gilmore, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 18 Y 3072 L.SPA 270 01 Adv Communicative Modes 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF KEAN 011 Livingston, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 18 Y 3073 L.SPA 270 02 Adv Communicative Modes 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF KEAN 011 Livingston, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12

COLLEGE STUDENTS AND THE CONSUMPTION OF NEWS

158


18 22 Y 3074 L.SPA 295 01 Intro Interpreting & Translat 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF WAHL 101 Jeffries, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

18 14 3075 L.SPA 350 01 El Mundo Hispano 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH WAHL 109 Jeffries, K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

18 12 3749 L.SPA 460 01 Themes in Literature 3.0
09:30-10:50 TTH ARCE 102 Livingston, D
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

30 30 3165 L.SSC 140 01 First Aid & Emergency Care 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF GRAB 206 Homan,K
Aug 26 - Dec 12

30 29 3166 L.SSC 140 02 First Aid & Emergency Care 3.0
01:30-02:20pm MWF ROHL 143 Kamm,C
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 23 3167 L.SSC 145 01 Nutrition 3.0
10:00-10:50 MWF ROHL 143 Kult, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12

25 22 3168 L.SSC 145 02 Nutrition 3.0
02:30-03:20pm MWF GRAB 206 Kult, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
INCOMING FY STUDENTS ONLY

25 23 3169 L.SSC 230 01 Anat/Phys I Musculoskeletal 4.0
08:00-08:50 MWF HENN 070 Newman, N / Homan,K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
11:00-12:20pm T SCIE 134
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

25 18 3170 L.SSC 230 02 Anat/Phys I Musculoskeletal 4.0
08:00-08:50 MWF HENN 070 Newman, N / Homan,K
Aug 26 - Dec 12
11:00-12:20pm TH SCIE 134
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

15 13 3171 L.SSC 322 01 Physiology of Exercise 3.0
09:00-09:50 MWF GRAB 206 Glover, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

15 15 3172 L.SSC 322 02 Physiology of Exercise 3.0
12:30-01:20pm MWF GRAB 206 Glover, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

16 16 Y 3174 L.SSC 344 01 Theory Strength Train & Condit 3.0
08:00-09:20 TTH GRAB 206 Kult, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
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NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

16 14 3175 L.SSC 344 02 Theory Strength Train & Condit 3.0
12:30-01:50pm TTH ROHL 127 Kult, T
Aug 26 - Dec 12
NOT OPEN TO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

10 7 3176 L.SSC 492 01 Internship in Sport Science I 3.0
ARR GRAB 206 Glover, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SENIORS ONLY
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

10 0 3699 L.SSC 493 01 Internship Sport Science II 3.0
ARR ARR ARR Glover, S
Aug 26 - Dec 12
SENIORS ONLY
INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED

16 21 3597 L.SSE 094 01 Learning Strategies 2.0
10:00-10:50 MW ARCE 102 L. Gallagher
Aug 26 - Dec 12
ENHANCED PROGRAM STUDENTS ONLY





















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Appendix B
Random Number Table




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Appendix C
E-mail sent to Professors
Dear Professor _______________,

My name is ___________. My COM 485 – Communication Research group is conducting a
study on _______________________. Your course, (name of course) which meets on (days of
the week) at (time of day), has been selected to be included in our study.

I would like to come to your class on ________________ and ask your students to complete our
questionnaire. It will take your students approximately 5 -7 minutes to complete the
questionnaire.

I appreciate your consideration of my request.

Please let me know if I may come to your class.

Sincerely,

Your name.













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Appendix D
Questionnaire
DIRECTIONS: Please circle the answers that are the most accurate.
1. What is your gender?
a. Male
b. Female
2. What year in school are you?
a. 1
st
year
b. Sophomore
c. Junior
d. Senior

3. Do you read the newspaper or magazines?
a. Yes
b. No

4. If you read the newspaper or magazines, how often a week do you read them?
a. more than 5 times
b. 3-4 times
c. 1-2 times
d. never


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For the purpose of this survey, refer to news meaning: newly received or noteworthy
information, esp. about recent or important events (Oxford, 2001).
5. How much interest do you have in learning the latest news? (5 being the most, 1 being
the least).
a. 1
b. 2
c. 3
d. 4
e. 5

6. Do you use social media?
a. Yes
b. No

7. Which of the two social media sites do you currently have?
a. Twitter
b. Facebook
c. Both
d. I do not use social media




