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How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr.

Hope Nordstrom
LIPSCOMB UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
EG 5203 How We Learn
3 hours/Online May 27-June 26

Professor: Dr. Hope Nordstrom Office Hours: T & W 1-5 pm/ R nights ONLINE 8-10 pm
Office: Ezell 153D Class Meeting: ONLINE
Contact: hope.nordstrom@lipscomb.edu or 615-966-2013
Since you are mostly off-campus, I recommend that you call or email for an appointment. Due to the number of conferences I am
attending or professional development sessions I am conducting this summer, I HIGHLY recommend that you make an appointment
with me first. I can also meet you online using AdobeConnect.

E-mail is the best method to contact me and is checked daily. I will respond within 24 hours.

If you experience trouble with network access or email issues, please contact the Information Technology HelpDesk at 615-966-1777.
You can also create a Help Ticket online. When providing information about the issue you are encountering, please provide as much
information about the system you are on and if possible provide a screenshot of the browser window.

Assignments will be graded in a timely manner usually within a week.

TEXT:

Sousa, D. A. (2011). How the brain learns. (4
th
ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Additional reading assignments will be made throughout the semester. These will be placed on Blackboard.
COURSE OVERVIEW: The student will participate in an advanced review of learning theories (including constructivism), human
growth and development and motivation, including cognitive, emotional and physical characteristics of children in various age groups.
Current brain research on teaching and learning, the importance of metacognition and strategies that increase student learning and
motivation will also be a focus of the course. Students will learn observation methods used to evaluate and improve instruction.

PROGRAM GOAL(S) ADDRESSED IN THIS COURSE: The student will have used learning theory to assess the effectiveness of
a lesson on the learning of students with diverse experience, background and learning preferences. The student will have observed a
class with diverse students and participated in an IEP meeting or a meeting to develop an instructional plan for a specific learner. The
student will have developed an online portfolio of work (incremental progressPhilosophy of Teaching and Leading will be
developed.) The student will have reflected upon their personal development as an educator and the role of Christian principles in their
teaching and leading.



How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
LEARNING
OBJECTIVES

Students will be able to:

DELIVERY
Lecture, on-line, site-visit,
field experience, readings,
guest lecturers, etc.
ASSESSMENT
Exams, reports, essays,
presentations,
discussions, etc.
C.A.R.E Framework GOALS
Level of achievement
in measurable terms
to determine success
Compare and contrast the
development of students in
grades K-4, 5-8 and 9-12
and suggest how diverse
learners are effectively
engaged at each level.
Readings, online
discussion
Discussion posts
1.a. applying standards and current
research in practice
1.b. planning instruction and student
learning goals based on formative
and summative assessment data
3.a. demonstrating a respect for and
appreciation of cultural diversity and
individual differences
4.h. appropriate written and verbal
communication

Class Discussion
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary
Explain the significant
learning theories and recent
brain research and how they
impact instructional
situations and strategies.
Readings, online
discussion
Theory paper and
PowerPoint
presentation
4.c. Developmental stages, learning
theories, and their impact on
teaching and learning
4.h. appropriate written and verbal
communication
Class discussion
and Writing
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary
Analyze, synthesize and
evaluate knowledge from
their subject and apply this
knowledge to implement
effective teaching strategies.


Readings, online
discussion
Discussion posts
1.c. analyzing and making informed
instructional decisions based on best
practice
1.k. using a variety of research-
based strategies to effectively
enhance student outcomes
4.a. The discipline being taught and
its relationship to general
knowledge/the discipline of
educational leadership

Class Discussion
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary
Develop a model of
effective teaching in a
transformational educational
environment.

Readings, online
discussion
Discussion posts,
Environment paper
1.a. applying standards and current
research in practice
1.b. planning instruction and student
learning goals based on formative
and summative assessment data
2.a belief that all children can learn,
regardless of gender, ethnicity, or
social status
4.g. the ability to embrace and
manage change

Class Discussion
and Writing
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary
Articulate the importance of
a facilitative leadership
approach to problem
solving.

Readings, online
discussion
Discussion posts,
Philosophy paper
1.i. developing and refining a
personal philosophy of teaching and
learning
3.f. utilizing community personnel
and resources
4.f. systematic processes used to
facilitate the management of
organizational resources for optimal
safety and productivity
4.g. the ability to embrace and
manage change
4.h. appropriate written and verbal
communication

Class Discussion
and Writing
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary
Review several of the basic
principles of statistics,
educational measurement
and test construction.

