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Your Name: _Maria Yassick_________

Inquiry Two, Part A:


Discuss Your Target Area and Core Practice for Guided Lead Teaching


Talk with your MT about your idea, and use the information you gained from
Inquiry One to respond to the following guiding questions listed below. Email
your responses to your instructor before our Week 4 class (September 26)
AND post them on your book club blog:

1. Describe your target area for guided lead teaching.

After discussing where my class will be during my guided lead teaching my
mentor wants me to focus on phonics and phonemic awareness.

2. Approximately how much time per day is allotted for your instruction in this
area?

I will be teaching ten lessons throughout the three week period. For each lesson I
will plan a literacy center and a short whole group lesson before reading street
officially starts. Literacy centers last about 12-13 minutes for each center and I
will have about twenty minutes for my whole group lesson.

3. Which Common Core State Standard(s) will you work toward?

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2 Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables,
and sounds (phonemes).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a Recognize and produce rhyming words.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2d Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and
final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or
CVC) words.
1
(This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3a Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-
sound correspondences by producing the primary sound or many of the most
frequent sounds for each consonant.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis
skills in decoding words.


4. How will teaching in this target area provide opportunities for students to
learn important content and/or skills that relate to their lives? In what
ways does this learning include learning literacy, learning about literacy,
and/or learning through literacy?

Phonological awareness and phonics are foundational skills children need to be
able to learn how to read and write. Without knowing that a word is made up
letters and each letter has a sound, a child is not going to be able to blend or be
able to read. If a child does not know how to read it not only negatively affects
their experience in school, but out as well. Reading is everywhere and being a
literate person is an important skill to have everywhere you go.

When children are learning letter sounds and how to rhyme they are learning
skills of literacy. While doing so they are learning about literacy because they are
getting a firmer picture of what literacy entails. Lastly they are learning through
literacy because the lessons I will plan to help in becoming more phonologically
aware will utilize literacy not only in the form of books, but of picture cards,
technology, ect.

5. What types of classroom talk take place within this target area? To what
extent is the talk teacher-led, student-led, or focused on higher-level
thinking? What norms for interaction would you like to build within your
classroom as you teach in this target area (e.g., see ideas in Chapter 6 of
Strategies that Work, the Berne & Clark 2008 article, or draw from some of
the readings done in TE 402 on classroom talk)?

Classroom talk my class could engage in within this target area is discussions. A
class can discuss why a word rhymes with another word and what patterns all of
the words have. In addition, we can talk about the differences between words
that start with the same letter, but have different sounds. I think whenever
students (especially a Kindergarten class) are looking at something they have
learned and are finding patterns or differences they are completing a higher level
task. While I think that some of our discussions will be teacher-led I also think
that student led discussions and thinking could easily be incorporated. However,
I will have to act much like the teacher in the Berne and Clark where she guided
the students in their first discussions. She did not give the students the answers,
but asked questions that got them to think deeper.

Therefore, since I want to incorporate classroom talk through my target area it
will be especially important that my students understands the norms of a
discussion. They need to know that I do not have to talk every time after a
student makes a comment and that it is important to be respectful and allow
everyone a chance to share if they would like.

There are different types of
6. Which core practice do you want to work on developing/improving as you
teach in this target area (refer to document Resources for Developing
Core Practices)? How will focusing on this core practice contribute to your
own professional learning?

The core practice I am focusing on is, explicit teaching and authentic application
activities: print concepts and phonological awareness, phonics and word
recognition, and word identification. Focusing on this core practice will help me
in my professional teaching because it will allow me to practice teaching
students authentic lessons. I believe students learn best when they are taught
explicitly and are given authentic experiences to coincide with what they are
learning. Focusing on this core practice will give me the experience and practice I
need in doing this.

7. What resources within the community, neighborhood, school district,
school or classroom do you have to work with in this target area?

Within this target area I could utilize the community and neighborhood. Students
come across words and letters all around them. To make lessons truly authentic I
could incorporate meaningful words that they have seen before (example: stop or
Meijer). Within my school I will utilize my teacher as a resource and the Reading
Street curriculum book. My teacher is one of the best resources I have. She may
have hands on materials I could use to make my lessons authentic. In addition,
the Reading Street textbook will be important because while I will make my
lessons unique, it is important that I am sticking to the target goals of the district
mandated curriculum.

8. What additional resources do you need to obtain?

As of now I cannot think of any additional resources I may need. However, I am
sure they will come up as I continue planning my lesson.

9. How will you pre-assess your students in your target area?

I recently created an anecdotal assessment binder. Each student has their own
page where I can take notes on my observations. As a pre-assessment, I will
take anecdotal records on phonics and phonological awareness skills that I
observe.

10. What else will you need to find out about all students in your class to help
you develop lesson plans for your Guided Lead Teaching?

I think it would be useful to think more about each of my students learning styles.
For some students I observed that when the room is quiet they are able to think
and work better. For others I can see that movement motivates them to listen and
learn. I think knowing the specific learning styles of all students in my classroom
will help me as I develop my lesson plan because I will be able to plan and cater
to their needs ahead of time.


11. What else do you need/want to learn about the core practice to support
your planning and teaching?

I have some ideas of how I can make my lessons very authentic, but I how to
learn about more ways in which I can do that.

12. What concerns, if any, do you have about planning and teaching your
unit?

I am worried about the time I have to complete my lessons. I know that our
schedule is laid out to the tea during our literacy block because there are a lot of
things to get to during that hour. This is especially true starting next week when
my class will be broken up into their best fit group.



Part C: Outline for a Daily Lesson Plan
Changes highlighted in yellow
(2 daily plans are due prior to beginning your unit teaching)
Please name each file with your last name (example: RosaenDailyPlan1.docx)


Date: Monday October 28, 2013
Objective(s) for todays lesson:

1. Students will determine whether or not a word has an initial or medial /a/ sound in a small group
setting. They must determine 4/5 correct to be proficient.
2. Students will explain that the sound /a/ corresponds to the letters A and a in a small group
setting.