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8. Is social media the most useful tool for finding out news?
a. Yes
b. No

9. If you answered no for question #8, what source do you find most useful in finding your
news?

_____________________________________________________________________

10. Which media platform do you use the most to find the news?
a. TV
b. Magazine/Newspaper
c. Facebook
d. Radio
e. Twitter

11. When you’re checking for news on the Internet, what is the first outlet you go to?
a. Twitter
b. Facebook
c. Online news outlets



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12. How often do you check for news per day?
a. More than 5 times
b. 3-4 times
c. 1-2 times
d. Never

13. Do you subscribe to an online newspaper?
a. Yes
b. No

14. Do you visit any of the following news sites: CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, Yahoo?
a. Yes
b. No

15. Where are you most inclined to find the latest news?
a. Word of mouth
b. Newspaper
c. Magazine
d. TV
e. Internet
f. Online periodicals
g. Social Media sites

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16. When reading your news on Facebook or Twitter and there is not a link provided, are you
inclined to follow up on a news site such as: CNN, MSNBC, etc.?
a. Yes
b. No

17. When reading about news on a social media site do you click on the link if there is one
provided to read on further?
a. Yes
b. No


18. Do you ―like‖ or follow any news sites on Facebook or Twitter such as: CNN, MSNBC,
online newspapers, online magazines?
a. Yes
b. No

19. If you heard about breaking news via word of mouth, what outlet would you immediately
turn to?
a. Facebook
b. Twitter
c. Yahoo
d. Online newspaper
e. News station
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20. Has making a Twitter or Facebook account made you more informed and conscientious
about the world around you?
a. Yes
b. No
c. Not applicable
Thank You

















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Appendix E
Cover letter
Dear Student,

As students enrolled in the Communication Research course, we are very interested in
assessing Loras College students’ perception of news. The course in which you are currently
enrolled has been randomly selected from the comprehensive list of Fall 2013 courses to
participate in our study.
Your participation in this study is voluntary; however, your feedback is important. Please print
and sign your name in the spaces provided below. Please do not put your name on the
questionnaire.
We, the researchers, guarantee your anonymity and the results will be confidential regarding all
responses and information shared in this study. Your responses will only be used for the
research being conducted in the Fall 2013 Communication Research course.
Please return your completed questionnaire to the researcher in the front of this classroom. If
you have further questions, please contact our professor, Dr. Mary Carol Harris at
marycarol.harris@loras.edu.
Thank you for your participation in our study.
Sincerely,

Michael Rovansek Mackenzie Hilmer Dylan Milkent Jake Zeller John O’Dea

Date______________

Print your name______________________

Sign your name____________________________
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Appendix F
Code book
1. Gender – Nominal
2. Year – Ordinal
3. Print – Nominal
4. Pread- Ratio
5. Int – Interest
6. SMuse – Nominal
7. SMtwo – Nominal
8. SMmost- Nominal
9. Other – Nominal
10. MPbest - Nominal
11. FirstOut - Interest
12. NewOften - Ratio
13. ONsub – Nominal
14. VisitNew - Nominal
15. MostInc - Ordinal
16. NoLink – Nominal
17. Click – Nominal
18. Like – Nominal
19. WOM – Ordinal
20. Inform - Nominal

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Appendix G
Hard Data from SPSS
1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
2.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
5.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 3.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
2.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 2.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 2.00
1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
4.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 3.00
2.00 4.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 7.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
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1.00 4.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 7.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 7.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
2.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 2.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
3.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
2.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
2.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 6.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
3.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
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2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 2.00 2.00
3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 2.00
1.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 2.0
1.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00
1.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00
1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 internet homepage; yahoo
1.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 2.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 tv news; online news outlets
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 news websites; tv
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 yahoo, espn, fox
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.00
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2.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
2.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 4.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 news websites
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
2.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 internet
1.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 newsite or newsnetwork
1.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
2.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 news broadcasting television
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.00
2.00 4.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 word of mouth
4.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 sports
3.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 2.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
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2.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
2.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 magazine/tv
1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 cnn,msnbc
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
3.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 new york times
1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 7.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00
2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 kwwl
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
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2.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
2.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 3.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 online news source
2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 online tv stations
3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 internet homepages
1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
2.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 7.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 newspaper
2.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00
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2.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 cnn news
1.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 telegraph herald, magaizne
3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 television news
1.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 2.00
2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 cnn
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 google news, time, chicago tribune
online ny times 5.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00
1.00
2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 tv
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 5.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00
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1.00 3.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 rcn fox cnn
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 wall street hournal, newspaper tv
2.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
3.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 4.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00
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1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 kwwl
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 3.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 read it
4.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 7.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
4.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 local news stations
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 5.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 ABC7 news app chicago
1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 2.00
1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 News Websites
2.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 5.00 2.00
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1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 News Stations
1.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 3.00
1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 Fox News
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00
2.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 Newspapers
2.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.00
1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 7.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 CNN app
1.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 4.00 1.00
2.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 BBC News
2.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 6.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 2.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 4.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
5.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
1.00 1.00 4.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 2.00 1.00
2.00 2.00 2.00 4.00 3.00 1.00 3.00 1.00
3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00









