Technology Serving the Future of America’s Heritage

NCPTT 2005
A Publication of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training

Annual Report
U.S. Department of the Interior www.ncptt.nps.gov

Architecture & Engineering Program holds second Summer Institute; Assists in planning APTI Conference page 4
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Archeology and Collections New program develops first training course; acquires equipment page 7
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Materials Research Program Brings Cutting Edge Cemetery Conservation to Omaha; Works with DVA on Vets’ Grave markers page 13
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Heritage Education Program holds successful workshops on teaching with Historic houses of worship page 16
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TeChNology rises To The Task
NCPTT Contributes Research and Technical Expertise to Disaster Response

Information Technology Online product catalog goes live page 17
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PTT Grants $466,483 awarded to 14 proposals in 2005 grant cycle page 18

Special RepoRt iN the eye of the StoRm:

Ncptt

Ncptt acts to protect cultural Resources affected by the 2005 hurricanes
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he National Center for Preservation Training and Technology (NCPTT) is very pleased to present its Annual Report for the Fiscal Year 2005. We wish to acknowledge the support from the preservation community at large shown to NCPTT and in return, we trust that this report will remind our many friends and partners in the National Park Service, other federal and state government agencies, universities, laboratories, preservation professions and contracting and all other affiliates of our astounding achievements. We fully intend to continue to provide our many worthwhile present services while at the same time

reaching into new areas to serve the historic preservation constituency with new research, teaching, convening and technology transfer. By Bob Silman PTT Board Chair In these challenging times of very tight budget constraints at all levels of government, NCPTT has managed in fiscal year 2005 to more than fulfill its legislated role to provide knowledge and training in the technology of historic preservation. Understanding the need to protect and preserve our country’s cultural
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resources, the Center has provided ongoing and new research in preservation technology and has successfully disseminated this information to our constituency by means of publications, a tremendously active internet site, seminars and courses, convening of conferences and assisting other groups in achieving their own missions. An extraordinary challenge was presented to NCPTT immediately after hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Gulf Coast in August and September. Partly because of its proximity to the storm ravaged areas, but more because of its incredible depth of expertise, NCPTT provided experienced staff members to aid in the assessment of the damage as well as the plans for salvage and reconstruction. These dedicated staff members left their regular jobs and families behind to minister to the needs of the devastated historic resources of this tri-state area. Other

The year 2005 brought great strides in fulfilling NCPTT’s mission to advance the use of science and technology in historic preservation and make the information available to the public through the most efficient means of technology transfer.
equipment acquisition and upgrades. Maintaining its position as one of the leading authorities on cemetery conservation, the MRP program offered training courses and initiatives in a number of different venues across the country. The program has also contracted with other government agencies to provide specific research in problem areas and has conducted investigations in partnership with other laboratories. The well-established Architecture and Engineering program has strengthened its existing activities as it develops new initiatives. Professional development for engineers in historic preservation continues to be a high priority; the Summer Institute provides an intensive training course. NCPTT signed a new five year cooperative agreement that will enable them to continue work with the AIA Historic Resources Committee Preservation Education Task Force in integrating the teaching of historic preservation into the main stream of architectural education. Issues such as sustainability and smart growth continue to occupy a significant place in the program. The impact of the Center’s activities and programs are now recognized around the country and around the world. The programs discussed above plus those in heritage landscapes, heritage education and research grants all have contributed to this success. The year 2005 brought great strides in fulfilling NCPTT’s mission to advance the use of science and technology in historic preservation and make the information available to the public through the most efficient means of technology transfer.
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In Other News
NCPTT Announces New Employees, Promotion n spring 2005, NCPTT announced the addition of three new members to its staff and one promotion. The new staff members include Jason Church, materials conservator; Dr. David Morgan, archeology and collections chief; and Sarah Jackson, materials research assistant. Additionally, Andy Ferrell was promoted to the position of architecture and engineering chief. He joined NCPTT in 1999 and was previously architecture and engineering research fellow.

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The impact of the Center’s activities and programs are now recognized around the country and around the world.
members of the Center assisted in different ways, not the least of which was to open their homes to families of National Park Service employees who were displaced as a result of the hurricanes. Our hats are off to all at NCPTT for their untiring efforts. A tremendous new surge of activity in 2005 has resulted from the filling of the position of Chief of the Archeology and Collections Program. Recent equipment purchases have allowed the program to offer services heretofore impossible. The Center looks forward to much renewed activity in this vital area of cultural resource management. The Materials Research Program forged ahead with much needed in-house research in a number of areas of conservation, aided by

NCPTT Receives Honor Award from National Trust t the National Preservation Conference in September, NCPTT was presented an Honor Award for its part in developing and distributing publications that encourage responsible growth in American towns and cities, along with information on policies to foster cost and energy efficient school buildings. The Center worked with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Council for Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) on this project. NCPTT previously partnered with CEFPI to produce the one of the publications included in the mailing: A Primer for the Renovation/Rehabilitation of Older and Historic Schools.

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AIC Recognizes NCPTT with Distinguished Service Award he American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) presented NCPTT with an Award for Advancement of the Field of Conservation. AIC Director Tom Chase presented the award to NCPTT Executive Director Kirk Cordell during the AIC annual meeting in June, 2005.

