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HSC Exam

Preparation
with practice
activities


Continuing the hard yards
towards the final exams
Maintaining Perspective
Overall Weighting
Reading
Imaginative
Synthesis
Modules
AREA OF STUDY: Belonging
A few things to
remember




AREA OF STUDY: Belonging

In their responses and compositions students examine, question,
and reflect and speculate on:

how the concept of belonging is conveyed through the
representations of people, relationships, ideas, places, events, and
societies that they encounter in the prescribed text and texts of
their own choosing related to the Area of Study
assumptions underlying various representations of the concept of
belonging
how the composers choice of language modes, forms, features
and structures shapes and is shaped by a sense of belonging
their own experiences of belonging, in a variety of contexts
the ways in which they perceive the world through texts
the ways in which exploring the concept and significance of
belonging may broaden and deepen their understanding of
themselves and their world
NOTE: THIS MEANS YOUR PERSONAL RESPONSE IS IMPORTANT in this
paper.
AREA OF STUDY: Section I
Rubric
Section I (15 marks)

There will be ONE section based on unseen texts related to
the Area of Study.
This question will consist of a number of short response parts.

Section I RUBRIC

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
demonstrate understanding of the way perceptions of
belonging are shaped in and through texts
describe, explain and analyse the relationship between
language, text and context.



1. When you first look at a text you should consider:

FORM
PURPOSE
AUDIENCE
CONTEXT

2. You should decide what aspect of belonging is being
presented.

3. You should decide how the composer has reflected these
aspects of belonging through their chosen form.
AREA OF STUDY: Section I
AREA OF STUDY: Section I
If asked to consider Audience, think about demographic:
Age
Sex
Education
Interests
Background

If asked to consider Purpose think about:
Persuade? Inform? Entertain? Review?
Express Feelings? Narrate? Share an opinion? Empathise?
Evoke Emotion? Express P.O.V?

If asked to consider Tone think about:
Attitudes to self, audience, context?
Sincere? Serious? Critical? Positive/negative? Neutral? Cynical?
Authoritative?

If asked to consider Structure think about:
Words, Sentences, Paragraphs, Overall Frame
Short, long, exhaustive, extended, littered with commas, cyclic, concise.
Beginning, Middle, End? Climax? Anti-climax? Coda?
AREA OF STUDY: Section I
IF ITS A WRITTEN TEXT, CONSIDER:

Strong Action Verbs? Modality? Pronouns?
Sensory Imagery - Metaphor, Simile, Personification? (SPAAAMOH + TTTSSSM)
Colloquialisms? register level of language?
Connotations / Tone positive? negative?
Use of Rhetorical Qs?
Parody? Pun? Oxymoron? Paradox?
Dialogue? Vernacular?
Symbolism? Motif? Microcosm?
Sophisticated vocab? Use of Humour? Emotive?
Description? Jargon? Clich? Irony? Euphemism?
Subjective/Objective language?
Structural devices? Punctuation? Cyclic? Juxtaposition?

IF ITS A VISUAL TEXT, CONSIDER:

Composition, Framing, Colour, Symbolism, Modality, Vectors, Angles,
Tone, Clarity?
AREA OF STUDY: Section I
HSC Marker Guidelines A Reminder

DO:

use direct quotations or paraphrases where appropriate in your
responses
analyse a text rather than simply explain or describe it
choose appropriate textual references to support your ideas
include a conceptual as well as technique-based discussion

DONT:

Write a longer response than necessary, brief responses are
required for two mark questions (1 mark = 2-3 lines)
Use limited textual support
Quote large portions of the text without explanation
Simply describe/recount the content of the texts
Describe generalised aspects of belonging with limited textual
references
AREA OF STUDY: Section I
ACTIVITY

Write potential questions for
the following two unseen texts.

1. WHAT? (2 marks)
2. HOW? (3 marks)
3. SYNTHESIS? (5 marks)
Future?

Our vision is to be happy.
We want to relax and have dreams
and laugh.
We want to love and talk.
We want more counsellors.
We want nobody to hurt us and make
fun of us.
We want to feel safe.
We want our own police.
We want a justice system that works.
We want to know our Indigenous culture.
We want to respect each other.
We have to have a better future.