Readings, online
discussion
Discussion posts
4.b. understanding and application
of current research and professional
organization standards on effective
teaching and learning
4.e. data-driven decision-making

Class Discussion
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary
Observe teaching/learning
styles in real world settings.

Readings, online
discussion, field
experience
Discussion posts,
Field experience
paper
3.a. demonstrating a respect for and
appreciation of cultural diversity and
individual differences

Class Discussion
and Writing
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary
How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
Reflect upon ones personal
development as an educator
and the role of Christian
principles in teaching and
leading.

Readings, online
discussion
Discussion posts
1.i. developing and refining a
personal philosophy of teaching and
learning
2.a belief that all children can learn,
regardless of gender, ethnicity, or
social status
4.h. appropriate written and verbal
communication


Class Discussion
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary
Explore and implement the
Environment section of
the TAP teaching standards,
including an application of
the four indicators:
expectations, managing
student behavior,
environment and respectful
culture and the exemplary
descriptors of each.
Readings, online
discussion
Discussion posts,
Environment
reflection
2.a belief that all children can learn,
regardless of gender, ethnicity, or
social status
1.h. organizing and managing the
learning environment to assure that
all students learn
3.a. demonstrating a respect for and
appreciation of cultural diversity and
individual differences

Class Discussion
and Writing
Rubric: proficient
or exemplary


COURSE REQUIREMENTS, ASSIGNMENTS and KEY ASSIGNMENTS, FIELD EXPERIENCES AND PROJECTS with
DUE DATES:
ASSIGNMENT TITLE Type of Assignment (note
if Spiritual Growth, Key,
Portfolio or Field
Experience)
DUE DATE: Percentage of
Grade or Points
Assigned (if
applicable)
Mere Christianity Book 3, 11. Faith

Spiritual Growth See weekly schedule. Included in
discussion grade.
Multiple Intelligences Survey Reflection and
Implications
Course Assignment Sunday, June 1, 2014 50 points
Philosophy of Teaching and Leading (To be
placed in portfolio template under
Philosophy of Teaching and Leading. This
philosophy statement must include a
reflection of the students personal
development as an educators and the role of
Christian principles in the students teaching
and learning.)
Key assignment (upload
to portfolio). This
assignment will also be
assessed with the College
of Education Writing
Rubric in LiveText.
Sunday, June 8, 2014 100 points
Environment TAP Rubric Reflection Course Assignment Sunday, June 15 50 points
Learning Theory Paper Course Assignment Sunday, June 22 200 points
Learning Theory Presentation Course Assignment Wednesday, June 25 100 points
Field Experience:
Student must observe one or more classes
with diverse students and submit a written
reflection on the observation. Special
attention should be paid to design of the
learning environment and the engagement of
the students. (5 hours)

Field Experience/Course
Assignment (upload
assignment to portfolio;
upload signed field
experience form to
portfolio and record field
experience hours and
demographics on chart in
portfolio)
Wednesday, June 25 100 points
Discussion Posts/Participation Various 400 points
Total 1000 points



