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Peace Corps Working with Youth: Approaches For Volunteers | 2002 (Reprint July 2010) M00067 Part 1 of 2

Peace Corps Working with Youth: Approaches For Volunteers | 2002 (Reprint July 2010) M00067 Part 1 of 2

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Peace Corps Working with Youth: Approaches For Volunteers | 2010 M00067

Working With Youth Part 1
Peace Corps Working with Youth: Approaches For Volunteers | 2010 M00067

Working With Youth Part 1

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Accessible Journal Media Peace Corps Docs on May 20, 2014
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09/23/2014

An important contribution to our understanding of assets building is being
made by the Search Institute of Minneapolis, Minnesota. From 1989 to 1999,
it surveyed over a million youth in the United States. It has identifed 40 de-
velopmental assets that correlate with positive outcomes for young men and
women, here grouped into eight asset types :

ASSET TYPES

External

Internal

1. Support

5. Commitment to Learning

2. Empowerment

6. Positive Values

3. Boundaries & Expectations

7. Social Competencies

4. Constructive Use of Time

8. Positive Identity

Asset types 1-4 are external. The external assets are located in the environ-
ment in which a young person grows up. They include the opportunities and
relationships provided to young people by their families, schools, or communi-
ties during their childhood and adolescence. Asset types 5-8 are internal. The
four internal asset types are the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that healthy
individuals develop in the course of their childhood and adolescence.

We know that the similarities of youth needs and issues the world over are
much greater than their differences. With appropriate care in its application,
we can look to this research-based framework for important insights into the
work Volunteers do. In the next section, we describe the asset types based on the
research, share some examples of how Volunteers have worked with communi-
ties to strengthen and build on the assets available, and offer some suggestions
to consider when planning work with young people in your community.

After reading the descriptions of the different asset types, you may wish to
use the “Youth Development Assets in Your Community” tool on page 81 to
determine the specifc developmental assets that are appropriate to support
each asset type in your host culture. Discuss with your Counterpart and your
APCD how to use the asset-type framework to support the goals and objectives
of your project plan.

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