Rationale: Being able to know that the letter a makes a sound when that letter is in a word is critical for
reading and writing. In order to be able to understand higher skills such as decoding and blending,
students must be able to connect the grapheme to the phoneme. When students see a word that starts
with the letter a they are not most likely not going to be able to read it if they dont also know that the
letter a has a corresponding sound.

Materials & supplies needed: Upper and lowercase letter a cards, T chart (x5), picture cards (with
words that start with /a/ sound and some that dont), green and red popsicles

Procedures and approximate time allocated for each event

Introduction to the lesson

Center Activity:

The first part of the lesson will be my center activity. I will start
by holding up a card of an upper case A.

What letter is this friends?

Academic, Social and/or
Linguistic Support during
each event








After that I will hold up the lowercase a. Below is what I will
say so students know that purpose of the lesson and how
they can connect what they learn in and out of school. I
know they all want to be readers so explaining this will help
them understand the lessons real world purpose and
motivate them to do it.

What letter is this? Who can tell me what sound the letter a
makes? Right, it makes the /a/ sound. We are going to play a
game that will help you learn this /a/ sound that the letter a
makes. It is important to know what sound the letter a
makes because knowing your letters and their sounds will
help you become great readers and writers! Tell me, where
do you see words? (Wait for responses) Right, we see them
in school, in our homes, on the drive to dance class. We see
words all around us and knowing the sounds of the letters
that make up words will help us to be able to read those
words.

Next I will go into explaining the center activity. Specifically I
will use the example/non-example strategy to make sure
students know the correct behavior expectations.

Today I have a chart for each of you. One side of the chart
says words that say /a/ and the other side says words that
say other sounds. I also have a bunch of cards with pictures
on them that are all mixed up? What do you think we are
going to do with these picture cards? Yes, we are going to
sort them on our charts. One at a time a student is going to
draw a card (I will draw a card), they will say the picture on
the card out loud (I will say what I draw), and then they will
determine whether that picture goes on the /a/ sound side or
the other side. They place the card on what side they think
is right and then the rest of us will give a thumbs up if you
agree with his or her decision or a thumbs down if you think
the pictured card goes on the other side of the chart. When
someone draws a card and says the word out loud should
you blurt out the answer right away? No, give them time to
think and wait for them to put it in the chart. When someone
chooses a side on the chart that you dont agree with should
you give the person thumbs down and say you are SO
wrong? No, you should quietly give a thumbs down and tell
us why he or she might have made a mistake is a respectful
way.

(3 minutes)


Reading Street:
I will continue the lesson with the students on the floor about an
hour later.

Okay Kindergarten, today with me at centers we did some work
with the letter a. Remember learning the letter a and its sound
/a/ is very important for reading and writing. We are going to do
some more activities with the letter a and the sound it makes



-I will make sure all friends are
participating so they are all
getting the extra practice.

-If they cannot come up with any
examples of where they see
words I will give prompting such
as: Do you see any words in our
classroom right now?


-When I am stating the
expectations I will ask my
students who need extra
behavior support to directly re-
state some of my guidelines so
they know the procedure for the
game.































-For those friends struggling to
choose which side of the chart
the picture goes on I will have
them say the word out loud a few
which is /a/.Look at this letter give me the yes sign if this is a.
Now is it uppercase or lowercase a? Right, this is the lowercase
a. Get out your magic pencil fingers and lets write a capitol A
together. We are going to continue the lesson doing more things
with the letter A and its sound /a/.

OUTLINE of key events during the lesson

Center Activity:

-I will introduce the center by explaining why we are learning the
letter a and its sound /a/. Again, I will say that it will help us
become readers in and out of school. I will make clear the
behavior expectations.
-I will explain the directions to the students and have them get
started. Since centers go by fairly quickly the first part of this
needs to be speedy, but thourally to make sure all students are
on the same page.
-Students will continue to draw picture cards and place them on
their charts until all the picture cards have been used. There will
be around 30 pictures so each student should have about 6
different pictures on their chart.
-As students are filling their chart I will ask them questions and
support their learning if needed.
-Questions I may ask:
Why did you put that picture card on that side of the chart?
Do these two pictures have the same beginning sound?
How do you know?
Do you have more picture cards that start with the /a/ sound
or something else?
What other sounds do the words on the other side sound
like? Do you know what letter makes that sound?
-I may also comment of childrens behavior by saying things such as,
____I loved how you politely disagreed with _______. You were not
rude or Everyone is following the directions so well, you are finding
all those words that start with /a/. Giving the students positive praise
with reinforce their behavior.
-The activity will end when all of the picture cards have been placed
in a section of someones chart. If there is time I will have the
students come up with more words that start with the /a/ sound or say
any word and determine if the word starts with the /a/ sound or
another sound.


(10 minutes)

Reading Street:
-I will be developing my core practice of explicit teaching by making
sure the children are always challenged just the right amount. In
addition, I will may activities meaningful to them because the
examples I use will be things that they see in their everyday life. For
example, since we are talking about the letter a I will mention that
apple starts with the letter a and its initial sound is /a/.
-I will begin this part of the lesson by holding up the letter a and
reviewing its name and sound. This will be a good transition so they
know where the lesson is heading.
more times. If needed I will say
the word out loud because
maybe they need someone else
to hear it.

-I will rephrase what the children
say when they are answering
their questions to make sure I
understood them correctly.




















-I will listen to the students
conversation to make sure they
are talking with each other.