How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
SPIRITUAL GROWTH: The College of Education seeks to provide opportunities for personal, professional and spiritual growth for
students. One avenue for spiritual growth is a thoughtful dialogue among students and faculty centered on a common text. The college
uses Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis (preferred text: ISBN 0060652926) as this common ground for exploration of spiritual contexts
and applications for learning. This text may also be available online. In specialty area courses, your instructor may chose an alternate
spiritual assignment related to the course topic. All core courses have a required Mere Christianity assignment.
FIELD EXPERIENCES: Each masters level course in the College of Education requires a field experience that is expected to take
five (5) to ten (10) hours (a minimum of 50 hours by graduation). These field experiences must be completed to be successful in the
course and are designed to support the expected program outcomes.
Definition: NCATE defines field experiences as: A variety of early and ongoing field-based opportunities in which candidates may
observe, assist, tutor, instruct, and/or conduct research. Field experiences may occur in off-campus settings such as schools,
community centers, or homeless shelters. Field experiences are defined as authentic workplace based learning experiences. It should
be a way to learn by doing and to practice skills learned in your coursework.
Because the College of Education is committed to equipping our students for diverse experiences, we ask that you complete your field
experiences with schools or districts in varied classifications (low SES, urban, suburban, rural and cross-cultural), and with different
student populations (ELL, Special Education, Advanced). This diversity of experience should be evident on your field experience data
form in LiveText by the time you graduate. A Field Experience Documentation and Data Form is required of each student for each
course. These forms are available in the online LiveText portfolio template.
LIVETEXT PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS:
All M.Ed. students are required to have a LiveText electronic portfolio account. A completed LiveText electronic portfolio is a
requirement for graduation from all M.Ed. programs. Information about purchasing LiveText, downloading your portfolio template
and creating your portfolio are found at:
http://education.lipscomb.edu/page.asp?SID=28&Page=9159
Some assignments are considered KEY ASSIGNMENTS. These assignments must be completed satisfactorily to pass the course
and will be assessed in LiveText to demonstrate mastery of your program goals. You are responsible for uploading the assignment to
your LiveText Portfolio after the instructor has graded it. Your final grade will not be posted until this assignment is complete and
uploaded to LiveText.
FIELD EXPERIENCE DOCUMENTATION must also be included in your LiveText portfolio. You are responsible for
completing the chart with data concerning your field experiences before your final grade can be posted. You may do this
immediately after completing the field experience.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMS: All students must take a comprehensive exam in the last semester before graduation. (For Education
Leadership students, this will be the SLLA Praxis). For all other students, you will be assigned a case study with a series of questions
to answer in a take home essay format. Please keep material from this course that may be helpful in responding to such a case study
question.

Grading and Late Work: Grading criteria for all assignments will be communicated at the beginning of the course. If you are
experiencing circumstances that will prevent you from turning in an assignment on time, you should notify the instructor immediately
via email, text message, or phone call. Late work will only be accepted under specific, emergency situations with prior approval
from the instructor. Late work will not receive full credit.

College of Education Grading Scale

A 94-100 B 86-93 C 77-85 F 0-76

Instructors initiate a Notice of Concern Process for students who earn a C or below in any class.

Course Requirements
Grading will be based on the College of Education grading scale. Students will earn a total number of points out of 1000 possible
points. That number will then be converted into the grading scale. (Ex. 935 points total; the calculation would be: 935/10 = 93.5 or a
94%, an A)

How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
Submission of Assignments
Writing assignments must be submitted in BOTH Blackboard and LiveText. A submission in any other format will be returned to the
student for resubmission. Grade reductions for late submissions will apply.

Written assignments should be submitted no later than 11:59 PM on the due date. The following grade reductions will apply:
10% grade reduction if assignment is one day late
25% grade reduction if assignment is two days late
50% grade reduction if assignment is three days late
No assignments will be accepted more than three days after the due date

If an emergency occurs that causes a late submission (an emergency that can be documented, such as unexpected illness or other major
unplanned life event), please contact me at your earliest opportunity to arrange any late submission. All assignments are due as
assigned unless given specific permission of the instructor to change the due date.

Discussion Board Responses
When submitting discussion board posts, please put your last name followed by title of your response (Example: Nordstrom-Response
1).

ATTENDANCE POLICY:
Since this is an online class, there are no scheduled class sessions. However, students are expected to show a strong presence on
Blackboard by posting regularly.
COMMUNICATION POLICY:
Students are asked to check their Lipscomb email regularly. Your Lipscomb email may be forwarded to another account, and
instructions to do so are found on the university website. The university is not responsible for information you miss if an email has
been sent to your Lipscomb account.
THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF C.A.R.E:
Lipscombs conceptual framework for the initial and advanced programs is built upon four categories:

Craft of Teaching
Attitudes and Values
Relationships
Essential Knowledge

The first letter of each category provides the theme of Lipscomb's initial and advanced programs: C.A.R.E. The College of Education
believes that this conceptual framework provides the structure within which all educational programs can sustain a high level of
excellence so that its candidates will be of the highest quality. It is shared widely within the university and beyond.

Each student will receive a copy of the C.A.R.E Framework (Advanced). Your LiveText portfolio will reflect ways in which
your program of study fit within this framework.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:

In keeping with our identity as a Christian University and our goal to help shape lifelong disciples of Christ, academic integrity will be
taken very seriously in this course. Unless specific permission is given to collaborate on assignments with other students, each
students work shall be his/her own. Cheating on assignments and plagiarizing on written assignments will, depending on the severity
of the case, result in penalties ranging from a significantly reduced grade on the assignment to failing the course. Instances of
cheating or plagiarism may also be reported to appropriate members of the administration, depending on the situation. Decisions in
these matters rest with the instructor. Please refer to Lipscombs Code of Conduct and Academic Integrity Policy.