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Technology Serving the Future of America’s Heritage
Lee H. Nelson Hall Home of NCPTT

NCPTT 2005
NCPTT conducts preservation technology research
NCPTT undertakes research at its in-house laboratories, which include an environmental chamber that allows researchers to test the effects of pollutants on cultural materials. More widely, the Center stimulates new research through its nationwide grants program.

in Brief
U.S. Department of the Interior

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CPTT advances the application of science and technology to historic preservation. Working in the fields of archeology, architecture, landscape architecture and materials conservation, the Center accomplishes its mission through training, education, research, technology transfer and partnerships. NCPTT was created by Congress in 1992 to develop and disseminate preservation technologies and to train practitioners in new technologies. NCPTT promotes preservation in the fields of archeology, historic architecture, historic landscapes, and materials conservation. NCPTT emphasizes preservation technology research. We support the use of innovative technologies in the preservation of cultural properties and the transfer of technology from arenas not readily identified within historic preservation. The Center has adopted these research priorities: 1. Protect cultural resources against vandalism, looting, terrorism, and natural disasters Conserve architectural materials of the “recent past” Develop appropriate technologies to preserve houses of worship and cemeteries Monitor and evaluate preservation treatments Study environmental effects of pollution on cultural resources Document and preserve threatened cultural landscapes

promotes excellence in preservation by promoting historic preservation training and education opportunities for professionals through projects like the NCPTT Preservation Engineers Initiative.

NCPTT serves as a Clearinghouse and Web Portal

NCPTT provides grants, creates partnerships
NCPTT maintains a broad partnership base that includes National Park Service sites; other federal agencies; state and tribal historic preservation offices; universities; private corporations; and local, state, national and international non-profit organizations. The Center provides direct and competitive grants to promote research and training opportunities in preservation technology.

NCPTT’s website and publications enable the Center to deliver the latest news about preservation technologies to a variety of audiences. Also, NCPTT supports the distribution of preservation information through its grants and partnerships.

NCPTT teaches preservation for future generations

NCPTT serves as a trainer and convener
The Center develops and conducts regional seminars and workshops on topics like cemetery monument conservation. NCPTT

Heritage Education – Louisiana conveys to our youngest citizens the power of place and the stories behind our irreplaceable treasures. The program administers competitive mini grants and holds teacher workshops to enhance the educational experience by teaching students the value of their local heritage. The program also serves as a national model for heritage education.

2005 orgANIzATIoNAl ChArT

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NCPTT • 645 College Ave., Natchitoches, La., 71457 • 318-356-7444 • www.ncptt.nps.gov

A tarped home expresses the resolve of New Orleans residents to rebuild their homes post-Katrina. NCPTT’s Architecture and Engineering program is offering expertise and research during the assessment and rebuilding period.

TeChNology ProvidiNg Tools To rebuild
Program holds second annual Summer Institute; Assists in AIA/HRC Preservation Education Task Force
“Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, a number of Summer Institute alumni provided useful feedback for the Rapid Building and Site Condition Assessment Form developed by NCPTT, and others worked for FEMA and volunteer organizations assessing historic buildings damaged by the storms.”
NCPTT’s Architecture & Engineering program encourages research and partnerships with organizations and institutions working to advance preservation technology for buildings and other structures. In 2005, the program took part in numerous projects with significant potential impact on the architecture and engineering fields: Professional Development Program for Engineers in Historic Preservation NCPTT continues working with partners towards improving preservation training opportunities for engineers. Since 2001, work has focused on developing professional development courses for architectural, civil, structural, and mechanical engineers, architects and technically-oriented graduates of historic preservation programs. To date, the courses include: Materials and Older Buildings, Building Pathology, Diagnostics Methodology and Treatment Strategies. These courses were offered at NCPTT’s initial Summer Institute in 2004 and again in 2005. The 2005 NCPTT Summer Institute featuring Engineering for Older and Historic Buildings was held June 14-24, in
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Natchitoches, Louisiana. Consisting of Historic Materials & Building Pathology and Diagnostics Methodology & Treatment Strategies, participants examined the historic Yucca House and Africa House. Located at Melrose Plantation in northwest Louisiana, these structures were built by former slaves and their descendants who became one of the wealthiest families of free people of color in the antebellum South. New features of the 2005 program were laboratory exercises and presentations on the archeology of the site. Partners for the 2005 Summer Institute included the Architectural Engineering Institute (AEI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Institute of Architects Historic Resources Committee (AIA/HRC), the Association for Preservation Technology International, Northwestern State University, Cane River Creole National Historical Park, Cane River National Heritage Area and the Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches. Continuing education units were available from the AEI and AIA. After two years of Summer Institute programs, an alumni network is beginning to develop. Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, a number of Summer Institute alumni provided useful feedback for the Rapid Building and Site Condition Assessment Form developed by NCPTT, and others worked for FEMA and volunteer organizations assessing historic buildings damaged by the storms. In addition to the preservation engineering training, the 2006 Summer Institute will feature training in archeological prospection and cemetery monument conservation. The 2006 Summer Institute is scheduled for June and July. AIA/HRC Preservation Education Task Force NCPTT continued to participate in the American Institute of Architects Historic Resources Committee Preservation Education Task Force towards integrating historic preservation into the basic curriculum of professional architecture degree programs. NCPTT participated in the first of a series of symposia addressing these issues held Nov. 19-21, 2004, at the AIA headquarters in Washington, D.C. and a follow up meeting in January 2005. As a result of the efforts of the task force, the