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Appendix H
IRB Form

Loras College Institutional Review Board
REQUEST FOR IRB REVIEW
Student Research Project

Please complete the following research application. Provide all information requested as part of
this application. Do not simply refer to other documents or grant applications. Once completed,
send this form, with the attached Research description, and all supporting documents (email
preferred) to the Institutional Review Board chair: Kathrin Parks, Sociology Program (588-
7819); kathrin.parks@loras.edu

Ethics Certification: In submitting this review request, you agree to conduct this research as
described in the attached documents. You agree to request and wait to receive approval from the
IRB for any changes to the research proposal. You will comply with the policies for conducting
ethical research as outlined in the Belmont Report (at
http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/policy/belmont.html .) and other applicable professional ethical
standards.

Please watch the video The Belmont Report: Basic Ethical Principles and Their Application
from the Office for Human Research Protections of the U.S. Department of Health & Human
Services, from the beginning of the program to minute 13, available at
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Up09dioFdEU . Your signature in the space below affirms that you
have watched the video and understand the ethical principles presented:



1. Student Investigator(s) and contact information:
 Michael Rovansek: Michael.rovansek@loras.edu
 Dylan Milkent: Dylan.milkent@loras.edu
 Mackenzie Hilmer: Mackenzie.hilmer@loras.edu
 John O’Dea: John.O’Dea@loras.edu
 Brian Zeller: brian.zeller@loras.edu


2. Title of Project: How college students consumer their news

3. Course Requring Project: Comm 485 – Communication Research

4. Faculty sponsor name and contact information: Dr. Mary Carol C. Harris. Office
Telephone: 563.588.7820. E-mail Address: marycarol.harris@loras.edu

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5. Proposed duration of all project activities: From August 26
th
2013 to December 12
th
,
2013

6. Approximate number of subjects:

7. Type of subject: (Mark all appropriate)

__ Adults, Non-student
 Loras College
students
__ Other college students
__ Minors (under age 18)
__ Persons with cognitive or psychological
impairment
__ Persons with limited civil freedom
__ Persons with HIV+/AIDS
__ Pregnant women

6. Special considerations: (Mark all appropriate)

__ No special materials
__ Videotaping
__ Audio taping
__ Use of deception (explain
in attachment)
__ Use of alcohol or drugs
__ Other (explain
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7. Funding source (other than Loras College):

 None

.Please complete the Research Description outlined on the next page.
RESEARCH DESCRIPTION
Please address each of the following points below. If a question or section is not applicable to
your research, please state this.

1. Purpose & Significance of Project.
 Briefly describe the purpose of your research.
o The purpose of our study is to see what media outlets college students receive their
news. When we know this, we can determine which outlet is best used to reach
college students for our own public relations goals
 Describe your hypotheses/goals. If you give background on previous research that supports
your goals, please include reference citations at end of this section.
o Our hypothesis is that Twitter is the media outlet in which most college students
obtain their news. Our goal is to be able to determine whether or not this is true so
that we can know what mediums are most popular with college student
 Include an explanation of the expected outcome.
o Our hypothesis that Twitter is the media outlet that college students use with the most
frequency to find their news is true. Twitter beat out television, newspapers,
Facebook, magazines, and online news sites as the top platform.
 Indicate why the information obtained might be useful or beneficial.
o The information obtained can be useful and beneficial because once we know what
the top media platform(s) are, we can use these platforms when we as public relations
professionals are trying to inform and persuade members of the society that are in
college.
2. Participants
Recruitment:
 How will you recruit the participants?
1. We will go randomly selected classrooms and ask for their participation once
we have permission from the professor of that class
 Where will they be recruited from?
1. From the list of Loras College Fall 2013 courses.
 How will they be selected?
1. They will be selected using a probability sampling method to draw a stratified
random sample. The participants will be stratified by grade (first year,
sophomore, junior, senior).
 Justification is required if participants will be restricted to one gender, racial, or
ethnic group.