UNIVERSITY EVALUATIONS AND C.A.R.E ASSESSMENTS:
It is part of your responsibility as a student to participate in university evaluations and C.A.R.E assessments of your course and
faculty. You will receive an email toward the end of the course with instructions on how to complete the university evaluations and
you will receive further instructions concerning how to complete the C.A.R.E. assessments.


How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
STUDENTS REQUIRING ACCOMMODATIONS:
If you require classroom accommodations for a documented disability, please discuss your circumstances with me immediately. If you
are a student with a documented disability who will require accommodations in this course, please register with Kaitlin Shetler,
Director of Disability Services (615-966-6301), for assistance in developing a plan to address your academic needs. The Office of
Disability Services is located in the Academic Success Center, basement of the Beaman Library.
DROPPING THE COURSE:
A decision to stop attending class does NOT constitute dropping the course. A drop/add form (available in the Registrar's Office) must
be signed by the teacher and processed in the Registrar's Office before the drop is official.
APA FORMAT:

Formal papers submitted for graduate coursework should follow American Psychological Association (APA) for general guidelines,
in-text citations of materials, avoiding plagiarism, and reference pages from the Publication Manual of the American Psychological
Association, Sixth Edition. Each instructor will be provided a desk copy of APA: The Easy Way!, Second Edition, a simplified guide
that has been updated for the sixth edition (ISBN 0923568964). Students are asked to purchase a copy of this publication. Other
helpful resources for APA guidelines and formatting include the following websites:
http://www.apastyle.org/learn/tutorials/basics-tutorial.aspx
http://www.apastyle.org/learn/faqs/index.aspx
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
http://www.vanguard.edu/faculty/ddegelman/index.aspx?doc_id=796

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION WRITING RUBRIC:

The College of Education has a writing rubric for general use with written assignments. Students who have difficulty with graduate
level writing will be asked to do some remediation with the university Writing Studio.
CLASS SCHEDULE DISRUPTION POLICY:
Except in the rarest of instances, Lipscomb University does not cancel classes or close offices. However, should an event (weather-
related or otherwise) occur that requires disruption of the entire Lipscomb University class schedule, students will be notified via
multiple venues including the Lipscomb homepage (www.lipscomb.edu), a text message sent through LU ALERT
(http://lualert.lipscomb.edu), and the Lipscomb Weather Information Line (966-1836). For information on possible snow-related
closures or late starts, students should consult local television stations (2-WKRN, 4-WSMV, 5-WTVF and 6-WZTV, and Channel 9
on campus). Students should look for information regarding Lipscomb University, not David Lipscomb Campus Schools.
RESOURCES:
Barber, J., Barrett, K., Beals, K., Bergman, L., & Diamond, M. (1996). Learning about learning. Berkeley: LHS GEMS.

Bransford, J.D. (2000). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington, DC: National Research Council.

Caine, G. & Caine, R. (2001). The brain, education, and the competitive edge. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Education

Damasio, A. (2003). Looking for Spinoza: Joy, sorrow, and the feeling brain. New York: Harcourt.

Diamond, M. & Hopson, J. (1999). Magic trees of the mind. New York: Penguin Group.

Feinstein, S. (ed). (2006). The Praeger handbook of learning and the brain. Westport: Greenwood Publishing Group

Gardner, H. (2007). Five minds for the future. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Gazzaniga, M. (2005). The ethical brain. New York: Dana Press.

Goleman, D. (1997). Emotional intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. New York: Bantam Books.

Hibbard, K. M. (1996). Performance-based learning and assessment. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Howard, P.J. (2000). The owners manual for the brain. Atlanta: Bard Press.

How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
Jensen, E. (2000). Brain-based learning. San Diego: The Brain Store.

Jensen, E. (2000). Different brains, different learners: How to reach the hard to reach. San Diego: The Brain Store.

Jensen, E. (2006). Enriching the brain. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Kandel, E. (2006). In search of memory: The emergence of a new science of mind. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Kaufeldt, M. (1999). Begin with the brain: Orchestrating the leaner-centered classroom. Chicago: Zephyr Press.

Marzano, R. J. (1992). A different kind of classroom: Teaching with Dimensions of Learning. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Pink, D. (2006.) A whole new mind. New York: Riverhead Books.