-If I notice a lot of friends got one
of the words wrong I will stop
and say the word again
emphasizing the /a/ sound.
-Next I will have the students turn and talk to their neighbor about
other words they know that start with the /a/ sound. They are familiar
with this drill, but I will direct this by saying, Ones will start, remember
that the ones are in these rows (point to rows). When I call on people
I will ask them what word their partner came up with to make sure that
they were listening.
-As I call on students to give me words I will write them on the smart
board.
-I will ask questions like:
Do all of these words start with the letter a?
How can we tell that they all make the /a/ sound?
Can you think of anymore words that start with the /a/ sound?
-To transition into the next part of the activity I will say, I know some
more words that start with the /a/ sound.
-After that I will explain the next activity and the materials used. I will
say, In a moment I am going to give you two sticks. One is a red stick
and one is a green stick. Then I am going to say different words. If
you think the word I say starts with the /a/ sound then you will hold up
a green popsicle stick and if you think it starts with the different letter
sound you will hold up a red popsicle stick. Should you be having a
sword fight with the sticks? No. Should you be throwing them up in
the air? No. You are only using them to tell me if my word begins with
the /a/ sound or not. From there I will distribute the materials.
-I will say the following words and the children will hold up either their
green or red stick.

-apple
-trash
-mushroom
-astronaut
-Africa
-Ann
-Turtle
-Mongoose
-Scissors
-act


(15 minutes)


Closing summary for the lesson

Here is what I will say to summarize the lesson:

Wow friends, you learned a lot today about the letter A and the
/a/ sound that it makes. You have learned about a lot of letters
and their sounds at school. Just think, you have learned this letter
(hold up M), and you know it makes the sound /m/. As you go
home today find things on your drive or bus ride home out the
window that has the /a/ sound. If you find something that has a
different sound you can say that doesnt make the /a/ sound so it
doesnt start with an A! Be ready for tomorrow because we are
going to work with the /a/ sound again, but this time the /a/ sound
will be in the middle of the word!

(2 minutes)


Transition to next learning activity

I will call students to line up for Best Fit Group.

Students who are working with Ms. Swords you may line up,
those with Ms. McKay, Mrs. Erickson, Mrs. Shauen. The rest
of you will say here!
Assessment
The assessment for this lesson will be making observational
notes on their T charts as well as the activity that involves
them holding up red and green popsicle sticks. These two
activities will allow me to see quickly and toughly which
students are not hearing the /a/ sound in words. For the
popsicle sticks, every time a person holds up the wrong stick I
will put a tally mark by their name. If they dont get 4/5 or 80% of
the words I ask then they have not met my objective.

Once the lesson is complete I will go back and look at my
observation notes. For those students who I see not meeting
my objectives I will provide a little extra support to during small
group time. In addition, I will create a small chunk of time to
work with them during choice time if possible.



Academic, Social, and/or
Linguistic Support during
assessment

-I will do the same thing as I
mentioned in the lesson plan
since my assessment is an
observation. However, if I stop to
go back over a word to help
them hear the /a/ sound I still will
count that word as a missed
word for the assessment.

Reflection After teaching each lesson, write a Book Club Blog
Posting discussing the following:
What students learned and which students struggled with the
lesson.
What are alternate reads of your students performance or
products?
What did you learn about your students literacy practices that
extend beyond your objectives?
When and how will you re-teach the material to students who
need additional support?
If you were to teach this same lesson again, what would you
do differently and how do you think the changes would
improve students learning?
What did you learn so far about implementing your core
practice and what do you need to do to continue your
professional learning?



Date: October 30, 2013
Objective(s) for todays lesson:

1. Students will blend at least two CVC words together in a one on one setting.

Rationale
Blending is an extremely important skill for students to acquire. Blending is one of the foundational skills
in reading. Without having the ability to blend students will be unable to figure out words unless they
memorize them strictly by sight. I will make blending relevant to their life by choosing words that they
know and are familiar with. The words we work with will be ones that I have seen from stories read
during class.

Materials & supplies needed:
Paper wheel (x5) and clothes pins

Procedures and approximate time allocated for each event

Introduction to the lesson

Center Activity:

To start the center I will introduce its purpose and directions.

Okay Kindergarten, today we are going to blend letter sounds
together to try to figure out words. Blending is an extremely
important skill. Why do you think blending is an important
skill? Yes, because blending helps us figure out words so we
are able to become readers! You all want to become readers
soon right? Well practicing your blending skills will do just
that! When we blend we may hear some sounds you are
familiar with? Do you remember what sound the letter A
makes? Right, it makes the /a/ sound. How about the letter
S, what sound does the letter S make. Right again, it
makes the /s/ sound. In this activity I will segment three letter
words into sounds. Let me give you an example. The word
sit has the sounds /s/ /i/ /t/ and together when those sounds
are blended together the word is sit. Try one with me. When
you blend the sounds /b/ /a/ /t/ together what word do you
get? Right, the word bat has the sounds /b/ /a/ /t/.

We are now going to play a game. I am going to segment more
words into their sounds and you are going to blend them
together. The blended word will be a picture on the circle.
(Hold up the circle and show them all the pictures). Lets go
back to the /b/ /a/ /t/ example. If I were to say /b/ /a/ /t/ and you
blend the word together what do you get again? Yes, batso
then I would look for the picture of the bat on the circle.
Once you have found the picture you cover it up with a
clothes pin. Your goal is to cover all of the pictures.
However, the only way you can cover a picture is when you
are the word being segmented and you blend the word. Are
you going to just take all of the clothes pins and start
covering all the words up? No, you are going to wait until
you hear that word being segmented so you can blend it
together!

(3 minutes)

Reading Street:

At the beginning of the week we found a whole bunch of words
that started with the /a/ sound. Does the /a/ sound always
need to be at the beginning of a word? Where can it be? How
do you know? Its important to know this because many
words that we read will not have the /a/ sound at the
Academic, Social and/or
Linguistic Support during
each event















-If they are unable to tell me the
answer I will give them words
that start with the letter a or s
so they can hear the /s/ sound.