Architecture and Engineering
“In August, NCPTT participated in the Louisiana University Consortium for Smart Growth and Educational Outreach. NCPTT attended Senator Mary Landrieu’s conference on Smart Growth and began researching Smart Growth issues related to historic preservation.”
Student Performance Criteria used by the National Architectural Accrediting Board to accredit architecture schools have been revised to include preservation values. The group convened again in Bath, England in September 2005, to examine European educational models and to continue this dialogue between academics and preservation practitioners. Sustainable Approaches to Historic Preservation Architecture and Engineering continues researching sustainable practices for historic preservation towards collecting a body of knowledge on this emerging topic. The initial phase of the sustainability initiative has involved attending conferences and facilitating informal conversations with professionals on green topics and sustainable practices as related to historic preservation. Smart Growth and Historic Preservation The preservation and revitalization of historic buildings and sites is a natural companion for the Smart Growth movement. Rehabilitating historic buildings and districts optimizes underutilized resources and takes advantage of existing infrastructure. In August, NCPTT participated in the Louisiana University Consortium for Smart Growth and Educational Outreach. NCPTT attended Senator Mary Landrieu’s conference on Smart Growth and began researching Smart Growth issues related to historic preservation. APTI Annual Conference 2006 The Association for Preservation Technology International (APTI) holds an annual conference that highlights technological developments in historic preservation. NCPTT is a member of the planning team for the September 2006 APTI conference, to be held in Atlanta. In August, NCPTT joined members of the Southeast Region Chapter of the APTI for the first planning committee meeting. Concrete Publication Work continues on a publication on the history of concrete, based on the extensive notes of Charles Peterson, founder of the NPS Historic American Buildings Survey. This project with the Athenaeum of Philadelphia will lead to a one-of-akind resource on early concrete. It will organize, edit and publish a substantial body of information pertaining to the origins of concrete construction.
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Students evaluate the condition of Yucca house at Melrose Plantation during NCPTT’s Summer Institute Training.

Architecture and Engineering research

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African house at Melrose Plantation provides Summer Institute participants a unique study of construction as well as deterioration and drainage issues.
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Architecture and Engineering research

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NCPTT provided advice and technical information to a grass-roots committee dedicated to the restoration of the historic Kisatchie School in Natchitoches Parish, la.

Chris Stevens of the olmsted Center for landscape Preservation designed a historically faithful landscape plan for NCPTT’s Nelson hall, which is scheduled for implementation in 2006.

Historic Schools Initiative At the annual National Trust for Historic Preservation conference, in Portland, OR, NCPTT was honored along with the Council for Educational Facility Planners International (CEFPI) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for two publications, A Primer for the Renovation/Rehabilitation of Older and Historic Schools (which resulted from an NCPTT grant) and Schools for Successful Communities: an Element of Smart Growth. NCPTT coordinated a targeted mailing of these publications during May 2005 and distributed them via mail to city governments, school boards and preservation leaders. It was for the impact of these publications and the outreach effort that NCPTT, CEFPI and the EPA were honored. Community Outreach NCPTT seeks to provide technical research and training for individuals and organizations. Outreach ranges from answering inquiries via e-mail and telephone to visiting historic neighborhoods and sites. In August NCPTT was asked to visit the long-vacant Kisatchie High School located about 30 miles south of NCPTT’s headquarters in Natchitoches, La. Alumni and local residents were interested in restoring the school, which was built around 1919. NCPTT staff visited the school and
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offered advice and technical preservation information to community members who are currently developing proposals for the adaptive use of the historic school buildings. Preservation and Affordable Housing Program Recognizing that many preservation degree programs require hands-on experience as part of graduate studies, NCPTT began exploring the development of a program that would involve the rehabilitation of small vernacular structures as affordable housing. The focus of the program would be to provide real world preservation experience using existing and emerging technologies to research, document and rehabilitate these resources.

“The newly created Archeology & Collections Program seeks to foster and develop technological innovations and applications that enhance the preservation of archeological sites, landscapes, materials, and collections.”
Archeology and Collections research

A contour map developed by the Archeology and Collections program will help Summer Institute instructors in the Architecture and Engineering program to develop a drainage plan for the historic structures at Melrose Plantation.

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PreservaTioN TeChNology from The grouNd uP
New NCPTT Archeology Program Begins New Initiatives in Plantation Archeology, Non-invasive Techniques
uch of the human past is unknown except for the record people left in the ground and across the landscape. Industrial and technological developments of the last two centuries have threatened this record to an unparalleled degree. Even the process of doing archeology takes its toll on the very resources from which we seek to learn about the past. However, modern technological innovations have given us the capability of protecting these finite materials and places in ways that once were unimaginable. Though the Center has always been involved in archeological research, NCPTT created the Archeology and Collections program to bring additional focus to this area by fostering technological advances in archeological sites, landscapes, materials, and collections. NCPTT enhanced the new program in April of 2005 by appointing David W. Morgan (Ph.D., Tulane
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University) as its chief. The Archeology & Collections Program has participated in numerous activities since its inception, including collecting GPS data to enhance the Cane River National Heritage Area GIS database hosted at NCPTT, public and professional outreach, and exploring new research partnerships and opportunities. One of the more important ongoing tasks is revising the National Center’s list of PTTGrant research priorities to include archeological concerns. Additionally, some of the most notable projects completed in 2005 include: Engineering for Older and Historic Buildings Leads to Preservation Partnership Effort. The faculty of NCPTT’s 2005 Architecture and Engineering Summer Institute program used the early 19th-century Africa and Yucca houses at Melrose