Ratey, J.J. (2002). A users guide to the brain: Perception, attention, and the four theaters of the brain. New York: Vintage Books.

Ratey, J.J. (2008). Spark: The revolutionary new science of exercise and the brain. New York: Little, Brown & Co.

Rose, S. (2005). The future of the brain: The promise and perils of tomorrows neuroscience. Oxford: University Press.

Silver, H. F., Strong, R.W., & Perini, M. J. (2000). So each may learn: Integrating learning styles and multiple intelligences.
Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Small, G., and Vorgan, G. (2008). iBrain: Surviving the technological alteration of the modern mind. New York: HarperCollins.

Sprenger, M. (1999). Learning & memory: The brain in action. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Stevenson, L.M. & Deasy, R.J. (2005). Third space: When learning matters. Arts Education Partnership, Washington, D.C.

Tate, M. L. (2003). Worksheets dont grow dendrites. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.

Wolfe, P. (2001). Brain matters: Translating research into classroom practice. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.





























How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
C.A.R.E. Outline
Lipscombs Teacher education program is committed to preparing educators who have the following competencies:











Practices exemplary CRAFT:

1 Develops and refines a personal philosophy of leading, teaching and learning
2 Plans instruction and student learning goals which are aligned to current standards
3 Analyzes and makes strategic instructional decisions based on assessment data and current research
4 Monitors and evaluates all student learning and engagement using multiple assessments
5 Encourages and motivates students to understand and monitor their own assessment data
6 Integrates current technology to enhance the learning environment and outcomes
7 Models and creates opportunities for critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skill development
8 Organizes and manages the learning environment and resources to assure that all students learn
9 Differentiates instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners and implements inclusive practices
10 Manages significant behavior issues effectively

Possesses professional ATTITUDES AND VALUES:

1 Believes that all children can learn, regardless of gender, ethnicity, or social status, and that s/he can teach them
2 Is self-reflective and committed to on-going professional development and self-improvement
3 Demonstrates confidence and enthusiasm to teach as a professional
4 Possesses a strong, achievement oriented work ethic
5 Completes assignments, tasks, and duties punctually and responsibly
6 Views teaching as a mission to serve others
7 Demonstrates coping skills, flexibility, a sense of humor, and joy in teaching
8 Responds appropriately to critical feedback
9 Makes decisions informed by high personal and ethical standards

Fosters collaborative RELATIONSHIPS:

1 Demonstrates a respect for and appreciation of cultural diversity and individual differences
2 Provides opportunities for increased cultural awareness for students in the global society
3 Relates to and communicates with all students, parents, and colleagues comfortably and effectively
4 Contributes to the school culture as a collaborative partner in the achievement of common goals
5 Demonstrates professional behavior in all circumstances
6 Listens to and appropriately responds to others
7 Demonstrates care and compassion for others
8 Maximizes communication through the use of appropriate means, including technology
9 Uses ethical standards to inform relationships with others

Demonstrates possession of ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE:

1 Possesses deep knowledge of the discipline being taught and its relationship to general knowledge
2 Plans effectively for short term and long term instruction within the discipline
3 Understands current research on effective teaching and learning
4 Knows developmental stages, learning theories, and their impact on teaching and learning
5 Knows where to find answers and resources to enhance teaching, learning, and classroom management
6 Effectively communicates orally and in writing
7 Is technologically literate
How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
ASSIGNMENT CALENDAR
May 27-June 1:

Introduction to
the Brain &
Learning
Theories /
Processing
Information-
Learning Styles
& Multiple
Intelligences
READINGS:
Read the Introduction and Chapters 1-2 in the text, How the Brain Learns.
Read all of the articles in the May 27-June 1 folder located on Blackboard and watch the videos posted.
Discussion on Blackboard:
FACT or FICTION Introduction: Briefly tell us who you are and what you are currently doing.
Then list three interesting things about yourself on the discussion board by Friday, May 30. Two of
the facts must be true and one must be false. Look at your classmates statements and try to guess
the false statement of at least two other classmates by Sunday, June 1. By Tuesday, June 3, go
back in to the discussion board and post which one is false. Im excited to learn more about all of
you!!!

RESPONSE 1: Write a reflective response to the articles and video on multiple intelligences by
Friday, May 30 and respond to two classmates by Sunday, June 1.