-I may have to go over these
examples extra times for some
students.
























beginning. Some of them will, but a lot of them wont. The
books you read in class and at your home will have both
words that start with the /a/ sound and words that have the
/a/ sound in the middle.

(2 minutes).



OUTLINE of key events during the lesson

Center Activity:
-I will start the center activity by explicitly telling the students why
they are learning about blending. Having them hear why it is
important will make the lesson authentic. All of them strive to be
readers in the near future and motivating them by saying that
learning this new skill will help them read will help many see the
benefit of the activity.
-I will explain the directions as outlined above making sure I give
students lots of examples and non-examples to help them
understand the directions and the expectations.
-I will give the directions before I hand out the supplies to the
children.
-When I am segmenting the words I will be observing the children to
see their strategies for blending. Specifically I will ask myself: are
they talking out loud, can they blend in their head, are they
looking onto a neighbors wheel?
-After I have segmented a word and the students have made their
choice, I will turn the word around to show them how the word is
spelled. Together we will segment and blend one more time as a
group. I hope that when they are able to see the letters to
segment and blend together they are making the letter-sound-
word connection! Specifically, I will point to each letter and say
their individual sounds one more time. When I blend the word
together I will run my finger under the word.
-I will continue to segment all of the words. After we are finished I
will follow up with some of the following discussion questions:
What strategy did you use to help you blend the words
together?
In what words did you hear the /a/ sound in the middle? Did
some of the words have other sounds in the middle?
How do you think you can use blending to help you become
a better reader?
-To end the lesson I will summarize blending and tell them what
center comes next.

(10 minutes)

Reading Street:
-During this time I am developing my core practice because
students need to know that the letter a makes the sound /a/ and
that sound can be at the beginning of a word or in the middle of a
word in order to read; this works on both phonological awareness
and phonics!
-To star this part of the lesson we will talk about the placement of
/a/ in words. I will start by asking questions such as: Does the /a/














-To endure that students are
engaged I will be highly
enthusiastic about blending and
the activity to come.





-If I notice they are having
difficulty I will segment the word
for them multiple times talking
directly to them. If they are still
having trouble I will segment the
CVC word in two chunks. For
example for the word bat I would
say /b/ -at instead of /b/ /a/ /t/.



















-Again, if they are unable to
respond to this question I will go
right into providing examples. If
some can answer the question I
will still provide examples for the
class so they are able to hear the
sound always need to be at the beginning of a word? Where can
it be? How do you know?
-To move into the next part of the lesson. I will say three words and
the students will determine whether the /a/ sound is at the
beginning of the word or the middle of the word. I will explicitly
explain that they are not to blurt out the answer, but will wait until
my hands come down before they share.
-After that we will move into the part of the lesson where they talk
with their partners about words that have the initial /a/ sound and
words that have the medial /a/ sound. The students are familiar
with partner work, but I will be sure to remind them of the
classroom norms. More specifically that all students will get a
chance to talk and that each person is listening intently to what
the other is saying.

(14 minutes)


Closing summary for the lesson

Wow friends, you have done a lot of work with letters and their
sounds today! Can you turn back to your partner and tell them
one thing that you have learned today? What you tell them can
also be something you learned during my blending activity at
centers today? (Give time) Okay, turn back in three, two, one.
Raise your hand and tell me what you learned?

I will have as many friends share as time allows. I will connect
their responses with prior lesson as well as future ones. For
example, if a student says they learned how to blend the word /b/
/a/ /t/ I will say, Yes, you took the three sounds in the word bat
and blended it together to read bat. This is an important skill to be
able to read. You will be blending a lot sounds to figure out
words! When I hear from the students what they learned I can
gauge what stuck and what didnt.

(3 minutes)


Transition to next learning activity

After the lesson I will tell the students to line up for Best Fit
Group.
difference between the words
with the /a/ in the beginning and
the middle.

-Giving them time to think and
them share their answer will
hopefully eliminate peers giving
away answers.

-I will join in on the conversation
with specific pairs who I think
need extra support during turn
and talk.





-I can paraphrase what a student
says if they are having trouble
putting into words what they
have learned.



Assessment

During the lesson I will be taking anecdotal records on the
students. During the center activity I will specifically be looking
for the strategies students use to blend the letter sounds
together. I want to know if they can take the sounds that I say,
remember them, and be able to put it together. During the
Reading Street material I will make observations on what
children are participating. If I notice that specific children are
not then I will speak with them after the lesson. In addition,
when I listen in on conversations during partner talk I will listen
to see that they give both an example of an initial /a/ word and a
medial /a/ word. I will make notes on what words they choose.
Academic, Social, and/or
Linguistic Support during
assessment



-During the share time I will try
to plant myself near students
who I know have a harder time
with letter sounds. However, I
want to hear other students

I will use these anecdotal records and observations to guide my
teaching for the rest of the unit. It may be that I need to ask my
mentor teacher if I can plan another center in case students are
needing more practice in a particular area.




conversations.

Reflection After teaching each lesson, write a Book Club Blog
Posting discussing the following:
What students learned and which students struggled with the
lesson.
What are alternate reads of your students performance or
products?
What did you learn about your students literacy practices that
extend beyond your objectives?
When and how will you re-teach the material to students who
need additional support?
If you were to teach this same lesson again, what would you
do differently and how do you think the changes would
improve students learning?
What did you learn so far about implementing your core
practice and what do you need to do to continue your
professional learning?



Inquiry Two
Part B: Teaching Overview
Please label your file with your last name (example: SmithPartBTeachingOverview.docx)


Name: _Maria Yassick_____________________________ Grade Level:
_Kindergarten__________

School: _Cornell Elementary_________________ MT: __Amy
Petersburg___________________

1. Describe your target area for guided lead teaching:
During my literacy unit I will be focusing on phonics and phonological awareness. We will focus
on letters and their sounds as well as blending, finding the number of syllables in words, and
finding rhyming words. The core practice that I am working towards is making instruction explicit
and authentic.