Archeology and Collections research

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Plantation as learning tools for their course, looking specifically at the interplay between restoration efforts and damage to the structures caused by standing water. Prior to the Institute, the non-profit owners of the plantation, a National Historic Landmark, were considering either raising the structure or grading the land surrounding it, both of which posed considerable threat to the property’s archaeological resources. Based on the Institute faculty’s recommendation, the Archeology & Collections Program partnered with the NPS Cane River Creole National Historical Park and the Cane River National Heritage Area to create a highly detailed topographic map of the 3,501 square meter area. The Institute architects used the map to plan a better way to drain water from the houses using the natural contours of the land, a mitigation strategy far less damaging than either of the options previously under consideration. Archeology & Collections Program Acquires Equipment One thing that makes archeology so distinctive as a discipline is its emphasis on understanding the precise spatial relationship between objects. Where one thing

is relative to another is the fulcrum by which its meaning is leveraged. NCPTT obtained three new pieces of equipment to enable it to participate in contemporary projects and research: · Trimble® Pathfinder Pro XH geographic positioning system with accessories-using satellites this device can tell its operator where on the globe they are to within 20 to 30 cm; · Trimble® GeoExplorer GeoXT geographic positioning system with accessories--using satellites this device can tell its operator where on the globe they are to within 1 m; · Topcon® GPT-8203A robotic total station with accessories--this surveying instrument allows its operator to record precise sub-millimeter spatial data. Archaeological Preservation Technology Research Consortium The Archaeological Preservation Technology Research Consortium (APTRC) was formed through a cooperative agreement between NCPTT, Arizona State University (the host), the University of Ark., the Western Center for Archeology and Paleontology, and several other partner institutions and research universities. The goal of the APTRC is to advance the use of technology for resolving critical issues facing the preservation of archaeological resources through creation of a working collaboration of university and federal agency partners. The consortium, led by Dr. Arleyn Simon of Arizona State University, met in Tempe, Ariz., on Aug. 18-20 to discuss developments and new directions in remote sensing research. Formal presentations highlighted current remote sensing techniques in practice, as well as three-dimensional modeling and analyses. The consortium concluded that changes need to be made in policy so that remote sensing is considered baseline pre-excavation fieldwork; that archeologists need to develop best practice protocols that parallel those developed in the United Kingdom; and that archeologists need to gain name recognition by sponsoring a united research effort in the near future. Plans were made to re-convene in Puerto Rico at the 2006 meeting of the Society for American Archeology to formulate an action plan to advance these proposed changes.

The powered parachute aerial survey vehicle was the result of a PTT grant. The vehicle and pilot, Tommy hailey, will take part in the Archeology and Collections training during the 2006 Summer Institute.

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Technology Serving the Future of America’s Heritage

Special Report
Ncptt acts to protect cultural Resources affected by the 2005 hurricanes

• Ncptt participates in heritage emergency National task force • Ncptt leads by developing condition assessment tools for fema.

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n August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina devastated a major portion of the central Gulf Coast in what was called the worst disaster in United States history. Less than a month later, Hurricane Rita brought similar destruction just east of the Texas/Louisiana border. In response to the massive damage to cultural resources throughout the region, the National Park Service (NPS) Cultural Resources program began coordinating NPS ef-

forts through a series of conference calls beginning September 3, 2005. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) called upon the Heritage Emergency National Task Force (HENTF) for information and assistance in response to the disasters. Located in north central Louisiana, NCPTT was positioned to assist immediately with staff and resources. NCPTT Staff Come to the Aid of People and Cultural Resources As Katrina and Rita threatened their homes, thousands of families fled south Louisiana and headed northward. NCPTT staff quickly began to understand the human toll the hurricanes would take even before the storms made landfall. Staffers took people into their homes and provided meals, clothing and volunteer
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• Ncptt Develops hurricane preservation technical assistance Web page • Ncptt details staff to fema recovery efforts • Ncptt partners to implement a series of wet recovery workshops in louisiana • Ncptt staff deliver presentations on Ncptt disaster response efforts

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Special Report

iN the eye of the StoRm
Ncptt acts to protect cultural Resources affected by the 2005 hurricanes
assistance to those in overfilled shelters. The immediacy and scope of the disaster further spurred staff to protect the countless cultural resources they knew would be affected by the disaster. Drawing upon their preservation expertise and close proximity to the disaster, NCPTT staff worked continuously with FEMA and the Heritage Emergency National Task Force (HENTF) to provide tools that would document the damage and provide surveyors in using it. Additionally, NCPTT developed a Rapid Cemetery Condition Assessment form and further contributed to or influenced similar forms including the Save Outdoor Sculpture! Rapid Condition Assessment by Heritage Preservation, and the H.E.A.R.T. form for collections by the American Association for State and Local History and the American Institute for Conservation. Each of these forms were built on a relational database so that information could be gathered manually or electronically and compiled for later evaluation. Technical Assistance Fills Communications Vacuum NCPTT also stepped in to fill the communications vacuum occurring during the post-storm chaos. Staff compiled maps, lists, disaster-related research and updated contact information that would be useful for those assisting in the recovery effort, no matter their location. The information was put into electronic format and made a special part of the NCPTT website. The Hurricane Technical Assistance website became a primary national information resource and the NPS’ principal reference for hurricane response and recovery relative to cultural resources. tarp New orleans, a group headed by former Ncptt intern alice-anne Krishnan, tarps historic houses that don’t qualify for tarp programs by fema and the National trust. guidelines that encouraged saving and recovering damaged structures, sites and collections. NCPTT Leads by Developing Condition Assessment Tools for FEMA As the extent of flooding and devastation made immediate recovery efforts impossible, NCPTT turned its focus to working with State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs) to develop a method to assess building and site conditions as part of an evolving debris management and demolition plan for affected states. NCPTT staff, working with HENTF members, developed a one-page Rapid Building and Site Condition Assessment form for FEMA, along with a brief instruction guide and glossary to assist NCPTT details staff to FEMA recovery efforts In September, NCPTT received a request from FEMA to embed two employees with historic building technology expertise at the Joint Field Office in Baton Rouge. Andy Ferrell, architecture and engineering chief, and Mary Striegel, materials research chief, served 30-day non-consecutive rotations as part of the National Emergency System, ESF-11 task force. Sean Clifford, NCPTT web developer and David Morgan, archeology and collections chief, provided additional assistance to FEMA as needed. Ferrell began working with FEMA on October 4 and was stationed in Baton

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iN the eye of the StoRm
Ncptt acts to protect cultural Resources affected by the 2005 hurricanes
Working with a fema strike force, al levitan recovers the fort Jackson plaque.