Hiallie, 16 (Brewarrina, NSW)
TEXT TWO
TEXT ONE
AREA OF STUDY: Section I
ACTIVITY

Share your questions.

Now, complete a WHAT, HOW
and a SYNTHESIS question from
the brainstorm.


AREA OF STUDY: Section II
Rubric
Section II (15 marks)
There will be ONE question.
Candidates will be required to compose or adapt a
text for a specified context, purpose and audience.

Section II - RUBRIC
In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
express understanding of belonging in the context of
your studies
organise, develop and express ideas using language
appropriate to audience, purpose and context.




AREA OF STUDY: Section II
Here are some suggestions that might be helpful if writing a narrative:

o strong sense of voice, if writing in first person
o clear characterisation suggesting who is affected/involved in the
belonging/not belonging
o barrier(s) to the belonging encountered on the way
o clear evocation of place through descriptive language
o sensory detail
o metaphorical language linked to chosen aspects of belonging
o clear conceptual reflection on certain aspects of belonging
o framing devices linking beginning and end

AREA OF STUDY: Section II
HSC Marker Guidelines A Reminder
DO:

Compose a response that is lengthy enough to allow you to explore the concept of
belonging in an enhanced manner.
Demonstrate an understanding and conceptual awareness of belonging
Demonstrate your ability to skilfully apply the mechanics of language, punctuation,
sentence structure and paragraphing as these are important elements of writing
Show an awareness of the question and the rubric
Respond with originality and insight to the question; this applies to content as well as form
Demonstrate a perceptive understanding of the concept of belonging in an insightful and
succinct manner
Use an authentic, sustained and engaging voice
Employ structural complexity and cohesion

DONT:

Simply use a linear structure and discuss belonging with limited or no conceptual
awareness
Use imagery that is simplistic or clichd
Simply recount a basic situation of belonging or not belonging with minimum reflection on
the concept of belonging
AREA OF STUDY: Section II
ACTIVITY
Writing Task Ideas Brainstorm

This person chooses not to belong.

In what ways has this decision been
prompted by and/or impacted upon the
individuals experiences and notions of
identity, relationships, acceptance and
understanding?

Describe the place that this person
finds themself in. Your description must
include full sensory detail, this means
tactile, olfactory, gustatory, visual and
aural imagery.






AREA OF STUDY: Section II
ACTIVITY
Writing Task Ideas Brainstorm


Creativity is a place. Memory is an image. The artistic
process itself is a journey, a specific one, the return to a
lost and cherished childhood realm, the original source of
inspiration and identity.

Compose an imaginative text that is inspired by this quote.
AREA OF STUDY: Section II
ACTIVITY
Writing Task Ideas
Brainstorm


Use the painting as
a stimulus for a text
about belonging or
not belonging.
AREA OF STUDY: Section III
Rubric

Section III (15 marks)

There will be ONE question based on the Area of Study
prescribed texts and related texts.
The question will require an extended response.

Section III RUBRIC

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
demonstrate understanding of the concept of belonging in the
context of your study
analyse, explain and assess the ways belonging is represented
in a variety of texts
organise, develop and express ideas using language
appropriate to audience, purpose and context.


AREA OF STUDY: Section III
HSC Marker Guidelines A Reminder
DO:

demonstrate a sophisticated control of language, expression and spelling in an
integrated and logical structure
display a depth of understanding of the concept of belonging and the ability to
construct an argument in response to the question
compose a response that is thoughtful and astute - confidently engage with the
question
establish a sense of personal involvement in the argument
be prepared to respond to the specific issues (theme) raised by the examination
display evidence of a personal voice and demonstrate a structured argument
select suitable supporting evidence from your texts
choose related material which demonstrates an insightful understanding of the
concept of belonging and which add substance to your argument
support your discussion of texts with reference to purpose, structure and language
features
skilfully analyse textual features in relation to a conceptual understanding of
belonging commenting on their impact
successfully link your texts by reflecting on your conceptual understanding and
analysis as this will result in a perceptive and sophisticated argument
explain and analyse how textual features contribute to your understanding of
belonging - analyse a range of techniques, making insightful comments,
accompanied by close textual reference and appropriate quotations
underpin your thesis with analysis and discussion in a cohesive manner

AREA OF STUDY: Section III
ACTIVITY

Read the sample Band 6
introduction.