2. List the main Common Core State Standard(s) that this unit will work toward.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1b Recognize that spoken words are represented in written
language by specific sequences of letters

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2 Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds
(phonemes).
o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a Recognize and produce rhyming words.
o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2b Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.
o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2c Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken
words.
o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2d Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds
(phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.
1
(This does not
include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)
o CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3a Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound
correspondences by producing the primary sound or many of the most frequent sounds for each
consonant.
o .

3. List a small set of well chosen objectives for the unit. Label each objective with a
number so you can easily list the objective(s) for each day in the table below

3. Students will determine whether or not a word has an initial or medial /a/ sound in a small
group setting and individually. They must determine 4/5 correct to be proficient.
4. Students will explain that the sound /a/ corresponds to the letters A and a in a small
group setting.
5. Students will state at least two words that have the initial or final /s/. They will be given
options.
6. Students will explain that the sound /s/ corresponds to the letters S and s out loud in a
small group setting.
7. Students will find at least 2 rhyming words from a given word and explain why it is a
rhyming word in a small group setting and individually.
8. Students will blend at least two CVC words together in a one on one setting.
9. Students will determine how many syllables are at least 4/5 words in a small group
setting and individually.


4. Provide a rationale for why your overall goals and your specific objectives are important
and worthwhile content or skills to learn, and how they are relevant to your students
lives.

The overall goals and objectives I have come up with are under the umbrella of phonological
awareness and thus phonics as well. These skills are foundational and children need them to be
able to learn how to read and write. For example, without knowing that a word is made up letters
and each letter has a sound, a child is not going to be able to blend and decode and thus will
struggle reading. If a child does not know how to read it not only negatively affects their
experience in school, but out as well. Reading is everywhere and being a literate person is an
important skill to strive as a modern day citizen.

Again, these skills are relevant to their lives now because they see print all around them. There is
print in their classrooms, homes, and community. For example, if they want to know the choices
on the childrens menu at a restaurant they need to know what the letters are, what sounds they
make, and be able to blend those sounds together.

5. List the main assessment(s) you will use to determine if your students meet your unit
objectives for the unit

Observation: Throughout my unit I will do a lot of observations. Many of my lessons will
incorporate the entire class. In other words, everyone will be participating or contributing
to the lesson. If I notice that a student is not contributing many because they are not
meeting the learning objectives I will make not of it in my observation notes.
Anecdotal Records: When I am teaching part of my lesson during literacy centers I will
have the opportunity to take anecdotal records on specific children. When they are in this
small group setting it will be easy for me to ask them a question that quickly assesses
whether or not they are meeting my listed objectives.
Checklists: At the end of the day my students have free choice time. During this time I
could pull students over to a table and ask them specific questions. If they answer those
questions correctly I could mark it with a check. This would be a quick and easy way for
me to go down the list to see who needs extra support. In addition, checklists can be
used

6. Indicate with an asterisk (*) which lessons will require your explicit attention in planning
and teaching to develop the core practice you identified for your professional learning.
7. Describe what you will do to provide differentiated instruction in one area (content,
processes or products), and explain how that choice appropriately meets some of your
students learning needs
The way in which I will provide differentiated instruction is the processes. I am including both
small group (centers) and large group activities for each lesson that I teach. The small group
atmosphere will help both struggling and advanced learners. If I need to work with a child one-on-
one a little more then I am able to do so during a small group setting. I can also cater to the
needs to students who need extensions during this time because I am able ask them the more in
depth discussion questions and have them explain their thinking behind what they are doing. The
large group discussion is also good for both learners. For the struggling students it reinforces the
skills they are leaning and gives them the backup and support from their peers. For the advanced
students the large group setting is a change of pace and keeps them engaged.

List the following
for each lesson
Lesson
Focus/Topic
Objective # that
is the focus of
this lesson

Instructional
Format (e.g., mini-
lesson followed by a
group activity)
Ongoing
Assessment:
what will you look for
as you teach, and
how will you use that
information to plan
your next lesson?
Teaching Notes: jot
down topics, resources or
tasks you want to make
sure you incorporate into
your lesson as you
develop your plans such
as introducing centers
that day, or making sure
you provide an anchor
chart on predictions, or
what you will focus on to
develop your core
practice

Day 1:
10-28-13
Initial /a/ sound
Objective #1 & 2
Center:
-Students will
complete an activity
that allows them to
practice working with
the initial /a/ sound.
-When they come to
the center they will
be in groups of
about four and five.
-I will hold up the
uppercase A and
say, What letter is
this?
-I will hold up the
lowercase a and
-As I teach this
lesson I will make
sure that students are
understanding the
difference between
the /a/ sound and the
sound the letter
makes when you say
A (like ay). I notice
that students in my
class tend to get
confused between
the letter sound and
the letter-name
sound.

-If the children are having
a hard time coming up
with their own words you
can help them by showing
them the Reading Street
picture cards.



-For centers you will need
laminated charts (5 count)
and a diverse set of
pictured cards.
say, What letter is
this?
-We will talk about
how they are the
same and how they
are different.
-We will then draw
the letters in the air
with our magic
pencil fingers.
-I will begin by
passing out a T
chart and explaining
the chart. I will say
that the chart has a
side for words that
begin with the /a/
sound or start with
the letter Aa and a
side for words that
start with a different
letter sound. I will
say that we will each
take turns choosing
a picture card and
determining whether
it does in the /a/
column and which
goes in the other
column.
-Next I will put the
cards in the middle
of the table face
down.
-As children choose
a card I will have
them say the word
out loud. After they
choose I will ask the
other students to say
the word out loud
and tell me if they
agree.

Challenge:
What is the final
sound in the word
printed on the
picture?