“NCPTT added hurricane technical assistance to its home page, www. ncptt.nps.gov, and provided links to NPS and non-NPS information. The NCPTT web site is a primary national information resource and the NPS’ principal reference for hurricane response and recovery relative to cultural resources.”
Rouge for one week and spent the remaining three weeks surveying storm-damaged buildings in New Orleans’ 20 National Register Districts. Working with a small team, he focused on assessing buildings that the city had previously deemed unsafe for entry. He also worked closely with the Louisiana SHPO to survey a mid 20th century African American suburb in preparation for a National Register district nomination. Striegel served a month long detail starting November 7. Striegel’s work included assessing the condition of damaged collections and providing technical assistance in collection recovery. During her detail, Striegel served as part of a five-member strike force deployed to recover and salvage about 1,750 objects in the Ft. Jackson museum in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Clifford participated in an inaugural workshop designed to develop a GIS program for FEMA and began working to provide database and web development support for this project. The GIS program was developed by FEMA and the National Park Service Cultural Resources GIS program in
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order to survey all red-tagged residential buildings in New Orleans to determine their eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places. Morgan collaborated with Alexa Roberts, superintendent of the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, who served a detail to FEMA. She was given the task of coordinating consultation between FEMA and Louisiana’s federallyrecognized Native American tribes with regard to Section 106 issues. Morgan was one of her main points of contact, and she included portions of one of his publications as part of her final report to FEMA. Morgan also coauthored a paper with Nancy Morgan (Cane River National Heritage Area) and Brenda Barrett (NPS) that describes how Hurricane Katrina exposed the difficulty our federal preservation system has had in adequately documenting the ordinary markers on the landscape that are crucial to a sense of community identity, despite the existence of NPS Bulletin 38 and its provisions for listing traditional cultural properties on the National Regis-

Special Report

iN the eye of the StoRm
Ncptt acts to protect cultural Resources affected by the 2005 hurricanes
ter. The peer-reviewed paper is scheduled for publication in a special issue of American Anthropologist in September 2006. He also planned to discuss the article at the Ename Conference in Belgium as one of its featured round-table case studies. NCPTT partners to implement a series of wet recovery workshops in Louisiana Scheduled for March 2006, NCPTT partnered with four other cultural resource groups and the American Institute for Conservation to develop and implement three day-long workshops titled, “After the Storm: Recovery of Wet Collections.” The workshops provide information and skills needed to recover wet collections. The audience for the training is collections staff and volunteers charged with the care of cultural collections, and to members of the public whose personal property were affected by storms and flooding. NCPTT staff facilitated the meeting and contributed coordination and outreach efforts. Dates and locations of workshops include: • March 16, The National D-Day Museum, New Orleans, LA • March 17, LSU Rural Life Museum, Baton Rouge, LA • March 20, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, Natchitoches, LA Staff Deliver Presentations on NCPTT Disaster Response Efforts Ferrell, along with Patricia Gay, executive director of the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans, and David S. Preziosi, executive director of Mississippi Heritage, were invited to present a session on hurricane recovery efforts at the Saving Places conference in Denver on February 9. The session, entitled “When Disaster Strikes,” focuses on efforts by government agencies and non-profit organizations to rehabilitate entire communities and neighborhoods, restore historic icons, and attract businesses and homeowners back to heavily damaged historic districts. Striegel was invited to speak as part of the Library of Congress Topics in Preservation Science series scheduled for March 2, 2006. Her presentation, entitled “The Conservation Scientist Meets Hurricane Katrina,” focuses her experiences in the real world aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Preconceived notions of what Louisiana needed were replaced with more realistic approaches to collection salvage and stabilization.

“NCPTT partnered with four other cultural resource groups and the AIC to develop and implement three day-long workshops titled, After the Storm: Recovery of Wet Collections. Held in Louisiana, these workshops provide information and skills needed to recover wet collections.”

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Participants in the 2005 CMC workshop at Prospect Hill in Omaha, Neb., learn to fill and patch stones.

leadiNg CemeTery CoNservaTioN TraiNiNg
MRP Brings Cutting Edge Cemetery Conservation to Omaha; Works with DVA on Vets’ Gravemarkers
Materials research

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CPTT’s Materials Research Program focuses on understanding how cultural objects deteriorate with time and on developing new methods to preserve these objects. NCPTT partners with parks, laboratories, universities and government agencies to accomplish these tasks. In 2005, the program strengthened its National Cemetery Preservation Initiative by adding a new course and developing new audiences. Jason Church, NCPTT’s materials conservator, joined the staff to head up this productive initiative. On the research front, experimental phases of three research projects were completed and final reports are now being drafted. Throughout the year, NCPTT increased its research capabilities with upgrades and additions to its laboratory equipment. National Cemetery Training Initiative On May 24-26, NCPTT partnered with the NPS Midwest Regional Office, Gerald R. Ford Conservation Center, and
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Prospect Hill Cemetery in Omaha, Neb., to hold the third Cemetery Monument Conservation (CMC) workshop. This intensive hands-on workshop focused on conservation treatments crucial to the preservation of historic grave markers. For the first time, historic metals conservation was introduced into the workshop’s schedule. The three-day workshop also addressed issues and techniques in cleaning, consolidation, adhesive and reinforced stone repair, setting techniques, patching and safety. The workshop was held at the newly relocated NPS Midwest Regional Office and historic Prospect Hill Cemetery. A total of 26 participants from the U.S. and Canada participated. In 2005, NCPTT developed and held its first CMC Basics workshop. This half-day workshop is geared to the nonpreservationist and includes classroom lecture and field demonstrations. NCPTT partnered with the Vernon Parish Tourism Commission to host this first CMC Basics workshop at Old Anacoco Baptist Church and cemetery in Leesville, La., in July. Thirty-five people participated in the workshop that focused on identifying materials, understanding symbols, maintenance, cleaning and simple stone repairs. The final course in the CMC workshop series is an advanced workshop

