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Chapter 9 and 10 Middle Ages Part I: Charlemagne

Chapter 9 and 10 Middle Ages Part I: Charlemagne

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Published by: David Duez on Nov 13, 2009
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11/13/2009

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Visigoth Migration

Pushed out of Asia By the Huns

Fall of Rome

The New Germanic Kingdoms
• Germanic peoples began moving into Roman territory by the third century. ⇓

• The Visigoths occupied Spain and Italy until the Ostrogoths took control of Italy in the fifth century. ⇓
• By 500 the Western Roman Empire had become a number of states ruled by German kings. ⇓
• Although these kingdoms kept the Roman governmental structure, Germanic warriors dominated the native populations and eventually excluded 285–287) (pages Romans from holding power.

The New Germanic Kingdoms (cont.)
• The only German kingdom to last long was the Franks. ⇓

• Clovis, who converted to Christianity Clovis around 500, established the Frankish kingdom. ⇓
• Clovis had resisted the pleas of his wife to convert, but during a battle that was going badly he called on Jesus, promising to believe and be baptized if Jesus came to his aid. ⇓ • After his plea, the enemy fled and Clovis converted.
(pages 285–287)

Video: The European Shift … to countryside

Charlemagne and the Carolingians

• In the 600s and 700s, the Frankish kings lost their power to the chief officers of the king’s household.⇓ • Charles the Great, or Charlemagne, became one of history’s greatest kings. ⇓
• Charlemagne was curious, driven, and intelligent. ⇓ • He was a strong warrior and statesman, and a devout Christian. ⇓ • Although possibly unable to write, he strongly supported learning.
(pages 289–290)

Charlemagne: King of the Franks

Charlemagne and the Carolingians (cont.)

• Charlemagne’s desire to promote learning led to what has been called the Carolingian Renaissance (rebirth). ⇓
• There was renewed interest in Latin culture and classical works–works of the Greeks and Romans.

• Benedictine monks copied Christian and classical Latin manuscripts in scriptoria, scriptoria or writing rooms. ⇓
• Most of the Roman works we have today exist because Carolingian monks copied them. (pages 289–290)

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