**Reading Street:
-To start the lesson I
will hold up a large
card of the letter A
and ask the students
which letter it is. I
-I will also make sure
they are choosing
words that begin with
the initial /a/ sound. It
is important that they
are hearing it
correctly in the words
they speak.

-Lastly, I will make
sure they know the
difference between
the lowercase a and
the uppercase A.
This is important
when students begin
to write more.

-If the students have
not mastered the
initial /a/ sound then
they are not ready to
move onto the medial
/a/ sound.
































will hold up a card
with a lowercase a
and again ask them
what letter it is.
-Together we will
say the /a/ sound.
-I will then have the
students turn to their
neighbor to tell them
different words that
start with the /a/
sound. I will have
them turn back and
have a partner tell
me something that
their other partner
said. As they list
words I will write
them on the Smart
Board.
-From there I will
give the students
words and they will
tell me if the word
begins with the /a/
sound or not.

Challenge:
Have the students
share more than just
one word with their
partner that starts
with the /a/ sound.
(There are not that
many words).









-To allow me to know
whether they are able
to determine whether
a word starts with the
/a/ sound I will give
them a green
popsicle stick and a
red popsicle stick. If
they think the word
begins with the /a/
sound then they hold
up the green stick.
Day 2:
10-29-30
Medial /a/ sound
Objective # 1 & 5
Center:
-We will engage in a
smart board activity.
-The smart board
will have three dice
on the screen. When
you tap on the dice
they move to find a
new letter. We will
keep the medial a
in the word constant,
but spin the other
dice to form new
words.
-We will talk about
how the sound in the
middle is always /a/.

Challenge:
I will give students




-This will be a good
pre-assessment for
the next lesson
because I am working
on blending. I am
looking to see if they
keep the medial
sound to always be
/a/. If I notice they are
having trouble
blending I will need to
do more of a
review/simplification
tomorrow.


I need to make sure I
have the Smart Board
lessons made and
running before I start my
lesson because they can
be very confusing to pull
up from the computer to
the Smart Board!

time to try to blend
the word together
before helping them.

Reading Street:

-**During Reading
Street we will talk
about the at, -ap,
and ag word
families. We will
come up with a list
of all the words in
those families.
Therefore we will be
coming up with
rhyme words.

-After that I will
discuss with the
students the pattern
they find in all the
words, namely that
they all have the
medial /a/ sound.

Challenge:
If time allows I can
change the a in one
of the word families
and ask the students
how the word would
change.

-I will look to see if
they are able to come
up with some of the
words in the word
families on their own.
This will show me
their rhyming ability.




-If the students are
able to connect the
similarities in the
word families it tells
me that they learned
from the literacy
center. If they do not
understand I will have
to do more work with
the medial sound; this
is especially true
because it will be so
new.
Day 3:
10-30-13
Blending
Objective #6
**Center:
-The students will
engage in an activity
that allows them to
practice blending
CVC words together.
All of the words will
have an a in the
middle to practice
medial /a/.
-First I will show the
students the
blending wheel. The
blending wheel is a
piece of paper
(reinforced with card
stock) that has
different three letter
pictures around the
outer edge.
-After that I will
explain what
-As I teach this center
I will see that
students are able to
blend the sounds I
say to find the three
letter word.















-I will observe the
-I will make sure to
explain to the students
during center that
segmenting and blending
is very important for when
they read. I will ask them
why and we will discuss
that you can segment and
blend words in a story.


-For the center and
activity I will need:
the blending circles and
green and red popsicle
sticks
segmenting and
blending is.
-Next I will explain
the activity. I will tell
them that I will be
segmenting words.
Their job is to blend
the sounds they
hear to figure out the
word I am
segmenting. Once
they figure out the
word they find the
corresponding
picture and cover it
up with a clothes
pin.
-I will then start the
game as long as
none of the children
have questions.
-I will have the
words printed so I
know which words to
segment.
-After I have
segmented a word
and they have
chosen the
corresponding
picture I will show
them what the word
looks like to
reinforce the letter-
sound connection.

Challenge:
I will ask the
students to segment
a three letter word
with the letter a in
the middle, the other
students will try to
guess.


Reading Street:
-I will start by
explaining that the
/a/ sound does not
have to be at the
beginning of the
word.
-Next I will have
students listen to
three words and
children to make sure
they are
understanding what I
am saying about
segmenting and
blending.


-If I notice they are
having trouble
blending I will make
sure to go over it
again during large
group for the
remainder of my
lessons. I know it
takes a lot of practice!























-Like the initial /a/, I
will give the students
the green and red
popsicle sticks.
Based on what color
they hold up I will be
able to determine if
they are able to hear
the medial /a/ sound.
If many do not I may
have to give more
examples with a more
in depth explanation.



determine where the
/a/ sound is.
-After that the
students will turn
and talk to their
partner to come up
with more words
where the /a/ sound
is in the middle.
-Next I will give them
some of my own
words and they are
to determine
whether the /a/
sound is in the
middle or another
sound.
-Challenge: I will
have students come
up with more
examples of the /a/
either at the
beginning or the
middle of the word
and have them ask
the class where it is.
-**Next we will play
a blending game. I
will segment a word
with the /a/ sound in
the middle. They are
to listen to my
segmentation and
blend the word
together.

I will be able to listen
and observe whether
they are blending the
correct word that I
segment.






Day 4:
10-31-13
Syllables
Objective # 7


**Center:
-The center activity I
have planned today
will allow students to
practice breaking
words into syllables.
-I will have their
pictures from the
first day of school as
well as their name
card.
-First I will go around
the table and ask the
students to figure
out how many
syllables are in their
name. We will clap
those out together.
-Next I will hold up
the name card. As

















-We have a lot of
names that start with
A in our classroom,


-This develops my core
practice because having
the students use their
names to find syllables is
an authentic and
meaningful activity.

