Algebra II Topic: Linear Equations  

By: Travis, Nano, Natasha, Jess, and Emily V. 
 
Definitions: 
1) A linear equation is an algebraic expression representing a line with a constant slope. Linear equations 
can have one or more variables and do not include exponents; these equations appear in many forms, six 
of them being: 
● Slope­intercept Form: Y= mx+b 
● Horizontal Line: Y= b 
● Vertical Line: X= a 
● Standard Form: Ax + By= C 
● Point Slope Form: Y
2
­Y
1
= m (X
2
­X
1

● Intercept Form: x/a + y/b= 1 
 
2) A linear equation is an equation for a straight line in which each term is either a constant or the product 
of a constant and (the first power of) a single variable. 
 
3) A linear equation is an equation that makes a straight line when it’s graphed after written in the form of 
y=mx+b where y corresponds to the y­axis with respective values of x and b. M corresponds to the slope 
of the line and b relates to the y­intercept. There are many forms for linear equations.  The line or slope is 
made up of multiple points. 
 
4) Linear equations, or linear functions are functions whose graphs are straight lines (Shmoop). 
 
1 Linear Equations 
Professions: 
● Construction and Remodeling 
● Managerial 
● Financial 
● Computer Scientist 
● Administrative 
● Construction 
● Health Care 
● Math Teacher 
● Advertising/Marketing 
● Engineering 
● Taxi Cab Driver 
● Chef 
● Structural Engineer 
● Architecture 
● Business 
● Biological Scientist 
● Physicist and Astronomer 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2 Linear Equations 
Examples: 
 
Example 1: Taxi Drivers 
Average taxi fare in Denver, Colorado is $2.25 per mile with a $2.50 service charge. How much money 
would you be charged if you were to take the taxi seven miles? (“Taxi Fare Finder”) 
 
Solution: 
(x=Number of Miles) 
y = 2.25x + 2.50 
y = 2.25(7) + 2.50 
y = 15.75 + 2.50 
y = 18.25 
 
Example 2: Train Stations 
The Bart train in San Francisco costs $10 per person (x) for a one way train ride. How much would it cost 
if 5 people went on Bart for 2 round trips? (“BART Bay Area Rapid Transit”) 
 
Solution: 
(x=Number of People) 
y= 4 (10x) 
y= 4 (10(5)) 
y= 200 
 
 
3 Linear Equations 
 
 
Example 3: Civil Engineering  
System of equations is utilized in civil engineering to figure the internal pressure of a vessel limited to its 
internal pressure by its structural material. Using internal and external radii “a” and “b”, the yield strength 
of the structural material, and the radius of the whole vessel the internal pressure of the vessel can be 
figured. As an example the following problem will be shown taken from Autar Kaw (Kaw).  
A pressure vessel can only be subjected to an amount of internal pressure that is limited by the 
strength of material used. For example, take a pressure vessel of internal radius of a 5" and outer 
radius, b 8" , made of ASTM 36 steel (yield strength of ASTM 36 steel is 36 ksi). How much internal 
pressure can this pressure vessel take before it is considered to have failed? 
 
Assuming a factor of safety of 2, while the yield strength is given as 36 ksi, 
Additionally simultaneous  linear equations can be used to figure the maximum internal pressure of a 
vessel in comparison to the ring flex of the vessel. Companies such as the American iron and steel institute 
use simultaneous linear equations such as the hoop stress formula ( σ = PD/2t ) and ring stress formula ( 
D/t = 2S/P ), when compiling design standards for both their materials and vessel designs ("Welded Steel 
Pipe Design Manual 2007 Edition").  
 
4 Linear Equations 
 
Example 4:Financial Manager  
A Financial Manager of Securities and Commodity makes $88.71 per hour. The Financial Manager of 
Sound Recording makes $74.84 per hour. If the Financial Manager of Security and Commodity works 40 
hours a week, how many hours would the Financial Manager of Sound Recording have to work to make 
the same pay as the Financial Manager of Security and Commodity ( "Compare Financial Managers 
Salary and Wages")( “Do Salaried Employees Get Paid Overtime?")? 
 
Solution: 
y=mx+b 
($88.71)(40) = 3,548.4 
3,548.4/74.84 = 47.4 = 47 hours and 25 minutes 
 
Example 5: Chef  
A chef at a restaurant wants to increase a recipe for peach pie by seven times and needs to know how 
many 16 oz. cans of peaches are needed for the filling. If the original recipe had two 16 oz. cans of 
peaches, how many will be necessary to complete the pie the chef wants to make (Moseley)? 
Solution: (x= (2) (16 oz. can of peaches)) 
y=7x 
y = 7 ((2)(16 oz. can of peaches)) 
y = 14 cans (16 oz.) of peaches 
 
The chef would have to use 14 cans (16 oz.) of peaches in order to bake the pie. 
5 Linear Equations 
Skills Needed in Order to Solve Linear Equations 
 