Multiple Intelligences Survey Reflection and Implications (DUE: Sunday, June 1)

Choose a Learning Theory to research further. Post on Blackboard by Sunday, June 8.
Everyone must have a different topic. First come first served!

June 2-8:

Memory &
Transfer/
Effective
Teaching


READINGS:
Read Chapters 3-4 in the text, How the Brain Learns.
Read all of the articles in the June 2-8 folder located on Blackboard and watch the videos posted.
Read C.S. Lewiss Mere Christianity 3.11 (link posted on Blackboard).
Discussion on Blackboard:
RESPONSE 2: Write a response to your most significant learning from this week. What difference will it
make in your professional practice? (DUE: Friday, June 6) Respond to two classmates. (DUE:
Sunday, June 8)

RESPONSE 3: Based on this weeks readings, write a reflective response on what you will do to support
a reluctant learner (DUE: Sunday, June 8).
Philosophy of Teaching and Leading (DUE: Sunday, June 8)

Select Learning Theory topic.
June 9-15:

Brain
Organization &
Learning /
Effective
Environments /
Thinking Skills
& Learning/
Blooms
Taxonomy
READINGS:
Read Chapters 5 & 7 in the text, How the Brain Learns. NOTE: WE HAVE SKIPPED CHAPTER 6
FOR NOW.
Read all of the articles in the June 9-15 folder located on Blackboard and watch the videos posted.
Discussion on Blackboard:
RESPONSE 4: Write a response to your most significant learning from this week. What difference
will it make in your professional practice? (DUE: Friday, June 13) Respond to two classmates.
(DUE: Sunday, June 15)

RESPONSE 5: Write a reflective response to how important the environment is to learning. (DUE:
Sunday, June 15)

Environment TAP Rubric Presentation (DUE: Sunday, June 15)
How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom

June 16-22:

The Brain and
Technology /
The Brain and
the Arts
READINGS:
Read Chapter 6 in the text, How the Brain Learns.
Read all of the articles in the June 16-22 folder located on Blackboard and watch the videos posted.
Discussion on Blackboard:
RESPONSE 6: Write a response to your most significant learning from this week. What difference
will it make in your professional practice? (DUE: Friday, June 20) Respond to two classmates.
(DUE: Sunday, June 22)

RESPONSE 7: Write a response discussing the challenges teachers face today that they did not a
decade ago. What challenges do you see coming in the future of education? (DUE: Sunday, June
22)

Learning Theory Paper (DUE: Sunday, June 22)
June 23-26:

A Whole New
Mind/ Putting
It All Together
READINGS:
NO READING in the text, How the Brain Learns.
Read all of the articles in the June 23-26 folder located on Blackboard and watch the videos posted.
Discussion on Blackboard:
RESPONSE 8: Write a brief reflection/insight from Daniel Pinks lecture. (DUE: Wednesday, June 25)
Learning Theory Presentation (DUE: Wednesday, June 25)

Field Experience Reflection and Documentation Form (DUE: Wednesday, June 25)




ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTIONS:
All papers and assignments should follow APA format and references should be cited correctly.
Other than research papers, a running head is not needed in this course.
Please read and review the APA portion of the syllabus and talk to Dr. Nordstrom if you have any questions.

Include a title page that follows APA formatting for ALL assignments submitted.
Include your last name with every online submission of assignments.

Multiple Intelligences Survey Reflection and Implications (50 points)
o Complete the Multiple Intelligences Survey.
o Review and reflect on the results from the Multiple Intelligence test you took.
What did the test reveal about your intelligence strengths?
Did you find the test to be accurate?
What are the implications of the test both personally and professionally?
o Submit a 1-2 page, double-spaced reflection and response to the test. Include how your intelligence relates to and affects your
teaching and work. Submit assignment onto Blackboard and LiveText.

Philosophy of Teaching and Leading (100 points)
o Reflect upon your philosophy of teaching and your role as a leader.
o What jobs or hats do teachers wear?
o Read Mere Christianity Book 3.11-Faith and include your reflections and insights from the reading
o Include and address the role of Christian principles in their teaching and leading.
o Feel free to include references to quotes that relate to your philosophy or quotes from Mere Christianity 3.11.
o This paper should be 1-2 pages in length.
o Submit assignment onto Blackboard and LiveText.
o You should then add it into your LiveText portfolio under Teaching Philosophy you created in the orientation course.