-I will need to get all the
students names together
as well as their pictures. I
will also need to pull up
the song before I start the
lesson so it is loaded.


Notes:
Pound their palm and use
finger poppers to count
group they will figure
out whose name it is
based on the first
letter. If they are
having trouble I will
show them the
corresponding
picture.
-After they have
figured out the name
we will clap (or do
another noisy
gesture) to figure out
the number of
syllables in each
persons name.

Challenge:
The students have
to think find the
largest number of
syllables in the
names we have in
our classroom. They
could also think of
other names they
know at the end of
the game to see if
that name has a lot.




Reading Street:
-During this time I
will review the letter
T and its sound.
-I will review the
actual letter and how
it is formed. We will
practice with our
magic pencil fingers.
-We will discuss that
T makes the sound
t.
-Next I will play a
little game. If I say a
word that starts with
the /t/ sound then
they point to the left
and if I say a word
that ends with the /t/
sound then they
point to the right.
-I will end the lesson
by playing a song
it will be interesting to
see if some students
notice that they dont
all have the short /a/
sound.

-During this center I
will look to make the
sure the students
stop when we are
done clapping each
students name. If
they are doing more
or less clapping them
that may mean they
are not finding the
correct number of
syllables.






-I will be able to
observe whether or
not students are
pointing in the correct
direction. For
students who are
having trouble I can
create a center that
works more on the /t/
sound because it may
mean that they did
not learn it the first
week it was
introduced.
the syllables.






































For the activity that they
are pointing, I will have a
visual prepared to remind
them where to point.
with lots of words
that start with the
letter t. When they
hear the /t/ sound
they are to clap.

Challenge: If they
hear a word with the
final /t/ sound in the
song they can tug
their ear lobe.


Day 5:
My Skills Buddy
Objective #
Center:
-To reinforce the
centers and lessons
we have done
throughout the week
I will go through the
My Skills Buddy
workbook. This
workbook looks at
the letters we have
learned during
Reading Street,
initial and medial
letter sounds, and
syllables.
-I will ask questions
to individuals and to
the group.

Challenge: I will ask
more challenging
questions to
students who need
an extension.

Reading Street:
-Today I will sum up
all of the things we
have done with the
letter /a/.
-To start the lesson I
will have the
students turn to a
partner and tell them
one word that starts
with the /a/ sound
and one word that
has the /a/ sound in
the middle.
-After that I will pull
up one of the My
Skill Buddy pages
on the Smart Board.


-If a student is unable
to answer a question
that I ask them during
the center I know that
it is a skill they need
more practice on. In
that instance I will
review that material
with the entire small
group. I may have
another child explain
some things to
solidify their
understanding.


-If students dont
come up with /a/
words during their
turn and talk I could
give them two
different options for
words. For example,
Does the word apple
or bear start with the
/a/ sound? I will also
know to do more
review in my lessons
to come if they
cannot pick between
the two words I give
them.
-I will need to pull the five
My Skills Buddy books
out for centers.




















-Make sure the Smart
Board picture is pulled up
from the shared file
before the lesson.
We will look at the
picture as a class
and circle things that
start with the /a/
sound or have the
medial /a/ sound.
-To end the lesson
we will listen to a
song and slap every
time we hear the /a/
sound at the
beginning of a word
or in the middle of a
word.
Day 6:
Initial /s/
Objective #
Center:
-The center activity I
have planned for
today helps the
students learn the
initial /s/ sound as
well as other sounds
they learned during
previous weeks.
-I will begin by
showing them an
uppercase and
lowercase S and
having them
determine what
letter it is.
-**For the activity,
children get a letter
and have to come
up with words that
start with that letter
sound so other
children guess the
letter they were
given.

Challenge: The
students can figure
out words that ends
with the sound of the
letter they were
given (as long as
they specify this to
the rest of the
group).

Reading Street:
-First I will hold up
three different letters
(A, S, and T) and
ask the students to
find the S.


-I will observe two
things. The first is to
see whether or not
they can identify the
letter they were given
and the second is to
listen to the words
they come up with
that they believe start
with the letter sound.
If they are unable to
come up with the
words then I will help
them by saying, /t/ /t/
/t/can you think of a
word that starts with
that sound? I will
also know to review
letters and their
sounds in another
center.



-I will be able to tell
that they can identify
the three letters. If
they cannot I know I
may need more
practice, possibly
morning work, to
continue building that
skill.



-I will be able to see
whether they can find
pictures on the page
that start with the
-I will need the Reading
Street letter and word
cards.
-I will also need smaller
letter cards for the center,
the poem Sally Sells
Seashells by the
Seashore, and the
Reading Street smart
board lessons up and
loaded.
-After that we will
talk about what
sound the letter S
makes.
-**Next we will turn
and talk with our
neighbor and talk
about words that
begin with the letter
S.
-After that we will
pull up the page
from the My Skills
Buddy book and
find as many words
as we can that start
with the /s/ sound.
-We will end the
poem Sally sells
seashells by the
seashore. The
students will look for
the initial /s/ sound.
When they hear the
initial /s/ they will
hold up their green
popsicle stick.
initial /s/ sound.



-I will be able to see if
they are holding up
the green popsicle
stick at the correct
time. If a student
holds up their stick at
the wrong time
Day 7:
Final /s/ and more
blending
Objective #
Center:
There will be no
literacy centers at all
today because we
will be going to the
computer lab.

Reading Street:
-We will begin by
going over some
words that begin
with the /s/ sound.
-After that we will
blend some words
together that contain
the /s/ sound like
sat, Sam, and sit.
-Next we will listen
to the Sally Sells
Seashells poem
again, but the
students will hold up
their green popsicle
stick when they hear
the finale /s/ sound
in a word.












-As the students are
blending the words
together I will make
sure they are all
participating.


-I will also be able to
watch to see if they
are holding up their
popsicle sticks at the
correct time.