NCPTT’s National Cemetery Training Initiative educates cemetery professionals about historically-sensitive methods of cemetery conservation. To accomplish this, NCPTT has reached out to allied professionals and new audiences.
open only to those people who have participated in the three-day CMC workshop. In 2005, NCPTT did the ground research and planned to hold a five-day Advanced CMC workshop during the 2006 NCPTT Summer Institute. NCPTT’s National Cemetery Training Initiative educates cemetery professionals about historically-sensitive methods of cemetery conservation. To accomplish this, NCPTT has reached out to allied professionals and new audiences. In 2005, NCPTT presented two

NCPTT researchers built an apparatus that measures friction across a treated terrazzo slab. A weight, which is connected to a block with thread, is suspended from the side of the table. Researchers measure the smallest amount of weight needed to make the block move.

Materials research

major lectures to cemetery professionals. The first was a presentation on “Cemetery Preservation” at the Monument Builders of North America annual conference. This presentation, held in January in Memphis, Tenn., drew a crowd of around 150 professional monument builders. The second presentation was at the Mid-America Monument Builders Association meeting in July in Wichita, Kansas. This presentation on “Cemetery Conservation Basics” drew a crowd of approximately 125 monument dealers and builders. Durability of Traditional and Modified Limewash for Use on Historic Buildings in the Cane River Creole National Historical Park NCPTT, Cane River Creole National Park (CARI), and Quality Finish, Inc. partnered to test the durability of traditional and modified limewashes for use on the park’s historic brick and wooden structures. The study, started in 2004 and continuing through 2005, looked at ten lime wash recipes made with three different types of lime. Researchers applied lime washes to handmade brick or wood samples, and evaluated performance based on standardized abrasion, adhesion and artificial weathering tests. Results of this study are available through NCPTT and may be used in the selection of limewashes for the Cane River Creole National Historical Park. The study has been expanded and new results will be forthcoming in 2006.
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Investigating Vitrification to Treat Traditional Terrazzo Floors In partnership with the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), NCPTT completed a study of vitrification as a possible treatment for historic terrazzo floors. The purpose of this study is to aid GSA in establishing a policy for terrazzo care by providing scientific evidence with which to evaluate the vitrification process. Researchers completed a wide variety of chemical and physical tests to investigate surface changes, strength changes, liquid water and water vapor transport, and appearance changes of the different surface treatments. The Center’s researchers have shown that compared to standard wax, vitrification allows for somewhat greater moisture transport through the terrazzo, that color saturation increases, and that surface chemistry changes permanently only for the top microlayer. Vitrification increases terrazzo’s resistance to surface impact. We also have determined that

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The Center’s researchers have shown that compared to standard wax, vitrification allows for somewhat greater moisture transport through the terrazzo, that color saturation increases, and that surface chemistry changes permanently only for the top microlayer.
vitrification by default produces a highly glossy surface that may not be characteristic of historic terrazzo floors (though glossiness can be modified during the application process with matting agents). NCPTT is in the last stages of editing the final report, expected out by mid2006. The final results of this work were submitted for presentation at the Association for Preservation Technology Annual Conference in Atlanta, GA, Sept. 13-16, 2006. Newly-Developed Stone Consolidant: Alkoxygermanes NCPTT partnered with Northwestern State University of Louisiana (NSU) to test the potential of several alkoxygermane compounds to perform as stone

Materials research

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consolidants. Working with a grant from the Louisiana Board of Regents, NCPTT researchers have successfully made a gel consolidant. The staff applied the gel to limestone samples and tested the performance relative to untreated stone and stone treated with traditional consolidants. The experimental consolidant does have some strengthening effect. However, the effect was marginal and requires further study and development. Additionally, Cole Stevens, an NCPTT undergraduate intern, has begun work together with faculty in the biology department at Northwestern State University to investigate the possible biocidal effects of these compounds. Several tests have been devised to examine this biocidal capability and research will begin in 2006. NCPTT Lab Capabilities With recent lab acquisitions and upgrades, NCPTT is fast developing wide-ranging lab capabilities. NCPTT’s Environmental Exposure Chamber (EEC) underwent an extensive upgrade. This instrument is used to measure pollution on materials. NCPTT researchers can also measure weathering effects of ultraviolet light and moisture with its Q-Panel QUV artificial weatherometer. New to the labs is a VersaTester three-point bend tester to test brick, mortar and other building materials. NCPTT also has the capacity to carry out ASTM tests, like the adhesion test of surface treatments and friction tests.
A limewash sample is undergoing a falling sand abrasion test.

The Center’s analytical equipment is similarly varied, providing capabilities to take micrographs of surfaces with a computer-assisted microscope, to analyze the surface morphology in depth using a laser profilometer, to quantitatively evaluate the color characteristics of samples with a portable colorimeter, and to measure glossiness with a handheld glossmeter. NCPTT’s analytical lab can analyze samples for various ion content with our Dionex Ion Chromatograph. A PerkinElmer Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectrometer with its attachments enables researchers to look at a sample’s surface chemical makeup.

With recent lab acquisitions and upgrades, NCPTT is fast developing wide-ranging lab capabilities.