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Consent:
 How will you obtain consent?
1. The cover letter to the questionnare requires a signature that each participants agrees to
the terms of the questionnare
 If, due to the nature of your research, a formal consent document cannot be used,
justification for this must be given.

Collaboration:
 If you will be collaborating with other institutions in order to recruit participants and
conduct the research, please attach approvals that have been or will be obtained (e.g.,
school districts, hospitals, other colleges). Preferably these will be letters on the
cooperating institution’s letterhead, stating willingness to participate.


3. Methods and Procedure: Describe your research procedure.
 What will you ask the participants to do?
o To fill out our survey. The survey asks what media outlets they get their news from,
how often they look up news on those outlets, and what social media websites they
belong to.
 Where will they do this? Alone or in groups?
o They will complete the questionnaire by themselves, while sitting among their peers.
 How long will the procedure take? How many sessions?
o The procedure will take approximately 5-7 minutes. Only one session is required per
participant.
 Give details about any questionnaires or stimuli participants will be exposed to; be specific in
amounts or dosages of any substances participants will be asked to ingest. (Participants may
not consume alcoholic beverages in student research projects.)
 Instruments/Materials: Attach copies of all forms, surveys and instruments to be used.

4. Risk & Benefit Analysis
 What are the psychological, physical, or social (loss of reputation, deception, privacy, etc)
risks subjects might encounter by participating? (Please do not say ―none.‖ All activities
involve some risk, although it may be minimal.)
o They may feel they are uninformed about what’s going on around them.
 What precautions will you take to protect participants or reduce risk?
o None.
 What benefit, if any, will the participants gain from participating in this research? (Please do
not include compensation or course credit as benefit. If none, simply state that.)
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o They may be informed of places to find news that they didn’t know about before.
 What compensation, if any, will participants receive (payment, gifts, course credit, etc.)? (If
none, simply state that.)
o None.
 What follow-up or debriefing procedures will you have after the research is concluded?
o We will thank them for their participation, and no follow up will take place after that.
 If any deception or withholding of information is required for this research, please explain
why it is necessary and how this will be handled in the debriefing. Attach debriefing script.

5. Data Handling
 How will the data be kept anonymous or confidential?
o Every piece of information will be one hundred percent confidential. It will be kept
confidential by ripping off the cover letter which states who to participant is before
the data is entered.
 Where will data be stored and for how long? Who will have access to the data?
o Data will be stored is SPSS. Everyone in our group will have access to it.
 Include specific details on the use and storage of any audio or video tapes.
o The storage will be used to take statisics of all participants to look for patterns and
find the answers to our questions.
 Do you plan to share the results of this research in a class? If so, how?
o Yes. In a presentation at the end of the semester to our entire class and professor.
 Do you plan to share the results of this research outside of your class? If so, how?
o The only scenario in which we would share our results outside of our classroom
would be if Dr. Harris approves our paper to presented at the research event in the
spring.

6 If Participants Will Be Minors (Under age 18)
 Justify the inclusion of minors.
 Specify how parental consent will be obtained
 Specify how you will obtain assent of minor subjects.
 Describe any activities planned for non-participants, if other children in a classroom will be
participating.
 Describe how you will use nonverbal signs to indicate when young children wish to stop
participating.
7. Investigator Background (Student researchers only)
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 What coursework have you had to prepare you for research?
o If have been taught how to phrase questions, what questions to ask, and how to
present them
 What is your previous research-related experience, if any?
o I do not have any research experience like this before.
 How will your faculty sponsor supervise or be involved?

8. Consent Forms. Please attach one of the following options related to obtaining consent:
 Written Consent – Attach copy of all consent & assent forms. See Informed Consent
Checklist on the IRB website
(http://inside.loras.edu/Academics/AcademicCommittees/IRB/default.aspx).
 Oral consent – Provide justification for not obtaining written consent and the text of the
script you will use to obtain oral consent.
 Waiver of consent – Provide written justification for waiving consent process. This is
rare and usually granted only if consent process itself adds substantial risk to the
research.