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Tools to Support Transparency in Land Administration: Toolkit

Tools to Support Transparency in Land Administration: Toolkit

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This publication forms a part of a two volume training package on Tools to Improve Transparency in Land Administration. The training package comprises a Training Toolkit and a Trainers’ Guide. The first provides content and the latter training methods. The publication is a product of a series of training workshops implemented across Sub-Sahara Africa, South and South East Asia. Under the leadership of the GLTN/UN-Habitat, the training brought together six universities from the global South and one from Europe. Much of the content compiled in the publication was produced by highly experienced experts drawn from these universities. The content was used, critiqued and revised in the course of implementing the training. Practitioners from each region were also identified to write region specific case studies that facilitated problem based learning and contextualized the training. A consultant conducted additional research to find and incorporate content and case studies which enhanced the global flavor of the content. The publication pulls together all these resources and provides generic content, case studies and indicative methodological guidance that allow designing and implementing country or specific training without or with very minimal support of experts from the GLTN/UN-Habitat and ITC of the University of Twente.
This publication forms a part of a two volume training package on Tools to Improve Transparency in Land Administration. The training package comprises a Training Toolkit and a Trainers’ Guide. The first provides content and the latter training methods. The publication is a product of a series of training workshops implemented across Sub-Sahara Africa, South and South East Asia. Under the leadership of the GLTN/UN-Habitat, the training brought together six universities from the global South and one from Europe. Much of the content compiled in the publication was produced by highly experienced experts drawn from these universities. The content was used, critiqued and revised in the course of implementing the training. Practitioners from each region were also identified to write region specific case studies that facilitated problem based learning and contextualized the training. A consultant conducted additional research to find and incorporate content and case studies which enhanced the global flavor of the content. The publication pulls together all these resources and provides generic content, case studies and indicative methodological guidance that allow designing and implementing country or specific training without or with very minimal support of experts from the GLTN/UN-Habitat and ITC of the University of Twente.

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07/04/2014

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01LAND GOVERNANCE CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES

The Business Anti-corruption Portal20

develops

corruption country profiles based on research by

Transparency International, international finance

institutions (like International Finance Corporation

(IFC) and from other relevant sources. All data are

based on public sources and are available free of

charge. Boxes 9 and 10 highlight a number of

examples of land corruption in different countries.

Perhaps one of the biggest factors affecting

transparency in the land sector is the over complexity

of organizations and institutions. Complex systems

are almost always problematic and often characterise

organizations where land administration systems are

weak or dysfunctional. In the land sector, weak and

dysfunctional organizations are often due to a range

of key issues and it is important to understand their

nature and how they impede transparency. Outlined

below are some examples of poor land administration

practice that result in complex and opaque land

administration.

Business corruption: Some regions are
experiencing increasing levels of corruption and
scams in relation to land transactions, organised
around networks including land owners, public
officials and court officials. The price of land is
inflated and ‘profits’ shared among members of
the networks. Some of the people responsible
for these scams have received prison sentences,
according to several 2007 news articles by
Kuensel Online.

Political Corruption: The Royal Audit Authority’s
Annual Audit Report 2009 reveals the total
unresolved irregularities involving fraud,
corruption, embezzlement and mismanagement
in the National Land Commission amounted to
BTN 1.036 million in 2009 alone.

Frequency: The World Bank & IFC: Doing
Business 2011:- A company must go through

5 administrative steps over 64 days to
register property. Furthermore it is free to
register property in Bhutan. Anti-Corruption
Commission: Case Details Year 2007: - 2 out
of the 16 corruption cases reported to the
ACC in 2007 concerned land administration.
Anti-Corruption Commission: Corruption
Perception Survey 2007: - 4% of the
Bhutanese surveyed report that bribery
in the form of cash is involved in the land
transaction services.

Source: Business Anti-Corruption Portal.
(2011). Bhutan Country Profile. At http://www.
business-anti-corruption.com/en/country-
profiles/south-asia/bhutan/corruption-levels/
land-administration/ Accessed on 9/11/2011.

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