How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
TAP Rubric Presentation (50 points)
o In the state of TN, the TAP environment rubric is used for teacher evaluation purposes. Examine the TAP Environment rubric
focusing on the areas of expectations, managing student behavior, environment, and respectful culture. Take a close look at the
characteristics of teachers at the significantly above expectations, at expectations, and significantly below expectations.
o Imagine that you have been charged with providing a professional development session for new teachers on the TAP
Environment Rubric. You want to have a creative way to engage the participants at the beginning of your session. Using this
weeks readings/videos, create a presentation (PowerPoint, NearPod, Haiku Deck, Prezi, Animoto, iMovie, etc.) describing what a
classroom would look like at each rubric level (1, 3, 5). Then include specific strategies for creating effective learning
environments that reach the whole brain.
o This presentation should last no more that 5 minutes and include graphics, audio, text, and animation or video.
o Submit assignment onto Blackboard and LiveText.

Learning Theory Paper (200 points)
o Select one theory of learning or other topics listed below and submit the topic to Dr. Nordstrom on Blackboard. Everyone must
have a different topic. First come first served!
o This will be the same theory you develop into a presentation.
o Summarize the research and history of the theory and theorist(s).
o Discuss the importance of this theory education, specifically your area of focus/expertise.
o This paper should be 3-5 pages in length.
o Be sure to follow American Psychological Association (APA) for general guidelines, in-text citations of materials to avoid
plagiarism.
While the paper should discuss how the theory relates to your area of teaching, it should NOT be written from a
personal perspective.
Research papers never use personal pronouns (I, me, my).
o Your reference page should include at least 3 scholarly sources/ references.
o Submit assignment onto Blackboard and LiveText.

Learning Theory Presentation (100 points)
o Prepare an 8-10 slide presentation that covers the learning theory selected for your paper. Feel free to use PowerPoint, NearPod,
Haiku Deck, Prezi, Animoto, or iMovie. If you have another idea pertaining to the style of presentation, please ask me.
o Include research as well as practical implications for actual classroom/work environment practice.
o List at least 3 sources other than the text on the last slide.
o Make it fun and practical with application to the classroom/work environment!
o Submit assignment onto Blackboard and LiveText for grading, and a copy onto the Discussion Board for your classmates to view.

Learning Theory Topic Choices:
Piagets Theory of Cognitive Development
Vygotskys Theory of Social Cognitive Development and ZPD
Behaviorism and Skinner/Pavlov
Constructivist Theory and Knowledge Construction
Discovery Learning (Bruner)
Social Learning (Bandura)
Andragogy/Adult Learning (Knowles)
Mind/Brain Principles of Learning (Caine and Caine)
Gagnes Taxonomy/Conditions of Learning
Webbs Depth of Knowledge
Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning
Motivation and Affect (self-perceptions, interest, goals, attributes, teacher expectations)/ARCS
Lateral Thinking (de Bono)
Kolbs Experiential Learning
Maslows Hierarchy of Needs
Problem Based Learning
Povertys Effect on Learning
Diet/Sleep and the Ability to Learn







How We Learn Summer 2014 Dr. Hope Nordstrom
Field Experience (100 total points)
o Field experience is expected to take between five (5) to ten (10) hours. They can be arranged in the current workplace, if
possible, but must be completed to be successful in the course. Your own classroom does not count toward field experience
hours.
o Complete and submit assignment onto Blackboard and LiveText of the Field Experience Documentation Form and Observation
reflections.
o You can take a picture of the Field Experience Documentation Form and upload it as a .jpg. Many students take a picture with
their phone or iPad.
o Once you upload the field experience for your grade, you also need to upload the documentation form into your portfolio on
LiveText.
o For this course, your Field Experience must include:
Observing 3 classes with diverse students. (5 hours total-3 for observation/2 for reflection)
Using the TAP Environment evaluation rubric, submit a written reflection (1 page for each classroom/3 pages
total) on the observations along with recommendations.
Special attention should be paid to design of the learning environment and the engagement of the students.
Since it is summer, the classrooms can be from summer schools or summer camps that are currently taking
place. I suggest you contact someone ASAP and organize when you will complete the observations.

Discussion Board Responses (400 total points)
o Each week you will be required to read a set of journal articles specific to our topic of study for the week. All of the required
articles will be available on Blackboard.
After reading the articles and text, respond to the discussion questions that have been posted on Blackboard.
Be sure to cite the readings in your responses on the discussion board.
For some posts, you will be required to write a response AND respond to 2 or moreof your classmates posts.