In order to understand and solve linear equations, basic concepts such as multiplication, division, 
subtraction, and addition must be fully understood. Once these basic concepts are understood, four more 
complex concepts are needed to correctly solve equations; these concepts being multiplication, division, 
subtraction, and addition properties of equality.  Addition and subtraction properties refer to adding and 
subtracting the same number on each side of the equation when solving a linear equation first. 
Multiplication and division properties refer to multiplying and dividing by the same non­zero numbers on 
both sides of the equation when solving a linear equation would be the next step.  
As you move further into linear equations, you will have to understand how to complete multi­step 
problems. In addition to this you will also need to know how to combine like terms. For example, for 
solving the equation: 4x= 7x +9, you would first need to subtract the 7x from both sides in order to combine 
like terms: ­3x=9; you would then proceed to divide both sides by ­3, then you have your answer: x = ­3. 
This would be an example of a multi­step problem (“Seventh Grade Math Skills”) 
In order to succeed in solving a linear equation, you will also need to know how to work with 
tables. Linear equations have plenty to do with graphing. If you want to plot points you need to know how 
to plug numbers into an equation and then put the outcomes in a table. For example, if you are trying to 
plot a line on a graph: y=2x+3, you can plug numbers into your equation (x) and place the results in a table: 
 
x  ­2  ­1  0  1  2 
y  ­1  1  3  5  7 
 
My final outcome would look like this:  
6 Linear Equations 
  
 
In addition to these concepts, one must have a grasp on variables. Variables are letters that are 
used to represent one or more numbers; these letters are what are solved for when solving a linear 
equation. For example: solving the equation 4x + 9 = 21, you must first subtract 9 from both sides. Your 
answer will be  4x = 12,  then proceed to divide both sides by 4. From there you will get your answer  x = 
3 (Ron, Boswell, Kanold, Stiff). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Works Cited 
7 Linear Equations 
Animal Planet CARNIVORES: The Lion's Body. Web. 24 Apr. 2013.   
     <http://animal.discovery.com/mammals/lion­info1.htm>. 
BART Bay area rapid transit. 2013. Web. 24 Apr. 2013.  
     <http://www.bart.gov/index.aspx>. 
"Compare Financial Managers Salary and Wages." Web. 26 Apr. 2013. 
     <www.findthedata.org>  
Do Salaried Employees Get Paid Overtime?" Small Business. Web. 26 Apr. 2013.   
     <http://smallbusiness.chron.com/salaried­employees­paid­overtime­10955.html> 
icoachmath.com. 2011. Web. 10 Apr. 2013.  
     <http://www.icoachmath.com/math_dictionary/Linear_Equation.html>. 
Kaw, Autar. "Physical Problem for Simultaneous Linear Equations Civil Engineering." Chapter  
     04.00C. Holistic Numerical Methods, 23 Dec. 2009. Web. 11 Apr. 2013.   
     <mathforcollege.com/nm/mws/civ/04sle/mws_civ_sle_phy_problem.pdf> 
Larson Ron, Laurie Boswell, Timothy D. Kanold, and Lee Siff. Algebra 2. Evanstone: McDougal   
     Littell,   2007. 18, 11. pag. Print. 
"Linear Equations." Linear Equations. Web. 23 Apr. 2013.   
     <http://www.mathsisfun.com/algebra/linear­equations.html> 
“Linear Functions and Equations”. Shmoop Editorial Team. Shmoop.com. Shmoop   
     University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 03 Mar. 2014   
     <http://www.shmoop.com/functions/linear­functions­equations.html> 
 math.com. 2000. Web. 10 Apr. 2013.   
     <http://www.math.com/school/subject2/lessons/S2U4L3GL.html>. 
Math is fun. Rod Pierce. Feb. 2013. Web. 10 Apr. 2013. 
     <http://www.mathsisfun.com/index.htm>. 
8 Linear Equations 
 McKinney, Daene C. "Linear Equations." Numerical Methods for Civil Engineers. Department of   
     Civil, Architectural and Environme, 8 Feb. 2009. Web. 10 Apr. 2013.   
    <http://www.ce.utexas.edu/prof/mckinney/ce311k/handouts/Linear_Equations.pdf> 
Moseley, Erin. "What Jobs Require the Use of Linear Equations?" EHow. Demand. Media, 05   
     May 2010. Web. 06 Mar. 2014.   
     <http://www.ehow.com/list_6060294_careers­use­linear­equations_.html> 
"SECTION 1­1 Linear Equations and Applications." McGraw Hill Education Textbook reference .   
     McGraw Hill Education, n.d. Web. 10 Apr. 2013.     
<http://www.mhhe.com/math/precalc/barnettpc5/graphics/barnett05pcfg/ch01/others/bpc5_ch01­01.pdf

“Seventh Grade Math Concepts”. IXL.Web. 05 Mar. 2014. 
     <http://www.ixl.com/math/grade­7> 
"TaxiFareFinder: US Taxi Cab Rate Ranking Chart ­ Sample Fares." TaxiFareFinder: US Taxi   
     Cab Rate Ranking Chart ­ Sample Fares. Web. 18 Apr. 2013.  
     <http://www.taxifarefinder.com/rates.php> 
"Welded Steel Pipe Design Manual 2007 Edition." American Iron and Steel Institute, 2007. Web. 24   
     Apr.2013. 
     <http://www.steeltank.com/Portals/0/pubs/Welded%20Steel%20Pipe%2010.10.07.pdf>. 
xp math . A Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001. Web. 10 Apr. 2013.   
     <http://www.xpmath.com/careers/topicsresult.php?subjectID=2&topicID=8>. 
9 Linear Equations