NCPTT Researchers prepare brick samples a for artificial weathering.
Page 5 • NCPTT 2005 Annual Report

Heritage Education — Louisiana
Cemetery Scavenger Hunts Growing out of the 2004 workshop theme of historic cemeteries, Heritage Education hosted several groups of students for presentations and tours at the historic American Cemetery in Natchitoches, La. Students from the Natchitoches Parish Library’s Teen Reading Program, NSU Elementary Lab School, the Natchitoches Education Center, Cane River Children Services and a group of students from Marshall, Texas, were all given a brief presentation on the significance and history of cemeteries at NCPTT. The groups went for a scavenger hunt in a cemetery. At the cemetery, the participants were given a list of over 30 items to locate. The students not only learned about the importance of the cemetery’s history and monuments, but they also established a new found interest and respect for cemeteries. Mini Grants In 2005 the Heritage Education program provided more than $80,000 in Mini Grants to 18 K-12 teachers in Louisiana for the development of curriculum-based heritage education activities using over 100 local cultural and historic sites as content. An awards ceremony was held that honored new grant recipients as well as past grant winners as part of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s “Preservation Month.” Nancy Hawkins from the Louisiana Division of Archaeology conducted a morning workshop for Mini Grant recipients to discuss grant policies and procedures. The Division of Archaeology in the Office of Cultural Development under the State Historic Preservation Office again administered the grants. Diversity Internship For the third consecutive year, NCPTT’s Heritage Education program was chosen to host an intern through the National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Diversity Internship Program. Only 10-20 preservation-oriented organizations from across the nation are chosen to serve as hosts for interns. In 2005, the program hosted Brittany Murphy, a student from Louisiana. Murphy worked with Heritage Education over the summer developing workshops for teachers.

In 2005, NCPTT’s heritage Education program hosted over 200 students for scavenger hunts designed to instill appreciation for cemeteries as a cultural resource.

The Tools of heriTage
Workshops on Historic Houses of Worship Prove Popular with Heritage Education Teachers
In 2005 Heritage Education provided more than $80,000 in Mini Grants to 18 K-12 teachers in Louisiana for the development of curriculum-based heritage education activities using 169 local cultural and historic sites as content.

I

n fiscal year 2005 NCPTT’s Heritage Education continued to work at meeting the needs of classroom teachers who must not only cover curriculum standards and benchmarks, but must also consider high-stakes testing. Classroom teachers, preservation specialists and education specialists are consulted to ensure that the program meets preservation ethics and provides professional development for teachers in innovative and evolving educational theory and techniques. Workshops NCPTT’s Heritage Education program used the theme of Historic Churches and Sacred Places for its 2005 summer workshops for teachers. Workshops were held across Louisiana, including the cities of Houma, Minden and Breaux Bridge. As with 2004’s workshops on teaching with cemeteries, each workshop attracted nearcapacity crowds. Heritage Education is already receiving requests from participants to hold similar workshops in their hometowns in 2006.
Page 6 • NCPTT 2005 Annual Report

Teachers in houma, louisiana, participate in a heritage Education Workshop focused on historic churches.

Information Technology

wiNdow To a world of researCh
Print and Online Product Catalogs Provide Quality Research at No Cost
system that allows users flexibility in producing their grant applications as well as easing the task of managing the grants program for the staff. Internet Program NCPTT’s Internet program encompasses all projects that are Internet-based and that enhance NCPTT as a leader in the electronic dissemination of information. A major focus of the program has been the continuing development of NCPTT’s website to deliver preservation information and NCPTT products to the preservation community. FY2005 saw a facelift in the website’s appearance. Among the new additions to the NCPTT website were the reorganization of the site’s knowledge center, more clearly defined labels, a scrolling news link, and a new on-line catalog for delivery of NCPTT’s grant publications and newsletters. In anticipation of greater traffic on NCPTT’s website in the coming years the site has been moved to a new high-speed server that contains a vast array of new and improved web tools. In-office Computer Systems In an effort to protect NCPTT data and systems from intruders a firewall was installed. IT staff continue to upgrade software on all workstations and servers. A disaster recovery plan has been written and implemented in the event a catastrophic event destroys NCPTT’s data. A plan is currently being developed to address a catastrophe to the workstations and servers. Additionally, NCPTT’s workstations were equipped with UPS backup systems to combat power outages and rogue surges. The measures taken during FY2005 have made NCPTT’s data and equipment more insulated from attacks and disasters. Publication Distribution One of the major functions of the NCPTT website is to provide a central location to search for preservation publications. In FY 2005 a total of 235 publications were mailed to the public by NCPTT information technology staff.

The NCPTT online product catalog provides a decade of preservation technology research in a convenient downloadable format. The online product catalog grew out of NCPTT’s first print catalog, which was distributed in July.

T

he information technology component of NCPTT is comprised of four elements: information management of grants and projects, the Internet program, in-office computer systems, and publication distribution. In 2005, exciting new enhancements have been made to all four components to achieve the Center’s principal goal of fostering development of, access to, and dissemination of preservation-related information. Access to information via electronic means is strongly promoted. Grants and Projects September marked the second year NCPTT utilized its in-house custom built on-line grants system. NCPTT’s Web Developer, Sean Clifford, revamped the PTT grants system into an SQL database-driven web based application that is more powerful and easier to use than its predecessor. The IT department has made great strides in recent years to be less reliant on commercial software to manage its PTT grants program. With the current system in place, NCPTT now has a totally automated
Page  • NCPTT 2005 Annual Report

PTT Grants Awarded in 2005
Jefferson Community College (& Dry Stone Conservancy)
Breaking the Virtual Barrier; a Model Program for Preservation Trades Education & Training Utilizing Satellite & Simulcast Distance Learning Technologies; $36,442