Then, based on the thesis in the
introduction and the rubric
design the possible question for
that response.




AREA OF STUDY: Section III
Example Band 6 Introduction:

An individuals perception of belonging is determined by the world in which
they live, grow and learn. Through the connections made with others and the
world, an individual can better appreciate what it is to belong and thus
develop a heightened sense of self-awareness . These very ideas about the
nature of belonging and not belonging are explored through the
employment of language, tone and recurring motifs in the poetry of Peter
Skrzynecki, specifically Felix Skrzynecki and Ancestors, as well as the
Australian western film The Proposition, and the novel Perfume (The Story of a
Murderer)by Patrick Suskind.
AREA OF STUDY: Section III
ACTIVITY
Write an introduction to the following practice question:


Belonging is essential to a fulfilled life.

Evaluate this statement, focusing on how composers of
texts represent the concept of the belonging.

In your answer, refer to your prescribed text and ONE
related texts.



MODULES
Gaining a new
perspective




MODULE A
Advanced Rubric
Module A Comparative Study of Texts and Contexts
Elective Two Texts in Time
Prescribed Text (Prose Fiction) Frankenstein Mary Shelley and (Film) Blade Runner Ridley
Scott

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
demonstrate understanding of the meanings of a pair of texts when considered together
evaluate the relationships between texts and contexts
organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose
and form

Standard Rubric
Module A Experience Through Language
Elective Two - Distinctively Visual
Prescribed Text (Prose) - Maestro by Peter Goldsworthy
Plus, related texts of students own choosing (for your exam these may include class based
texts)

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
demonstrate understanding of how distinctive voices or the distinctively visual are created
in texts
demonstrate understanding of meanings shaped through distinctive voices or the
distinctively visual
organise, develop and express your ideas using language appropriate to audience,
purpose and form

Module A
ACTIVITY
Based on the rubric
design a potential question
for Module A.



MODULE B
Advanced Rubric
Module B Critical Study of Texts
Prescribed Text (Shakespeare/Drama) - Hamlet William Shakespeare

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
demonstrate an informed understanding of the ideas expressed in the
text
evaluate the texts language, content and construction
organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to
audience, purpose and form


Standard Rubric
Module A Close Study of Text
Prescribed Text (Drama) - Cosi by Louis Nowra

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
demonstrate understanding of a texts distinctive qualities and how these
shape meaning
organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to
audience, purpose and form

Module B
ACTIVITY
Based on the rubric
design a potential question
for Module B.



MODULE C
Advanced Rubric
Module C Representation and Texts
Elective One Conflicting Perspectives
Prescribed Text (Non Fiction) - The Justice Game Geoffrey Robertson
Plus, related texts of students own choosing

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
demonstrate understanding of and evaluate the relationship between
representation and meaning
organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience,
purpose and form


Standard Rubric
Module C Texts and Society
Elective One The Global Village
Prescribed Text (Film) - The Castle Rob Sitch / Roadshow (1997)
Plus, related texts of students own choosing (for your exam these may include class
based texts)

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:
demonstrate understanding of the ways texts and meaning are shaped by context
organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience,
purpose, context and form

Module C
ACTIVITY
Based on the rubric
design a potential question
for Module C.



MODULE A - Practice Questions

Advanced
How has your perception of Texts in Time OR
Exploring Connections been illuminated by your
comparative study of the prescribed texts?

Standard
All images are clouded by memory, youth, time
and place. Is this true of the texts studied in this
elective?


MODULE B - Practice Questions

Advanced
To what extent has your personal response to
Hamlet been shaped by the enduring power of
Shakespeares focus on language and power?

Standard
How successful has Louis Nowra been in
conveying significant ideas about human
nature?


MODULE C - Practice Questions

Advanced
It isnt possible to generate a truly objective
perspective. There will always be conflict.
To what extent do the texts you have studied
represent this statement?

Standard
Individuals living in a global village may
encounter many unexpected obstacles, but
may also gain significant benefits. Do you agree
with this perspective?