Day 8:
Rhyming
Center:
-To reinforce
-I will be able to
observe the students
-I will need to borrow this
game from a cooperating
Objective # rhyming, I will play a
game from the
FCRR.
-I will explain that
the game is a lot like
Go Fish. If they do
not know how to
play Go Fish I will go
into detail about the
rules.
-I will split the
children at the
center up into pairs.
Each pair will
receive a deck of
cards. The student
proceeds by asking
their partner a
question such as,
Do you have any
cards that rhyme
with duck? The
player then looks at
their hand to see if
they have anything
the rhymes with
duck.
-Before I pass out
the cards I will go
through a few words
to make sure they
are all familiar with
rhyming.
-I will end the game
by going through
each pair to see
what rhymes they
found.

Challenge: I will ask
the students to come
up with more words
that rhyme with the
pair they found.

**Reading Street:
-To start off Reading
Street we will talk
about the difference
between the initial
/s/ sound and the
final /s/ sound.
-After that I will say
various words and
the students can
determine whether
hand their partner
words that rhyme with
the word they asked
about. It will be
interesting to see how
the pairs work
together and
determine which pairs
of cards actually
rhyme.




























-So I can see their
own thinking I will
give them two words
like bats and swim
and ask them if they
notice anything about
these words. This will
help so they are
involved in the
discussion and it is
not me saying that
the /s/ sound can
come at the
beginning or ending
of words. It will be
interesting to see
which students make
the claim that the /s/
teacher. Look at the
pictures before hand to
make sure the picture on
the card can be easily
determined.
or not the final
sound in the word
makes /s/.
-Next I will have the
students turn to their
partner and come up
with more words that
end with /s/.
-After that we will
blend words
together that have
the /s/ sound at the
beginning.
-I will stress that
everyone does
everything because
we are team
Petersburg!
sound can be in the
middle of words as
well.


-The students who
dont participate after
I say this may be
confused. I may pull
them during choice
time to get a better
understanding of their
skill level with
blending.

























Day 9:
Word Muncher with
initial, medial, and
final /a/ & /s/
Objective #
Center:
-For the word
muncher center I will
focus on the initial,
medial, and final /a/
& /s/ sounds.
-The word muncher
is a small trash can
or Pringles
container. The
muncher likes to eat
certain words at
certain times.
-I will explain to the
children that they will
be feeding the word

-I will look to see
what their non-verbal
is when I ask them to
find a word to feed
the muncher. Do they
mouth words? Do
they pick right away?
Are they really
thinking? To better
understand their
thinking I may ask
them, How did you
know that was what
the muncher wanted
to eat?

-I will need to create the
word muncher as well as
the cards.
muncher certain
words. I will give
them example by
saying, The word
muncher is hungry
for a word with the
initial /a/ sound,
would I feed him this
apple (hold up
picture) or this snake
(hold up picture).
-After I give an
example or two I will
tell the students that
they will be finding
the words to feed
the muncher.
-I will place six
pictures in the
middle of the table.
Taking turns I will tell
an individual student
what the muncher is
craving and that
student will choose
which picture works.
-To make sure
everyone is involved
ask the students
who turn is not up to
give me a thumbs up
or thumbs down if
their peer has
chosen the right
word to give the
word muncher.

Challenge: For the
students whom I feel
can handle an
extension I will ask
harder questions
such as: the
muncher wants a
word that is
segmented /b/ /a/ /t/
or a word that has
the medial /a/ sound.


Reading Street:
-This portion of the
lesson will be a
review. We will go
back and look at the
/a/, /t/, and /m/


































-I want to observe
how quickly these
letters and their
sounds come back to
them. I will watch to
see that all are
participating.









sounds.
-We will come up
with words that have
the initial and final
sounds of the letters
a, t, and m.
-After that we will
blend words
together that have
these letters.
Day 10:
Review
Objective #
Summative
Assessment:
So that I can see the
childrens progress
over the course of
my unit, I will be
giving a summative
assessment. I will
assess each student
individually so I have
a more accurate
picture of who
understands. For
each of my
objectives, I will ask
one questions. For
example, I will hold
up a picture of the
letter A and ask
them to identify the
letter and tell me
what sound it
makes. I will have
them blend words,
clap syllables, and
produce rhyming
words.





-Based on my
observation of the
students during this
assessment and the
actual assessment I
will determine which
children need more
support. I will use the
information to reform
my teaching and
come up with a few
more centers if
necessary to review a
certain objective.


-I will ask my mentor
teacher about the
assessments she uses for
each Reading Street unit.
I will take ideas from
there, but will also come
up with my own
questions.


Part D: Make a Unit Assessment Plan: Whole Class
(due prior to beginning your unit teaching)



While I will be assessing individual students it is important that I come up with a
way to assess my entire unit. I will do this by collecting all the informal and formal
assessments I use for each individual lesson and compile it to assess myself and my
unit as a whole. For each lesson I will utilize one of the assessment strategies I talked
about during part B of the lesson plan. The informal assessments are: observation,
anecdotal records, and checklists. At the end of each day I will reflect on these
assessments and on my teaching. I will make changes to upcoming lessons during my
unit based on these daily reflections.
At the end of the unit I will give a summative assessment. If 90% of the students
score proficient on this assessment I believe I will meet proficient for meeting all of my
objectives for my unit. When I am checking the summative assessment I will compare
questions in that assessment to the daily lesson assessment for specific students. For
example, say that after looking over my observation for my lesson on rhyming words I
see that child N could not rhyme any words. During my unit I will make changes to help
that child master the objective of producing rhyming words. Therefore, when I reflect on
my summative assessment I will specifically look at child Ns answers for the question
that pertains to rhyming to see if my changes during my unit teaching worked for that
child. This type of reflection on my assessments will be able to help me determine
whether I have been affectively teaching my students.