Fort Ticonderoga Association
Acoustic Emission and Vibration Correlation; $39,975

Victoria Mansion The Mariner’s Museum
An Evaluation of Supercritical Drying and PEG/Freeze-Drying of Waterlogged Archaeological Wood; $31,158 Recent Research and Technical Innovations in Brownstone Conservation; $11,362

University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Evaluation of Remote Sensing Tools for Estimation of Interior Wyoming Basin Cultural Landscape Attributes Using Archived Satellite Imagery and Off the Shelf Software; $36,875

Montana Preservation Alliance
Creating a Digital Archive for Cultural Landscapes: Recordation of Montana’s Tongue River Valley; $40,000

University of Cincinnati Association for Preservation Technology International
Development and Dissemination of a Grading Protocol for Lumber in Historic Structures; $32,813 Testing the Regional Reliability of Spectral Signatures of Archaeological Phenomena; $40,000

San Juan County Historical Society Catalina Island Conservancy
Merging Aerial Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Satellite Multispectral Data to Inventory Archaeological Sites; $39,990 Shenandoah-Dives Mill Historic Structure Assessment, HAER and HALS Workshop; $8,284

National Park Service, Midwest Archaeological Center University of Arizona
Removal of Arsenic and Mercury Contamination in Museums Using a Natural Environmentally Benign Chemical; $39,578 Identification of Unmarked Graves; $30,200

National Park Service, Pacific West Regional Office
Technical Assistance and Training in the Identification, Documentation, Investigation, Analysis, and Treatment of a Cultural Resource Site, Pohnpei; $40,000

Louisiana State University
Disaster Science and Heritage Resources: Modeling and Mapping the Risks to Critical (Heritage) Infrastructure in New Orleans; $39,806

Total: $466,483 Investigate environmental effects of air pollution on cultural resources, 2

Meet the preservation needs of houses of worship and cemeteries, 8 

%
Protect cultural resources against vandalism, looting and terrorism, 2 

2%

Grant Proposals Categorized by NCPTT Research Priority
65 submissions 

% %
other technologies, 31

Monitor and evaluate preservation treatments, 7 

% 

%
Document and preserve threatened cultural landscapes, 13 

%
Conserve architectural materials of the recent past, 2
Page  • NCPTT 2005 Annual Report

PTT Grants: Seeking New Solutions for Old Problems

PTT Grants Requests and Awards 1997-2005
In 2005, NCPTT funded 14 PTTGrants totaling $466,483. The proposals were peer reviewed and selected by a panel consisting of NPS staff, a PTTBoard representative and Grants administrator. This graph shows the total dollar amounts of proposals submitted and grants funded for fiscal years 1997-2005.

Distribution of Applications By State
The most recent PTTGrants Call for Proposals drew 65 requests totaling over $2 million. Proposals were received from 25 states and the District of Columbia. This map graphically depicts the geographical distribution of grant proposals received for the PTTGrants program.

Page  • NCPTT 2005 Annual Report

National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior National Center for Preservation Technology and Training 645 University Parkway Natchitoches, louisiana, 71457 official Business Penalty for Private Use, $300

First Class Mail Postage and Fees PAID National Park Service Permit No. G-83

National Park Service Headquarters
Fran P. Mainella Jan Matthews Jon C. Smith Director Associate Director, Cultural Resources Assistant Associate Director, Heritage Preservation Assistance Programs

PTT Board
Judith Ann Bense, Ph.D. Chair, department of anthropology director, archaeology institute university of west florida Horace Henry Foxall, Jr. Program manager, u.s. Corps of engineers

National Center for Preservation Technology and Training Staff
Kirk A. Cordell Kevin Ammons Mary Bistodeau Tye Botting Jason Church Sean Clifford Lance Ellis Andy Ferrell Jeff Guin Sarah Jackson David W. Morgan executive director administrative officer receptionist NCPTT/Nsu Joint faculty materials Conservator web developer i.T. administrator Chief, architecture and engineering marketing manager materials research assistant Chief, archeology and Collections

James Walter Garrison state historic Preservation officer, arizona Roy Eugene Graham, FAIA director, College Programs in historic Preservation school of architecture, university of florida Norman Koonce, FAIA National Co-Chairman The Campaign for the american Center of architecture Suzanne Lewis, Vice Chair superintendent, yellowstone National Park secretary of interior’s designee to PTT board Patricia O’Donnell, FASLA Principal, heritage landscapes Rob Pahl, AIA President, Pahl, Pahl, Pahl architects/Planners Frank Preusser, Ph.D. frank Preusser and associates, inc. Robert Silman, PE, Chair robert silman and associates, P.C. Suzanne Louise Turner, FASLA Professor emerita of landscape architecture louisiana state university Norman Weiss, FAPT Professor, Columbia university

NCPTT Notes Issue 45 Spring 2006 NCPTT Executive Director Kirk A. Cordell Editor Jeff Guin NCPTT Notes is published by the National Park Service’s National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. The purpose of this publication is to convey NCPTT’s Mission, which is to advance the use of science and technology in the field of historic preservation including archeology, architecture, landscape architecture and materials conservation. The Center accomplishes its mission through training, education, research, technology transfer and partnerships. The mail list for NCPTT Notes is subject to request under the Freedom of Information Act. Persons or organizations not wanting to have mail list information disclosed should unsubscribe. Send comments to NCPTT Notes or submit articles or notices for consideration to ncptt@nps.gov or call 318-356-7444.

Mary Ellen Servello executive secretary Mary F. Striegel NCPTT Interns Anna Breaux Jennifer Renfrow Cole Stevens information Technology intern information Technology intern materials research intern Chief, materials research

Page 20 • NCPTT 2005 Annual Report

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